LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » McSweegan at it again

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: McSweegan at it again
nancyb
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 10154

Icon 1 posted      Profile for nancyb     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
http://www.hometownannapolis.com:80/cgi-bin/read/2008/08_03-42/LIF

Pathogens & People: Lyme disease: The good, the bad and the silly
By EDWARD, McSWEEGAN, For The Capital
Published August 03, 2008

Summer is here with its annual flurry of news reports about Lyme disease and tick bites. This year's news is a lot like a newspaper; there's good news, bad news, comics and movie reviews.

First, the good news. Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a slow-release antibiotic formulation that should protect against Lyme disease and a related tick-borne infection called anaplasmosis. Instead of swallowing antibiotics such as doxycycline or amoxicillin for two to four weeks, a single injection of slow-release doxycycline hyclate should provide effective protection or therapy for 19 days. A slow-release skin patch also may be possible and would eliminate the discomfort of a needle.

Now the bad news. The slow-release antibiotic isn't ready for human use yet. That's unfortunate because there's more bad news about Lyme disease. In Maryland last year, reported Lyme cases doubled to 2,576. Counties with increased cases included Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford, Howard and Prince George's. The increase may be due to better diagnosing and reporting. It also may be due to more actual cases because of developments encroaching on woodlands populated by deer and other tick-carrying creatures.

Other states are seeing similar increases. Worse, a more virulent strain of the Lyme bacterium may be spreading through parts of the United States. According to Ben Luft and colleagues at Stony Brook, Long Island, this strain - called OspC Type A - appears to be the most common in the U.S. today, and may be partly responsible for both the increase in cases and the seriousness of some of those cases. Durland Fish at Yale University suggests changes in climate, tick feeding behavior and the presence of this virulent clone may lead to more severe infections in the Northeast.

It's a little good news and a lot of bad news about an infection that can be prevented, or cured, but which continues to generate great public angst. So on to the comics.

Earlier this year, M.M. Drymon, a self-described historian, published the book, "Disguised as the Devil: How Lyme Disease Created Witches and Changed History" (Kindle, $24.95). The author believes Salem's witches were identified not by the devil's mark but by the Lyme disease skin rash, and their behavior was not supernatural but rather symptomatic of neurological infection.

There's a lot wrong with this theory, but it reminded me of Macbeth's witches concocting potions of "eye of newt and toe of frogge, wool of bat and tongue of dogge." Similarly, some modern-day Lyme enthusiasts like to gather online to hawk the benefits of equally exotic potions such as teasel root extract, colloidal silver and rectal refloridization.

Adding to the humor was Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal who - at the behest of two Lyme groups - started an investigation of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and its treatment recommendations for Lyme disease. (The IDSA takes a dim view of quackery.) In May, Mr. Blumenthal gave up his attempt to overturn evidence-based medicine, but implied the treatment recommendations were tainted by financial conflicts. He offered no evidence of such conflicts, leaving IDSA President Donald Poretz to wonder how the authors of the recommendations could gain financially by discouraging long treatments, expensive drugs and patented diagnostics. IDSA's guidelines remain in effect.

Mr. Blumenthal's actions caught the attention of Congressman Frank Pallone, D-NJ. Mr. Pallone had a $100 million Lyme disease research bill (HR 741) originally drafted by activists, but then decided to hold it up. In May, he announced, "At a time when significant disagreements exist on treatment, I am hopeful that the (IDSA) panel's final recommendations will give us guidance on how best to proceed."

Angry activists quickly descended on his office waving signs that read, "Pallone hates sick people" and "Time to make him pay." If the activists had not created so much controversy there might have been $100 million for Lyme research next year.

Taking solace at the movies, activists cheered a Lyme disease docudrama, which the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases described as manipulative, partisan and prone to conspiracy theory. One of the DVD's physician stars is currently under investigation by the Connecticut licensing board.

So the controversies and antics continue. And that's not helpful to the public. Paul Auwaerter, director of infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins, recently told Baltimore magazine, "I train infectious disease fellows; fellows don't want to see Lyme patients. They don't want to enter this controversial area because it seems like it's just a recipe for headaches." With fewer interested doctors, it's also a recipe for more serious disease.

For some straightforward information about Lyme disease, see Maryland's educational Web site at www.marylandtickoff.org.

--------------------
The Canadian Lyme Disease Foundation www.canlyme.com

Posts: 128 | From Canada | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dmc
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5102

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dmc     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
up for others
Posts: 2675 | From ct, usa | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bettyg
Unregistered


Icon 13 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
breaking this up so we can comprehend...


quote:
Originally posted by nancyb:

http://www.hometownannapolis.com:80/cgi-bin/read/2008/08_03-42/LIF

Pathogens & People: Lyme disease: The good, the bad and the silly


By EDWARD, McSWEEGAN, For The Capital
Published August 03, 2008


Summer is here with its annual flurry of news reports about Lyme disease and tick bites. This year's news is a lot like a newspaper; there's good news, bad news, comics and movie reviews.


First, the good news. Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed a slow-release antibiotic formulation that should protect against Lyme disease and a related tick-borne infection called anaplasmosis.


