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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » my report back on Vit D supplementation

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Author Topic: my report back on Vit D supplementation
gwenb
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I started supplementing with Vit D (d3) at the end of February of this year. After 6 weeks of supplementing at 10,000 IU (I don't recommend this high a does for everyone but I had symptoms of vit D deficiency, have avoided the sun for the last 16 years and I don't get nearly enough vit D from my diet)I went it to get my levels vit D tested. I tested at 117 nmol/lt - ideally you want to be at 125nmol - 150nmol.

I can not believe the difference it has made - I hesitate to say amazing, but it is astounding. I am back at the gym and feeling good - not like hell warmed over as I normally do. My heart rate has stabilized, my blood pressure is down etc. Adequate Vit D, aside from dramatically lowering cancer rates, also works as a natural antibiotic. I can say without a doubt, so far, that this is the most important supplement I have taken for Lyme disease.

On a side note - I have had Lyme disease for at least 17 years. Diagnosed 2 years ago with a CDC positive IGENEX test as well as a clinical diagnosis from an MD. I have not taken antibiotics. I was about 65% normal after radically modifying my diet and using herbs and supplements. With vitamin D supplementation I am now at 80-85% - at times feeling completely normal. I have residual tinnitus, trouble with word recall (although less than it was) and some fatigue but the difference from where I was 4 years ago is astounding.

Vit D is a fat soluble vitamin - as such it can be toxic in doses that are too high. Recent peer-reviewed studies, of which there are MANY, have shown that the current RDA which is set at 400 IU is far too low. Many people in N. America, especially Canada, are deficient in Vit D.

Do yourself a favour and check out the benefits of Vit D at www.pubmed.com There is also an excellent article on the benefits of Vitamin D at www.globeandmail.com

Vit D lowers the incidence of MS - I personally believe MS is an undiagnosed bacterial infection - possibly a borrelia infection - anyways, food for thought.

Gwen

[ 01. May 2007, 09:50 AM: Message edited by: gwenb ]

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ByronSBell 2007
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Glad to hear, my LLMD is against the Marshal Protocol which is to reduce the most vitamin D possible. All the people my LLMD has tried it on they have responded negativly or it did nothing at all. He actually recommends to go out and get a tan!
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tsmith
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I am glad you posted. I belong to a forum about Vitamin C. It's controversial, but interesting to read.

Someone mentioned that since supplementing with D3, they have never felt better. I just went to Walgreens today and picked up a bottle.

[Smile]

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Greatcod
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How many weeks before you knew that you were improving?
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Boomerang
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Thanks Gwen. Great post to read. Hubby just started the high does Vitamin D a week ago. Am anxious to see if it helps him.

Yep, LLMD also told hubby to get a tan, Byron. I've heard this from other docs besides hubby's Lyme Doc. Apparently the lack of Vitamin D is chronic these days. We all sit inside under the air conditioning too much. Lol.

How long do you plan to take the high dose, gwen? Are you still being treated with ABX?

Thanks a bunch for posting this.

I agree with you about MS.

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cordor
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Gwen, was wondering if there is a specific brand you recommend. Also, do you take it in pill form or liguid? I continuosly test very low for Vit D, but really don't know best way to treat it and in what form. Thanks for any input.

--------------------
Corinne

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May
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Thanks for posting this, Gwen. I haven't seen the sun in years, thanks to antibiotics, and also have low D levels. I have two doctors who are in disagreement over vit D, and I couldn't decide who to listen to. Now I'll definitely try it. I took three weeks of high dose vit D2 (50,000 IU), but didn't feel a difference. Then I read that D3 is the bioactive form. Great.
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fancykat
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Was there a recent article regarding too much vitamin D supplementation? I can't recall. As with everything, balance is the key. But if anyone knows where this article is, please pass it on.

I've been tested and run on the low side and have been considering adding a D supplement. Just want to make sure I do it safely.

Thanks!

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Boomerang
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Gwen can probably answer this better, but I thought I'd let you know what we got from LLMD.

It is Biotech brand D3-5. 5000 IU

Doseage is one per day, but I'm really not sure for how long.

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gwenb
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Hi all

I have ramped down my intake - I am about 2,000 IU daily, plus I am aiming to get sun (3x per week 90% exposure for 90 minutes in total - don't burn or even tan - just want to get slightly pink). I will retest my levels in 2 months and see where I am and adjust accordingly.

Sunshine is the more efficient and effective way to get D (although in many places in N. America we are too far north to get uvb rays for about 7 months of the year)- plus although the body converts UVB to Vit D very efficiently and in very large dosages (10,000 IU+++ in under 1/2 hour) it is not toxic this way. I am not taking any abx - although mind you I have a feeling that with adequate Vit D levels, abx would be much much much more effective.

It was probably about 3 weeks before I really knew I was improving (supplementing every day). First of all my heart rate, which is fast, went down by about 20%, my resting pulse is now about 67 bpm. Then I noticed that I just felt better - had much more energy. I felt peppy and had zip - so much so that I took out a gym membership and have worked out 7 of the last 10 days - including weights and 30+ minutes of cardio (fairly hard). I don't feel bagged afterwards either, and I don't swell up as I normally do. The swelling in my ankles is down, my blood pressure is heading in the right direction etc.

I originally took vitamin d to reduce my risk of cancer. I have dense breasts, and women with dense breasts have a five-fold increase in getting breast cancer. Vitamin D (again peer-reviewed studies from Montreal) reduces breast density and substantially reduces the incidence of breast, colon and prostate cancers - tons and tons of peer-reviewed studies to back those claims up (vitamin d controls cell proliferation and differentation - which is why it is KEY in reducing cancer rates.)

By staying out of the sun, idiotic advice when taken to the extreme, covering up 90% of our bodies and relying on far far far too low an RDA we have inadvertently created a health crisis. Also, vitamin D is effective not only in treating MS, but also RA and tuberculosis - interesting.

I take SISU brand of vit D3 - it is VERY cheap. I also supplement with cod liver oil. Be careful with cod liver oil, nearly all brands sold in the US have the natural Vit A and D stripped out and replaced with lower level synthetic versions of A and D - insane I know.

I wouldn't touch D2 or any vitamin D analogs - D3 is tres cheap and natural and supposed to be the best to absorb. Do remember that people react differently to vitamins and get your vitamin D levels tested - ideally before and after supplementing. I have posted previously on vitamin D - just need to hit search.

I must say I also got better through a herbal formula that was energy tested for me and which I have been taking for almost 12 months - however the vitamin D improvement was so amazing I just had to share it.

Gwen

[ 01. May 2007, 12:55 AM: Message edited by: gwenb ]

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treepatrol
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quote:
Originally posted by gwenb:
I There is also an excellent article on the benefits of Vitamin D at www.globeandmail.com


Gwen

There is also an excellent article on the benefits of Vitamin D at www.globeandmail.com


The link must be old what was the exact name of artical gwen????


TAKE A PILL

In the winter months, and for those who do not want to expose their skin to sun, Dr. Cannell recommends taking vitamin D supplements. Vitamin D3 cholecalciferol pills are available over the counter in most pharmacies and health-food stores. He suggests taking 2,000 international units of the supplement per day.

It is possible to have too much vitamin D; Dr. Cannell cautions against buying supplements over the Internet. "You can get capsules with 50,000 units. That's a medicine; it's not for supplementation," he says
from:

Vitamin+D search


In the body, vitamin D is converted into a steroid hormone, and genes responding to it play a crucial role in fixing damaged cells and maintaining good cell health. "There is no better anti-cancer agent than activated vitamin D. I mean, it does everything you'd want," said Dr. Cannell of the Vitamin D Council.

from:
Vitamin D Council

Vitamin D3 immunity

1: Inaba Y, Yamamoto K, Yoshimoto N, Matsunawa M, Uno S, Yamada S, Makishima M.

Vitamin D3 Derivatives with Adamantane or Lactone Ring Side Chains are Cell
Type-Selective Vitamin D Receptor Modulators.
Mol Pharmacol. 2007 May;71(5):1298-311. Epub 2007 Feb 26.
PMID: 17325131 [PubMed - in process]

2: Ramer JC, Maria R, Reichard T, Tolson PJ, Chen TC, Holick MF.
Vitamin D status of wild Ricord's iguanas (Cyclura ricordii) and captive and
wild rhinoceros iguanas (Cyclura cornuta cornuta) in the Dominican Republic.
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2005 Jun;36(2):188-91.
PMID: 17323557 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

3: Schauber J, Dorschner RA, Coda AB, Buchau AS, Liu PT, Kiken D, Helfrich YR,
Kang S, Elalieh HZ, Steinmeyer A, Zugel U, Bikle DD, Modlin RL, Gallo RL.
Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a
vitamin D-dependent mechanism.
J Clin Invest. 2007 Mar;117(3):803-11. Epub 2007 Feb 8.
PMID: 17290304 [PubMed - in process]

4: Zhang AB, Zheng SS.
Strong additive effect of calcitriol and cyclosporine A on lymphocyte
proliferation in vitro and rat liver allotransplantations in vivo.
Chin Med J (Engl). 2006 Dec 20;119(24):2090-5.
PMID: 17199961 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

5: Zhang A, Zhang M, Wang Y, Xie H, Zheng S.
Calcitriol prolongs recipient survival by inducing expression of zinc-finger
protein A20 and inhibiting its downstream gene following rat orthotopic liver
transplantation.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol. 2006;28(4):591-600.
PMID: 17190736 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

6: Penna G, Amuchastegui S, Giarratana N, Daniel KC, Vulcano M, Sozzani S,
Adorini L.
1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 selectively modulates tolerogenic properties in
myeloid but not plasmacytoid dendritic cells.
J Immunol. 2007 Jan 1;178(1):145-53.
PMID: 17182549 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

7: Enioutina EY, Bareyan D, Daynes RA.
Vitamin D3-mediated alterations to myeloid dendritic cell trafficking in vivo
expand the scope of their antigen presenting properties.
Vaccine. 2007 Jan 26;25(7):1236-49. Epub 2006 Oct 24.
PMID: 17092617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

8: Chung JW, Jeon JH, Yoon SR, Choi I.
Vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 (VDUP1) is a regulator for redox signaling and
stress-mediated diseases.
J Dermatol. 2006 Oct;33(10):662-9. Review.
PMID: 17040494 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

