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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Herbal People ? PEPPERMINT -Altoids-Oils

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Author Topic: Herbal People ? PEPPERMINT -Altoids-Oils
treepatrol
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Why do I get really sick when I eat any pepperment that is farely strong like this candy.
Symptoms:
= Dizzy,want to throw up,quizzey,spinning,hot all over,Dry mouth,hot,flush,?

 -

I like peppermint patties ?I like peppermint gum?

I just dont use them hardly at all.


 -

Any answers appreciated  -

[ 20. April 2007, 07:18 AM: Message edited by: treepatrol ]

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bejoy
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Peppermint has antifungal, antiviral, and antimicrobial properties, and it stimulates the lymph nodes.

Those altoids give you a pretty strong dose!

Interesting.

http://www.ageless.co.za/herb-peppermint.htm

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treepatrol
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I cant find any scientific studies about peppermint?

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Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
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TerryK
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Do you have gallbladder problems or liver problems?
http://www.drugs.com/MTM/peppermint.html
Do not take peppermint without first talking to your doctor if you have a blockage of the gallbladder or bile ducts, gallbladder inflammation, gallstones, or liver damage.

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/peppermint-000269.htm
Gallstones
Peppermint oil may help the body break down gallstones.
...
Peppermint tea is generally a safe way to soothe an upset stomach. However, peppermint should not be used by those with gastoesophageal reflux disease (GERD -- a condition in which stomach acids back up into the esophagus) even though some of the symptoms include indigestion and heartburn. This is because peppermint can relax the sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, allowing stomach acids to flow back into the esophagus. (The sphincter is the muscle that separates the esophagus from the stomach.) By relaxing the sphincter, peppermint may actually worsen the symptoms of heartburn and indigestion.

http://www.luhs.org/HEALTH/kbase/htm/mdx-/ame0/133/mdx-ame0133.htm
You may have the following side effects, but this medicine may also cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have side effects that you think are caused by this medicine.

Stomach pain and upset (1)
Heartburn (4)

OR
Perhaps you are allergic to it? Peppermint is high in salicylates.
http://www.webmd.com/allergies/guide/salicylate-allergy

Terry

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GiGi
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Peppermint crosses the blood brain barrier.
It is a brain stimulant and thus stimulates everything else.

Peppermint should not be used if any homeopathic remedies are being taken and should be stored away from them as it can antidote them.

Peppermint can keep you awake if taken close to bedtime. So if you use a toothpaste, mouthwash, dental floss etc. and can't sleep, take a look at the

Peppermint, menthol, etc. should not be used in any form during LED (Laser Energetic Detoxification).

Take care.

[ 18. April 2007, 02:25 PM: Message edited by: GiGi ]

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I love peppermint tea but it is on a list of things that I am suppose to avoid - I am on a Tibetan diet and dealing with inflammation and liver issues. I will have to ask why I am suppose to avoid it.

Altoids I think have gelatin in them and I stopped eating them when people said they could possibly be linked to Mad Cow disease in the future. Aren't they British made? I can only handle 2 diseases at a time without adding a third one. Mad Cow seems worse then Lyme.

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Marnie
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Some possibilities:

1.Xylitol (in some of the Altoids)...go here:

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-03-18-xylitol-sweetener_N.htm

2.The amount of sugar will be a big surprise as well. For example, Altoids contain one half cup of sugar in a small tin. That translated into 2 grams of sugar present in just 3 Altoids.

3.Please note that Altoids gum CONTAINS GLUTEN!


Mints and specialty
Serving Size: 3 pieces
Calories: 10
Fat: 0g
Sodium: 0mg
Carbohydrate: 2g
Sugars: 2g
Protein: 0g

o Peppermint: Sugar, gum arabic, oil of peppermint, gelatin, corn syrup.

In April of 2006, the ingredients were changed to sugar, gum arabic, artificial flavor, oil of peppermint, gelatin, glucose syrup.

Well...high fructose corn syrup would have made Bb happy. Glucose might not. Either way the elevation in lactic acid isn't good. It's ALREADY high...as MANY OF OUR CELLS PRODUCE LACTIC ACID.

Artificial flavor?

P.S. I will cut to the chase ...I would get on Juvenon IMMEDIATELY. Follow bottle directions. Personally, I'd take 1 with breakfast and 1 at EXACTLY 5pm with food. (For reasons relating to this: "Timing Enhances Allergy, Asthma Drugs"

Not enough cysteine = not enough ALA.

"Alpha-lipoic acid is synthesized in mitochondria; octanoic acid and L-cysteine (for its sulfur) are precursors in its synthesis."

ALA will sub for insulin to carry glucose into the cells.

Bb is PFK dependent. FRUCTOSE.

Our cells...all of them...preferentially need glucose, not fructose

By triggering fructose instead of glucose use, this is literally starving our cells of the BEST form of sugar...glucose.

Look closely at the 2 dimensional structure of glucose, galactose and fructose.

See the H-C-OH attached to a carbon on fructose?

Not good!

We MUST put the brakes back on PFK1. So we can use glucose, not fructose, for our cellular energy.

Bb is also using our fats (specific ones) to MAKE its lipoprotein cell wall.

We are upregulating the Omega 6s essential fatty acids to try to counter.

Arachidonic acid can, in a jam, INactivate CHat.
(choline acetyltransferase). This is happening.

Less acetylcholine produced, but more choline available to help out the "fatty liver".

[ 18. April 2007, 01:59 PM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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MariaA
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My guess lies with the sugar, too. Does other sugar-eating do you in also?

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Symptom Free!!! Thank you all!!!!

Find me at Lymefriends, I post under the same name.
diet: http://lymefriends.ning.com/group/healthylowcarbrecipes
Homemade Probiotics thread
Herbal Links Thread

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MariaA
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...Although I have to also admit that my grandmother, who was a skilled herbal medicine user, used to use peppermint candy for some kind of gut condition because it was easier to find the candy form than the peppermint oil she was actually after.

And we didn't even have Altoids-strength candy available back then. That small amount of peppermint oil is certainly strong enough to have an effect on the body.

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Symptom Free!!! Thank you all!!!!

Find me at Lymefriends, I post under the same name.
diet: http://lymefriends.ning.com/group/healthylowcarbrecipes
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seibertneurolyme
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Maybe a call to this doc is in order. I recently did a google search on the words "lyme protocol" and came across a reference to "Short Toothed Mountain Mint Lyme Protocol".

Have not followed up on this as I was highly skeptical. The doc sounds too good to be true.

http://www.bestnaturaldoctor.com/besttest.htm

Read the testimonials -- about half way through. Several different Lyme patients give testimonials but few details of their treatments.

Bea Seibert

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Marnie
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http://ygraine.membrane.com/enterhtml/free/FoodForThought/lyrics/herb/Z08_Methyl.html

The MP3 recording is weird...;-)

Cancer cells follow the glycolysis pathway, produce lots of lactic acid and are undermethylated.

Food for thought.

Pass the Junior Mints please.

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treepatrol
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All I know is when I put one of the pepperment altoids from england in my mouth all he-ll broke lose this was years ago Iam trying to remember the exact time I think it was in between 1988 to 1991.{{{I got infected 1988}}}
Anyway it threw me for a big loop !!head spinning sick in the stomach, [dizzy] hot flash,couldnt focus eyes it took a hour to pass. I told my dad dont ever give me another one of thoses altoids pure peppermint from england.
I dont have allergies to any foods I never had any reaction to anything but maybe swalloing snuff when I was a kid that was similar??


I think we need to or at least I need to check this out further it may be lyme related.


Iam checking out the links you guys gave me and the one with Dr Mtn treatment for lyme needs further invetigation.

ps thanks Marnie looking at your stuff too.

Thanks guys if you have time keep checking this out and post any Good info here in this thread. [hi]


ps I forgot I have no stomach disorders or liver or gallbladder problems either??

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clairenotes
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http://www.innvista.com/health/microbes/parasite/treatpar.htm

"Essential oils -- have a diverse antimicrobial action that can kill many types of worms and protozoa. The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita) and lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) have the fastest killing effects, acting within twenty minutes and fifteen minutes, respectively. The essential oil thymol is specific for hookworms. Caution should always be taken when using essential oils to treat parasitic infections. Many of them are toxic, especially to children. Those with heart, liver, kidney, stomach, or intestinal disease should also use caution, as well as in pregnancy."

This just happened to come up during some research I was doing not long ago.

Claire

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treepatrol
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English oil is incomparably the best, but it fetches a very high price, and the French oil, though much inferior, is of finer quality than the American.The problem is to obtain a strain of mint plants which would yield larger quantities of oil in our climate.


It is possible that varieties yielding a more abundant supply of essential oils might be secured by persistent endeavour, without reducing our English standard of refinement.


Also economy in harvesting and distilling should be studied. If our English oils could be reduced in price, they would replace the foreign to a greater or less extent depending upon the reduction in cost of production.


---Constituents---Among essential oils, Peppermint ranks first in importance. It is a colourless, yellowish or greenish liquid, with a peculiar, highly penetrating odour and a burning, camphorescent taste. It thickens and becomes reddish with age, but improves in mellowness, even if kept as long as ten or fourteen years.


The chief constituent of Peppermint oil is Menthol, but it also contains menthyl acetate and isovalerate, together with menthone, cineol, inactive pinene, limonene and other less important bodies.?


On cooling to a low temperature, separation of Menthol occurs, especially if a few crystals of that substance be added to start crystallization.

The value of the oil depends much upon the composition. The principal ester constituent, menthyl acetate, possesses a very fragrant minty odour, to which the agreeable aroma of the oil is largely due.


The alcoholic constituent, Menthol, possesses the wellknown penetrating minty odour and characteristic cooling taste. The flavouring properties of the oil are due largely to both the ester and alcoholic constituents, while the medicinal value is attributed to the latter only.


The most important determination to be made in the examination of Peppermint oil, is that of the total amount of Menthol, but the Menthone value is also frequently required.


The English oil contains 60 to 70 per cent of Menthol, the Japanese oil containing 85 per cent, and the American less than ours, only about 50 per cent.


The odour and taste afford a good indication of the quality of the oil, and by this means it is quite possible to distinguish between English, American and Japanese oils.

---Medicinal Action and Uses---


Peppermint oil is the most extensively used of all the volatile oils, both medicinally and commercially. The characteristic anti-spasmodic action of the volatile oil is more marked in this than in any other oil, and greatly adds to its power of relieving pains arising in the alimentary canal.



From its stimulating, stomachic and carminative properties, it is valuable in certain forms of dyspepsia, being mostly used for flatulence and colic. It may also be employed for other sudden pains and for cramp in the abdomen; wide use is made of Peppermint in cholera and diarrhoea.



It is generally combined with other medicines when its stomachic effects are required, being also employed with purgatives to prevent griping.


Oil of Peppermint allays sickness and nausea, and is much used to disguise the taste of unpalatable drugs, as it imparts its aromatic characteristics to whatever prescription it enters into. It is used as an infants' cordial.



