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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Anyone experimented with "Earthing"? (Page 2)

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Author Topic: Anyone experimented with "Earthing"?
kidsgotlyme
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momlyme- I have been looking into this, and I am thinking about buying the pad because it's cheaper. I figure that I can use it when I am in the living room while I am sitting in my chair, or I can take it easily to the bedroom and sleep on it.

If it works well, then I would invest in the more expensive sheets.

--------------------
symptoms since 1993 that I can remember. 9/2018 diagnosed with Borellia, Babesia Duncani, and Bartonella Hensalae thru DNA Connections.

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Wallace
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Another interesting book on barefoot running:


Amazon.com Review
Book Description
Full of incredible characters, amazing athletic achievements, cutting-edge science, and, most of all, pure inspiration, Born to Run is an epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? In search of an answer, Christopher McDougall sets off to find a tribe of the worlds greatest distance runners and learn their secrets, and in the process shows us that everything we thought we knew about running is wrong.

Isolated by the most savage terrain in North America, the reclusive Tarahumara Indians of Mexicos deadly Copper Canyons are custodians of a lost art. For centuries they have practiced techniques that allow them to run hundreds of miles without rest and chase down anything from a deer to an Olympic marathoner while enjoying every mile of it. Their superhuman talent is matched by uncanny health and serenity, leaving the Tarahumara immune to the diseases and strife that plague modern existence. With the help of Caballo Blanco, a mysterious loner who lives among the tribe, the author was able not only to uncover the secrets of the Tarahumara but also to find his own inner ultra-athlete, as he trained for the challenge of a lifetime: a fifty-mile race through the heart of Tarahumara country pitting the tribe against an odd band of Americans, including a star ultramarathoner, a beautiful young surfer, and a barefoot wonder.

With a sharp wit and wild exuberance, McDougall takes us from the high-tech science labs at Harvard to the sun-baked valleys and freezing peaks across North America, where ever-growing numbers of ultrarunners are pushing their bodies to the limit, and, finally, to the climactic race in the Copper Canyons. Born to Run is that rare book that will not only engage your mind but inspire your body when you realize that the secret to happiness is right at your feet, and that you, indeed all of us, were born to run.

Amazon Exclusive: A Q&A with Christopher McDougall

Question: Born to Run explores the life and running habits of the Tarahumara Indians of Mexicos Copper Canyon, arguably the greatest distance runners in the world. What are some of the secrets you learned from them?

Christopher McDougall: The key secret hit me like a thunderbolt. It was so simple, yet such a jolt. It was this: everything Id been taught about running was wrong. We treat running in the modern world the same way we treat childbirthits going to hurt, and requires special exercises and equipment, and the best you can hope for is to get it over with quickly with minimal damage.

Then I meet the Tarahumara, and theyre having a blast. They remember what its like to love running, and it lets them blaze through the canyons like dolphins rocketing through waves. For them, running isnt work. It isnt a punishment for eating. Its fine art, like it was for our ancestors. Way before we were scratching pictures on caves or beating rhythms on hollow trees, we were perfecting the art of combining our breath and mind and muscles into fluid self-propulsion over wild terrain. And when our ancestors finally did make their first cave paintings, what were the first designs? A downward slash, lightning bolts through the bottom and middlebehold, the Running Man.

The Tarahumara have a saying: Children run before they can walk. Watch any four-year-oldthey do everything at full speed, and its all about fun. Thats the most important thing I picked up from my time in the Copper Canyons, the understanding that running can be fast and fun and spontaneous, and when it is, you feel like you can go forever. But all of that begins with your feet. Strange as it sounds, the Tarahumara taught me to change my relationship with the ground. Instead of hammering down on my heels, the way Id been taught all my life, I learned to run lightly and gently on the balls of my feet. The day I mastered it was the last day I was ever injured.

Q: You trained for your first ultramarathona race organized by the mysterious gringo expat Caballo Blanco between the Tarahumara and some of Americas top ultrarunnerswhile researching and writing this book. What was your training like?

CM: It really started as kind of a dare. Just by chance, Id met an adventure-sports coach from Jackson Hole, Wyoming named Eric Orton. Erics specialty is tearing endurance sports down to their basic components and looking for transferable skills. He studies rock climbing to find shoulder techniques for kayakers, and applies Nordic skiings smooth propulsion to mountain biking. What hes looking for are basic engineering principles, because hes convinced that the next big leap forward in fitness wont come from strength or technology, but plain, simple durability. With some 70% of all runners getting hurt every year, the athlete who can stay healthy and avoid injury will leave the competition behind.

So naturally, Eric idolized the Tarahumara. Any tribe that has 90-year-old men running across mountaintops obviously has a few training tips up its sleeve. But since Eric had never actually met the Tarahumara, he had to deduce their methods by pure reasoning. His starting point was uncertainty; he assumed that the Tarahumara step into the unknown every time they leave their caves, because they never know how fast theyll have to sprint after a rabbit or how tricky the climbing will be if theyre caught in a storm. They never even know how long a race will be until they step up to the starting linethe distance is only determined in a last-minute bout of negotiating and could stretch anywhere from 50 miles to 200-plus.

Eric figured shock and awe was the best way for me to build durability and mimic Tarahumara-style running. Hed throw something new at me every dayhopping drills, lunges, mile intervalsand lots and lots of hills. There was no such thing, really, as long, slow distancehed have me mix lots of hill repeats and short bursts of speed into every mega-long run.

I didnt think I could do it without breaking down, and I told Eric that from the start. I basically defied him to turn me into a runner. And by the end of nine months, I was cranking out four hour runs without a problem.

Q: Youre a six-foot four-inches tall, 200-plus pound guynot anyones typical vision of a distance runner, yet youve completed ultra marathons and are training for more. Is there a body type for running, as many of us assume, or are all humans built to run?