9: Nijenhuis T, van der Eerden BC, Zugel U, Steinmeyer A, Weinans H, Hoenderop
JG, van Leeuwen JP, Bindels RJ.
The novel vitamin D analog ZK191784 as an intestine-specific vitamin D
antagonist.
FASEB J. 2006 Oct;20(12):2171-3.
PMID: 17012263 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

10: Ito T, Wang YH, Duramad O, Hanabuchi S, Perng OA, Gilliet M, Qin FX, Liu
YJ.
OX40 ligand shuts down IL-10-producing regulatory T cells.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Aug 29;103(35):13138-43. Epub 2006 Aug 21.
PMID: 16924108 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

11: Schauber J, Dorschner RA, Yamasaki K, Brouha B, Gallo RL.
Control of the innate epithelial antimicrobial response is cell-type specific
and dependent on relevant microenvironmental stimuli.
Immunology. 2006 Aug;118(4):509-19.
PMID: 16895558 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

12: Noubir S, Lee JS, Reiner NE.
Pleiotropic effects of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in monocyte cell
regulation.
Prog Nucleic Acid Res Mol Biol. 2006;81:51-95. Review. No abstract available.
PMID: 16891169 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

13: Yamamoto M.
[Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism]
Nippon Rinsho. 2006 Jun 28;Suppl 2:37-42. Review. Japanese. No abstract
available.
PMID: 16817345 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

14: McCurry KR, Colvin BL, Zahorchak AF, Thomson AW.
Regulatory dendritic cell therapy in organ transplantation.
Transpl Int. 2006 Jul;19(7):525-38. Review.
PMID: 16764631 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

15: Stio M, Martinesi M, Bruni S, Treves C, d'Albasio G, Bagnoli S, Bonanomi
AG.
Interaction among vitamin D(3) analogue KH 1060, TNF-alpha, and vitamin D
receptor protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of inflammatory bowel
disease patients.
Int Immunopharmacol. 2006 Jul;6(7):1083-92. Epub 2006 Feb 23.
PMID: 16714211 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

16: Yanagi T, Shibaki A, Tsuji-Abe Y, Yokota K, Shimizu H.
Epidermodysplasia verruciformis and generalized verrucosis: the same disease?
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2006 May;31(3):390-3. Review.
PMID: 16681585 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

17: Vierboom M, Johnsson C, 't Hart B, Jonker M.
Monotherapy with the vitamin D analogue MC1288 does not result in prolonged
kidney allograft survival in rhesus monkeys.
Transpl Int. 2006 May;19(5):396-403.
PMID: 16623875 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

18: Hamamoto H, Kusudo T, Urushino N, Masuno H, Yamamoto K, Yamada S, Kamakura
M, Ohta M, Inouye K, Sakaki T.
Structure-function analysis of vitamin D 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) by
site-directed mutagenesis: amino acid residues responsible for species-based
difference of CYP24A1 between humans and rats.
Mol Pharmacol. 2006 Jul;70(1):120-8. Epub 2006 Apr 14.
PMID: 16617161 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

19: Muthian G, Raikwar HP, Rajasingh J, Bright JJ.
1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin-D3 modulates JAK-STAT pathway in IL-12/IFNgamma axis
leading to Th1 response in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.
J Neurosci Res. 2006 May 15;83(7):1299-309.
PMID: 16547967 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

20: Imazeki I, Matsuzaki J, Tsuji K, Nishimura T.
Immunomodulating effect of vitamin D3 derivatives on type-1 cellular immunity.
Biomed Res. 2006 Feb;27(1):1-9.
PMID: 16543659 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

21: Ma Y, Khalifa B, Yee YK, Lu J, Memezawa A, Savkur RS, Yamamoto Y,
Chintalacharuvu SR, Yamaoka K, Stayrook KR, Bramlett KS, Zeng QQ, Chandrasekhar
S, Yu XP, Linebarger JH, Iturria SJ, Burris TP, Kato S, Chin WW, Nagpal S.
Identification and characterization of noncalcemic, tissue-selective,
nonsecosteroidal vitamin D receptor modulators.
J Clin Invest. 2006 Apr;116(4):892-904. Epub 2006 Mar 9.
PMID: 16528410 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

22: Liu PT, Stenger S, Li H, Wenzel L, Tan BH, Krutzik SR, Ochoa MT, Schauber
J, Wu K, Meinken C, Kamen DL, Wagner M, Bals R, Steinmeyer A, Zugel U, Gallo RL,
Eisenberg D, Hewison M, Hollis BW, Adams JS, Bloom BR, Modlin RL.
Toll-like receptor triggering of a vitamin D-mediated human antimicrobial
response.
Science. 2006 Mar 24;311(5768):1770-3. Epub 2006 Feb 23.
PMID: 16497887 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

23: Ivanov AP, Dragunsky EM, Chumakov KM.
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin d3 enhances systemic and mucosal immune responses to
inactivated poliovirus vaccine in mice.
J Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;193(4):598-600. Epub 2006 Jan 12.
PMID: 16425140 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

24: Sadeghi K, Wessner B, Laggner U, Ploder M, Tamandl D, Friedl J, Zugel U,
Steinmeyer A, Pollak A, Roth E, Boltz-Nitulescu G, Spittler A.
Vitamin D3 down-regulates monocyte TLR expression and triggers
hyporesponsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns.
Eur J Immunol. 2006 Feb;36(2):361-70.
PMID: 16402404 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

25: Yamamoto H, Tani Y, Kobayashi K, Taketani Y, Sato T, Arai H, Morita K,
Miyamoto K, Pike JW, Kato S, Takeda E.
Alternative promoters and renal cell-specific regulation of the mouse type IIa
sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter gene.
Biochim Biophys Acta. 2005 Dec 30;1732(1-3):43-52. Epub 2005 Dec 13.
PMID: 16380173 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

26: Wu ZL, Bartleson CJ, Ham AJ, Guengerich FP.
Heterologous expression, purification, and properties of human cytochrome P450
27C1.
Arch Biochem Biophys. 2006 Jan 1;445(1):138-46. Epub 2005 Nov 28.
PMID: 16360114 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

27: Sato K.
[Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism]
Nippon Rinsho. 2005 Oct;63 Suppl 10:347-51. Review. Japanese. No abstract
available.
PMID: 16279660 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

28: Cantorna MT, Mahon BD.
D-hormone and the immune system.
J Rheumatol Suppl. 2005 Sep;76:11-20.
PMID: 16142846 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

29: Helming L, Bose J, Ehrchen J, Schiebe S, Frahm T, Geffers R, Probst-Kepper
M, Balling R, Lengeling A.
1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a potent suppressor of interferon
gamma-mediated macrophage activation.
Blood. 2005 Dec 15;106(13):4351-8. Epub 2005 Aug 23.
PMID: 16118315 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

30: Ernest Dodd M, Ristich VL, Ray S, Lober RM, Bollag WB.
Regulation of protein kinase D during differentiation and proliferation of
primary mouse keratinocytes.
J Invest Dermatol. 2005 Aug;125(2):294-306.
PMID: 16098040 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

31: Murillo G, Mehta RG.
Chemoprevention of chemically-induced mammary and colon carcinogenesis by
1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D5.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2005 Oct;97(1-2):129-36. Epub 2005 Jul 26.
PMID: 16051482 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

32: Hallal-Calleros C, Agramonte-Hevia J, Garay-Canales C, Oliver JM,
Guerra-Araiza C, Heras D, Camacho-Arroyo I, Soto-Cruz I, Ortega E.
Syk and Lyn phosphorylation induced by FcgammaRI and FgammaRII crosslinking is
determined by the differentiation state of U-937 monocytic cells.
Immunol Lett. 2005 Jul 15;99(2):169-79. Epub 2005 Mar 17.
PMID: 16009267 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

33: Amuchastegui S, Daniel KC, Adorini L.
Inhibition of acute and chronic allograft rejection in mouse models by BXL-628,
a nonhypercalcemic vitamin D receptor agonist.
Transplantation. 2005 Jul 15;80(1):81-7.
PMID: 16003237 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

34: Verminnen K, Loock MV, Cox E, Goddeeris BM, Vanrompay D.
Protection of turkeys against Chlamydophila psittaci challenge by DNA and rMOMP
vaccination and evaluation of the immunomodulating effect of 1
alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3).
Vaccine. 2005 Aug 22;23(36):4509-16.
PMID: 16002193 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

35: Gombart AF, Borregaard N, Koeffler HP.
Human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is a direct target of the
vitamin D receptor and is strongly up-regulated in myeloid cells by
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
FASEB J. 2005 Jul;19(9):1067-77.
PMID: 15985530 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

36: Rajapakse R, Mousli M, Pfaff AW, Uring-Lambert B, Marcellin L, Bronner C,
Jeanblanc M, Villard O, Letscher-Bru V, Klein JP, Candolfi E.
1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces splenocyte apoptosis and enhances BALB/c mice
sensitivity to toxoplasmosis.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2005 Jul;96(2):179-85.
PMID: 15939587 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

37: Chen L, Cencioni MT, Angelini DF, Borsellino G, Battistini L, Brosnan CF.
Transcriptional profiling of gamma delta T cells identifies a role for vitamin
D in the immunoregulation of the V gamma 9V delta 2 response to
phosphate-containing ligands.
J Immunol. 2005 May 15;174(10):6144-52.
PMID: 15879110 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

38: Daniel C, Schlauch T, Zugel U, Steinmeyer A, Radeke HH, Steinhilber D,
Stein J.
22-ene-25-oxa-vitamin D: a new vitamin D analogue with profound
immunosuppressive capacities.
Eur J Clin Invest. 2005 May;35(5):343-9.
PMID: 15860047 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

39: Stefanovic V, Djordjevic V, Ivic M, Mitic-Zlatkovic M, Vlahovic P.
Lymphocyte PC-1 activity in patients on maintenance haemodialysis treated with
human erythropoietin and 1-alpha-D3.
Ann Clin Biochem. 2005 Jan;42(Pt 1):55-60.
PMID: 15802034 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

40: Ren S, Nguyen L, Wu S, Encinas C, Adams JS, Hewison M.
Alternative splicing of vitamin D-24-hydroxylase: a novel mechanism for the
regulation of extrarenal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D synthesis.
J Biol Chem. 2005 May 27;280(21):20604-11. Epub 2005 Mar 23.
PMID: 15788398 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