The oil itself is often given on sugar and added to pills, also a spirit made from the oil, but the preparation in most general use is Peppermint Water, which is the oil and water distilled together.


Peppermint Water and spirit of Peppermint are official preparations of the British Pharmacopoeia.


In flatulent colic, spirit of Peppermint in hot water is a good household remedy, also the oil given in doses of one or two drops on sugar.



Peppermint is good to assist in raising internal heat and inducing perspiration, although its strength is soon exhausted.


In slight colds or early indications of disease, a free use of Peppermint tea will, in most cases, effect a cure, an infusion of 1 ounce of the dried herb to a pint of boiling water being employed, taken in wineglassful doses; sugar and milk may be added if desired.


An infusion of equal quantities of Peppermint herb and Elder flowers (to which either Yarrow or Boneset may be added) will banish a cold or mild attack of influenza within thirty-six hours, and there is no danger of an overdose or any harmful action on the heart. Peppermint tea is used also for palpitation of the heart.



In cases of hysteria and nervous disorders, the usefulness of an infusion of Peppermint has been found to be well augmented by the addition of equal quantities of Wood Betony, its operation being hastened by the addition to the infusion of a few drops of tincture of Caraway.


From:
Botanical Peppermint

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Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

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SarahL
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Wow, thought I was the only one! Altoids make me have *horrible* stomach pain and make me have a "bad brain" for awhile if I eat a couple of them. Haven't noticed visual problems, but I wouldn't have noticed them since they come and go with me almost daily. (Right now everything has a bright white halo for instance.)

For years now if someone has offered me one I've taken it and sucked on it for a few seconds, then spit it out discreetly into paper or the trash. Someone bought me a box of the newer chocolate ones a few months ago and I never opened it. Too painful!!

I do like peppermint tea, and it doesn't seem to have the same effect, but maybe the peppermint oil in altoids is more concentrated than a tea bag steeped for two or three minutes.

I've already had my gallbladder out, fyi, but I had *far* more gastro sx before I had it out. I couldn't process anything even remotely concentrated or toxic when I had my gallbladder problems. Even caffiene was more potent and painful, too.

Sarah

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treepatrol
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School Backs Peppermint for Student Alertness
by Madeleine Brand and John Ydstie

Day to Day, March 21, 2007 A middle school in Maryland is using a unique method to help kids do better on their tests. Not only is the principal urging them to get plenty of sleep, but also to chew on peppermint. The treat is said to help increase concentration.
From
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=9040969

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Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

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clpgotlyme
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Tree,
One of the worst herxes I have had was when I accidently put wayyyyyyyyyyy too much peppermint and lemon oils in my bath water.

I could hardly move for 3 days! Not sure if it was one or the other, but I limit myself to 3-4 drops only now. Strong mints orally dont seem to affect me though,I eat them often.
Cindy

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Cindy

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treepatrol
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Link

Chemical composition
The chemical components of peppermint oil are menthol, menthone, 1,8-cineole, methyl acetate, methofuran, isomenthone, limonene, b-pinene, a-pinene, germacrene-d, trans-sabinene hydrate and pulegone.

Precautions
Peppermint oil is non-toxic and non-irritant in low dilutions, but sensitization may be a problem due to the menthol content.

It can cause irritation to the skin and mucus membranes and should be kept well away from the eyes. It should be avoided during pregnancy and should not be used on children under seven.

Therapeutic properties
The therapeutic properties of peppermint oil are analgesic, anesthetic, antiseptic, antigalactagogue, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor and vermifuge.


Glossary Of Terms:


Abortifacient Capable of inducing abortion

Absolute The most concentrated form of fragrance obtained when distilling a concrete

Acetylcholine Is a fluid used in the transmission of information from one nerve ending to another

Allergy Hypersensitivity caused by a foreign substance

Alopecia Baldness - can be temporary or permanent

Alterative Correcting disordered bodily functions

Amenorrhoea The absence of menstruation

Anaerobic Type of organism that does not require oxygen

Analgesic Relieving or deadening pain

Anaphrodisiac Lessening sexual desire

Anemia Deficiency of either quantity or quality of red corpuscles in the blood

Anesthetic Pain relieving by loss of sensation

Annual Plant that completes its life cycle in one year

Anodyne Stills pain and quietens disturbed feelings

Anosmic Loss of smell

Anthelmintic A vermifuge, destroying or expelling intestinal worms

Anti-acid Combats acid in the body

Anti-arthritic An agent which helps to combat arthritis

Anti-allergenic Reduces symptoms of allergies

Antibacterial Fights bacterial growth

Antibiotic Fights infection in the body by preventing the growth or destroying bacteria

Anti-convulsant Helps control convulsions

Anti-depressant Helps to counteract depression and lifts the mood

Anti-dontalgic Relieves toothache

Anti-emetic Reduces the severity or incidence of vomiting

Anti-fungal Prevents the growth of fungi

Anti-galactagogue Impedes or lessens the flow of milk

Anti-hemorrhagic A substance preventing or combating bleeding

Antihistamine Counteracts allergic reaction

Anti-infectious Prevents against infection

Anti-microbial A substance reducing or resisting microbes

Antioxidant A substance to prevent or delay oxidation

Anti-parasitic Acts against parasites

Anti-phlogistic Counteracts inflammation

Anti-pruritic Relieves or prevents sensation of itching

Anti-pyretic Reduces fever

Anti-rheumatic An agent which helps to combat rheumatism

Anti-sclerotic Helps to prevent hardening of arteries

Anti-seborrheic Helps control the oily secretion from sweat glands

Antiseptic A substance helping to control infection

Anti-spasmodic A substance to help prevent and ease spasms and relieve cramps

Anti-sudorific A substance to help lessen sweating

Anti-toxic Antidote or treatment to counteract the effects of poison

Anti-tussive Relieves coughing

Aperient Mild laxative

Aphonia Loss of voice

Aphrodisiac Increasing sexual desire and sexual functioning

Apoplexy Sudden loss of consciousness, a stroke or sudden hemorrhage

Aromatherapy The therapeutic use of essential oils

Arrhythmia Irregular or loss of heartbeat rhythm

Arteriosclerosis Hardening of the arteries

Astringent Causing contraction of organic tissue

Atherosclerosis Accumulation of fatty deposits on the inside walls of arteries

Atony Lack of muscle tone

Bactericidal An agent destroying bacteria

Balsam Water soluble, semi-solid or viscous
resinous exudate similar to that of gum

Balsamic Soothing medicine or application having the qualities of balsam

Bechic Anything referring to coughing, or an agent relieving cough

Biennial A plant completing its life cycle in two years, without flowering the first year

Bilious A condition caused by an excessive secretion of bile

Blepharitis Inflammation of the eyelids

Calmative A sedative

Carcinogenic A substance that promotes cancer or cancerous growths

Cardiac Pertaining to the heart

Carminative Settles the digestive system and relieves flatulence

Carrier oil An oil which is used to dilute essential oils for the purpose of massage - see fixed oils

Cellulite / cellulitis An "orange peel" effect caused by local accumulation of fat and waste products

Cephalic A substance stimulating and clearing the mind

Chemotypes The same botanical species occurring in other forms due to different growth conditions
Chi / Qi Chinese term referring to the essential life force

Cholagogue Stimulating the secretion of bile into the duodenum

Cholecystokenetic Agent that stimulates the contraction of the gall bladder

Choleretic Helps the liver to excrete bile, leading to greater bile flow

Cholesterol Is a steroid alcohol found in red blood cells, bile, nervous tissue and animal fat

Cicatrisation Formation of scar tissue

Cicatrizant Agent promoting healing by scar tissue formation

Cirrhosis Chronic inflammation and degeneration of any organ (normally in the liver)

Clinical trial A controlled study to look at the effectiveness of a specific ingredient or application

Cohobation Is a process in the extraction method of especially rose essential oil, to ensure a "complete" oil

Cold pressed Refers to a method of extraction where no external heat is applied during the process

Colic Pain due to contraction of the muscle of the abdominal organs

Colitis Inflammation of the colon

Concrete A waxy concentrate semi-solid essential oil extract, made from plant material, and is used to make an absolute

Constipation A state where normal bowel functions are not present

Cutaneous Pertaining to the skin

Cystitis Bladder inflammation

Cytophylactic Action of increasing the leukocyte activity to defend the body against infection

Cytotoxic Toxic to all cells

Decoction A herbal preparation made by boiling the material and reducing it to a concentration

Decongestant A substance which helps to relieve congestion

Demulcent An agent protecting mucus membranes and helps stop irritation

Depurative Helps to detoxify and to combat impurities in the blood and body

Dermatitis Inflammation of the skin

Detoxifier Helps to detoxify and to combat impurities in the blood and body

Diaphoretic A substance which helps to promote perspiration

Diffuser A device which helps to release the fragrance molecules into the air

Distillation A method of extraction used in the manufacture of essential oils

Diuretic Helps to produce urine and remove water from the body

Dysmenorrhoea Painful menstruation

Dysuria Pain or difficulty in urinating

Edema Water retention

Emetic Inducing vomiting

Emmenagogue Inducing or assisting menstruation

Emollient Softening and soothing to the skin

Emphysema Degenerative disease of the lungs where the air sacs become enlarged

Endocrine Pertaining to the ductless glands

Engorgement Congestion or fullness of the tissue

Enteritis Inflammation of the mucus membranes of the intestine

Enuresis Involuntary urinating

Enzyme Protein produced by living cells which catalyze biochemical reactions

Erethism Abnormal state of irritation or excitement

Essential oil Volatile aromatic liquid constituting the odorous principles of botanical matter

Exocrine Pertaining to a gland with a duct, secreting directly onto outside surface of organism

Expectorant A substance that helps to expel mucus from the lungs

Expression Is an extraction method where essential oils are pressed to obtain the oil

Exudates Natural material secreted by plants - can be spontaneous or after damage to plant

Febrifuge Helps to combat fever

Fibrillation Rapid twitching of muscle fiber

Fixative Material that slows evaporation of volatile components in perfume

Fixed oils Vegetable oils obtained from plants that are fatty and non-volatile

Flower water The water resulting from the distillation of essential oils, which still contains some of the properties of the plant material used in the extraction

Fold Refers to the percentage of terpenes removed by re-distallation - singlefold to fivefold

Fractionated oils Refers to oils that have been re-distilled, either to have terpenes removed or to remove other substances

Fungicide A substance which destroys fungal infections

Galactagogue Helps to increase milk secretion

Gemicidal An agent that destroys micro-organisms

Gingivitis Inflammation of the gums

Glossitis Inflammation of the tongue

Halitosis Bad breath

Hematuria / Haematuria Presence of blood in the urine

Hemorrhoids Piles which are dilated rectal veins

Hemostatic Helps to stop bleeding

Hepatic Pertaining to the liver

Hepatoxic An agent having a toxic or harmful effect on the liver

Herpes Inflammation of the skin or mucus membranes

Hormone A product from living cells that produces a specific activity of cells remote from its point of origin