CM: Yeah, Im a bigun. But isnt it sad thats even a reasonable question? I bought into that bull for a loooong time. Why wouldnt I? I was constantly being told by people who should know better that some bodies arent designed for running. One of the best sports medicine physicians in the country told me exactly thatthat the reason I was constantly getting hurt is because I was too big to handle the impact shock from my feet hitting the ground. Just recently, I interviewed a nationally-known sports podiatrist who said, You know, we didnt ALL evolve to run away from saber-toothed tigers. Meaning, what? That anyone who isnt sleek as a Kenyan marathoner should be extinct? Its such illogical blatherall kinds of body types exist today, so obviously they DID evolve to move quickly on their feet. Its really awful that so many doctors are reinforcing this learned helplessness, this idea that you have to be some kind of elite being to handle such a basic, universal movement.

Q: If humans are born to run, as you argue, whats your advice for a runner who is looking to make the leap from shorter road races to marathons, or marathons to ultramarathons? Is running really for everyone?

CM: I think ultrarunning is Americas hope for the future. Honestly. The ultrarunners have got a hold of some powerful wisdom. You can see it at the starting line of any ultra race. I showed up at the Leadville Trail 100 expecting to see a bunch of hollow-eyed Skeletors, and instead it was, Whoah! Get a load of the hotties! Ultra runners tend to be amazingly healthy, youthful andbelieve it or notgood looking. I couldnt figure out why, until one runner explained that throughout history, the four basic ingredients for optimal health have been clean air, good food, fresh water and low stress. And that, to a T, describes the daily life of an ultrarunner. Theyre out in the woods for hours at a time, breathing pine-scented breezes, eating small bursts of digestible food, downing water by the gallons, and feeling their stress melt away with the miles. But heres the real key to that kingdom: you have to relax and enjoy the run. No one cares how fast you run 50 miles, so ultrarunners dont really stress about times. Theyre out to enjoy the run and finish strong, not shave a few inconsequential seconds off a personal best. And thats the best way to transition up to big mileage races: as coach Eric told me, If it feels like work, youre working too hard.

Q: You write that distance running is the great equalizer of age and gender. Can you explain?

CM: Okay, Ill answer that question with a question: Starting at age nineteen, runners get faster every year until they hit their peak at twenty-seven. After twenty-seven, they start to decline. So if it takes you eight years to reach your peak, how many years does it take for you to regress back to the same speed you were running at nineteen?

Go ahead, guess all you want. No one Ive asked has ever come close. Its in the book, so I wont give it away, but I guarantee when you hear the answer, youll say, No way. THAT old? Now, factor in this: ultra races are the only sport in the world in which women can go toe-to-toe with men and hand them their heads. Ann Trason and Krissy Moehl often beat every man in the field in some ultraraces, while Emily Baer recently finished in the Top 10 at the Hardrock 100 while stopping to breastfeed her baby at the water stations.

So hows that possible? According to a new body of research, its because humans are the greatest distance runners on earth. We may not be fast, but were born with such remarkable natural endurance that humans are fully capable of outrunning horses, cheetahs and antelopes. Thats because we once hunted in packs and on foot; all of us, men and women alike, young and old together.

Q: One of the fascinating parts of Born to Run is your report on how the ultrarunners eatsalad for breakfast, wraps with hummus mid-run, or pizza and beer the night before a run. As a runner with a lot of miles behind him, what are your thoughts on nutrition for running?

CM: Live every day like youre on the lam. If youve got to be ready to pick up and haul butt at a moments notice, youre not going to be loading up on gut-busting meals. I thought Id have to go on some kind of prison-camp diet to get ready for an ultra, but the best advice I got came from coach Eric, who told me to just worry about the running and the eating would take care of itself. And he was right, sort of. I instinctively began eating smaller, more digestible meals as my miles increased, but then I went behind his back and consulted with the great Dr. Ruth Heidrich, an Ironman triathlete who lives on a vegan diet. Shes the one who gave me the idea of having salad for breakfast, and its a fantastic tip. The truth is, many of the greatest endurance athletes of all time lived on fruits and vegetables. You can get away with garbage for a while, but you pay for it in the long haul. In the book, I describe how Jenn Shelton and Billy Bonehead Barnett like to chow pizza and Mountain Dew in the middle of 100-mile races, but Jenn is also a vegetarian who most days lives on veggie burgers and grapes.

Q: In this difficult financial time, were experiencing yet another surge in the popularity of running. Can you explain this?

CM: When things look worst, we run the most. Three times, America has seen distance-running skyrocket and its always in the midst of a national crisis. The first boom came during the Great Depression; the next was in the 70s, when we were struggling to recover from a recession, race riots, assassinations, a criminal President and an awful war. And the third boom? One year after the Sept. 11 attacks, trailrunning suddenly became the fastest-growing outdoor sport in the country. I think theres a trigger in the human psyche that activates our first and greatest survival skill whenever we see the shadow of approaching raptors.

(Photo James Rexroad)
From Booklist
From the depths of Mexicos Copper Canyon to the heights of the Leadville Trail 100 ultramarathon in Colorado, from the centuries-old running techniques of Mexicos Tarahumara tribe to a research lab at the University of Utah, author McDougall celebrates, in this engaging and picaresque account, humankinds innate love of running. There are rogues aplenty here, such the deadly narco-traffickers who roam Copper Canyon, but there are many more who inspire, such as the Tarahumara runners, who show the rest of the world the false limitations we place on human endurance. McDougall has served as an Associated Press war correspondent, is a contributing editor to Mens Health, and runs at his home in rural Pennsylvania, and he brings all of these experiences to bear in this slyly important, highly readable account. --Alan Moores
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Product Details

* Hardcover: 304 pages
* Publisher: Knopf; First American Edition edition (May 5, 2009)
* Language: English
* ISBN-10: 0307266303
* ISBN-13: 978-0307266309
* Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.6 x 1.1 inches
* Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
* Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars See all reviews (609 customer reviews)
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* Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #94 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
o #1 in Books > Health, Mind & Body > Exercise & Fitness > Running & Jogging
o #1 in Books > Sports > Individual Sports
o #1 in Books > Nonfiction > Social Sciences > Anthropology > Cultural

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382 of 387 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars A great story and so much more, May 16, 2009
By
D. Sull (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen (Hardcover)
Born to Run succeeds at three levels. First, it is a page turner. The build up to a fifty-mile foot race over some of the world's least hospitable terrain drives the narrative forward. Along the way McDougall introduces a cast of characters worthy of Dickens, including an almost superhuman ultramarathoner, Jenn and the Bonehead--a couple who down bottles of booze to warm up for a race, Barefoot Ted, Mexican drug dealers, a ghostly ex-boxer, a heartbroken father, and of course the Tarahumara, arguably the greatest runners in the world.