41: Ferguson GW, Gehrmann WH, Karsten KB, Landwer AJ, Carman EN, Chen TC,
Holick MF.
Ultraviolet exposure and vitamin D synthesis in a sun-dwelling and a
shade-dwelling species of Anolis: are there adaptations for lower ultraviolet B
and dietary vitamin D3 availability in the shade?
Physiol Biochem Zool. 2005 Mar-Apr;78(2):193-200. Epub 2005 Feb 25.
PMID: 15778939 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

42: Abe D, Sakaki T, Kusudo T, Kittaka A, Saito N, Suhara Y, Fujishima T,
Takayama H, Hamamoto H, Kamakura M, Ohta M, Inouye K.
Metabolism of 2 alpha-propoxy-1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 2
alpha-(3-hydroxypropoxy)-1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by human CYP27A1 and
CYP24A1.
Drug Metab Dispos. 2005 Jun;33(6):778-84. Epub 2005 Mar 11.
PMID: 15764712 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

43: Meindl S, Rot A, Hoetzenecker W, Kato S, Cross HS, Elbe-Burger A.
Vitamin D receptor ablation alters skin architecture and homeostasis of
dendritic epidermal T cells.
Br J Dermatol. 2005 Feb;152(2):231-41.
PMID: 15727633 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

44: Wissing KM, Broeders N, Moreno-Reyes R, Gervy C, Stallenberg B, Abramowicz
D.
A controlled study of vitamin D3 to prevent bone loss in renal-transplant
patients receiving low doses of steroids.
Transplantation. 2005 Jan 15;79(1):108-15.
PMID: 15714177 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

45: Moed H, Stoof TJ, Boorsma DM, von Blomberg BM, Gibbs S, Bruynzeel DP,
Scheper RJ, Rustemeyer T.
Identification of anti-inflammatory drugs according to their capacity to
suppress type-1 and type-2 T cell profiles.
Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Dec;34(12):1868-75.
PMID: 15663561 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

46: Ochiai E, Miura D, Eguchi H, Ohara S, Takenouchi K, Azuma Y, Kamimura T,
Norman AW, Ishizuka S.
Molecular mechanism of the vitamin D antagonistic actions of
(23S)-25-dehydro-1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3-26,23-lactone depends on the primary
structure of the carboxyl-terminal region of the vitamin d receptor.
Mol Endocrinol. 2005 May;19(5):1147-57. Epub 2005 Jan 13.
PMID: 15650022 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

47: Cantorna MT, Zhu Y, Froicu M, Wittke A.
Vitamin D status, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and the immune system.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6 Suppl):1717S-20S. Review.
PMID: 15585793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

48: Pollmann A, Kabisch H, Block A, Muller J, Hellwinkel OJ.
Limited specificity of promoter constructs for gene therapy in osteosarcoma.
Int J Mol Med. 2004 Oct;14(4):737-42.
PMID: 15375610 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

49: Kusudo T, Sakaki T, Abe D, Fujishima T, Kittaka A, Takayama H, Hatakeyama
S, Ohta M, Inouye K.
Metabolism of A-ring diastereomers of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by CYP24A1.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2004 Sep 3;321(4):774-82.
PMID: 15358094 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

50: Perakyla M, Molnar F, Carlberg C.
A structural basis for the species-specific antagonism of 26,23-lactones on
vitamin D signaling.
Chem Biol. 2004 Aug;11(8):1147-56.
PMID: 15324816 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

51: Wang TT, Nestel FP, Bourdeau V, Nagai Y, Wang Q, Liao J, Tavera-Mendoza L,
Lin R, Hanrahan JW, Mader S, White JH.
Cutting edge: 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is a direct inducer of antimicrobial
peptide gene expression.
J Immunol. 2004 Sep 1;173(5):2909-12. Erratum in: J Immunol. 2004 Nov
15;173(10):following 6489. Hanrahan, JH [corrected to Hanrahan, JW].
PMID: 15322146 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

52: Arlt W, Hewison M.
Hormones and immune function: implications of aging.
Aging Cell. 2004 Aug;3(4):209-16. Review.
PMID: 15268754 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

53: Sato H, Nakayama Y, Yama****a C, Uno H.
Anti-inflammatory effects of tacalcitol (1,24(R)(OH)2D3, TV-02) in the skin of
TPA-treated hairless mice.
J Dermatol. 2004 Mar;31(3):200-17.
PMID: 15187340 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

54: Hultgren C, Desombere I, Leroux-Roels G, Quiroga JA, Carreno V, Nilsson B,
Weiland O, Sallberg M.
Evidence for a relation between the viral load and genotype and hepatitis C
virus-specific T cell responses.
J Hepatol. 2004 Jun;40(6):971-8.
PMID: 15158338 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

55: Chandra G, Selvaraj P, Jawahar MS, Banurekha VV, Narayanan PR.
Effect of vitamin D3 on phagocytic potential of macrophages with live
Mycobacterium tuberculosis and lymphoproliferative response in pulmonary
tuberculosis.
J Clin Immunol. 2004 May;24(3):249-57.
PMID: 15114055 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

56: Hmama Z, Sendide K, Talal A, Garcia R, Dobos K, Reiner NE.
Quantitative analysis of phagolysosome fusion in intact cells: inhibition by
mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and rescue by an 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin
D3-phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.
J Cell Sci. 2004 Apr 15;117(Pt 10):2131-40.
PMID: 15090599 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

57: Zhang AB, Zheng SS, Jia CK, Wang Y.
Role of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in preventing acute rejection of allograft
following rat orthotopic liver transplantation.
Chin Med J (Engl). 2004 Mar;117(3):408-12.
PMID: 15043782 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

58: Adorini L, Giarratana N, Penna G.
Pharmacological induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T
cells.
Semin Immunol. 2004 Apr;16(2):127-34. Review.
PMID: 15036236 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

59: Yamasaki T, Izumi S, Ide H, Ohyama Y.
Identification of a novel rat microsomal vitamin D3 25-hydroxylase.
J Biol Chem. 2004 May 28;279(22):22848-56. Epub 2004 Mar 16.
PMID: 15026419 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

60: Egawa K, Ono T.
Topical vitamin D3 derivatives for recalcitrant warts in three
immunocompromised patients.
Br J Dermatol. 2004 Feb;150(2):374-6. No abstract available.
PMID: 14996120 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

61: Chang JM, Kuo MC, Kuo HT, Hwang SJ, Tsai JC, Chen HC, Lai YH.
1-alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 regulates inducible nitric oxide synthase
messenger RNA expression and nitric oxide release in macrophage-like RAW 264.7
cells.
J Lab Clin Med. 2004 Jan;143(1):14-22.
PMID: 14749681 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

62: Sprague SM, Josephson MA.
Bone disease after kidney transplantation.
Semin Nephrol. 2004 Jan;24(1):82-90. Review.
PMID: 14730514 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

63: Tanaci N, Karakose H, Guvener N, Tutuncu NB, Colak T, Haberal M.
Influence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 as an immunomodulator in renal transplant
recipients: a retrospective cohort study.
Transplant Proc. 2003 Dec;35(8):2885-7.
PMID: 14697928 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

64: Decallonne B, Mathieu C.
Defective activation-induced cell death in NOD T lymphocytes:
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 restores defect.
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2003 Nov;1005:176-7.
PMID: 14679054 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

65: Cobbold SP, Nolan KF, Graca L, Castejon R, Le Moine A, Frewin M, Humm S,
Adams E, Thompson S, Zelenika D, Paterson A, Yates S, Fairchild PJ, Waldmann H.
Regulatory T cells and dendritic cells in transplantation tolerance: molecular
markers and mechanisms.
Immunol Rev. 2003 Dec;196:109-24. Review.
PMID: 14617201 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

66: Rhodes SG, Terry LA, Hope J, Hewinson RG, Vordermeier HM.
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and development of tuberculosis in cattle.
Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003 Nov;10(6):1129-35.
PMID: 14607878 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

67: McCarty MF.
A moderately low phosphate intake may provide health benefits analogous to
those conferred by UV light - a further advantage of vegan diets.
Med Hypotheses. 2003 Nov-Dec;61(5-6):543-60.
PMID: 14592785 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

68: Coleman JL, Benach JL.
The urokinase receptor can be induced by Borrelia burgdorferi through receptors
of the innate immune system.
Infect Immun. 2003 Oct;71(10):5556-64.
PMID: 14500474 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

69: Waters WR, Nonnecke BJ, Foote MR, Maue AC, Rahner TE, Palmer MV, Whipple
DL, Horst RL, Estes DM.
Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination of cattle: activation
of bovine CD4+ and gamma delta TCR+ cells and modulation by
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2003;83(5):287-97.
PMID: 12972342 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

70: Manavalan JS, Rossi PC, Vlad G, Piazza F, Yarilina A, Cortesini R, Mancini
D, Suciu-Foca N.
High expression of ILT3 and ILT4 is a general feature of tolerogenic dendritic
cells.
Transpl Immunol. 2003 Jul-Sep;11(3-4):245-58.
PMID: 12967778 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

71: Torricelli P, Fini M, Giavaresi G, Giardino R.
Osteoblasts cultured from osteoporotic bone: a comparative investigation on
human and animal-derived cells.
Artif Cells Blood Substit Immobil Biotechnol. 2003 Aug;31(3):263-77.
PMID: 12906308 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

72: Nonnecke BJ, Kimura K, Goff JP, Kehrli ME Jr.
Effects of the mammary gland on functional capacities of blood mononuclear
leukocyte populations from periparturient cows.
J Dairy Sci. 2003 Jul;86(7):2359-68.
PMID: 12906053 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

73: Stammberger U, Kubisa B, Gugger M, Ayuni E, Claudio R, Grodzki T, Schmid
RA.
Strong additive effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and cyclosporine A but
not tacrolimus in rat lung allotransplantation.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2003 Aug;24(2):196-200; discussion 200.
PMID: 12895607 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

74: Agramonte-Hevia J, Hallal C, Garay-Canales C, Guerra-Araiza C,
Camacho-Arroyo I, Ortega Soto E.
1alpha, 25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 alters Syk activation through FcgammaRII in
monocytic THP-1 cells.
J Cell Biochem. 2003 Aug 1;89(5):1056-76.
PMID: 12874838 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