Hybrid A plant created by fertilization of one species by another

Hydrodiffusion Is a distillation method of essential oil extraction where the steam is produced above the botanical material and then percolates down

Hydrosol Floral water

Hyperglycemia / Hyperglycaemia Excess of sugar in the blood

Hypertension High blood pressure

Hypocholesterolemia Lowering of the cholesterol content of the blood

Hypoglycemia Lowered blood sugar levels

Hypotension Abnormally low blood pressure

Hypoxia A shortage of oxygen

In vitro In a test tube

In vivo In a living body

Infused oil An oil produced by steeping the macerated botanical material in oil until the oil has taken on some of the material's properties
Infusion Herbal remedy made by steeping the plant material in water

Laxative A substance that helps with bowel movements

Leukocyte White blood cells responsible for fighting disease

Leucocytosis Raises number of white blood cells in the blood

Leucorrhoea Whitish vaginal discharge

Lipolytic Causing lipolysis which is the chemical disintegration of fats

Macerate To soak until soft

Massage therapist A person qualified to perform therapeutic massage on people

Massage therapy The manipulation of soft tissue to enhance health and general well-being

Menopause The normal cessation of menstruation

Menorrhagia Excessive blood loss during menstruation

Metrorrhagia Uterine bleeding outside the normal menstrual cycle

Microbe Minute living organism such as pathogenic bacteria and viruses

Mucilage Substance containing demulcent gelatinous constituents

Mucolytic Breaking down mucus

Myelin Fatty material enveloping the majority of nerve cells

Narcotic Substance inducing sleep

Nephritis Inflammation of the kidneys

Nervine Substance that strengthens and tones the nerves and nervous system

Neuralgia Stabbing pain along a nerve pathway

Neurasthenia Nervous exhaustion

Neurotoxin A substance having a toxic or harmful effect on the nervous system

Oedema Water retention

Oleo gum resin Odoriferous exudation from botanical material consisting of essential oil, gum and resin

Oleoresin Natural resinous exudation from plants or aromatic liquid preparation extracted from botanical material

Olfaction Sense of smell

Olfactory bulb The center where the processing of smell is started and is then passed onto other areas of the brain

Oliguria Low volume of urine

Ophthalmia Inflammation of the eye

Ostitis Inflammation of the ear

Oxidation Related to the addition of oxygen to an organic molecule, or the removal of electrons or hydrogen from the molecule

Palpitations Undue awareness of heartbeat, or rapid heartbeat or abnormal rhythm of the heart

Parturient Assisting and helping childbirth

Pathogenic An agent causing or producing disease

Peptic Pertaining to gastric secretions as well as areas affected by them

Perennial A plant living for more than two years

Pharmacology Medical science pertaining to drugs

Pharmacopoeia Official book of drugs

Pheromone Chemical messenger used between people

Phytohormones Plant substances mimicking the actions of human hormones

Phytotherapy Treatment of disease with plant material, including herbal medicine

Polypus Non-malignant type of growth

Pomade Perfumed fat obtained during the enfleurage extraction method

Prophylactic Preventative of disease or infection

Prostatitis Inflammation of the prostate gland

Pruritis Itching

Psoriasis A chronic skin disease characterized by red patches and silver scaling

Psychosomatic Pertaining to the mind and body

Pulmonary Pertaining to the lungs

Pyelitis Inflammation of the kidneys

Pyorrhea / Pyorrhoea Discharge of puss from the gums

Pyrosis Heartburn

Rectification Process of re-distilling essential oils to rid them of certain constituents
Renal Pertaining to the kidneys

Resin Natural or prepared product - natural resins are exudations from trees, prepared resins are oleoresins from which the essential oil has been removed

Resinoids Perfumed material extracted from natural resinous material by solvent extraction

Resolvent An agent that helps disperse swelling, or that helps absorption of new growth
Rhizome Underground stem that lasts for more than one season

Rubefacient Substance causing redness and possible irritation to the skin

Sciatica Pain down the back of the legs in the area serviced by the sciatic nerve

Sclerosis Hardening of tissue due to inflammation

Scrofula Tuberculosis of the lymphatic glands

Seborrhea Increased secretion of sebum

Sialogogue An agent stimulating the secretion of saliva

Soporific A substance which helps to induce sleep

Spermatorrhoea Involuntary emission of sperm without orgasm

Splenic Pertaining to the spleen

Stomachic A substance which helps with the digestion and helps to improve appetite

Stomatitis Inflammation of the mucus membranes of the mouth

Styptic An agent that stops external bleeding

Sudorific An agent causing sweating

Synergy Agents working together and in harmony to produce an effect greater than the sum of the two separate agents

Synthetic Refers to anything not of organic source

Tachycardia Abnormally increased heartbeat

Tannin An astringent substance that helps seal tissues

Terpeneless Essential oil from which monoterpene hydrocarbons have been removed

Thrombosis The formation of a blood clot
Thrush A fungal infection in the mouth or vaginal area

Tic Repetitive twitching

Tincture Referring to either a herbal or perfume material prepared in an alcohol base

Tracheitis Inflammation of the windpipe

Tuber Swollen part of underground stem of one year's duration and capable of new growth

Unguent A soothing or healing salve or balm

Urticaria Weals on the skin

Vasoconstrictor An agent causing the contraction of blood vessel walls

Vasodilator An agent causing the dilation of blood vessel walls

Vermifuge An agent expelling intestinal worms

Volatile Substance that is unstable and evaporates easily, like an essential oil

Vulnerary An agent applied externally which helps to heal wounds and sores and helps to prevent tissue degeneration

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treepatrol
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Peppermint is said to be.


1. Analgesic Relieving or deadening pain.

2. Anesthetic Pain relieving by loss of sensation.

3. Antiseptic A substance helping to control infection.

4. Anti-galactagogue Impedes or lessens the flow of milk.

5. Anti-phlogistic Counteracts inflammation.

6. Anti-spasmodic A substance to help prevent and ease spasms and relieve cramps.

7. Astringent Causing contraction of organic tissue.

8. Carminative Settles the digestive system and relieves flatulence.

9. Cephalic A substance stimulating and clearing the mind.

10. Cholagogue Stimulating the secretion of bile into the duodenum.


11. A cordial is any invigorating and stimulating preparation; e.g. peppermint cordial. The term derives from obsolete medicinal usage, as various beverages were concocted which were believed to be beneficial to one's health, especially for the heart (cordialis, Latin).

From the Renaissance onwards, cordials were usually based on alcohol in which certain herbs, spices or other ingredients were allowed to steep.

Examples of such cordials are Rosa Solis or Rosolio, derived from the carnivorous sundew (Drosera rotundifolia L.) and believed to not only invigorate the heart, but to be an aphrodisiac as well, and Royal Usquebaugh (from a Celtic word meaning life water which also gave rise to the word whiskey), a spicy concoction containing flecks of gold leaf thought to capture the sun's golden radiance.


Precious ingredients like the gold leaf mentioned, as well as pearls and coral were sometimes added. These were believed to revive the spirit and to preclude disease. Cordials became more and more frequently consumed recreationally as time progressed, eventually evolving into liqueurs.


12. Decongestant A substance which helps to relieve congestion.

13. Emmenagogue Inducing or assisting menstruation.

14. Expectorant A substance that helps to expel mucus from the lungs.

15. Febrifuge Helps to combat fever.

16. Hepatic Pertaining to the liver.

17. Nervine Substance that strengthens and tones the nerves and nervous system.

18. Stimulants are drugs that temporarily increase alertness and wakefulness.

19. Stomachic A substance which helps with the digestion and helps to improve appetite.

20. Sudorific An agent causing sweating.

21. Vasoconstrictor An agent causing the contraction of blood vessel walls.


22. Vermifuge An agent expelling intestinal worms.


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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by clpgotlyme:
Tree,
One of the worst herxes I have had was when I accidently put wayyyyyyyyyyy too much peppermint and lemon oils in my bath water.

I could hardly move for 3 days! Not sure if it was one or the other, but I limit myself to 3-4 drops only now. Strong mints orally dont seem to affect me though,I eat them often.
Cindy

Iam going to search this out its WAY to big a coincedince!!!!
Thanks Cindy [kiss]

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Greatcod
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Maybe you have an allergy to Peppermint.


Allergies
Allergic/hypersensitivity reactions may occur from using peppermint or menthol by mouth or on the skin, including throat closing (laryngeal spasm), breathing problems (bronchial constriction/asthma symptoms), or skin rash/hives/contact dermatitis. People with known allergy/hypersensitivity to peppermint leaf or oil should avoid peppermint products.

Side Effects and Warnings

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treepatrol
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Greatcod I dont think its a allergy.
Its a deffinate reaction.
But it dosent act like {{{Allergies
Allergic/hypersensitivity reactions may occur from using peppermint or menthol by mouth or on the skin, including throat closing (laryngeal spasm), breathing problems (bronchial constriction/asthma symptoms), or skin rash/hives/contact dermatitis. People with known allergy/hypersensitivity to peppermint leaf or oil should avoid peppermint products.}}}
I didnt have the above.

I had immediate dizzyness,spinning,ringing ears,sick to stomach,hot flash,blurred vision,sweating.
I had no lasting effects from the one time reaction.
And this was with altoids pure peppermint from england.
Theres someting to this I think.

I can eat peppermint patties,chew peppermint gum it has to be the dosage and maybe the type?

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mag
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hi there

Peppermint does increase your blood pressure - So the brain cells can be deprived of blood flow

It would be interesting to have one and follow up with a spect scan of the brain.


i could not have caffeine because of the same sensation
[Smile]
mags

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treepatrol
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Inhibition by the essential oils of peppermint and spearmint of the growth of pathogenic bacteria.Imai H, Osawa K, Yasuda H, Hamashima H, Arai T, Sasatsu M.
Functional Foods Section, Central Laboratory, Lotte Company Ltd, Urawa, Saitama, Japan.

The effects of the, essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), spearmint Mentha spicata L.) and Japanese mint (Mentha, arvensis L.), of four major constituents of the esssential oil of peppermint, and of three major constituents of the essential oil of spearmint, on the proliferation of Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin sensitive Staphylococccus aureus (MSSA) were examined. The essential oils and the various constituents inhibited the proliferation of each strain in liquid culture in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, they exhibited bactericidal activity in phosphate-buffered saline. The antibacterial activities varied among the bacterial species tested but were almost the same against antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-sensitive strains of Helicobacter pylori and S. aureus. Thus, the essential oils and their constituents may be useful as potential antibacterial agents for inhibition of the growth of pathogens.

PMID: 11549238 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
:::::::::::::::


:::::::::::::::::::::::
Effects of essential oil from mint (Mentha piperita) on Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes in model food systems at 4 degrees and 10 degrees C.Tassou CC, Drosinos EH, Nychas GJ.
National Agricultural Research Foundation, Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Lycovrysi, Greece.