Born to Run is such a rip-roaring yarn, that it is easy to miss the book's deeper achievements. At a second level, McDougall introduces and explores a powerful thesis--that human beings are literally born to run. Recreational running did not begin with the 1966 publication of "Jogging" by the co-founder of Nike. Instead, McDougall argues, running is at the heart of what it means to be human. In the course of elaborating his thesis, McDougall answers some big questions: Why did our ancestors outlive the stronger, smarter Neanderthals? Why do expensive running shoes increase the odds of injury? The author's modesty keeps him from trumpeting the novelty and importance of this thesis, but it merits attention.

Finally, Born to Run presents a philosophy of exercise. The ethos that pervades recreational and competitive running--"no pain, no gain," is fundamentally flawed, McDougall argues. The essence of running should not be grim determination, but sheer joy. Many of the conventions of modern running--the thick-soled shoes, mechanical treadmills, take no prisoners competition, and heads-down powering through pain dull our appreciation of what running can be--a sociable activity, more game than chore, that can lead to adventure. McDougall's narrative moves the book forward, his thesis provides a solid intellectual support, but this philosophy of joy animates Born to Run. I hope this book finds the wide audience it deserves.
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154 of 158 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars A phenomenal book about running but more importantly a way of life, May 17, 2009
By
R. George "raygeo3" (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
This review is from: Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen (Hardcover)
My wife handed me Born to Run about 24 hours ago and said "you might like this." Having run quite a bit but nursing an achilles tendon injury for about 3 years, I had almost given up on my dreams of getting back into marathon shape. 24 hours (and very little sleep) later, I feel inspired, awed, and enlightened, and I have Christopher's wonderful book to thank.

In a nutshell, I have not been this entralled by a story since Shadow Divers, Seabiscuit and/or Into Thin Air. Christopher's recounting of the forbidding Copper Canyons, the amazing Tarahumara, ultramarathoners young and old, and the greatest race you've never heard of is enough for me to give this a rave review. But like the aforementioned books, there is so much more to this story, not the least of which was Christopher's own quest (and amazing resiliency) to run without pain. Finally, he put to words many of the thoughts and feelings I've had about running but am unable to articulate. And Christopher is a great writer - I laughed out loud many times throughout. He has a style akin to a Timothy Cahill - a great wit that was obviously aided by a wonderfully intriguing cast of characters.

As the sun was coming up this morning I was a bit sad to see this book end, and am already contemplating picking it up again. But only after I strap on the old, beaten up sneaks and get in a quick jog. Thanks so much for writing this book - I hope it changes lives and perspectives in the process.
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114 of 123 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars The Cure for Modernity, May 11, 2009
By
A Customer - See all my reviews
This review is from: Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen (Hardcover)
If, when you finish with this book, you don't immediately get yourself outside and run like hell, then there's probably not a drop of living blood in you. This book is the perfect antidote to everything that's wrong with modern running and the way to find everything that's still so right with it. Even if it were all a work of fiction McDougall's tale would still be worth the price of admission. Fabulous.
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Wallace
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I guess the cheapest option is to get the bands.

I use my half sheet while at the PC.

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Wallace
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No one else read the book but not convinced?

I have decided to order the book Born to Run.

[ 12-08-2010, 11:34 AM: Message edited by: Wallace ]

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daystar1952
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I just bought a trifield meter which measures magnetic, electric and radio/microwaves. I have a special wrist grounding bracelet attached to the ground plug on an outlet nearby the computor. When I put the meter on the keyboard, it measures 2and 1 half milligauss.

The computor screen is 3 milligaus and the mouse is 1 milligauss. When I put on the bracelet, all three items then measure at zero. But...I'm not sure what that means.

Does it mean that the electromagnetics are going through me and I am protecting the equipment or does it mean that wearing the bracelet is canceling out the positive ions emitting from the equipment with the negative ions from the earth so that I am NOT absorbing them?

I have already changed a couple of lightbulbs in the kitchen from flourescent (which made the meter go off the scale)to xenon bulbs. The xenon bulbs use more electricity than the flourescent...probably more comparable to the incandescent bulbs....but the electomagnetic frequencies that the xenon bulbs emitted was much much less and the light was so much more soft and pleasing.

It was like a relief looking at the light from those bulbs.....calming. Flourescent bulbs never make me feel calm and that must mean something

The meter has also shown me how far away to place my floor lamps from my head...etc. Our electric radio alarm clock is pretty bad also. I may replace it with a bateery operated one which is supposed to be much better in that respect.

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momlyme
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Daystar- that's interesting about the fluorescent lights... Perhaps the link I posted earlier in this thread will shed some light with your experiement and the tester you have.

David wolfe does a similar test grounding himself with the grounding pad. He uses a voltmeter... First his body EMF reads at 8-13 volts then he touches the pad and the reading is close to zero. He does it again and again.

Seems to me that means when you are grounded you are getting zero negative effects from the electronics that surround you. Here's the vid again:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E46Fm0dtE2c

I bought the grounding pad last night. Haven't received it yet. Hoot - how bout you? Any benefits yet?