75: Mahon BD, Wittke A, Weaver V, Cantorna MT.
The targets of vitamin D depend on the differentiation and activation status of
CD4 positive T cells.
J Cell Biochem. 2003 Aug 1;89(5):922-32.
PMID: 12874827 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

76: Applegate TJ, Angel R, Classen HL.
Effect of dietary calcium, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, or bird strain on small
intestinal phytase activity in broiler chickens.
Poult Sci. 2003 Jul;82(7):1140-8.
PMID: 12872971 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

77: Penalba A, Neme G, Tirado S.
[Vascular and tissue calcifications of hemodialysis patients]
Nefrologia. 2003;23 Suppl 2:112-6. Spanish.
PMID: 12778866 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

78: Zhang AB, Zheng SS, Jia CK, Wang Y.
Effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on preventing allograft from acute rejection
following rat orthotopic liver transplantation.
World J Gastroenterol. 2003 May;9(5):1067-71.
PMID: 12717858 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

79: Chen H, Hewison M, Hu B, Adams JS.
Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) binding to hormone response
elements: a cause of vitamin D resistance.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 May 13;100(10):6109-14. Epub 2003 Apr 25.
PMID: 12716975 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

80: Sierra J, Villagra A, Paredes R, Cruzat F, Gutierrez S, Javed A, Arriagada
G, Olate J, Imschenetzky M, Van Wijnen AJ, Lian JB, Stein GS, Stein JL,
Montecino M.
Regulation of the bone-specific osteocalcin gene by p300 requires Runx2/Cbfa1
and the vitamin D3 receptor but not p300 intrinsic histone acetyltransferase
activity.
Mol Cell Biol. 2003 May;23(9):3339-51.
PMID: 12697832 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

81: Lowenstine LJ.
A primer of primate pathology: lesions and nonlesions.
Toxicol Pathol. 2003 Jan-Feb;31 Suppl:92-102. Review.
PMID: 12597436 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

82: Zhu KJ, Zhou WF, Zheng M.
[1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its analogues modulate the phagocytosis of
human monocyte-derived dendritic cells]
Yao Xue Xue Bao. 2002 Feb;37(2):94-7. Chinese.
PMID: 12579950 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

83: Van der Stede Y, Cox E, Verdonck F, Vancaeneghem S, Goddeeris BM.
Reduced faecal excretion of F4+-E coli by the intramuscular immunisation of
suckling piglets by the addition of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or
CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides.
Vaccine. 2003 Feb 14;21(9-10):1023-32.
PMID: 12547616 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

84: Adorini L.
1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 analogs as potential therapies in transplantation.
Curr Opin Investig Drugs. 2002 Oct;3(10):1458-63. Review.
PMID: 12431018 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

85: Tagliafico E, Tenedini E, Bergamaschi A, Manfredini R, Percudani R, Siena
M, Zanocco-Marani T, Grande A, Montanari M, Gemelli C, Torelli U, Ferrari S.
Gene expression profile of Vitamin D3 treated HL60 cells shows an incomplete
molecular phenotypic conversion to monocytes.
Cell Death Differ. 2002 Nov;9(11):1185-95.
PMID: 12404117 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

86: Millard AL, Mertes PM, Ittelet D, Villard F, Jeannesson P, Bernard J.
Butyrate affects differentiation, maturation and function of human
monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.
Clin Exp Immunol. 2002 Nov;130(2):245-55.
PMID: 12390312 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

87: O'Herrin JK, Hullett DA, Heisey DM, Sollinger HW, Becker BN.
A retrospective evaluation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and its potential
effects on renal allograft function.
Am J Nephrol. 2002 Sep-Dec;22(5-6):515-20.
PMID: 12381953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

88: Fuster D, Torregrosa JV, Ortega M, Mas M, Martin F, Setoain FJ, Pons F.
[Diagnosis of recurrent secondary hyperparathyroidism using double-phase
99m-Tc-MIBI gammagraphy after total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation]
Nefrologia. 2002;22(4):377-80. Spanish.
PMID: 12369130 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

89: Xing N, L Maldonado ML, Bachman LA, McKean DJ, Kumar R, Griffin MD.
Distinctive dendritic cell modulation by vitamin D(3) and glucocorticoid
pathways.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2002 Sep 27;297(3):645-52.
PMID: 12270143 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

90: Raposo JF, Sobrinho LG, Ferreira HG.
A minimal mathematical model of calcium homeostasis.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Sep;87(9):4330-40.
PMID: 12213894 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

91: Motoyama K, Inaba M, Emoto M, Morii H, Nishizawa Y.
Sarcoidosis initially manifesting as symptomatic hypercalcemia with the absence
of organic involvement.
Intern Med. 2002 Jun;41(6):449-52.
PMID: 12135177 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

92: Pani MA, Regulla K, Segni M, Krause M, Hofmann S, Hufner M, Herwig J,
Pasquino AM, Usadel KH, Badenhoop K.
Vitamin D 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP1alpha) polymorphism in Graves' disease,
Hashimoto's thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Eur J Endocrinol. 2002 Jun;146(6):777-81.
PMID: 12039697 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

93: O'Kelly J, Hisatake J, Hisatake Y, Bishop J, Norman A, Koeffler HP.
Normal myelopoiesis but abnormal T lymphocyte responses in vitamin D receptor
knockout mice.
J Clin Invest. 2002 Apr;109(8):1091-9.
PMID: 11956247 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

94: Mathieu C, Adorini L.
The coming of age of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) analogs as immunomodulatory
agents.
Trends Mol Med. 2002 Apr;8(4):174-9. Review.
PMID: 11927275 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

95: Wang R, Zhang L, Zhang X, Moreno J, Celluzzi C, Tondravi M, Shi Y.
Regulation of activation-induced receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL)
expression in T cells.
Eur J Immunol. 2002 Apr;32(4):1090-8.
PMID: 11920576 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

96: Merida L, Shigetomi M, Ihara K, Tsubone T, Ikeda K, Yamaguchi A, Sugiyama
T, Kawai S.
Effects of vitamin D analog, 22-oxa-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3), on bone
reconstruction by vascularized bone allograft.
Bone. 2002 Feb;30(2):422-7.
PMID: 11856652 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

97: Staeva-Vieira TP, Freedman LP.
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits IFN-gamma and IL-4 levels during in vitro
polarization of primary murine CD4+ T cells.
J Immunol. 2002 Feb 1;168(3):1181-9.
PMID: 11801653 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

98: Cippitelli M, Fionda C, Di Bona D, Di Rosa F, Lupo A, Piccoli M, Frati L,
Santoni A.
Negative regulation of CD95 ligand gene expression by vitamin D3 in T
lymphocytes.
J Immunol. 2002 Feb 1;168(3):1154-66.
PMID: 11801650 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

99: Li C, Wang Y, Gao L, Zhang J, Shao J, Wang S, Feng W, Wang X, Li M, Chang
Z.
Expression of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 and CD14 during differentiation of
HL-60 cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and 1 alpha,
25-dihydroxy-vitamin D(3).
Cell Growth Differ. 2002 Jan;13(1):27-38.
PMID: 11801529 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

100: Redaelli CA, Wagner M, Gunter-Duwe D, Tian YH, Stahel PF, Mazzucchelli L,
Schmid RA, Schilling MK.
1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 shows strong and additive immunomodulatory
effects with cyclosporine A in rat renal allotransplants.
Kidney Int. 2002 Jan;61(1):288-96.
PMID: 11786111 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Thats just the first 100 hundred citations

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
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gwenb
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Here is the link to the Vitamin D article in the Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20070428.wxvitamin28/BNStory/specialScienceandHealth/

Gwen

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Cass A
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Dear Friends,

I have a friend who is really on the Vitamin D bandwagon and thinks that people should get their D-25 test up to 300 ng/mL. Mine, at the highest, was still under 50. The Marshall Protocol says that you should be under 12 ng/mL for your body to attack the Lyme bacteria successfully.

My personal experience was that I got very dry eyes when on 5000 IU a day of Vit D and my hubby had cardiac problems. We both have Lyme. I cut back the Vit D a lot, lowered my light exposure, and started wearing the NoIR glasses, which really helped me. My hubby cut out supplimental Vitamin D, but not Vitamin D rich-foods. He still has an elevated 1,25 D--well outside the normal range. Mine has come way down--almost normal--from quite elevated.

I personally would get the 25-D and 1,25-D tests done before maxing out on Vit D3.

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oxygenbabe
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I find the Vitamin D research fascinating esp. since multiple sclerosis doesn't seem to occur much in sunny hot climates like Carribean etc. And the Vitamin D/cancer connection is very strong.

The worst idea anybody ever had was sunscreen. It took away the ability to make Vitamin D while lettng people stay in the sun longer than their natural mechanisms suggest. If you want to be out in the sun all day, do some uncovered to get Vit D and then wear light covering clothing and a floppy hat, like the Ozzies do.

However I am personally leery of taking huge doses of one single supplement, who knows exactly what the body does with sunlight--it does more than just create D3. How would I know what dose I really need?I could under or overdose.

So I plan to get a lot of sun now that it's warm and I'm even thinking of relocating eventually because I always felt better in sunny climates. You can built up reseves of Vit D in the summer but in northern latitudes in the US you simply don't get enough the sun is too weak in the winter months. Probably one reason the Scandinavians are all blonde as they absorbed more UVB with their light skin and were able to use the bit of sun they got more efficiently. Justa thought.

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Robin123
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Seems strange that there's such a dichotomy between the Marshall protocol low Vitamin D advocacy and the high dosage advocacy. Maybe for different body types?

Also when I read that Vitamin D and cancer are linked, I wonder if there's any connection with lipomas, which is what I've got(fatty tissue tumors).

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gwenb
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I stumbled across the Vitamin D advice, and once I did I couldn't stop researching. I am sure that there will be a massive emphasis on Vitamin D supplementation in the near future, and how authorities have unwittingly contributed to a cancer epidemic by telling people to stay out of the sun.

Gwen

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heiwalove
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hmm. this is really interesting.

personally, though, i am grateful for sunscreen. i have red hair, blue eyes, and EXTREMELY fair skin and i wouldn't be able to be in the sun for more than five minutes without it. i have a good friend with albinism who wouldn't be able to go outside at all if not for sunscreen. trust me, severe sunburn (i've gotten second degree burns before - blisters all over my shoulders and back) is NO fun.