Instead of swallowing antibiotics such as doxycycline or amoxicillin for two to four weeks, a single injection of slow-release doxycycline hyclate should provide effective protection or therapy for 19 days.


A slow-release skin patch also may be possible and would eliminate the discomfort of a needle.


Now the bad news. The slow-release antibiotic isn't ready for human use yet.


That's unfortunate because there's more bad news about Lyme disease.


In Maryland last year, reported Lyme cases doubled to 2,576.

Counties with increased cases included Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford, Howard and Prince George's.


The increase may be due to better diagnosing and reporting. It also may be due to more actual cases because of developments encroaching on woodlands populated by deer and other tick-carrying creatures.


Other states are seeing similar increases.


Worse, a more virulent strain of the Lyme bacterium may be spreading through parts of the United States.


According to Ben Luft and colleagues at Stony Brook, Long Island, this strain - called OspC Type A - appears to be the most common in the U.S. today, and may be partly responsible for both the increase in cases and the seriousness of some of those cases.


Durland Fish at Yale University suggests changes in climate, tick feeding behavior and the presence of this virulent clone may lead to more severe infections in the Northeast.


It's a little good news and a lot of bad news about an infection that can be prevented, or cured, but which continues to generate great public angst. So on to the comics.


Earlier this year, M.M. Drymon, a self-described historian, published the book, "Disguised as the Devil: How Lyme Disease Created Witches and Changed History" (Kindle, $24.95).


The author believes Salem's witches were identified not by the devil's mark but by the Lyme disease skin rash, and their behavior was not supernatural but rather symptomatic of neurological infection.


There's a lot wrong with this theory, but it reminded me of Macbeth's witches concocting potions of "eye of newt and toe of frogge, wool of bat and tongue of dogge."


Similarly, some modern-day Lyme enthusiasts like to gather online to hawk the benefits of equally exotic potions such as teasel root extract, colloidal silver and rectal refloridization.


Adding to the humor was Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal who - at the behest of two Lyme groups - started an investigation of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and its treatment recommendations for Lyme disease.


(The IDSA takes a dim view of quackery.)


In May, Mr. Blumenthal gave up his attempt to overturn evidence-based medicine, but implied the treatment recommendations were tainted by financial conflicts.


He offered no evidence of such conflicts, leaving IDSA President Donald Poretz to wonder how the authors of the recommendations could gain financially by discouraging long treatments, expensive drugs and patented diagnostics.


IDSA's guidelines remain in effect.


Mr. Blumenthal's actions caught the attention of Congressman Frank Pallone, D-NJ.


Mr. Pallone had a $100 million Lyme disease research bill (HR 741) originally drafted by activists, but then decided to hold it up.


In May, he announced, "At a time when significant disagreements exist on treatment, I am hopeful that the (IDSA) panel's final recommendations will give us guidance on how best to proceed."


Angry activists quickly descended on his office waving signs that read, "Pallone hates sick people" and "Time to make him pay."


If the activists had not created so much controversy there might have been $100 million for Lyme research next year.
***********************************


Taking solace at the movies, activists cheered a Lyme disease docudrama, which the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases described as manipulative, partisan and prone to conspiracy theory.


One of the DVD's physician stars is currently under investigation by the Connecticut licensing board.


So the controversies and antics continue. And that's not helpful to the public.


Paul Auwaerter, director of infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins, recently told Baltimore magazine, "I train infectious disease fellows; fellows don't want to see Lyme patients. They don't want to enter this controversial area because it seems like it's just a recipe for headaches."


With fewer interested doctors, it's also a recipe for more serious disease.


For some straightforward information about Lyme disease, see Maryland's educational Web site at www.marylandtickoff.org.

*********************************************

eddie is up to his old tricks.


IF protest had NOT occurred, the bill would be on agenda!!! that was decided day after protest by pallone's entire committee and idsa panel who made the rules! [puke] [cussing] [toilet] [tsk]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ldfighter
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 9405

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ldfighter     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by bettyg:
breaking this up so we can comprehend...

With all due respect to Betty, no amount of spacing can make this comprehensible. [Wink]

Belittling suffering people by calling them "silly" and "comic" is the hallmark of a personality disorder and is best ignored. Even people who don't know a thing about Lyme can see this isn't coming from a rational place.

Posts: 621 | From US | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
northstar
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 7911

Icon 1 posted      Profile for northstar     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I cant find a link to read others' comments.


All I see is the link to post a comment.

Has anyone found it?

That guy is such a smug toad!

Northstar

Posts: 1331 | From hither and yonder | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
cjnelson
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 12928

Icon 1 posted      Profile for cjnelson     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Notice he did not mention Pam Weintraub's book, Cure Unknown!

For if he had made any light on that book others may also be enlightened! He only chose to shed light on the far right side of the issue - the one that would gather the most snide remarks! Salem Witches!

But he did the nail on the head with THIS one!

quote:
"I train infectious disease fellows; fellows don't want to see Lyme patients.

They don't want to enter this controversial area because it seems like it's just a recipe for headaches."

With fewer interested doctors, it's also a recipe for more serious disease.