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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hoot
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momlyme--
the first couple of days I felt tingling and warmth in my hands and feet. Now I just feel the warmth. I seem to be getting really good sleep [sleepy] and it seems as though I am dreaming more (or remembering that I have had dreams). I don't have any chronic health issues. I think I read that the people with more serious issues may see more...

My hubby has not used it yet. He insists on sleeping in the basement bedroom lately because it has in-floor heating and is much warmer down there (too hot for me to sleep there!!!). I should have put the sheet on that bed. I will switch it tomorrow unless I can convince him to come upstairs.

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momlyme
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Thanks for the update hoot! Glad you are getting good sleep! Has hubby seen the benefits described in David Wolfe's Longevity conference?

I had my hubby watch that. He can't wait to try it! I did not get the sheet, just the pad. We will have to share. [Wink]

According to what I have seen from David Wolfe... the more you can stay grounded the better, but you can see the benefits (blood under a microscope) in just one hour. So the minimum is one hour per day.

I found another good video on a cheap method of grounding: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYT3qaNIUPs&feature=related

The guy in this video mentions another website where you can buy grounding/EMF stuff cheap:
http://lessemf.com

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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Wallace
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Lots of testimonials with Earthing stuff here
http://www.earthingusa.com/TESTIMONIALS.html

Slept really well!

Anybody else going barefooted in spite of it being for most of us the wrong time of year??

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hoot
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momlyme--
I am going to try to get my hubby to start using it. Tonight is the night. He will be back from California...no excuses!

He has not tried it yet so no results to report.

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momlyme
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Good luck Hoot! I hope he has a good night's sleep!

Glad it's working for you Wallace!

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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Wallace
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sleeping 20 per cent more and go for a daily 2km barefoot walk!
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Wallace
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atural Walking for Exercise
By Tom A. Kutscher

Natural walking is the practice of barefoot walking in the most natural environments, with the most natural techniques and methods in order to maximize the enjoyment of walking while providing low stress exercise. The concept of natural walking is that to do whatever is most natural for the body is the best form of walking. Natural walking, as exercise and not as simply an enjoyable pastime, is one of the very best forms of exercise of any kind while being low on stress and high on pure fun.

What is "natural walking?" Natural walking is outdoor walking during daylight hours in bare feet on non-abrasive natural surfaces such as grass, earth, hard-packed sand or other natural surfaces at a pace that is adequate for exercise and enjoyment of the outdoors.

Natural walking vs. unnatural walking The following list covers the advantages of natural walking and guidelines to doing it properly and safely.