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klutzo
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I live in Florida and spend 20 minutes in the sun at least five times weekly. 20 mins. is all it takes for me to start to burn.

I also take 1,200 units of D3 daily, 1,000 in a gelcap and the other 200 in my multi-vitamin.
Still, I can never get my 25D above 40. I have tried cod liver oil and that did not help either. I am not sure what to do...I am a bit afraid of high doses.

For those of you who decide to go in the sun to get vit. D, please remember not to shower for at least an hour afterwards or you will wash the vit. D off your skin before it's absorbed. That is hard to do here in Florida, where just five minutes in the sun can make you soaking wet with sweat!

Klutzo

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MariaA
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Oxygenbabe,

there's another theory on the alzheimers/tropical countries connection- people tend to eat a lot of turmeric (like in both Indian and Caribbean curries) , which has been proven to cut down on one's chance of developing Alzheimer's.

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kelmo
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Ten minutes in unprotected sun is all you need to fulfill your daily requirement.

But, to start out, that was too much for my daughter, it was making her sick (herx), so she supplemented.

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oxygenbabe
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Klutzo, what do you mean wash the vitamin D off your skin? Just curious. Seems really odd [Smile]

Maria, thanks for that point.

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luvdogs
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I don't feel comfortable with D supplementation because a friend of mine with Lyme supplemented with D and got sicker and sicker following standard ILAds treatment plus D.

Now, even with very very low 25 D he has started on the Marshall Protocol and is completely eliminating sun exposure and seems to be making improvement.

I personally would opt for the middle path and make sure one has their 25-D and 1,25-D tested before supplementing.

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Cass A
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This seems to me to be the most sensible advice. Dr. K recommends in the end pages of his Beyond Antibiotics, that if someone has 1,25-D above 45 pg/mL, they should then do the Marshall Protocol. This is where you KNOW you're bones are being disolved back into your blood, to be deposited in the soft tissue or excreted in the urine. Among other hypervitaminosis-D symptoms. Yuck.

I think some people are fine with D, and some are not. If you're already dealing with Lyme, best to test! The numbers are at the Marshall Protocol site. As I recall, the target for Lymies on 1,25 D is 25 pg/mL, but 12 pg/mL is adequate for health, as this is the active metabolite whereas 25-D is the precursor.

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klutzo
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Oxygenbabe,
Dr. Mercola says vitamin D is made on the skin when you sun yourself, and it takes about an hour for it to be absorbed into your body from the surface of the skin, so if you shower too soon, it gets washed off.

He is very big on raising vitamin D levels, and has studied it a lot, so I presume he knows what he's talking about, but who knows. I would guess swimming would wash it off too.

www.mercola.com

Klutzo

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chootik
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Vitamin D Test

Hi Guys.

Where is the best place to get the 25-D and 1,25-D Test done?

Are these the most acurate tests?

Thanks.

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luvdogs
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Chootik - That is a good question! I have been trying to figure this out! It seems that some doc's know how and where to do it and others get confused. I hear that the 1,25-D needs to be frozen before sent to the lab or something.

OK, OK... I found this document that I had saved in the past. At the end of it you will find how to have it measured. For a more complete document I would suggest doing a search for it on the internet. But it seems to summarize the whole D controversy and concern in a nutshell, whether or not one believes in Marshall's approach. I know very little about him and have chosen not to go on their website. I only get this info from the fringes and I find it very interesting - enough so that I would not want to supplement with D!

Here are parts of the document - I tried to shorten it but I think that it will help:
_______________________________________
Excess of active form of vitamin D (1,25 D) linked to chronic fatigue syndrome,
Lyme disease, fibromyalgia and autoimmune illnesses

by J. C. Waterhouse, Ph.D.


Recent research shows that the active form of the vitamin D hormone (1,25 D) is present in excessive levels relative to the inactive 25 D form in patients diagnosed with a number of inflammatory illnesses, such as certain autoimmune illnesses, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and Lyme disease. Evidence suggests that this is due to unregulated production of 1,25 vitamin D by macrophages in the course of an excessive TH1 immune response. Research indicates that this occurs in response to cell wall deficient forms of bacteria parasitizing immune cells and other tissue.

To ensure accurate results for 1,25 D in the serum, laboratories must freeze the sample for transport and not all labs currently do so.

In healthy people with a normally functioning immune system, the kidneys regulate the amount of conversion of the inactive form of vitamin D (25 D) into the active form (1,25 D), producing whatever amount of the active form the body needs. However, as has been shown in recent research ( 2, 5, 6), several chronic illnesses show evidence of excessive activity of TH1 immune function leading to an overabundance of 1,25 vitamin D produced by immune cells, such as macrophages. This occurs because, as part of the TH1 inflammatory response, activated macrophages convert 25 D to the 1,25 D form (2, 4). For example, in research on sarcoidosis, Marshall et al (4) have found an elevated ratio of 1,25 D to 25 D (D ratio),


The above patterns have been missed previously because there have been a number of problems with vitamin D testing. The most important problem is that most studies have only measured the inactive form of vitamin D (25 D). This tends to reflect the intake of vitamin D and thus largely misses the role of processes that cause dysregulation of the 1,25 vitamin D hormone levels, such as the conversion of 25 D to 1,25 D by macrophages. Also, since the active form of vitamin D (1,25 D) tends to degrade easily, it requires that the sample be frozen for transport, and not all labs do this.

................................................................................... In addition, many of the estimates of serum levels of 25 D may be misleadingly low, since the inflammation from TH1 activity leads to conversion of the inactive 25 D form to the active 1,25 D form, often depleting serum levels of the measured inactive vitamin D (25 D) in order to increase active vitamin D (1,25 D).
........................................................................

Need for More Study of Active Vitamin D (1,25 D) Levels: Multiple Sclerosis and Other Diseases

..................................There has been a growing movement to routinely recommend increased vitamin D supplementation and sun exposure based on the results of studies of levels of the inactive form of vitamin D (25 D).............................

These studies, especially in higher latitudes, may truly reflect vitamin D deficiencies in many people (3)

. .........................................In most people, the kidneys regulate the conversion of 25 D to 1,25 D, so, in the past, many doctors and researchers have concluded that there is no need to measure the 1,25 D form. However, this view is contrary to the U.S. FDA's recommendations for studies of osteoporotic therapies to include testing of the 1,25 D form (14). It would seem wise to also apply this more thorough level of testing to other diseases that may involve vitamin D,.......................... considering the recently widening understanding of its important immune system functions.

...........................It is also important to note that any short term benefit of vitamin D in autoimmune illness may be the result of a phenomenon observed in sarcoidosis patients, who sometimes seem to improve for a period of time when vitamin D is elevated, only to relapse later. This is thought to be due to immunosuppressive effects of higher levels of active vitamin D that lead, over time, to increased levels of CWD bacteria, which cause a worsening of the illness (see reference 17 and below). Also, an approach that has succeeded in achieving remission in more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients has included minimizing vitamin D exposure (2, 5).


************** .................................To illustrate the potential problems with supplementing vitamin D based on the levels of the inactive form of vitamin D (25 D) alone, I will present a brief example of a person disabled with chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia for 18 years and later diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease. Vitamin D testing revealed a borderline low level of the inactive 25 D form of vitamin D (11 mg/ml) despite moderate supplementation (500 IU/d), which might have prompted a recommendation to increase vitamin D intake. However, this patient was actually suffering from vitamin D intoxication, since the level of 1,25 D, the active form, was at 64 pg/ml, well above the Merck Manual upper limit of 45 pg/ml (8).

This level was high enough to potentially decrease bone mineral density (6). Over a period of several weeks of minimizing vitamin D intake and avoiding sun exposure, many of the symptoms of hypervitaminosis D improved significantly (including fatigue, weakness and cognitive problems). ...................Apparently, the 25 D form was low, not because of too low an intake, but because it was vigorously being converted by active macrophages into excessive levels of the active 1,25 D form.


**********.............. show that many patients with a variety of inflammatory illnesses show a similar pattern of elevated active vitamin D and/or an elevated D ratio. It seems to this author, that it might be wise for anyone with a chronic inflammatory illness to keep their vitamin D from food, supplements and sun to a moderate level (e.g., 200-400 IU) until they can get both

***************their 25 D and 1,25 vitamin D levels properly tested at a lab that freezes the sample for transport (e.g., Quest Labs).

This might also apply to those who have symptoms of hypervitaminosis D, which include: fatigue, weakness, mood changes, insomnia, inability to concentrate, sleepiness, irritability, feeling of intoxication, metallic taste, difficulty swallowing, muscle and joint pains and a number of other symptoms (9). .................


In assessing changes in vitamin D intake, it should be remembered that the inactive 25 D form of vitamin D is stored in fat tissue and has a half life of 1-2 months, thus any effects of vitamin D reduction may take weeks to appear. Experience has shown (4, 5) that the higher the 25 D level, the more it fuels the conversion to the active 1,25 D form by the unregulated macrophages in inflamed tissue. Finally, until much more research is done on both active and inactive forms of vitamin D and their role in inflammatory diseases, it seems advisable that any deviation from a moderate average vitamin D intake or, more precisely, a moderate level of active 1,25 D, should proceed only with great caution. And for those illnesses that are similar to sarcoidosis in patterns of vitamin D levels, it may be that one must temporarily minimize vitamin D ingestion and sun exposure in order to reduce an elevated 1,25 D level to a moderate level and thus achieve improvement in symptoms (4, 5 and above example of CFS/FM/Lyme patient).

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gwenb
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I personally find it interesting that most of the recommendations against Vitamin D supplementation come from researchers associated with the Marshall Protocol - a protocol that is controversial to say the least.

There are hundred and hundreds if not thousands of peer-reviewed studies showing the benefits of adequate Vitamin D levels in combating multiple cancers, microbial infections, respiratory infections, metabolic syndrome, MS, RA, tuberculosis, hypertension, cardio-vascular disease and the list goes on.

I encourage everyone with doubts to go to pubmed.com and do a simple search, or google for peer-reviewed articles. I believe by evaluating the extremely compelling data about the dangers of Vitamin D deficiency that many people will come to the conclusion that adequate levels of Vitamin D, which most people in N. America do not have, are necessary to dramatically lower one's cancer risk and improve one's overall health.