The effect of mint (Mentha piperita) essential oil (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0%, v/w) on Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes in a culture medium and three model foods; tzatziki (pH 4.5), taramosalata (pH 5.0) and pate (pH 6.8), inoculated at 10(7) cfu g-1, at 4 degrees and 10 degrees C for ca 1 week was studied. In the culture medium supplemented with the essential oil, no growth was observed over 2 d at 30 degrees C determined by a conductance method with a Malthus 2000 growth analyser. Salmonella enteritidis died in tzatziki in all treatments and declined in the other foods except for pate at 10 degrees C as judged with viable counts. Listeria monocytogenes populations showed a declining trend towards the end of the storage period but was increased in pate. Mint essential oil antibacterial action depended mainly on its concentration, food pH, composition, storage temperature and the nature of the micro-organism.

PMID: 7615414 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
::::::::::::::::::::


:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of three Mentha species essential oils.Mimica-Dukic N, Bozin B, Sokovic M, Mihajlovic B, Matavulj M.
University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Department of Chemistry, Novi Sad, FR Yugoslavia. [email protected]

The present study describes the antimicrobial activity and free radical scavenging capacity (RSC) of essential oils from Mentha aquatica L., Mentha longifolia L., and Mentha piperita L. The chemical profile of each essential oil was determined by GC-MS and TLC. All essential oils exhibited very strong antibacterial activity, in particularly against Esherichia coli strains. The most powerful was M. piperita essential oil, especially towards multiresistant strain of Shigella sonei and Micrococcus flavus ATTC 10,240. All tested oils showed significant fungistatic and fungicidal activity [expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) values, respectively], that were considerably higher than those of the commercial fungicide bifonazole. The essential oils of M. piperita and M. longifolia were found to be more active than the essential oil of M. aquatica. Especially low MIC (4 microL/mL) and MFC (4 microL/mL) were found with M. piperita oil against Trichophyton tonsurans and Candida albicans (both 8 microL/mL). The RSC was evaluated by measuring the scavenging activity of the essential oils on the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and OH radicals. All examined essential oils were able to reduce DPPH radicals into the neutral DPPH-H form, and this activity was dose-dependent. However, only the M. piperita oil reduced DPPH to 50 % (IC50 = 2.53 microg/mL). The M. piperita essential oil also exhibited the highest OH radical scavenging activity, reducing OH radical generation in the Fenton reaction by 24 % (pure oil). According to GC-MS and TLC (dot-blot techniques), the most powerful scavenging compounds were monoterpene ketones (menthone and isomenthone) in the essential oils of M. longifolia and M. piperita and 1,8-cineole in the oil of M. aquatica.

PMID: 12802721 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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treepatrol
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Herbs & Supplements Mentha piperita

Scientific Name: Peppermint


Who is this for?


Uses


Peppermint is widely known for its soothing effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Because it may relax the muscles in the intestinal wall, it may relieve cramps and reduce pain associated with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. Because the production of saliva is also stimulated by peppermint, the resulting increase in swallowing may possibly improve appetite, reduce nausea, or lessen motion sickness. Sometimes, peppermint oil is given orally or made into lozenges or suppositories to relieve muscle spasms associated with diagnostic procedures such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enemas.

Peppermint has also been used for relieving respiratory conditions such as colds. When taken orally as tea or tablets, peppermint may reduce coughing. Additionally, it is believed to have mild antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral effects, so taking it may help to control the infective agents that may be causing acute respiratory problems. Peppermint oil may be inhaled for soothing irritated nasal passages and it is often included in commercial chest rubs for that effect. It may also have some effect for reducing allergy symptoms. In at least one animal study, sneezing and other allergic symptoms were reduced by oral doses of peppermint oil. It is believed that peppermint oil may prevent the release of histamine, but further study is needed to confirm these results.

Aromatherapy is a type of alternative treatment that uses fragrances to affect mood and behavior. Because the smell of peppermint is considered to be energizing, it is often used in aromatherapy to reduce sleepiness and improve alertness. Results from some animal studies have shown increased activity when laboratory animals smell peppermint oil. A few studies of humans have found mixed results, however, suggesting that individuals who believe that peppermint will relieve fatigue respond better than those who do not.

Peppermint oil may also be used topically. When applied to the skin, it first may activate the skin's receptors for cold, producing a cool feeling. Secondly, peppermint oil may cause widening of blood vessels close to the skin's surface. The resulting increase in blood flow causes the skin to redden and creates a feeling of warmth that relieves muscle or joint aches. This double cooling and warming effect may make topical peppermint oil useful in treating some types of headaches. Additionally, it may be applied directly to cavities, gums, or teeth to relieve toothache and it may also alleviate the itching of mild skin conditions resulting from insect bites and rashes.

From:
drugdigest

Mentha piperita

Scientific Name: Peppermint


When should I be careful taking it?


In case reports, at least two infants experienced intense spasms of the larynx, tongue, and the bronchi in the lungs, when products containing peppermint oil were applied to their faces particularly their noses. Severe breathing problems, including complete breathing failure, resulted. Due to this possible effect, neither peppermint oil nor its derivative menthol should be applied to the faces of small children.

Although peppermint's effects are mild and positive for most individuals, gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) or a hiatal hernia may be worsened by taking it. GERD happens when the lower esophageal sphincter the muscular "gate" that separates the esophagus and the stomach is already weak, allowing acidic stomach contents to splash back into the esophagus. If peppermint relaxes the lower esophageal sphincter even more, the symptoms of GERD may increase. A hiatal hernia occurs when part of the stomach pushes through the opening in the diaphragm where the esophagus enters. If the "gate" between the esophagus and stomach relaxes, more of the stomach may extend and the possibility of complications may increase. Individuals with GERD or a hiatal hernia should avoid taking peppermint.

Taking large amounts of peppermint may encourage the start of menstrual periods. Therefore, its use during pregnancy is not recommended.


Precautions


Although peppermint is sometimes suggested to relieve the discomfort associated with gallstones, it should not be taken by individuals who have gallstones unless supervised by a doctor. Because peppermint may stimulate the production of bile, it may worsen some types of gallstones.

Not enough is known about how large amounts of peppermint might affect an infant to recommend its supplemental use while breast-feeding. However, amounts used in foods are not thought to present a risk.
From:
Mentha piperita Scientific Name: Peppermint When should I be careful taking it?

Mentha piperita

Scientific Name: Peppermint


What side effects should I watch for?


Major Side Effects

One case has been reported of rapid, severe lung injury following the injection of peppermint oil into an IV line. It is believed that the oil made lung tissues leak, which caused swelling and interfered with breathing. The patient recovered, but intensive care which included the use of a ventilator was necessary for several days after the exposure.

Topical application of peppermint oil to infants may cause breathing failure due to muscle spasms in the throat and lungs.

Less Severe Side Effects

Orally, peppermint oil has been known to cause heartburn. It may also produce a burning sensation in the mouth or around the anal opening.

Topical application of peppermint oil may irritate skin, especially skin that is damaged or injured already.
From:
HerbsSideEffects

Mentha piperita

Scientific Name: Peppermint


What interactions should I watch for?


Prescription Drugs

Drugs known as histamine-2 (H-2) receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors lower the amount of acid in the stomach. If enteric-coated peppermint capsules that are meant to dissolve in a low-acid location are taken at the same time as one of these acid-lowering drugs, the peppermint may be released in the stomach instead of the intestines. Intestinal spasms may not be relieved. If peppermint oil capsules are taken at the same time as an acid-lowering drug, they should be taken 2 hours or more before the drug.

Some H-2 receptor blockers are:
cimetidine (Tagamet)
famotidine (Pepcid)
nizatidine (Axid)
ranitidine (Zantac)
Some proton pump inhibitors are:
esomeprazole (Nexium)
lansoprazole (Prevacid)
omeprazole (Prilosec)
pantoprazole (Protonix)
Peppermint oil has been shown to decrease the rate at which the body breaks down the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporine. As a result, more cyclosporine may be available for the body to use and its effects may be increased. Cyclosporine is usually taken to prevent the rejection of a transplanted organ.

Non-prescription Drugs

Peppermint oil capsules should be taken at least 2 hours before an antacid or an over-the-counter medication such as Pepcid AC, Prilosec OTC, or Zantac AR is used. Because these products decrease the amount of acid in the stomach, they may cause enteric-coated peppermint capsules to dissolve in the stomach instead of the intestines.

Some interactions between herbal products and medications can be more severe than others. The best way for you to avoid harmful interactions is to tell your doctor and/or pharmacist what medications you are currently taking, including any over-the-counter products, vitamins, and herbals. For specific information on how peppermint interacts with drugs, other herbals, and foods and the severity of those interactions, please use our Drug Interactions Checker to check for possible interactions
From:
HerbsInteractions

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treepatrol
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Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

Tropical Plant Data Base

Peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.)Medline

Peppermint oil @ NIH

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stymielymie
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neat trick with altoids.
no it was mentos.

drop mentos in a bottle of cola stand back
20 feet and watch it geyser up 20-30 feet.

scarry what mixtures of unknown combination can
do!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

docdave [woohoo]

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brentb
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quote:
Originally posted by stymielymie:
neat trick with altoids.
no it was mentos.


Yep mentos...google or youtube mentos and diet coke. One genius downed a whole liter of diet coke after eating some mentos. The projectile vomitting is quite funny and from the look of things quite painfull.
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kelmo
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This peppermint thing has opened a can of worms. But, it answers the question. My daughter needs to suck on a non-sugar mint for her dry mouth.

She is always telling me to get the green "wintergreen" ice breakers and not the blue, peppermint because it makes her sick.

BINGO! [Eek!]

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Marnie
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Look very, very, very closely at genistein .

Also...I hope you LOVE green tea !

Bb maybe good at downregulating uPA via its PKC inhibitor in endothelial cells , but not that induced by TNF alpha!

Normally..."cultured human epidermal cells secrete a plasminogen activator inhibitor (urokinase inhibitor)" , but Bb's PKC inhibitor counters that.

Giving you a hint at pages of research today:

OspA contains lys and glu...Lysine and glutamic acid. (Sorta in the "middle" of this lipoprotein).

We figure this out too late. OspC (Salp 15) hinders what should have been the best response:

Thrombin-activated platelets demonstrated maximal antibody binding and maximal secretion.

Stimulation with ADP, epinephrine , or collagen resulted in lower levels of secretion and antibody binding.

Platelets initially treated with acetylsalicylate (which impairs secretion) and activated with ADP, collagen, or epinephrine did not express the activation-specific antigen.

NH2-terminal glutamic acid and lysine forms of

*human plasminogen*...

AND...

The increase in cAMP induced by epinephrine.

activation of the urokinase plasminogen activator
(uPA)..to break the bond...off the charts via TNF alpha.

"These results suggest that the metastasis suppressor activity of p75NTR is mediated, in part, by

down-regulation of

specific proteases (uPA, type IV collagenases) implicated in cell migration and metastasis."

"forskolin increased t-PA activity and reduced u-PA activity"

(Above quote from prostate cancer research.)