1. Barefoot Natural walking must be done barefoot. That is the way that humans walked for many thousands of years prior to the invention of footwear. Barefoot walking utilizes the feet entirely while shoes restrict some of the natural movement of the feet. Shoes and footwear, since they are man-made, cannot be considered as natural. Since we are not born with shoes on, we have to adapt to wearing them. In addition to restricting some of the natural movement of the feet, shoes cut off the range of sensory ability of the feet and cut down on the sensory pleasures of contacting the grass and earth. Shoes also are often the cause of blisters, overheating, fungus, foot injuries and pain.
2. Outdoors Walking outdoors is natural. Early humankind had no indoor facilities; walking was a daily outdoor activity and was a necesity for survival. Outdoor walking maximizes the contact with nature and availability of fresh air and natural scenery.
3. Earth Connection to the Body Natural walking allows for a natural connection to the earth through the feet. Nearly all natural health specialists and healers acknowledge that we need to be "grounded" to the earth. This "groundedness" effect is believed by many to enhance and unblock the body's chi energy, chakras, and subtle energy.
4. Reflexology Effect Reflexology is a form of massage therapy that involves point pressure stimulation of parts of the feet. Natural walking on grass and other natural surfaces provides a similar form of stimulation that has a "reflexology effect" that is beneficial. While this benefit is not as intense as a full reflexology session, it is far superior to walking with the feet encased in shoes. Shoes offer no reflexology effect at all and in fact shoes block the feet from any stimulation by the environment.
5. Natural Surfaces Grass that is healthy and well hydrated is the best natural surface to walk on. This includes grass that is common in lawns (fescue, bluegrass, zoysia, etc.) and other similar forms of soft vegetation such as clover, soft (non-toxic) broadleaf weeds, and other non-toxic leafy vegetation. Grasses generally range from good to outstanding as a natural surface. Other non-grassy earth surfaces, such as smooth earth, slightly muddy earth, and hard-packed sand (e.g. wet sand that is near the shore of a beach and provides a firm support for walking) are also natural as long as they are not harmful to the feet, and range from fair to excellent. For best results, the earth that the grass grows in should be fairly smooth (i.e. not filled with a lot of hard dirt clumps) and not filled with stones, sticks, or other debris. These types of obstacles, while natural, tend to diminish the enjoyment of the natural walking experience. Unnatural hazards (glass, metal, garbage, biohazards, etc.) should be avoided. Clean, well-maintained parks usually provide some of the best natural walking surfaces.
6. Cooler Walking Area Grass and live vegetation have much less surface heat radiation than concrete and asphalt, and generally can provide a cooler walking area.
7. Natural Gait The body's natural walking sequence and motion of bones, muscles, and other body parts, i.e. "gait", is thrown off in all cases at least moderately and sometimes substantially with the use of shoes. Studies have shown that only barefoot walking makes it possible for a completely natural gait as long as the feet are normal and healthy. A natural gait allows for full movement of the toes and front of the feet as is readily done when barefoot. Likewise, carrying substantial weight (being substantially overweight, carry a heavy backpack, etc.) will adversely affect the natural gait. Natural walking promotes a natural gait.
8. Use of the Toes Natural walking allows for full use of the toes when walking. This is not possible with any type of footwear, even flip flops, which provide a barrier between the toes and the ground.
9. Natural Exercise Pace Natural walking is best done at a pace that is good for exercise; not too fast, and not too slow. A too-fast pace can cause a risk of injury and sometimes is unduly stressful in warm or hot conditions. A too-slow pace is inadequate for a good exercise workout. A general range for natural walking is 4 to 7 km/hr (2.5 mph to 4.7 mph), and will depend on several factors, especially the quality of the surface. Smooth soft grass and earth surfaces are much more conducive to a faster pace than are uneven grassy areas that are rocky or are full of unpleasant sharp-edged weeds or stubble. It is quite acceptable, and in fact wise, to temporarily slow down a bit if some obstacles or poor terrain are encountered and then return to the regular pace when safe to do so.
10. Water Water is the most natural liquid refreshment. Bottled water should be brought with you when natural walking and you should hydrate yourself before, during, and after the walk. For natural walking to be done most successfully, at least 0.5 to 0.8 liter (1 pint to 1.7 pints) of water should be consumed per hour, and more if the weather is hot or if it is very sunny. The water can be cold, cool or at a tepid temperature.
11. Distance A natural walking distance is one that provides sufficient exercise but does not exceed one's natural limits. If you feel pain, aches, significant discomfort, etc., the walk should be ended as soon as possible. Exercise should not cause regular significant injuries or even regular minor injuries. Each person's appropriate distances (i.e. natural limits) will vary as you get more in shape and as your feet get more "ruggedized." It will typically increase over time.
12. Daylight Natural walking is best done in daylight with natural lighting (i.e. sunlight). It is not recommended to be done under the lights, or in darkness.
13. Posture The posture is either straight or slightly leaning forward. The main exception to this is when going uphill it may be necessary to make posture adjustments (e.g. slightly more forward when going uphill).
14. Leg Movement A natural sequence of leg movement is used, not an exaggerated lifting of the legs up and down and also not a lack of upward leg movement along with sliding the feet across the ground or shuffling motion. The legs and feet should be lifted moderately and go straight forward, not outward.
15. Weight Natural walking is best done if you are at a natural weight for your height and body type. You should not be substantially overweight. Being very overweight may put too much stress on the feet and knee joints. Early humans that went barefoot all the time were rarely overweight due to the scarcity of food. Being at one's correct weight is best for optimizing the natural walking experience. Regular natural walking can lead to some weight loss (with proper dieting) if you are overweight but it is better for stabilizing weight rather than reducing weight.
16. Cleanliness Natural walking is done in a clean environment (i.e. no bio hazards). Harmless grass, dirt, and vegetation debris will get on your feet. Brushing debris off the feet and watering and drying them should be done after each walk. A full cleaning of the feet and rest of the body should be done after returning home.
17. Breathing Deep lung breathing is used in natural walking, as practiced in yoga and martial arts. The diaphragm is fully expanded for belly breaths when inhaling, and each inhaling breath starts at the bottom of the lungs and goes to the top of the lungs, which are totally filled before exhaling.
18. Stride Length A comfortable stride length should be used for natural walking. The stride should not be too long or too short. Your natural walking stride will typically vary from your natural stride length to less than this when encountering difficult terrain or obstacles.
19. Do Some Uphill Walking If possible, part of each walk should include some uphill walking. The uphill portion(s) can be very slightly uphill or more steeply uphill, depending on your preference. Uphill walking promotes a better aerobic workout and is better for the muscles. As you get better at natural walking the uphill sections will become more easy to accomplish.
20. Armswing The arms should swing in the reverse direction to the legs and should be back-and-forth, not side-to-side.(i.e. not crossing the front of the body). The amount of armswing can be either slight or substantial, whatever your preference is.
21. Time Duration of Each Natural Walk Initially, as you get used to walking barefoot outdoors, this will typically be a 20 to 30 minutes. After a while when you are fully acclimated to natural walking, the time duration of a walk can range from 30 minutes to about 2 hours. There is no fixed upper limit; it is an individual parameter that can vary depending on how you feel, the weather, your fitness, etc. The typical range for a natural walk is 40 to 100 minutes. During most of the spring, summer, and early fall, three to six natural walks per week, weather permitting, should typically be possible.
22. Temperatures The best temperature range for natural walking is 55 F (13 C) to 86 F (30 C). Walking barefoot outdoors below 46 F (8 C) may not be comfortable for everyone and is a matter of individual choice. Even above 50 F (10 C), if the grass is wet, it may be too cool on the feet for some. Walks on wet grass at temperatures of 59 F (15 C) or above should not be a problem for most. Natural walking should not be done at temperatures or wind chills at or below 39 F (4 C), with the exception of very short walks (0.8 km total, i.e. 0.5 mile) or possibly longer distances for those experienced barefoot walkers who have gradually acclimated themselves to cold weather barefoot walking. Walking in extreme heat should be limited to shorter-than-normal distances, and requires much more hydration (water intake) than usual. All walks should be ended if discomfort or numbness is felt due to either heat or cold.
23. Foot Motion When walking naturally, the feet do not come down hard on the heels. Three methods of natural walking are all perfectly fine and are a matter of preference. These three are (1) heel-to-toes with rapid shift of weight away from the heel, (2) straight down, and (3) front-part-first or fox walking. For heel-to-toes method the foot lightly touches the surface with the heel first and the contact surface moves rapidly toward the ball of the foot and toes. Normally the front of the foot (including the toes) carries the bulk of the load, not the heel. The other two methods are self-explanatory but there are websites that go in more detail on fox walking (so refer to them if you want to learn more about front-part-first walking). With any of these methods, if an obstacle (e.g. large stone) that you did not see is stepped upon by the middle or inner part of a foot, you can rapidly adjust the weight to the outside of the foot is your pace is not too fast. This ability to make quick adjustments should be used if you feel an obstacle that is uncomfortable and large enough to cause an injury. A too fast pace makes it harder to make momentary adjustments and makes bruising injuries more likely when stepping on protruding blunt objects that you do not see and subsequently step on. Generally, an experienced natural walker will have a light stepping foot motion that is well matched to the pace.
24. Clothing In mild, warm and hot weather, clothes should be light, loose and comfortable. Cotton and natural fabrics should be used as much as possible. Cotton/synthetic blends are okay but less desirable. Hats with brims are recommended for sunny conditions. In colder weather it is important to dress with warmer clothes to retain body heat as there will be greater heat loss from the feet being barefoot than there is when wearing shoes.
25. Safety There are 25 safety guidelines for natural walking that should be followed. These are listed under The 25 Basic Safety Guidelines of Barefoot Grass Walking by Tom Kutscher. It is best to memorize the safety guidelines and practice them at all times that you do natural walking. They are included in this website.
26. Accessories That Are Okay Sunglasses, bug repellant, sunscreen, watches, keys, IDs, and other essential items are okay. Cell phones, electronic devices, and other items that will distract you from the walk should either be shut off or left behind. Shut off the outside world except where you are walking. Also, do not wear weights for strength conditioning; weight work is fine but should be done separate from natural walking.
27. Rainy Conditions While it may be tempting, it is not advisable to walk in the rain. The primary hazard is lightning. However there are other hazards as well (slippery areas, puddles that can temporarily hide sharp objects and other hazards, possible chilling from wet clothes, etc.). Light drizzle is usually okay for walking as long as there is no lightning. Natural walking is best done in weather conditions that are dry or after a light rain. Walks that are done on wet grass in warm weather after a substantial rain are especially enjoyable.
28. Non-Competitive Natural walking is not competitive. It is for exercise and enjoyment.
29. Enjoy the Moment The sensual pleasures of natural walking vary with the temperature, grass moisture level, sunlight, wind, natural sights, grass length, grass texture, ground texture, and other parameters. Take it all in as you walk and enjoy the moment.
30. What will Others Think? It is understandable that you may feel self-conscious walking barefoot while others are all in some form of footwear. You will get over this fairly quickly. Remember, you are the one doing the natural form of walking, and they are not.
31. Fun You had fun as a kid going barefoot, didn't you? So go back to what you did as a kid! Kids instinctively get it right…ditch the shoes and return to what is fun!