Gwen

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believe3
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I was just wondering. Can you herx from Vitamin D3? I started it about 3 weeks ago and I have just got off the worst herx I have had in years. It lasted 3 weeks. I didn't make the connection but I guess it is possible to herx from it.

Right?

--------------------
Love, Merrie
Believe in the power of your spirit..for it will carry you through the darkest hours of your life

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gwenb
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Hi

I am not sure if it is possible to herx from Vitamin D - but I suppose it is, if it is revving up your macrophages which can attack the bacteria.

Gwen

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Boomerang
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Very very interesting thread to read. I think there is a lot to do with the lack of Vit D in all of us. I know my thyroid doc (who is great) always tests mine. He says more and more studies show people are deficient.

Now Hubby's Lyme doc is saying the same thing.

Just think what we've watch on the news for the last twenty years.....melanoma, melanoma, skin cancer, use your sunscreen, etc.

Same with ABX. Cut back on ABX, because we were becoming immune to it.

Yet more and more people are getting cancer.

Just strange.

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jarjar
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The thing about all these studies about need for more Vitamin D is that they don't take into considertation what Dr. M discovered. The testing of D 1.25.

The elevated D 1.25 is what keeping so many ill.

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luvdogs
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Jarjar - That is what my above Waterhouse article summarizes.

That is the part that scares me with people wanting to start D supplements when there is evidence to the contrary. It really seems like they should get the proper testing done before supplementing (1,25-D testing), to make sure their active D is not highly elevated.

I have seen a few cases where people crash hard after initially getting well on D. Does it follow a steroid type course which is what this research says it does. We know Lyme patients do not do well on steroids. It just scares me.

But I do not see that people should do the opposite extreme and avoid sun and all foods with D etc... but just make sure their 1,25-D is not hugely elevated before they start to supplement.

[ 06. May 2007, 01:05 PM: Message edited by: luvdogs ]

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Wallace
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As I mentioned in another posting Buhner is advocating 12000iu of D3 so I am going to try it for a few weeks to see if it makes any difference.

But I am going to taking it the form of vitimin D taken from Cod liver oil as I think that is more likely to be absorbed than taking it in plant form(I have leaky gut).


The naturopath below advocates this this as well in terms of the form taken ie cod liver oil.

Wallace

http://www.mercola.com/2002/feb/23/vitamin_d_deficiency.htm

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Aniek
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Sharing a story from a non-Lymie. She has had very bad insomnia. She lives in a northern state with very intense winters, so she doesn't get sun.

Mid-winter her doctor tested her D levels and found her to be very low. She did massive supplementation until they were high, and then cut back.

Her insomnia is gone from many times a week to once a month.

--------------------
"When there is pain, there are no words." - Toni Morrison

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Myco
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D is a hormone, not a vitamin. Plain and simple. Do you all think taking hormones will help your disease or alleviate symptoms and allow the disease to progress?

Supplementing D is dangerous unless you have both D and 1,25D levels checked first.

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jarjar
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luvdogs Yes I was trying to break down real quick what Joyce W was trying to say to people.

Sometimes seems some people get lost in longer post so I was trying to put it in a nutshell.

Thanks for posting!

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Boomerang
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Supplementing D is dangerous? I'm surprised to hear since Dr. C is recommending it.....

I'm so confused......

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DolphinLady
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When at my worst being in the sun made me very ill. As I began to get better this didn't happen to me anymore.

Now I take D3 and it has helped me. I did however have my levels checked first and I'm working with my llmd on it.

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gwenb
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Supplementing with Vit D is only dangerous for a very small subset of the population. The real, and proven, danger lies in being deficient in it. That said, it is important to get your levels checked, ideally before and after supplementing, because it is a fat soluble vitamin - meaning it can be toxic if the doses are too high.

Just a reminder that the RDA for Vit D which is set at 400 IU is much much much too low to prevent anything but rickets.

Gwen

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Wallace
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A nice sunny book!

sunny thoughts,
wallace

Richard Hobday
Richard Hobday's second book THE LIGHT REVOLUTION: HEALTH, ARCHITECTURE AND THE SUN (Findhorn, 2006) brings together historical evidence, traditional wisdom and the latest scientific findings to explain how to use light - especially sunlight - to promote health in the built environment.

We all need as much natural light as possible, and the best available artificial light when sunlight is insufficient or absent. Correct lighting is not only conducive to human happiness and productivity, but also essential to good health.

None of this is widely understood or simple: hence a book full of constructive information. To miss the holistic health message of this book is to lay yourself open to a host of illnesses, including depression, heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, TB and falling host to MRSA.

Richard has a PhD in Engineering and has been involved in a wide range of projects concerned with sustainability and health in the built environment. His first book was THE HEALING SUN: SUNLIGHT AND HEALTH IN THE 21ST CENTURY (Findhorn, 2000).



The Light Revolution
Paperback: 156 pages
Publisher: Findhorn Press Ltd. (1 Nov 2006)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1844090876
ISBN-13: 978-1844090877

Article reproduced from www.relax-well.co.uk

"An excellent title for an excellent book - showing the way forward for public health and wellbeing"

Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin.

This book is just what we need to start putting right our nation's health - safely and free of charge, meanwhile providing a few home truths for the UK's outdated and misguided health service. Here we have a highly readable, well-researched account of the value of sunlight to human beings throughout the ages right up to the very latest research evidence that may have missed the headlines. In the nicest possible way, `The Light Revolution' serves as a warning to us all - keep out of the sun at your peril.

In this new book Richard Hobday, also author of `The Healing Sun', admirably introduces us to his expert knowledge of how ancient Egyptians and Roman city planners made full use of their understanding of sunlight to promote good public health and specifically to prevent ill-health. He takes us step by step, in layman's language but with thoroughness and a gentle sense of humour, through the more recent historical evidence from the nineteenth century. At that time amidst the new industrial squalor and polluted Victorian cities, scientists, writers, nurses, doctors, philanthropists, architects and all were announcing to the world that sunlight is vital as a disinfectant, restoring very sick patients to good health as well as strengthening the immune system and significantly controlling our physical and emotional wellbeing. It was common knowledge that sunlight is the best disinfectant. In those days the great public health challenges for which sunlight provided a ready answer were infected wounds, pain management and melancholia. Rickets and TB were soon to be identified as preventable and treatable with solar therapy. In 1903, a Nobel Prize for Physiology was awarded to Niels Finsen in recognition for his success in treating TB with ultraviolet light. How is it that nowadays sunlight doesn't even get a mention in the official TB information for the British public?

The real punch to this book is what has gone badly wrong in the last hundred years or so. Whilst building technology and modern medicine have advanced immeasurably, the necessary skills and art of harnessing the sun's power for health have been overlooked. Much of the painstaking research and pioneering achievements have been ``airbrushed out'' of the medical books and courses in architecture - all but forgotten. The human basic biological need for sunlight is not only being ignored and neglected. We can ask ourselves - is it even being denied - cavalier-style - by the government agencies and medical experts whose job it is to protect the nation's health?

Hobday reminds us of those well-intentioned public health campaigns advocating sun avoidance. They could actually be having a harmful effect because sunscreens cut out our ability to make Vitamin D by 90%. Meanwhile, we have known for half a century that exposure to UV light reduces cholesterol levels by 13%, and also lowers blood pressure! Has this artificially created fear of sunlight actually caused thousands of people to die prematurely - many, many more than have died from skin cancer?

Conversely, the author advises us that there is now enough evidence of a link between vitamin D deficiency and the modern ills of cancer, coronary heart disease, diabetes, obesity, depression and numerous others. He calls for health campaigns to actively promote sunbathing, and inform the public of the best ways of doing this safely.

Here is the historical evidence for sunlight therapy in terms of curing rickets and TB during the pre-antibiotic era, along with plenty more evidence about sunlight's other general antimicrobial properties. It was reported to the Royal Society back in 1877 that sunlight kills bacteria. More recently, scientists have concluded that infection with the influenza virus depends on variations in natural sunlight - how could that knowledge be applied to 21st century flu infections such as SARS and bird flu perhaps? It is emphasised, loud and clear, that a consequence of 20th century antibiotics has been a complacent, over-relaxed attitude to infections. The dangers nowadays are that multi-resistant superbugs cling on to the indoor airborne dust that is basically microscopic skin cells but not noticed because of the lack of strong beams of sunlight in our modern buildings! Thankfully, we are given a simple example of some research dating back to 1944 when the dust in dark hospital corners consistently contained bacteria - whereas dust on or near the windows was consistently germ-free. Yes, in sunlight, the bacteria are destroyed and the principle is simple enough for a child to understand.

Now at last we are provided with a wake-up call to fresh air, sunlight and cleanliness, because the same bactericidal principle would apply whether the germs have developed antibiotic-resistance or not. Whether the `contact' theory of germ transmission, or the `droplet' theory or the `dust' theory is now accepted, (or even all three), the fact remains that multi-drug resistant infections are here to stay and we could learn a lot from our forebears who had other methods of keeping people healthy.

Hobday suggests that perhaps a business case could be put forward - where healthy lighting has a value placed on it in terms of hospital running costs, including staff illness and patient outcomes. He also offers some research topics for the future, such as what is the healthier option - sunbeds or vitamin D supplements. After reading this book, the public would want to know, one way or the other. He points out the dangers of shift work and 24 hour lighting in hospitals, linked with medication errors by staff and poor quality of sleep for patients, so there are major opportunities for developing lighting technologies that promote safety and health. We are provided with practical suggestions for doing a light audit, and by applying the basic principles of building orientation, how we can work out for ourselves from maps of our homes, workplaces and hospitals whether we are likely to be receiving enough sunlight.

In terms of town planning and architectural design, we are treated to some superb explanatory diagrams of how buildings should be oriented for maximum benefit inside and outside buildings - and as an interesting contrast to the rest of the book, there are some descriptions and drawings showing the creativity and idealism of 20th century architects who themselves were great sun-worshippers of the day, as examples of Modernism and the new International Style. The author includes some choice quotations that are still worth contemplating today: for example, the great Le Corbusier from 1953:

``Doling out cosmic energy, the sun's effects are both physical and moral, and they have been too much neglected in recent times. The results of that need can be seen in cemetery and sanatorium.''