;-)

So far...cancer cells follow the glycolysis pathway (PFK dependent). They produce lactic acid. They have very few mitochondria. Many/most originate as endothelial cells. AND now...

they are high in uPA activity.

"Elevated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in breast tumors predicts poor survival."

Something else you should know:

"It is therefore of particular interest that many cancer cells and virally infected cells are unable to make PGE1 because they cannot convert linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid."

Spirulina should help. However, it is IMPERATIVE that it comes from an excellent source as this, when grown, grabs ahold of heavy metals too...if it is grown in a contaminated source.

Review and for your research:

1. genistein

2. Green tea

3. acetylsalicylate..good old aspirin

4. forskolin

5. Spirulina (or to sub...L-cysteine + Omega 3s)

Where there's a will, there's a way!

[ 19. April 2007, 05:48 PM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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clpgotlyme
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Tree,
You are welcome.I have tesyted positive for Salmonella, by the way. Maybe thats what caused the herx? If you start a new message about Peppermint essential oil, perhaps Farah will see it and could give some info.
Cindy [group hug]

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Cindy

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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by Marnie:
Look very, very, very closely at genistein .

Also...I hope you LOVE green tea !


Cancer link


Some recent studies have raised the concern that genistein might potentially increase the risk of leukemia, because it can inhibit an enzyme (topoisomerase) that protects DNA from mutations. Some cancer patients whose chemotherapy drugs inhibited topoisomerase later developed leukemia. NCI researchers have completed animal studies on genistein with no adverse effects being seen. Clinical trials with people are in progress.

Well that dosent sound good [Frown]

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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by kelmo:
This peppermint thing has opened a can of worms. But, it answers the question. My daughter needs to suck on a non-sugar mint for her dry mouth.

She is always telling me to get the green "wintergreen" ice breakers and not the blue, peppermint because it makes her sick.

BINGO! [Eek!]

{{{peppermint because it makes her sick.}}}

Anybody else???

Its only the pure really strong peppermint that did it to me I dont even know if it is still being made the same way its from the {{{Mentha x piperita L}}} (Mentha piperita) is a (usually) sterile hybrid mint, a cross between watermint (Mentha aquatica) and spearmint (Mentha spicata).


Look at the plant chemicals unreal!


1,8-cineole, acetaldehyde, acetic-acid, alpha-amorphene, alpha-cadinene, alpha-carotene, alpha-copaene, alpha-gurjunene, alpha-pinene, alpha-terpinene, alpha-terpineol, alpha-thujone, alpha-tocopherol, aluminum, amyl-alcohol, amyl-valerate, anethole, azulene, benzoic-acid, beta-betulenol, beta-carotene , beta-caryophyllene, beta-copaene, beta-ionone, beta-pinene, beta-thujone, beta-ylangene , betaine, bicycloelemene, bisabolene, cadinene, calcium, camphene, carvacrol, carveol, carveol-acetate, carvone, caryophyllene-oxide, cedrene, cedrol, choline, chromium, cineole, cinerol, cinnamic-acid-methyl-ester, cis-piperitol, cis-roseoxide, cis-sabinol, citronellol, cryptone, flavons hymenoxin, iron, isoamyl-phenylacetate, isobutyric-acid, isomenthol, isomenthol-acetate, isomenthone, isomenthyl-acetate, isopulegol-acetate, isorhoifolin, isovaleraldehyde, isovaleric-acid, isovaleric-acid-n-octyl-ester, jasmone, lavandulol, ledol , limonene, linalool, luteolin, menthol, menthone, menthoside, menthyl-acetate, menthyl-isovalerate, menthyl-valerate, myrcene, myrtenol, neoisomenthol-acetate, neomenthol, neomenthone, neomenthyl-acetate, nerolidol, nevadensin, octan-3-ol, p-cymene, p-cymol, pectin, pent-cis-2-en-1-ol, perillyl-alcohol, phellandrene, phenylethanols, phenyl-propyl-pyridines, phosphorus, pinene, piperitenone, piperitone, piperitone-oxide, pulegone, pyridine, rosmarinic-acid, sabinene, sabinene-acetate, sabinene-hydrate, salvigenin, sideritoflavone, silicon, terpinolene, thymol, trans-piperitol, trans-roseoxide, vanillin, viridiflorol, xanthomicrol.

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Truthfinder
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Well, Tree, I know this doesn't help a bit but...

Dizzy,want to throw up,queazey,spinning,hot all over,Dry mouth,hot,flush,?

This is exactly what I experience when I drink regular iced tea - bottled, home-made, decaffienated, powdered - it all affects me the same way. (Not herbal stuff - never tried that).

I wondered if it was the tannic acid in tea.... ?

I think its quite odd that some of you have these same symptoms from certain types of peppermint....

Tracy

--------------------
Tracy
.... Prayers for the Lyme Community - every day at 6 p.m. Pacific Time and 9 p.m. Eastern Time just take a few moments to say a prayer wherever you are.

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treepatrol
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Tree,

Gotta ask: Is this thread a put-on?


No Cave its true I mean when I ate that peppermint it knocked me sideways no ifs ands or butts about it!!! it happened.

Cave You like playing dont cha? [Big Grin]

Truthfinder it is odd. I wish more people would have tryed the same peppermint as I did I would like to no there reactions.

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Marnie
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"More recently, it has become clear that

cyclase activity is regulated by

multiple effectors, which include not (me..missing the word, only?) the alpha subunits of Gs and Gi proteins,

but also the beta-gamma subunits of G proteins and

protein kinase C."

Bb has a PKC Inhibitor. Is this inhibitor preventing adenylyl cyclase activity?

DECREASING cAMP in the cells it attacks? Not only endothelial cells, but then the langerhans cells too?

Our first defense system cells run on too little energy?

When adenylyl cyclase is activated, it catalyses the conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP, which leads to an increase in

intracellular levels of cyclic AMP.

Apparently epinephrine increases cAMP via receptors on some cells BUT decreases cAMP on other cell receptors! Kinda amazing.

It looks like forskolin increases fructose uptake via GLUT5 and stimulates adenylate cyclase -> more cAMP.

This is interesting:
"red light (630 nm) decreased, whereas far-red light (720 nm) increased cellular adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) content"

And...

Forskolin was reported to increase STOCs (Spontaneous transient outward currents)frequency in myocytes (muscle cells) isolated from resistance arteries.

And...

A number of different hormones instruct different types of cells to make cAMP and that the effect of increased cAMP production depends on the target cell.

Liver cells respond to cAMP by producing glucose, for example, while salivary glands send fluid out of the cell. But while the responses varied, the second messenger was always cAMP, not cGMP.

IS Bb's NH4 protein (lysine-glutamic acid) binding to an estrogen receptor and impacting:

"It has been known for more than 30 years that estrogen can alter the intrinsic and synaptic physiology of neurons within minutes.

The physiological significance of these acute effects has been unclear, however, because some effects require higher concentrations of estrogen than are detected in plasma, and because estrogen secreted by the ovary rises and falls over a time course of days, not minutes.

These concerns may be answered by new research demonstrating that estrogen is produced at high levels within the brain itself, and that production of estrogen in the brain may be regulated by neuronal activity.

Additionally, recent studies indicate that classical estrogen receptor proteins are found not only in the nucleus where they regulate gene expression but also at extranuclear sites, including at synapses.

These findings, together with evidence for new types of extranuclear estrogen receptors, suggest that estrogen might act directly at synapses to activate second messenger signaling, thereby rapidly altering neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, and/or synaptic plasticity."

And...

"Forskolin is in fact a potent estrogen promoter due to its cAMP stimulating and aromatase inducing effects."

And...

"Although increases in intracellular cAMP can stimulate estrogen receptor-a (ERa) activity in the absence of exogenous hormone, no studies have addressed whether ERβ can be similarly regulated...

In transient transfections, forskolin plus 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), which increases intracellular cAMP, stimulated the transcriptional activities of both ERa and ERβ."

Humm...promotes estrogen to lock onto its own receptors preventing Bb locking onto those receptors via its NH4 (lysine-glutamic acid) section of its lipoprotein???

Tamoxifen is a man-made PKC inhibitor. Bb has a PKC inhibitor too. Tamoxifen is an anti-estrogen compound.

Is Bb's "anti-estrogen"? Is it blocking the activation of estrogen? Does this result in too much estrogen remaining in "circulation" like the SSRI drugs work?

Go here:

http://www.thisisms.com/article36.html

Re: genistein...yes, pro and con research!

"genistein and estrogen receptor (ER)"

Looks like the body choses to slow down the cAMP in specific beta cells and increase it in specific alpha cells.

Maybe we should "follow" the body's "directions"?

"Estrogens are known to influence a variety of autoimmune diseases, but it is not known whether their actions are mediated through classic estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha).

The presence of a functional ER was demonstrated in secondary lymphoid tissues, then ERalpha expression was shown at both the RNA and protein levels in these tissues.

Use of ERalpha knockout mice revealed that both the estrogen-induced disease protection and the estrogen-induced reduction in proinflammatory cytokines were dependent upon

ERalpha in the prototypic Th1-mediated autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

These findings are central to the design of selective ER modifiers which aim to target biologic responses in specific organ systems."

PMID: 14662901

Looks like we need to get that receptor to work.

Getting back to peppermint:

"Because antiandrogenic effects of spearmint and peppermint were found previously in rats, it was decided to observe the effect of this herbal tea on the androgen levels in hirsute women.Twenty-one female hirsute patients, 12 with polycystic ovary syndrome and 9 with idiopathic hirsutism were included to the study.

They were took a cup of herbal tea which was steeped with M. spicata for 5 days twice a day in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycles. After treatment with spearmint teas,

there was a significant decrease in free testosterone and

increase in luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol."

"Class Notes" on hormones as we age here:

http://www.gnhealth.com/scripts/April_class_notes.doc.

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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by cave76:
Tree,

Yeah----cave's my name and playin's my game. [Big Grin]

FWIW Altoids do nothing to me----except if I have a very slight bit of nausea (like with doxy sometimes) it will take away the nausea.

Do we need any more proof that we're all different?? [Smile] [Smile]

[Big Grin] [Big Grin] [woohoo]

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Marnie
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Into a search engine, type in: peppermint acetylcholine.

Then read..

Ahhh...

My "minty" showers on the Radisson Seven Seas (cruise ship) -bath soap was really minty! - sure as heck woke me up in the morning so I was ready to go!

A real "pick up"...

Don't think in terms of the neurotransmitters, think in terms of working RECEPTORS.

The receptors are key to everything!

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treepatrol
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Peppermint
Botanical Description & Habitat

Mentha piperita

Family
Labiatae

Common names:
Amb mint
Brandy mint

Habitat
Native to Great Britain and found in Europe and the United States. It prefers a moist soil and is generally found in damp places and marshes.

Description
Has a creeping root which produces an erect, purple, hairy stem. It is branched near the top and reaches two feet in height. The leaves are opposite, petiolate, ovate, and dark green in color. Small, purple flowers grow in terminal spikes from July through September.