While natural walking is terrific, there are three main drawbacks when compared to traditional forms of indoor exercise. First, the weather will be a limitation, especially cold, winter weather. Second, the conditions of the grass and the ground can vary substantially. Dry grass and earth is less fun to walk on than well-hydrated grass and moistened soil. If you really want a totally predictable exercise routine with an unchanging environment and with unchanging grass and earth, that is not possible. And third, there are some minor hazards (minor bruises, cuts, scrapes, slivers, occasional bug bites, etc.) that usually are not a problem for most people but could be for some.

But the benefits of natural walking far outweigh the drawbacks. And the cost is FREE if you go to public parks with no admission charge or to other free public areas. No expensive athletic shoes to buy, no lessons, and no equipment, yet excellent exercise with the backdrop of the scenic outdoors. The upside of natural walking greatly exceeds the downside!

It is permissible to reproduce any and all of this article "Natural Walking for Exercise" by Tom A. Kutscher without permission from the author provided that (1) the author is acknowledged as the originator and source of this text and (2) no copying of this article is done for commercial purposes.

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Toppers
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Just to follow up, still using this thing at the computer and during sleep. The quality of sleep is so deep it's incredible, vivid healthy dreams and feeling great the next morning.

Definitely a piece of the puzzle in overcoming all this.

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momlyme
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Awesome Toppers... glad it is working for you!!!

...still waiting for mine in the mail!

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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rachellemarie
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I have ordered the grounding mat, which I plan on using in bed, on the couch and while working on the computer. I'll check back later and let everyone know how it works. I should receive the mat next week. My main symptom is chronic fatigue, but have other weird Lymey stuff going on too from time to time. Hoping this helps with my immune system, adrenals, cortisol level and fatigue. We shall see!

For those that can't afford the earthing.net prices, looks like www.lessemf.com has better pricing. Their mats are $29.99. Noticed this after I paid $59 through the earthing site. Not sure if it's exactly the same thing, but it appears to be.

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Wallace
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Feel like I am going through a detox, sleeping and resting an awful lot.

Glad to hear the encourging reports of others.
This is important!

I also feel walking barefoot is important Thom hartmann explains in his book that walking is a form of bilateral therapy similar to hynosis and EMDR in releasing gradually trauma etc.

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Wallace
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

96 of 101 people found the following review helpful:
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple--But Fascinating--Theory, November 14, 2006
By
Janet Boyer "JanetBoyer.com" (Pennsylvania) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER) (VINE VOICE) (REAL NAME)
This review is from: Walking Your Blues Away: How to Heal the Mind and Create Emotional Well-Being (Paperback)
"Just as a person with a severe hemispheric imbalance can be badly disconnected from emotions such as empathy, and thus sanction or even encourage actions such as mass murder that is war, so too can an entire society. In the opinion of some researchers, societies that are hemispherically unbalanced are more likely to be patriarchal, hierarchal, and violent, whereas societies that are hemispherically balanced are more likely to be egalitarian and democratic, and employ violence only in self-defense." - From the book

Remember the caricatures of stage hypnotists brandishing a swinging pocket watch while intoning "Look into my eyes..." ? Well, according to author Thom Hartmann, this type of hypnosis was actually a bona fide psychiatric therapy in the late 1700's and early 1800's. In fact, Franz Anton Mesmer ("mesmerize") was the first person to develop a system of bilateral cross-hemispheric stimulation by waving his fingers side to side while a patient followed with their eyes. Mesmer discovered that his system was quite effective in resolving non-organic physical and psychological problems. That is, psychosomatic conditions or issues rooted in emotional trauma.

In the late 1800's, Sigmund Freud--a protg of Josef Breuer--discovered the power of bilateral therapy in the form of alternatively stroking both sides of the body, a technique that Mesmer first developed. In fact, in the 1880's and early 1890's, Freud's preferred method of treatment wasn't talk therapy (which is what he became famous for) but a bilateral technique known as hypnosis.