How ungrateful we are, by staying in the shadows and depriving ourselves of sunlight. We may not in this country have a legal right to sunlight, but this book, the sequel to `The Healing Sun' by the same author, is about revolution. No doubt there will soon be more to tell, when this sorry situation is looked at in a different light. Now we can, if we choose, take some responsibility for our own health and act on the information we have been given in this salutary book. Also we can calmly request that our public buildings are free of harmful pathogens for our health and safety. The onus is on the hospital trusts and employers. Are you still sitting comfortably? Now let's begin the new year afresh, and let some sunlight in. It sounds simple enough, doesn't it?

An excellent book for the new year.

Grace Filby BA (Hons.) Cert.Ed.
Reigate, Surrey
5.12.06

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Wallace
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Three days on 12000iu of fish oil vitamin D nothing to report.

The vitamin D council prefer you to take plant based D3 because of the the vit A in fish oil but there in an article in the may issue of Townsend letter for Doctors disputing this.

Gwen personally I would keep on at the 10000 ie but I am very pleased for you.

Wallace

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Wallace
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http://lassesen.com/cfids/supplements/vitamin_d.htm

for assessing your vit D level.

4000iu have done nothing for me hence raising it to 12000iu.

Wallace

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gwenb
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Hi Wallace

You need to be careful how you get your Vit D. Sunshine is best - getting it from cod liver oil is also good with the exception that to get enough Vit D you would be likely getting far far too much Vit A - also many brands in the US strip out natural levels of Vit A and D in cod liver oil and replace it with synthetic A and D which can be toxic in lower doses.

Gwen

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Wallace
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I am taking solgar natural vitamin D3 1000iu from cod liver oil. Yes it has 3000iu of vit A but Gaby says its O.K in TLFD

Yep most commercial cod liver oil is yuk.

Wallace

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Wallace
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just started taking a weekly dose of solgar natural D3 which is 50,000
iu of vit D3(cod liver) and 150,000iu vit A.

Vit A helps the body absorb Vit D and together they are non toxic in their natural forms argues www.westonprice.org. But we need plenty of sunshine as well he argues.

I had been taking 12,000iu of D3 daily but want to try a larger weekly
dose. Michael Holick argues this.

Previously I have been taking 4000iu of plant D3 to no effect.

I havent had my levels tested. Not feasible locally.

Wallace

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Wallace
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It mentions here taking 90,000iu of Vit A daily.

To be honest I think Weston Price would be even more liberal with regards the safety of cod liver oil but that info isnt on the web, just in his book.

Wallace

Vitamin A, Vitamin D and Cod Liver Oil: Some Clarifications
by Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, PhD
Several visitors to our website have noted inconsistencies in various statements about vitamin A, vitamin D and cod liver oil. These issues revolve around questions of dosage and safety.

Vitamin A Dosage:
We have pointed out that concerns about vitamin A toxicity are exaggerated. While some forms of synthetic vitamin A found in supplements can be toxic at only moderately high doses, fat-soluble vitamin A naturally found in foods like cod liver oil, liver, and butterfat is safe at up to ten times the doses of water-soluble, solidified, and emulsified vitamin A found in some supplements that produce toxicity.(1) Additionally, the vitamin D found in cod liver oil and butterfat from pasture-raised animals protects against vitamin A toxicity, and allows one to consume a much higher amount of vitamin A before it becomes toxic.(1-3) Liver from land mammals is high in vitamin A but low in vitamin D, and should therefore be consumed with other vitamin D-rich foods such as lard or bacon from pasture-raised pigs, egg yolks, and oily fish, or during months in which UV-B light is sufficient to provide one with adequate vitamin D.

As a general guideline, we recommend the following doses of vitamin A from cod liver oil, along with a nutrient-dense diet that contains other vitamin A-rich foods:

Children age 3 months to 12 years: A dose of cod liver oil that provides about 5000 IU vitamin A daily
Children over 12 years and adults: A maintenance dose of cod liver oil that provides about 10,000 IU vitamin A daily
Pregnant and nursing women: A dose of cod liver oil that provides about 20,000 IU vitamin A daily

Individuals under stress or wishing to use cod liver oil to treat a disease condition may take much larger doses, even up to 90,000 IU vitamin A per day, for a period of several weeks.

Vitamin D
The recommended dosages for cod liver oil provide about 500 IU vitamin D for children, 1000 IU vitamin D for adults, 2000 IU vitamin D for pregnant and nursing women and up to 9000 IU for those taking large amounts of cod liver oil to deal with stress and disease.

In 1997, the Food and Nutrition Board of the US Institute of Medicine set the tolerable upper intake level (TUIL) for vitamin D at 2000 IU per day. However, the vitamin D content experts on the Upper Limits Panel objected to this limit, and several prominent vitamin D researchers have called for an upward revision of the limit. Experiments show that even during the winter with a low vitamin D intake, humans will exhaust stores of vitamin D at a rate of 3000-4000 IU per day, an amount that many people require to maintain optimal levels of the vitamin in the blood. Extensive exposure to summer sun at mid latitudes naturally produces levels of vitamin D in the blood equivalent to what is attained by supplementing with a continued daily dose of 10,000 IU, suggesting humans are designed to tolerate such large amounts of vitamin D.(4)

If you are a lifeguard or spend a lot of time in the sun, you do not need to take supplemental vitamin D; however you still need to consume adequate vitamin A. Animal studies show that even moderate amounts of vitamin D increase the body's need for vitamin A, whether the vitamin D is provided in the diet or by UV light (2,5). So, if you cut back or eliminate cod liver oil in the summer, be sure to consume plenty of oily fish, liver, butterfat and egg yolks from grass-fed hens to ensure adequate vitamin A.

For a discussion of Vitamin D Toxicity, see
http://www.cholecalciferol-council.com/toxicity.pdf

This does not mean we do not recommend that some individuals have their vitamin D levels tested. Such testing can be very useful in determining vitamin D status and the effectiveness of cod liver oil or vitamin D supplements.

Cod Liver Oil
As of February, 2005, we recommend the following brands of cod liver oil:

In Stores: Garden of Life, regular dose cod liver oil

By Mail Order:

Dr. Ron's High Vitamin Old Fashioned Blue Ice Pure Cod Liver Oil, 1-877-472-8701, drrons.com
Radiant Life, Premier High Vitamin Cod Liver Oil, (888) 593-8333, radiantlifecatalog.com
Blue Ice, High Vitamin Cod Liver Oil, (402) 338-5551, greenpasture.org
In Europe, Healthspan Ltd., 0800 73 123 77, www.healthspan.co.uk
In Australia, Melrose cod liver oil, email: [email protected]

Note that 1 scant teaspoon of regular dose cod liver oil provides about 5,000 IU vitamin A while 1 scant teaspoon of high-vitamin cod liver oil provides over 11,000 IU vitamin A. This extra vitamin A helps to protect the polyunsaturated fatty acids from becoming oxidized after they are incorporated into the cell membrane.(6) High-vitamin cod liver oil also contains a higher proportion of vitamin D than does regular-dose cod liver oil, which is necessary to balance the vitamin A.

Some of the brands recommended in various articles on our website we no longer endorse because the manufacturer is removing vitamin A out of concerns of toxicity. An adequate dose of vitamin A-reduced cod liver oil may supply more unsaturated fatty acids than is considered safe.

Warning: Many brands of cod liver oil are processed to remove all the vitamins A and D and then have synthetic vitamins A and D added back in. These products should be completely avoided as the synthetic versions of A and D are toxic. For those living in Canada or overseas, where our recommended brands are not available, be sure to contact the manufacturer and inquire whether the A and D in their cod liver oil is naturally occurring or synthetic.

References

1. Myhre, et al., "Water-miscible, emulsified, and solid forms of retinol supplements are more toxic than oil-based preparations," Am J Clin Nutr, 78 (2003) 1152-9.

2. Aburto, et al., "The influence of Vitamin A on the Utilization and Amelioration of Toxicity of Cholecalciferol, 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol, and 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol in Young Broiler Chickens," Poultry Science, 77 (1998) 570-577.

3. Metz, et al., "The Interaction of Dietary Vitamin A and Vitamin D Related to Skeletal Development in the Turkey Poult," J. Nutr. 115 (1985) 929-935.

4. Heaney, Robert P., "The Vitamin D requirement in health and disease," Journal of Steroid Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, 97 (2005) 13-19.

5. Aburto and Britton, "Effects of Different Levels of Vitamins A and E on the Utilization of Cholecalciferol by Broiler Chickens," Poultry Science, 77 (1998) 570-577.

6. Masterjohn, Chris, "Dioxins in Animal Foods: A Case for Vegetarianism," http://www.westonaprice.org/envtoxins/dioxins.html October 17, 2005.




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Copyright Notice: The material on this site is copyrighted by the Weston A. Price Foundation. Please contact the Foundation for permission if you wish to use the material for any purpose.
Disclaimer: The information published herein is not intended to be used as a substitute for appropriate care by a qualified health practitioner.

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Posts: 654 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wallace
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 4771

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Dr Holick recommends a big weekly dose tp remedy a defieciency.

wallace
Vitamin D:
The Underrated Essential
Researcher Michael F. Holick, M.D. shares
his insight into this overlooked necessity

Despite being one of the most crucial components of healthy bones, a
protector against cancer and diabetes, and a valuable component of
the immune system, vitamin D has gone largely unnoticed in the
public eye. To uncover some of the benefits of this underrated
nutrient, Life Extension spoke with Dr. Michael F. Holick, a vitamin
D researcher at Boston University's Medical Center and the author of
The UV Advantage.

Life Extension Foundation: What is the role of vitamin D in the
human body?

Dr. Michael Holick: Vitamin D has a multitude of effects, the
principal of which is the development and maintenance of bone health
from birth to death. In people who are vitamin D deficient, you will
see a wide variety of bone disorders, such as osteoporosis and
osteomalacia-the inability to mineralize bone, causing pain and
weakness.

But while its effect on bones may be its most commonly known
property, vitamin D also has many other subtle but very important
functions. For example, it reduces the risk of diabetes and certain
forms of cancer including ovary, breast, colon and prostate; it has
been shown to improve hypertension; help psoriasis; and it
drastically reduces the risk of heart disease. There are even some
studies that link Alzheimer's disease, depression and multiple
sclerosis to low vitamin D levels.

LEF: How critical is vitamin D for bone development in children?

Holick: In children, vitamin D is critically important. Without it,
you'll have growth retardation, rickets and other skeletal
deformities. In fact, rickets-once considered a disease from a
hundred years ago-is on the rise. Why? There is not enough vitamin D
in breast milk. Children in particular need to get more vitamin D.