Medicinal parts
Leaves, dried, collected just before flowering.


Historical Properties & Uses

Peppermint, and to a lesser extent spearmint and cornmint, are among the most popular herbs; their many uses as flavoring ingredients are well known.

Medicinally, peppermint is used to aid the various processes of digestion: to combat gas, increase bile flow, heal the stomach and liver, etc. Its active constituents are found in its essential oil, mainly menthol and carvone. The oil's spasmolytic, anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties have been experimentally verified.


Peppermint is nontoxic, though some people may be allergic to the leaves.


Peppermint leaf and oil, as well as mint oil, are approved by the German Commisssion E for internal and external uses:


Mint and peppermint oil are used internally for flatulence, GI and gallbladder disorders and catarrh and externally for myalgia and neuralgia.


Peppermint leaf is used for spastic complaints of the GI tract and gallbladder.


References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.


Method of Action


Peppermint is a common flavoring, which makes it seem familiar and therefore "simple". Actually, its chemistry is highly complex, with over 100 components, primarily menthol.

Peppermint is a digestive aid


Experiments conducted in Russia on four dogs with chronically implanted fistula of the gallbladder, indicated a preparation of peppermint leaves, containing mostly mixed flavanoids, had a pronounced choleretic effect on the liver, markedly increasing bile output.


Its effect was superior to the choleretic drug chologon (ketocholamic acid). Bile composition was changed, resulting in decreased cholates, bilirubin, and cholesterol, although the total output of cholates increased.


Peppermint stimulates gallbladder contraction, resulting in increased digestion. A peppermint infusion or tea raises bile secretion to a level about 9 times greater than normal.


In addition, the antiseptic property of peppermint helps disinfect the bile duct as it is secreted in the bile. A mode of action has been proposed for peppermint and a few other essential oils: they stimulate the vagus nerve, which then leads the secretion of bile.


Peppermint has spasmolytic properties
The spasmolytic property of peppermint has been established against many convulsant drugs, including acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, and anaphylaxotocin. Preparations used include isolated cuts of rabbit and guinea-pig intestine, isolated guinea pig lungs, cat lungs "in situ," and whole animals under conditions of anaphylactic shock.


The smooth muscle spasmolytic effect is myotropic, resembling that of papaverine. Peppermint extract has been found to decrease the tone of the lower esophagus sphincters to aid the escape of air.


Peppermint oils have strong antibacterial properties
Peppermint oils are consistently among the strongest antibiotic natural oils tested. In one study, for example, peppermint ranked among the top 3 of 17 essential oils tested for inhibition of swine erysipelas, and a sporeless culture of Bacillus anthracis.


Of 22 essential oils tested in another study, peppermint was on of the top 5 inhibitors of 11 species of bacteria. In a semi-solid agar held at 45 degrees, peppermint and a select few other essential oils inhibited Streptococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enteritidis, and other gram positive and gram negative bacteria.


Candy made from peppermint and other such materials has a low content of microorganisms, due to the germicidal properties of its flavoring. Peppermint oil is effective against other organisms as well, including:


Staphylococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pyogenes, Penicillium glaucum, Aspergillus albus, Neisseria perflava, Sarcina lutea, Bacillus mensentericus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus aureus. Cornmint and spearmint also have effective antibacterial properties, as would be expected. Spearmint has some antitubercular and anthelmintic action.


Peppermint has considerable antiviral activity
Peppermint contains many of the same components as lemon balm, which had been shown to have considerable antiviral activity. On that basis, peppermint was investigated and found also to inhibit several viruses, including Newcastle Disease, Herpes simplex, vaccinia, Semliki Forest, and West Nile viruses in egg and cell-culture systems.


The herb contains a tannin with an affinity for Newcastle virus and mumps virus, and a nontannin fraction with antiviral effects agains herpes simplex virus.


Azulene from peppermint has antipyretic and antiulcer actions
Azulene, an isolate from the residue of peppermint oil distillation has a marked antipyretic action. A 0.1 gm/kg dose, injected intramuscularly, was effective against hot water burns on the ear of a rabbit.


Administered in a dose of 0.05 gm/kg, the preparation is effective in reducing pathological changes of the mucosa in experiments on rats with butadione-induced gastric ulcer. With intraperitoneal administration, the LD50 of azulen is 1.5 gm/kg for mice and 1.165 gm/kg for rats.


Mints have some cytotoxic properties
Cornmint and peppermint oils have some cytotoxic properties, but it is unlikely the whole plant would exhibit these effects.


Drug Interactions & Precautions

Possible Interactions


If peppermint is used on a daily basis, the following drugs may be imperfectly absorbed: tetracycline derivatives, oral anticholinergics, phenothiazines, digoxin, isoniazid, phenytoin, and warfarin.


The urinary excretion of alkaline drugs, such as amphetamines or quinidine, may be inhibited by the antacid nature of peppermint.


Peppermint's analgesic effects may be additive with other analgesics and anesthetics. These effects may be inhibited by barbiturates, despite any CNS-depressant effects which may occur. The analgesic property of this herb may be reversed or even eliminated by P-chlorophenylalanine, cyproheptadine HCl, and phenobarbital.


Conversely, the CNS-depressant tendency of this analgesic may be potentiated by chlorprothixene HCl, haloperidol, and tranquilizers.


Comments


Since peppermint's action depends on the presence of cholinergic substances, it will be affected by the decrease in cholinergic-receptor stimulation produced by anticholinergics.


The presence of azulenes in peppermint may interfere with the actions of bradykinin, histamine, acetylcholine, and serotonin.


In the absence of other hard data, it may be assumed observable interactions occur between the many central nervous system drugs and the psychoactive principles in this herb.


There is evidence to show combined use of bactericidal and bacteriostatic agents will lower the effectiveness of the bacteriostatic agent. However, how this finding applies to herbal anti-infectives is still unknown.


Safety Factors & Toxicity


Some individuals may experience allergic contact dermatitis from the plant, and some hay fever has been associated with fields of peppermint.


Menthol and menthol-containing drugs can be lethal to infants if applied to the nose, as when the infant has a cold. This use should be avoided.


Mint oil has approval status by the German Commission E.


Peppermint leaf has approval status by the German Commission E.


References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.


Preparation & Administration

Three times a day

Dried herb
2-4 grams

Tea
made from 1 tsp of dried herb

Oil
0.05-0.2 ml (Use enteric coated capsules if for Irritable Bowel Syndrome)

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E.

Recommended daily dosages in Germany are as follows:

Internal

6 - 12 drops oil.
3 - 4 drops in hot water for inhalation.

3 - 6 g leaf
5 - 15 g leaf tincture

External

1 - 5% essential oil for nasal ointment
5 - 20% solution.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Note: This Herbal Preparation information is a summary of data from books and articles by various authors. It is not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals.


Abstracts

References

Abdullin, K.K. Bactericidal effect of essential oils. Uch Zap Kazansk Vet Inst., 84, 75-79, 1962.

Am Hospital Formulary Service. Am Soc of Hosp Pharm. Wash, D.C.

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Bressler, R., M.D. Bogdonoff & G.J. Subak-Sharpe. 1981. The Physicians Drug Manual. Doubleday & Co, Inc. Garden City, NY. 1213 pp.

Chabrol, E. & Charonnat, R. Les agents therapeutiques de la secretion biliaire. Annuales De Medecine, 37(1), 131-142, 1935.

Clark, T.H., A.H. Conney & B.P. Harpole, et.al. 1967. Drug interactions that can affect your patients. Patient Care, 1(11). pp. 33-71.

Committee on Pharmocopaeia of the Am Institute of Homeopathy, The Homeopathic Pharmacopaeia of the United States. 8th ed., Vol 1. Otis Clapp and Son, Agents, Boston, l981.

De Martinis, M., et.al. Milk thistle (silybum marianum) derivatives in the therapy of chronic hepatopathies. Clin. Ter., 94(3). pp. 283-315. 1980.

Drug package insert (FDA approved official brochure) and other labeling based on sponsored clinical investigations and New Drug Application data.

Facts and Comparisons. The Lawrence Review of Natural Products. Jul, 1990.

Farnsworth, N.R. & G.A. Cordell. A review of some biologically active compounds isolated from lants as reported in the 1974-1975 literature. Loloydia, 39(6), 422-455, 1976.

Fitzpatrick, F.K. Plant substances active against mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antibiotics And Chemotherapy, 4(5), 528-536, 1954.

Forster, H. Spasmolytische wirkung pflanzlicher carminativa. Zeitschrift Der Allgemein Medizin, 59, 1327-1333, 1983.

Goodman, L.S. & A. Gilman. 1975. Pharm Basis of Thera. MacMillan, NY. Hansten, P.D. 1979. Drug Interactions, 4th ed. Lea & Febiger, Phila.

Hermann, E., Jr. & L. Kucera. Antiviral substances in plants of the mint family (labiatae). Peppermint & other mint plants. Proceedings Of The Society For Experimental Biology & Medicine, 124, 874-878, 1967.

Holtmeier, H.J. Taschenbuch Der Pathophysilogie Fuer Mediziner Und Ernaehrungswissenschaftler. Bd. 3825-142, Stuttgart, New York, 1977.

Hyde, F.F. British Herbal Pharmacopoeia. British Herbal Medicine Assoc: West Yorks, England, 1983

Jelicic-Hadzovic, J. & P. Stern. 1972. Azulenes and bradykinins. Arzneimittel-forschungen, 22(7). pp. 1210-1211.

Kastrup, E.K., ed. 1981. Drug Facts and Comparisons, 1982 edition. Facts and Comparisions Division, J.P. Lippincott Co, Phila (St. Louis).

List, P. & L. Hoerhammer. 1969-1976. Hagers Hanbuch der Pharmazeutischen Praxis, vols. 2-5. Springer-Verlag, Berlin.

Maksimenko, G.N. Antipyretic effect of azulene from peppermint oil. Farmakologia I Toksikologia, 27(5), 571-573, 1964.

Martin, E.W. 1978. Drug Interactions Index, 1978/79. J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia.

Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia, The Pharmaceutical Press, London, 1977.

Maruzzella, J.C. & N.A. Sircurella. Antibacterial activity of essential oil vapors. J Of The Am Pharm Assoc, 49(11), 692-694, 1960.

Maruzzela, J.C. & M.B. Lichtenstein. The in vitro antibacterial activity of oils. J. Of The Am. Pharm. *** . 45(6), 378-381, 1956.

Melmon, K., H.F. Morelli, J.A. Oates, et. al. 1967. Drug interactions that can affect your patients. Patient Care, Nov. pp. 33-71.

Mowrey, Daniel B., Ph.D. Exper. Psych., Brigham Young University. Director of Nebo Institute of Herbal Sciences. Director of Behavior Change Agent Training Institute. Director of Research, Nova Corp.

Neuvonen, P.J., et.al. 1970. Interference of iron with the absorbtion of tetracyclines in man. British Medical J, 4. p. 532.