Dont we all KNOW this to be true!!! Thanks for the admission of what we have been saying McSweegan!

--------------------
Seeking renewed health & vitality.
---------------------------------
Do not take anything I say as medical advice - I am NOT a dr!

Posts: 830 | From TN | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
feelfit
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 12770

Icon 1 posted      Profile for feelfit     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
nerd, turd, so absurd. A-hole.

ff

Posts: 3975 | From usa | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MM DRYMON
Member
Member # 15783

Icon 1 posted      Profile for MM DRYMON     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I had put off promoting my book until I could get its production worked out. However,I was sent the Mc Sweegan article by a friend and felt the need to issue a response. I have replied with the following letter to my Senators and Congressmen:

RE: EDWARD McSWEEGAN
PERMANENT FEDERAL EMPLOYEE

I am a historian who lives in South Portland, Maine. I am the author of the recently published Disguised as the Devil: How Lyme disease created Witches and Changed History.

I spent over five years researching and writing this work, and although I have had problems with the technical production of the book (POD printing out a draft instead of a corrected final work) I stand by my hypothesis that people in the past who had Lyme disease may have been considered bewitched or treated as witches.

I have theorized that the devil's mark was a bull's eye rash.

As an author, I am fully expectant that this might be controversial and that there will be criticisms of my work, but there is a point where a line of decency is passed. Public employee Edward McSweegan has done that.

I have a dedicated my career to public history. I worked for over ten years as a museum curator, educator, and public historian. I have had articles published in a variety of places including the New York Times.

Although affected by Lyme disease, I was able to obtain an MA and have completed all course work, passed both comprehensive and research exams, and am entering the dissertation phase of my PHD(ABD).

In his newspaper column, that is also plastered all over the internet, McSweegan describes me as ``a self-described historian'' with a 296 page book that is one of the ``comics.'' After having spent most of my adult lifetime in the field of public history, I wonder what other qualifications I would have to obtain to be considered a historian in McSweegan's eyes.

I find his comments to be extremely distressing, especially in light of his position as a federal employee in charge of the public's health.

The point of this letter is, why has McSweegan been given a lifetime appointment to the public payroll?

And at what point does the behavior of a civil servant and federal employee just go too far?

Dr. McSweegan has repeatedly insulted many members of the Lyme community, especially online, has complained publicly in a television interview that he has no work to do, and yet produces all sorts of insulting rhetoric that he spreads all over the internet.

I am offended that my tax money is used to underwrite this sort of drivel. People back home here in Maine are struggling to afford gasoline, oil, food and medical care. Paying the salary of this man is a complete waste.

Dr. McSweegan's activities should be investigated and his workless condition should be made permanent: he should be fired.

Sincerely,
M.M. Drymon

cc. Tom Allen, Mike Michaud, Olympia Snowe, Susan Collins

Posts: 15 | From Maine | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bettyg
Unregistered


Icon 14 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
drymon, [bonk] [bow]


outstanding rebuttal!!! [group hug] [kiss]

glad you copied your state's FEDERAL reps/senators also!


idfighter .... no offense taken! i should have left no normal to read! and left off comprehend such a nut case!


i'm appaled he's been paid TAX DOLLARS to write such TRASH on FEDERAL TIME. [cussing] [puke]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
herxuk
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 15873

Icon 1 posted      Profile for herxuk     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Most Medicines are derived from plant's, there active ingredients isolated , and then sometimes produced synthetically. His mockery of the sick for using them, he appears to link them to ( WITCH CRAFT ) Potions, makes one wonder if there has been a Gap in his Education.

Yet he failed to say, Stony Brook reported these Virulent stains, are also in Europe ( Not JUST the Us )

Some part's of this report, should have been censored, as they border on being offensive.

Very sad person, who seam's to get pleasure out of the suffering.

Posts: 153 | From England | Registered: Jun 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
stella marie
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7216

Icon 1 posted      Profile for stella marie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Dr. McSweegan has a Ph.D, so does this stand for Pig headed Doctor?

Just reading his dribble makes me sick. What's with his staement "He offered no evidence of such conflicts, leaving IDSA President Donald Poretz to wonder how the authors of the recommendations could gain financially by discouraging long treatments, expensive drugs and patented diagnostics."

Well wouldn't it discredit some McSweegan's & his cronies previous papers?

And Auwaerter's statement "I train infectious disease fellows; fellows don't want to see Lyme patients. They don't want to enter this controversial area because it seems like it's just a recipe for headaches."

WTF???

So they only want to rehash what they already think they know about Lyme and other TBI's.

These so called docs will never understand the reality since they have closed their minds.

--------------------
Stella Marie

Posts: 694 | From US | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
northstar
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 7911

Icon 1 posted      Profile for northstar     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
IDSA President Donald Poretz to wonder how the authors of the recommendations could gain financially by discouraging long treatments, expensive drugs and patented diagnostics."
Well, that statement means that Poretz is not in communication with his fellow cronies.

He would benefit from talking to them more, since they know the answer to his wonderment.

Serious lack of communication.

Northstar

Posts: 1331 | From hither and yonder | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.