In Walking Your Blues Away, author Thom Hartmann traces Freud's sudden discontinuance of hypnosis to the popularity of the book Trilby, authored by George Du Maurier in 1894. Playing on the new wave of anti-Semitism that swept Europe at the end of the 19th century, Du Maurier's novel Tribly chronicled the seductive story of Svengali a "sinister, Jewish" hypnotist who exploited susceptible women both sexually and financially.

Hartmann suggests that the public reaction to Jewish physicians employing hypnosis was so intense, that Freud had no choice but to abandon this successful form of therapy.

Walking Your Blues Away offers theories as to why bilateral therapies such as hypnosis, side-to-side stimulation, NLP, EFT, etc. are so successful at reframing emotional trauma--and the author applies this mode of therapy to walking.

The hippocampus is the part of the brain that functions as a "dumping ground" of memories, so to speak. Whatever we go through or experience in a day is processed by the hippocampus while sleeping (REM being another form of bilateral stimulation). However, some emotional trauma--such as what is experienced with PTSD--is so severe that the hippocampus can't process it all. This trauma then becomes "stuck" in the brain, unable to be processed as a mere memory. These frozen experiences can debilitate and depress unless they become resolved.

Interestingly, talk therapy can often cause a "re-wounding", asserts Hartmann, which actually makes matters worse. Drawing on his experience with NLP, he realized that emotionally charged memories are "seen" front and center of a person--in full color--while non-traumatic memories are "seen" far away, off to the side, "flat", or in black and white.

Combining the most natural form of bilateral therapy extant--walking--with NLP, Hartmann realized that holding a painful memory in central awareness while walking can resolve a traumatic issue in less than 30 minutes.

Amazing, no?

Yet, according to Walk Your Blues Away, Hartmann's technique has proven successful for alleviating both short term and long-term symptoms in people--ranging from angry domestic disputes to war trauma. This is because walking uses both hemispheres of the brain, and "holding" the traumatic issue in one's mind while walking can literally vaporize disturbing events. In addition to providing compelling evidence in the form of case studies, he also shares fascinating cultural and historical anecdotes as to why "brain balance" can heal. For example, Hartmann refers to the legacy of left-brain dominance caused by literacy as put forth in the book The Alphabet Versus the Goddess by Leonard Shlain, as well as Darwin and the "noble savage" and how "walking" tribes were much less violent than "civilized" horse-riding people.

Most of us realize the many benefits of walking, but Walking Your Blues Away describes a deceptively simple process to resolving stuck emotions and symptoms stemming from traumatic experiences. At only 102-pages, this is a short book, but the case histories and theories Hartmann presents is compelling--and his methodology is so easy that even a child could use it.

In fact, walking as bilateral therapy can also be used to generate creativity, solve problems, and create motivational states.

My one criticism of this book is that the author doesn't mention if this type of therapy can be used with treadmills. I happen to live in a region that experiences some cold winters and while I'll go to the park as long as I can stand it, it's difficult to do so when the wind chill sinks to 0 degrees!

Bilateral therapy through walking is a fascinating, sensible idea--so if this form of healing sounds appealing to you, it's an easy way to (hopefully) treat chronic emotional distress or resolve "stuck" emotions.

Janet Boyer, author of The Back in Time Tarot Book: Picture the Past, Experience the Cards, Understand the Present (coming Fall 2008 from Hampton Roads Publishing)
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50 of 51 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars A Breakthrough Book, January 16, 2007
By
Dave Smith "Author of 'To Be Of Use'" (Mendocino County, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Walking Your Blues Away: How to Heal the Mind and Create Emotional Well-Being (Paperback)
Don't let the lightweight title, cover, and page-count fool you. This is a breakthrough book, and not just another self-help, happy-talk rip-off. This book can stand proudly next to the most academic psychological tome, and replace much of the pop psychology pap moldering on our bookshelves.

To be open to something so important, one first has to know who the author is, what he stands for, and why he can be trusted. I've read several of Thom Hartmann's books, and listened to his daily progressive radio program numerous times. I can only state emphatically: This is a gifted man we can trust. He is the real deal. (See my earlier post on him for more info.)

The basics of the book are these:

1. Our bodies are self-healing if we feed it the right food and exercise it properly under the right conditions. Shouldn't our minds and emotions also be self-healing?

2. Rhythmic, bilateral movement is the way we've healed ourselves from traumatic, psychological wounds for hundreds of thousands of years. But until now, we didn't know how it worked.

3. "Bilaterality is the ability to have the right and left hemispheres of the brain fully functional and communicating with each other."

4. Freud's early, very successful work was based on Bilaterality techniques, but after some unfortunate, sensationalistic historical events, he was forced to abandon it for mostly unsuccessful "talk-therapy" methods. Freud tried, but failed, for years to find an equally-successful technique. This history is crucial to our understanding of why psychotherapy evolved the way it did.

5. Devastating events can haunt our every waking moment for years. Some suffer war-caused "post traumatic stress disorders" for years or allow a loved-one's untimely death to ruin their lives, while others are able to move on. Just as we learned to transform our physical health by eating organic food, exercising, and drinking pure water, now we know how to consiously bring ourselves back to a healthy mental state.

6. This discovery comes from Hartmann's own training, observations and experiments, with dramatic results illustrated by case studies and testamonials.

7. Hartmann details a simple, five step technique.

8. Bilaterality has also been used by humans for less-traumatic problem solving, creativity, and motivation. Now we can train ourselves to use it consciously.