Ngai, S.H., L.C. Mark & E.M. Papper. 1970. Pharmacologic and physiologic aspects of anesthesiology. N Eng J of Med, 282 pp. 479-491.

Pasechnik, I. Study of choleretic properties specific to flavonoids from mentha piperita leaves. Farmakologia I Toksikologia, 29(6), 735-737, 1966.

Pizsolitto, A.C., et. al. Determination of antibacterial activity of essential oils officialized by the Brazilian pharmacopeia, 2nd edition. Rev Fac Farm Odontol. Araraquara, 9(1), 55-61, 1975.

Pizzorno, Joseph E. & Murray, Michael T. A Textbook of Natural Medicine. John Bastyr College Publications: Seattle, Wa, 1985

Ramadan, F.M., H.T. El-zanfaly, A.M. Alian & F.A. El-wakeil. Antibacterial effects of some essential oils. II. Semisolid agar phase. Chem. Mikrobiol. Technol. Lebensm., 1, 96-102, 1972.

Sanyal, A. & K.C. Varma. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity of mentha arvensis var. piperascens oil obtained from different sources. Indian J Of Micro, 9(1), 23-24, 1969.

Scientific Committee, British Herbal Pharmocopaeia, British Herbal Med Assoc, Lane House, Cowling, Na Keighley, West Yorks, Bd Bd220lx, l983.

Shipochliev, T. Pharmacological study of several essential oils. I. Effect on the smooth muscle. Vet. Med. (Prague), 13(8-9), 63-69, 1968.

Silyanovska, K., et. al. Parfuem. Kosmet., 50, 293, 1969.

Stuart, D.M. 1968. Drug metabolism Part 2. Drug interactions. PharmIndex, 10(10). pp. 4-16.

Tanner, F.W. & E. Davis. Some observations on the sanitary condition of confections. The Am

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treepatrol
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The chemical compound acetylcholine, often abbreviated as ACh, was the first neurotransmitter to be identified.

It is a chemical transmitter in both the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) in many organisms including humans. Acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter in all autonomic ganglia.


In layman's terms, it is a chemical that allows neurons to communicate with each other within humans and other organisms.


Acetylcholine is synthesized in certain neurons by the enzyme choline acetyltransferase from the compounds choline and acetyl-CoA.


Organic mercurial compounds have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups, which causes dysfunction of the enzyme choline acetyl transferase. This inhibition may lead to acetylcholine deficiency, and can have consequences on motor function.


Normally, the enzyme acetylcholinesterase converts acetylcholine into the inactive metabolites choline and acetate.


This enzyme is abundant in the synaptic cleft, and its role in rapidly clearing free acetylcholine from the synapse is essential for proper muscle function.


The devastating effects of organophosphate-containing nerve agents (e.g. Sarin gas) are due to their irreversible inactivation of this enzyme.


The resulting accumulation of acetylcholine causes continuous stimulation of the muscles, glands and central nervous system; victims commonly die of suffocation as they cannot contract their diaphragm.


Other organophosphates and some carbamates are effective insecticides because they inhibit acetylcholinasterase in insects.


On the other hand, since a shortage of acetylcholine in the brain has been associated with Alzheimer's disease, some drugs that inhibit acetylcholinesterase are used in the treatment of that disease.


A recent study [1] has shown that THC is one such drug, effective at reducing the formation of characteristic neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid beta plaques


Main Entry: 1spasmolytic
Pronunciation: spaz-m-lit-ik
Function: adjective
: tending or having the power to relieve spasms or convulsions



So do I understand it right that it fixes the over abundance of acetylcholine????

If Iam right this is a good thing. [Big Grin]

The spasmolytic property of peppermint has been established through comparisons with a wide variety of convulsant drugs, including acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, anaphylaxotocin.


The smooth muscle spasmolytic effect is exerted primarily on the neuromuscular junction. Peppermint extract has been found to decrease the tone of the lower esophagus sphincter so that the escape of air is made easier

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Marnie
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Bb has a gene for C-acetlytransferase - enzyme to MAKE acetylcholine. Bb cannot breakdown acetylcholine.

IF Bb is taking from us that enzyme (as it is PFK) then logic would say we are making less acetylcholine in some cells, more in others?

It appears Bb wants/needs choline. This isn't good for us. It will impact our liver -> "fatty liver" (only seen on an ultrasound). It will impact our bile salts (choline is one of several components) which act to remove Hg from our systems...

Bb looks to be greatly denying us of phosphorus...needed for bile salts, ATP, bone health, etc.

Zinc, histidine, cysteine, Mn...

This is one serious parasite!

Overabundance or too little acetylcholine OR too few working healthy RECEPTORS?

It has to do with the RECEPTORS...how long they are open or shut.

We're talking FRACTIONS OF SECONDS.

As well as the number of healthy receptors .

Everything about lyme...involves receptors... on langerhans cells, estrogen receptors,etc.

WORKING receptors is what this is all about.

NOT the amount of the enzyme, hormone, neurotransmitter.

If we eat healthy and have a healthy gut...we have the nutrients to MAKE the neurotransmitters.

The RECEPTORS...are they working/damaged?

We actually MAKE more receptors as we learn.

We can "rewire"...make more nerves, more receptors, but it takes time...not to mention the right nutrients to rebuild post destruction.

Is it healthy to block the receptors (as in using SSRIs)? I suspect it -> long term dependency because some maybe destroyed and now there are fewer. So -> "dependency" on SSRIs lifelong.

Everything in the body is happening for a good reason.

When moms vomit in early pregnancy it is because they are pumping out (intestine) a lot of serotonin. Well...serotonin converts to melatonin (yawn) which is a powerful antioxidant. It releases bicarbonates to alkalinize.

The fetus is protected.

I think we need to "respect" the paths the body is taking and be very careful how much we alter those paths.

Vitamin D goes up in lyme. It is a MAJOR cancer preventative, for one. It greatly impacts our ability to keep Ca IN our bones. Which may then help us to conserve (less reactive) Mg from the foods we eat.

Complex, isn't this?!

P.S. Did you catch how forskolin impacts fructose? Are we ACTIVATING PFK via additional fructose instead of insulin? Ultimately death by "sugar" OD? OR...difference between 2-6 / 1-6 bisphosphates?

BTW...going out of town for several days tomorrow, so will be offline. "I WILL be back..."

Rambette.

[ 24. April 2007, 09:13 AM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

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treepatrol
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TKO Orange Link

Plant Terpenoids- Volatile Oils

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imanurse
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Tree - You are not alone with this reaction.

I had the same thing happen to me. I never had this reaction prior to Lyme. I never did understand why I felt that way but have avoided them for about a year now.

Hmmmm, you really have me thinking now. It really was almost like a herx reaction for me. Thanks for posting this!

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**Eat Chocolate**

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treepatrol
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Now whats peppermint do Marnie

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treepatrol
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Up for thoughts!

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tailz
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I get sick on peppermint, though I don't know why.

I have found that I have trouble with many herbs and some veggies, however, especially those containing phorbol esters. I wonder if I have a tumor somewhere sometimes:

http://tinyurl.com/3c2abo

Apparently herbs and veggies containing phorbol esters are tumor promoters. I find this interesting since I have both a vocal chord polyp and nasal polyps. I've also had skin lesions.

I'm not sure if peppermint contains phorbol esters, but I'd be curious to find out.

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I have to go back & finish reading a lot of this, but I wanted to let you know that I have found that altoids or any really strong peppermint make me very sick.

I had two tins in the drawer forever because I used to love them but they started to nauseate me, big time. I just went looking for them because I was going to eat some & see what happened.

It's probably a good thing for me that I had recently thrown them out. (I forgot)

I don't know when it started, but I know that it seems anything peppermint makes me sick. I thought this was strange because I know it's supposed to be good for upset stomach.

I have a nasty cold & got the brilliant idea to try some peppermint tea the other night before bed. I was up ALL night. I had awful reflux and felt like total poop.

I like mint gum. I can't handle peppermint anymore, I had to switch to spearmint. I guess it must be milder. Lately, I've just been going with cinnamon.

I remember a years ago, I got the idea to make peppermint brownies. I must have put too much extract in because they made me sick.

I can occasionally stand a small piece of a REALLY mild peppermint candy or a small piece of peppermint patty. I really do like the taste of mint, but it's just not worth it.

This is really interesting, thanks for posting it. [Big Grin]

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AliG
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Here's something I found interesting. I was reading Alternative Medicine - The Definitive Guide, a section called Viral & Bacterial Infections on p641 in Children's Health.

For "Traditional Chinese Medicine" it states:
quote:
In the case of infections, before prescribing herbs, Dr. Ni will identify the infection as either a cold type (yin) or a hot type (yang).

For Yin type of infection, he prescribes herbs like cinnamon and ginger, spicier types of herbs that will warm a cool condition.

In the case of a Yang type of illness, which needs to be cooled, herbs like chrysanthemum flowers and peppermint are effective, Dr. Ni says.

To reduce a fever naturally, Dr. Ni recommends a tea made of boiled gypsum.

I've been craving ginger & cinnamon, and peppermint makes me sick, I wonder if there's any significance there. ????

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5dana8
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altoids come in different flavors.

If you want to know for sure it wasn't the additives in them you could try their cinnanon(sp?)flavor altoids.

If ya get sick it probably the additives ~if not it's probably the peppermint.

I don't think you want to take a chance on being so sick again but this was the only thought in my lyme brain today [Smile]

Hope youre feeling better tree [group hug]
Dana

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AliG
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Antibacterial Treatment
Treatment Options - Treatment Information

For The Treatment Of Bacterial Dysbiosis, Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), Bacterial Overgrowth




The Problem

Bacterial dysbiosis is a common finding among environmental illness sufferers going by results from stool analysis, organic acid testing, hydrogen breath tests and gut fermentation profiles reported in lay literature.

There is also a growing body of research linking small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome1, 2, 3.

Given these findings it's a good idea to have one or more of the lab tests mentioned above to determine if you have a bacterial overgrowth problem as treating this may improve your overall condition considerably. To read more about these lab tests click here.


Treating Bacterial Dysbiosis

There are many options available for treating bacterial dysbiosis but it generally boils down to a change in diet and/or taking an anti-bacterial agent along with probiotics/prebiotics.

All available research points to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) being the problem in environmental illnesses so we'll concentrate on this.


Diet

According to Dr. Leo Galland, a specialist in dysbiosis related illness, the best diet to aid in the treatment of SIBO is very similar to that used to treat yeast overgrowth.

This being a diet free of simple sugars and grains/cereals and low in fruit and starchy vegetables depending on individual tolerance.

This diet restricts the nutrition available for bacteria in the upper GI tract to proliferate and reduces the excess alcohols and organic acids that are produced as a result of bacterial fermentation.

See the anti-fungal page for more details on the low carb diet.

Anti-Microbial Treatment

There are basically two options when it comes to eradicating bacterial overgrowth, antibiotic medication or natural antibiotic substances.

The two can be combined however and often are, to good effect.