LEF: How does the average person get a sufficient supply of vitamin
D?

Holick: Sunlight is a crucial factor in maintaining proper levels of
vitamin D. It's so important that our body-our skin-makes vitamin D
when exposed to UVB radiation from the sun. Studies have shown that
between 80% and 100% of the daily requirement for vitamin D comes
simply from being in sunlight for about 15 minutes a day. One
problem with that is, according to modern perception sun exposure
is "bad" because of the risk of cancer. We stay indoors more often,
wear sunscreen-things that don't allow us to get the proper amount
of sun. The bottom line is, the public needs to be aware that
adequate sunlight is an important part of good health.

LEF: Some people just don't have the ability to get adequate
sunlight. Are there any foods that are rich in vitamin D?

Holick: Herein lies the problem-not many. Few foods actually contain
any appreciable level of vitamin D naturally. Certain fish, like
mackerel and salmon have some, as do oils from fish like cod, shark
and tuna. Meats and egg yolks also have some vitamin D in them, but
very little. Of course fortified milk has vitamin D, but the amounts
in every container are highly variable-it simply might not have as
much as the label says that it does. Besides that, in order to get a
high enough level of vitamin D from milk you would have to drink
about 10 glasses of it every day. That's a lot of milk.

LEF: What about tanning salons? Can your body make vitamin D from
the light of a tanning bed?

Holick: Yes. Research has shown that certain types of low pressure
lamps supply UVB radiation-which is exactly what you need to make
vitamin D. But not all places use those, so you have to check first.

LEF: Who is most at risk for having a vitamin D deficiency?

Holick: While anyone who doesn't get enough exposure to sunlight or
supplement their diet is at risk, studies from the Center for
Disease Control (CDC) have shown that African Americans suffer from
vitamin D deficiencies the most. As many as 42% of all African
Americans ages 15 to 45 have low levels of vitamin D. In fact, they
need five to ten times more exposure to make the same amount as a
caucasian because the melanin is a sunscreen.

People who live at higher latitudes are also at high risk for being
deficient. We just completed a study in Boston which showed that 36%
of young adults ages 18 to 29 had insufficient levels of vitamin D.
Our subject pool was that of local medical school students and
hospital residents whose work or studies limit their exposure to
sunlight. The bottom line here is, people-especially if they live in
the north or spend most of their time indoors-need to find ways to
get outside and replenish their levels of vitamin D.

LEF: How critical is vitamin D to the functioning of the immune
system?

Holick: In terms of the immune system, vitamin D has extremely
important, yet subtle effects. For example, studies have shown that
people at higher latitudes have a higher rate of multiple sclerosis
(MS)-possibly due to deficiency in vitamin D. In fact, several
animal models have shown that with animals that can be induced with
MS, they will not get MS if treated with vitamin D beforehand.
Another study in Finland found that proper levels of vitamin D
actually reduce the occurrence of Type 1 diabetes in children by
about 80%.

LEF: How do vitamin D supplements fit into all of this?

Holick: Supplements can be an excellent source for vitamin D. The
problem is, many people only take a multivitamin and if you're
already low in vitamin D, your body needs more than the 400 IU it
can get from a single multivitamin. While 400 IU may be fine for
some people, those who do not have adequate sun exposure need more-
about 1000 IU a day to satisfy their body's requirement for vitamin
D. Some moderately deficient people may benefit from even higher
daily doses, but I'd say, 2000 IU is the safe upper limit.

In extreme cases of vitamin D deficiency, some patients will need to
get a prescription to take very high doses 50,000 IU/week for eight
weeks. Why? If you are extremely deficient, taking 400 or even 1000
IU a day would be like putting in a gallon of gas into an empty car
it won't get you very far. You need to fill up your tank to get the
necessary amount.

LEF: Would you say that vitamin D is an underrated vitamin? Why?

Holick: Yes, it is definitely underrated-we simply take it for
granted because it is a factor in our everyday lives. However,
vitamin D is critically important for maintaining normal calcium
levels in the blood and for bone health. Not only that, but we have
found that if blood levels of vitamin D are good, it reduces the
rate of colon cancer by about 50%. In short, vitamin D plays a
crucial role in many metabolic functions as well as neural, cardiac
and muscle function

Posts: 654 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wallace
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 4771

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Wallace     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dr Holick recommends a big weekly dose tp remedy a defieciency.

wallace
Vitamin D:
The Underrated Essential
Researcher Michael F. Holick, M.D. shares
his insight into this overlooked necessity

Despite being one of the most crucial components of healthy bones, a
protector against cancer and diabetes, and a valuable component of
the immune system, vitamin D has gone largely unnoticed in the
public eye. To uncover some of the benefits of this underrated
nutrient, Life Extension spoke with Dr. Michael F. Holick, a vitamin
D researcher at Boston University's Medical Center and the author of
The UV Advantage.

Life Extension Foundation: What is the role of vitamin D in the
human body?

Dr. Michael Holick: Vitamin D has a multitude of effects, the
principal of which is the development and maintenance of bone health
from birth to death. In people who are vitamin D deficient, you will
see a wide variety of bone disorders, such as osteoporosis and
osteomalacia-the inability to mineralize bone, causing pain and
weakness.

But while its effect on bones may be its most commonly known
property, vitamin D also has many other subtle but very important
functions. For example, it reduces the risk of diabetes and certain
forms of cancer including ovary, breast, colon and prostate; it has
been shown to improve hypertension; help psoriasis; and it
drastically reduces the risk of heart disease. There are even some
studies that link Alzheimer's disease, depression and multiple
sclerosis to low vitamin D levels.

LEF: How critical is vitamin D for bone development in children?

Holick: In children, vitamin D is critically important. Without it,
you'll have growth retardation, rickets and other skeletal
deformities. In fact, rickets-once considered a disease from a
hundred years ago-is on the rise. Why? There is not enough vitamin D
in breast milk. Children in particular need to get more vitamin D.

LEF: How does the average person get a sufficient supply of vitamin
D?

Holick: Sunlight is a crucial factor in maintaining proper levels of
vitamin D. It's so important that our body-our skin-makes vitamin D
when exposed to UVB radiation from the sun. Studies have shown that
between 80% and 100% of the daily requirement for vitamin D comes
simply from being in sunlight for about 15 minutes a day. One
problem with that is, according to modern perception sun exposure
is "bad" because of the risk of cancer. We stay indoors more often,
wear sunscreen-things that don't allow us to get the proper amount
of sun. The bottom line is, the public needs to be aware that
adequate sunlight is an important part of good health.

LEF: Some people just don't have the ability to get adequate
sunlight. Are there any foods that are rich in vitamin D?

Holick: Herein lies the problem-not many. Few foods actually contain
any appreciable level of vitamin D naturally. Certain fish, like
mackerel and salmon have some, as do oils from fish like cod, shark
and tuna. Meats and egg yolks also have some vitamin D in them, but
very little. Of course fortified milk has vitamin D, but the amounts
in every container are highly variable-it simply might not have as
much as the label says that it does. Besides that, in order to get a
high enough level of vitamin D from milk you would have to drink
about 10 glasses of it every day. That's a lot of milk.

LEF: What about tanning salons? Can your body make vitamin D from
the light of a tanning bed?

Holick: Yes. Research has shown that certain types of low pressure
lamps supply UVB radiation-which is exactly what you need to make
vitamin D. But not all places use those, so you have to check first.

LEF: Who is most at risk for having a vitamin D deficiency?

Holick: While anyone who doesn't get enough exposure to sunlight or
supplement their diet is at risk, studies from the Center for
Disease Control (CDC) have shown that African Americans suffer from
vitamin D deficiencies the most. As many as 42% of all African
Americans ages 15 to 45 have low levels of vitamin D. In fact, they
need five to ten times more exposure to make the same amount as a
caucasian because the melanin is a sunscreen.

People who live at higher latitudes are also at high risk for being
deficient. We just completed a study in Boston which showed that 36%
of young adults ages 18 to 29 had insufficient levels of vitamin D.
Our subject pool was that of local medical school students and
hospital residents whose work or studies limit their exposure to
sunlight. The bottom line here is, people-especially if they live in
the north or spend most of their time indoors-need to find ways to
get outside and replenish their levels of vitamin D.

LEF: How critical is vitamin D to the functioning of the immune
system?

Holick: In terms of the immune system, vitamin D has extremely
important, yet subtle effects. For example, studies have shown that
people at higher latitudes have a higher rate of multiple sclerosis
(MS)-possibly due to deficiency in vitamin D. In fact, several
animal models have shown that with animals that can be induced with
MS, they will not get MS if treated with vitamin D beforehand.
Another study in Finland found that proper levels of vitamin D
actually reduce the occurrence of Type 1 diabetes in children by
about 80%.

LEF: How do vitamin D supplements fit into all of this?

Holick: Supplements can be an excellent source for vitamin D. The
problem is, many people only take a multivitamin and if you're
already low in vitamin D, your body needs more than the 400 IU it
can get from a single multivitamin. While 400 IU may be fine for
some people, those who do not have adequate sun exposure need more-
about 1000 IU a day to satisfy their body's requirement for vitamin
D. Some moderately deficient people may benefit from even higher
daily doses, but I'd say, 2000 IU is the safe upper limit.

In extreme cases of vitamin D deficiency, some patients will need to
get a prescription to take very high doses 50,000 IU/week for eight
weeks. Why? If you are extremely deficient, taking 400 or even 1000
IU a day would be like putting in a gallon of gas into an empty car
it won't get you very far. You need to fill up your tank to get the
necessary amount.

LEF: Would you say that vitamin D is an underrated vitamin? Why?

Holick: Yes, it is definitely underrated-we simply take it for
granted because it is a factor in our everyday lives. However,
vitamin D is critically important for maintaining normal calcium
levels in the blood and for bone health. Not only that, but we have
found that if blood levels of vitamin D are good, it reduces the
rate of colon cancer by about 50%. In short, vitamin D plays a
crucial role in many metabolic functions as well as neural, cardiac
and muscle function

Posts: 654 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wallace
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 4771

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Wallace     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Of course taking vitamin D through various means may still not remedy the situation. Then I feel we are talking of an underlying trauma which needs to be dealth with. Body,mind, spirit!

Wallace

Posts: 654 | Registered: Oct 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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