It usually takes a period of several months or more to get a bacterial overgrowth under control so the risk/benefit profile of potential treatment must be considered.

For this reason the use of natural substances with fewer side-effects than medications is particularly appealing.

There are a few specific medications that are commonly used in the treatment of SIBO and a huge number of natural substances that can potentially be used.

We'll look at some of the most common medications and natural antibiotics in more detail now.


Antibiotic Medications

Antibiotic medications can be seen as a double-edged sword.

They have the potential to both cause and treat intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

When dealing with SIBO with antibiotic medications it is important to know how they will effect beneficial species of bacteria in the intestines.

Some broad spectrum medications may cause more harm than good, wiping out more of the beneficial bacteria.

For this reason, specific medications targetting only the pathogenic bacteria causing the problem are used as much as possible.


Metronidazole
Metronidazole appears to be the drug of choice for treating most cases of SBBO judging by reports from physicians and the scientific literature.

There have been a number of studies showing metronidazole to be effective in treating SIBO4, 5.

Mitronidazole is extremely effective against anerobic bacteria but has little effect on aerobes.

The most common side-effects of use involve the gastrointestinal tract with nausea being the most common and diarrhea and abdominal discomfort frequently occuring.

Another side-effect listed is the subsequent growth of candida in the vagina, so it is safe to say candida growth in the intestines may present as well.

When using mitronidazole or any other antibacterial it is important to use probiotics and possibly anti-fungal agents concurrantly to avoid candida overgrowth.


Tetracycline
Although tetracycline is likely the cause of a large number of cases of both bacterial and fungal dysbiosis due to its broad spectrum of action killing of resident flora, it is sometimes necessary to use it in the treatment of SIBO if other more focused antibiotics aren't effective against an identified pathogen.

It is especially important to reinoculate the intestines with friendly bacteria when tetracycline is used because of the way it indiscriminantly kills off friendly bacteria as well as the offending organisms.


Ciprofloxacin
Ciprofloxacin is the most common drug used when an overgrowth of aerobic bacteria such as enterobacter sp. or klebsiella oxytoca is present for example.

Ciprofloaxacin is very specific and very powerful at killing aerobes while having no effect on anerobes.

Side-effects from ciprofloaxacin encountered by patients in order of frequency are nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), liver function tests abnormal (1.3%), vomiting (1.0%), and rash (1.0%).

However where dysbiosis patients are concerned GI and liver related side-effects due to the poor health of these organs/tissues in patients.


Herbal/Natural Antibiotics

Natural antibiotics substances have a number of advantages over drug therapy.

The two main ones being the lower incidence of side-effects and the cheaper cost of treatment.

This is an important factor when you consider that treatment for SIBO can often take a long period of time.

Here are some of the most common natural antibiotics used to treat SIBO.


Grapefruit Seed Extract (GSE)
This bitter herb is widely used by naturopaths and alternative minded doctors to treat SIBO and other GI infections.

Lab testing has shown it to be effective against a long list of microorganisms including Giardia lamblia, Proteus vulgaris, E.coli, Aspergillus parasiticus, Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus.

GSE is especially useful where infecting microbe cannot be determined as it is effective against such a wide range of pathogens.

Another advantage is that it is effective for controlling diarrhea.

GSE generally comes in either capsules, good if you can't stand the taste) or in liquid concentrate form. As low a dose as 2-4 drops in 4oz water or juice twice daily can be effective.


Garlic (Allium sativum)
Garlic is arguably the most famous natural antibiotic.

In World War II it was used by the Russians to treat typhus, dysentry, septic poisoning and gangrene in batle wounds when they ran out of penicillin.

This gained it the nickname 'Russian penicillin'.

Garlic's antimicrobial activity is derived from several compounds, the most important of which is allicin.

Studies have found garlic to be effective in combatiing infections with bacillus, brucella, citrobacter, E.coli, hafnia, klebsiella, Salmonella typhi, shigella, Vibrio chlorae and various species of staph and strep.

Garlic can also be useful for relieving gas pains and as an antispasmodic.

It is most effective when taken raw, either eaten with food or pressed into a juice.

Many people find this isn't acceptable due to the taste/smell or the fact that it may sting the GI tract, especially if it is irritated. If this is the case it is available in capsules.

To combat SIBO 2-3 capsules, 3 times daily would be a reasonable dose.


Ginger
Research has shown that ginger possesses inhibitory action against a variety of pathogenic bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, E.coli, Salmonella and Steptococcus viridans.

Also of benefit in treating bacterial dysbiosis is the fact that ginger acts as a prebiotic, encouraging the growth of friendly bacteria like Lactobacilli sp.

Ginger also has a number of other properties that make it beneficial for treating SIBO and associated problems.

For instance ginger is known to be very high in anti-oxidants which will make it useful for reducing inflammation and other problems associated with the oxidative stress that is commonly seen in environmental illnesses6.

Ginger has also been proven to be effective for treating nausea and vomiting from a variety of causes which is again relevant to bacterial dysbiosis and environmental illnesses7.


Olive Leaf Extract
Olive leaf extract has a broad antimicrobial action and is often used by alternative medicine practioners to treat gut dysbiosis, chronic fatigue syndrome and irritable bowel syndrome amongst other things.

In one study olive leaf extract was shown to completely destroy E.coli cells at a very low concentration of only 0.6%8. Like ginger it has the benefit of promoting the growth of friendly bacteria as well as killing pathogenic bacteria due to its high content of fructooligosaccharides (FOS).


Peppermint
Peppermint, in the form of enteric coated capsules, has been shown in clinical studies to significantly improve IBS symptoms due to small bowel bacterial overgrowth.

In one case study significant improvement was seen both in symptoms reported by the patient and on hydrogen breath analysis, indicating a decrease in small bowel bacteria1.


Peppermint also has significant anti-oxidant activity6 and known to enhance digestion by increasing stomach acid production.

Other benefits derive from its ability to slightly anesthetize mucous membranes thus making it useful for digestive problems in general by calming the GI tract.

Specific problems that can benefit are nausea, indigestion and diarrhea.


Berberine
The alkaloid berberine is the active compound found in goldenseal, oregon grape root, barberry and Chinese goldthread.

It's included here seperately as it is commonly available as pure berberine extract. Berberine is a strong antibacterial and works by a unique mechanism.

It appears to work by staining microbes to be targets for macrophages (large immune cells that 'eat' pathogens) and by preventing microbes from attaching to cells.

Berberine has been widely studied and shown to have high antimicrobial activity, mainly against Gram-positive bacteria and yeasts9.

It has been found to be most effective against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa S (sensitive), E. coli S, P. aeruginosa R (resistant), E. coli R10.

Berberine is commonly used by doctors treating dysbiosis and is included on many microbial sensitivity tests carried out on stool samples by the major functional medicine labs.


Echinacea
Echinacea contains the antibiotic coumpound echinacoside which has broad spectrum activity and it often compared in potency to penicillin.

This fact is well known in Germany where Echinacea is used to treat bronchitis, tonsilitis, ear infections, wounds and absecesses amongst other infectious diseases.

As well as having powerful direct activity against a wide range of bacteria, echinacea is also a powerful immune-stimulator.

It works to improve the body's defenses by three methods. Firstly it contains a substance known as echinacein that deactivates the tissue-dissolving enzyme used by bacteria to spread and infect other tissues, thus preventing them from doing so.

Secondly echinacea has been shown in a well respected immunology journal to stimulate production of white blood cells and phagocytes and increase macrophage activity.

Finally echinacea has the ability to significantly boost production of infection-fighting T-lymphocytes.

Not only that but it was found to do this significantly better than many standard immune-supportive drugs.

This herb is best taken in liquid or capsule form and should not be taken for longer than 8 weeks at a time.

For treating SIBO it can be effective when rotated with some of the other natural antibacterials.


Probiotics

It is a good idea that as the bacterial overgrowth is being treated probiotic bacteria are consumed to take the place of the pathogenic colonies and prevent recurrence or overgrowth of yeast. To learn more about probiotics click here



References

[ 21. September 2007, 10:02 PM: Message edited by: AliG ]

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Note: I'm NOT a medical professional. The information I share is from my own personal research and experience. Please do not construe anything I share as medical advice, which should only be obtained from a licensed medical practitioner.

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sometimesdilly
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phew, ali.

you say WHAT???

hope this mean you are feeling [email protected]!!

[hi] dill pickled

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AliG
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I'm sorry, by the time I finished posting that, I forgot what my point was. I was hoping maybe Tree could figure it out.

I think it had something to do with the die-off of bacteria in the small intestine with regard to peppermint oil capsules.

Maybe it is a herx that Tree's been having and maybe I need to go get me some peppermint.

[confused]

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5dana8
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Thanks AliG [Smile]

Awesome super post!

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5dana8

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AliG
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Thanks Dana! [Big Grin]

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treepatrol
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figure what ali?

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farah
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I have gotten better using primarily an essential oil protocol. The first time people use some of these oils they experience an aggravation of symptoms because the keets hate the stuff. The dormant stuff comes out, swarms, and dies. It is probably a combination of the peppermint essential oil irritating the keets and forcing them out of hiding, or them dying after coming out for the sugar in your mouth after being exposed to the oil.

Farah

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treepatrol
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Up

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Brussels
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Peppermint here in Europe is known to keep people awaken (a bit different than coffee though, you get a different type of excitation from it, less high). No wonder people can't sleep after it.

Although I like to eat peppermint leaves in summer, my tummy hates the tea (even though I like the taste). I'll get tummy aches from it. Definitively, the definition 'to help digestion' that is attributted to peppermint is not for me.

Esssential oils of peppermint and extremely strong. I would never recommend it for ingestion.
I rubbed it though on my body, together with eucaliptus and something else (Chinese recipy, google Olbas oil) and it was really helpful.

I guess Farah is right, it does kill stuff, at least when rubbed directly. The main problem though is the cold feeling that comes after. I rubbed it when I got desperate feeling borrelia in my muscles, making my arms numb (hands and whole arms numb), and it certainly killed. The great problem was that I got so chilly after, because I rubbed on my whole back and arms and it took me very long to stop shivering that night.

Now I'm more attentive, and rub only in smaller parts. Rubbing oils reach parts that aren't reached by ingestion, in my opinion. Yes, I rubbed the pure essential oil mix, without dilution.

Another very useful thing to do with peppermint and alike essential oils is accupuncture (with oils instead of needles). It's not so deep as needles but it clearly helps when applied correctly. I did that for YEARS when I suffered from gastritis, not on my tummy, but on the bladder meridian beside my vertebral column, it felt like nirvana sometimes.

Peppermint will excite the accupuncture point, if is that what your body is wanting. If done in the wrong accu points though, the ones that need to have less energy, it will worsen your situation. Energetic tests can tell you what you need in each specific point.

I heard that ticks don't like peppermint and that it's a good idea to plant it in your garden. The only problem is that it is an invasive plant and you'll probably get your garden invaded by it soon.

that's my experience with peppermint.

Selma

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treepatrol
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up for james

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treepatrol
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http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/70336?

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