This book deserves a wide readership and word-of-mouth recommendations. I urge you to read it and pass it on, especially to those whose lives have been darkened by tragedy.
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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful:
5.0 out of 5 stars It works, November 25, 2007
By
Bill (Pittsburgh, PA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Walking Your Blues Away: How to Heal the Mind and Create Emotional Well-Being (Paperback)
When a self-improvement book is reviewed I always look for actual experience from people who have tried the methods in the book - not just those read it and agree with it. Well now I am reviewing 'Walk Your Blue's Away' and I can say unequivocally IT WORKS, at least for me. All of my adult life I have been prone to depressive episodes from rejection and loss - even if the loss is very small. Recently a loving and satisfying relationship of 5 years was broken off by my partner. I knew from experience I was poised to nosedive into depression. This was despite many years of zealous embrace of cognitive behavior therapy in which the two sides of the brain battle. An adverse event triggers dejection, anger, depression. With cognitive therapy you have to identify the irrational thought that supposedly triggers your negative emotions, dispute the thought, and find a rational and sensible substitute thought. The problem was the negative emotions would take sometimes years to dissipate and I was constantly ruminating and flashing back to previous events. What Thom's book does is address healing. When you heal from emotional trauma with this method, the two sides of the brain actually are successful in integrating reason and emotion. With cognitive therapy reason and emotion seemed to constantly battle one another without resolution. You might win a battle but the next day another begins. I contend that after 5 daily walks following the simple guidelines of the book, the crushing sadness of rejection has lifted. The memories that previously would trigger bouts of depression are still there but now in the distance. They no longer dominate my mood allowing me to concentrate and get on with my life. At the end of each session my thinking was especially sharp - the corrective rational thoughts that I tried for years to marshal with cognitive therapy were at last automatic. Everyone suffers loss, rejection and emotional trauma. The key, as Thom says is, to facilitate your ability to heal naturally.
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rachellemarie
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I received my grounding mat and using it already at my computer. Will sleep on it tonight. Will report back soon as to what I feel. Any others getting good/bad/indifferent results from grounding?
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momlyme
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I wish mine would get here already!!!

My son's gonna have to fight me for it!

Just kidding.

[Big Grin]

Can't wait to hear about your good night's sleep.

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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Brussels
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I started doing my own grounding lately. It does feel good and I need about an hour less of sleep without waking up tired, on the contrary, somehow I think I sleep even deeper.

My daughter is on the same 'device' and she begs for it, when it moves out of her reach in bed.

I only connected a copper cable to the water tap in the toilet (metal part), then linked it to my bed letting the wire under my thin sheet touch my legs. With a bit of sweat during the night, I do think 'connection' is happening (that is how Dr. K. sells his own grounding mat, to be used under the sheet).

I've been using it for about 3 weeks now, and I am happy with it. Energetically it tests good but it is still not as strong as grounding ourselves barefoot outside.

I am living in a country that doesn't have an 'earth' in the electrical plugs in the houses, so I have to do this alternative on the water tap.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYT3qaNIUPs&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmMn7o8QzZQ&feature=related

The guy there connects either to his heat radiator (I think he's in Canada) or to the electrical plug. He's got a voltimeter to show that after grounding on the radiator, his voltage is down to zero (or close to zero).

He also has another video on how to ground your shoes (very simple, even though might not be comfortable). You can buy a softer copper wire to connect to the harder copper wire that goes under your shoes though.

I'll try it when I find the proper material and let you know. You certainly sweat in the shoes, so connection through the socks is easy.

I think that a combination of BLOCKING EMRs from reaching you while in bed PLUS grounding gives very profound effects, much better than doing these things isolated.

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Brussels
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Just one more video from the same Max from above, he's talking about muscle tests to be done by yourself. I feel he has some good tips and different types of testing for you to try.

Here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a39U0a_eE78

You can do this test to see if there are harmful EMRs reaching you while you sleep.

If the grounding device helps you sleep deeply or not.

Etc.

Good luck!
Selma

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Wallace
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Anyone know where Dr K sells his grounding mat?

Thanks for the tips Selma!

I have developed sore red marks on K1 points on both feet which according to the earthing books is the major meridian on the foot.

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MichaelTampa
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Thanks for the links Selma, very cool to see.
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Brussels
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You're welcome!

Wallace, I think I saw these mats at Biopure not too long ago. If not, just call them, they certainly know where to find these. Explain you are talking about the mats that go under the sheets, that you are supposed to link to the earth with a sort of crocodile 'clip' (I don't know the tecnical name in English).

If I remember well, they are of silver too, so not unexpensive, but I do believe dr. K. when he says that if a patient has, for example, cancer, and you go do ART down in the garden of the house of the sick guy and look for a better place to place a metal stick (the grounding 'tool) for his SPECIFIC health problem, then you simply connect it with a wire to the grounding sleeping mat, he said that healing is so deep and so fast, that is truly amazing.

Like each health problem or each person has a better spot to be connected!!! Like each spot gives even more profound impact than simply connecting to the water tap like I do.

It's 'almost' like laying down directly on the earth every night, and in a special chosen spot! Of course, if you live like me, in the 8th floor, it may be a problem.

In Swiss internet shops, I certainly saw some grounding mats but quite expensive too. Dont' ask me where.. I guess I could google again.

I was more for building on my own, but sort of too lazy or too busy with treatments to try that. I'm pretty sure it's perfectly possible to weave a net of thin metal threads, (I would choose copper if possible). Not too much, just a small mat would be enough for a start.

If I had a time machine, I would have started with this grounding from the beginning, because the effect can be deep, I believe.

I started with protecting myself against EMRs and NEVER regreted. I still protect myself using whatever I have in my hands. It is a must in my bedroom. The difference between sleeping in a dirty EMR bedroom and clean one, is soo sharp!

Now daughter and I are used to sleep on the grounded wire. I wonder what will happen if we take it off. So far, we both sleep well, deep, I feel more rested than before as though I reached even deeper sleep and therefore, I need about one hour less of sleep and so does my daughter. I have to let the experience go on and see long term.

Next week I will be moving to the first floor! I will try to pierce a hole in some part of the bedroom walls or windows and send my cable outside!!! Let's see!!

I wonder how is Rachel sleeping mat experiences??

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Wallace
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Its good to know that Dr K thinks we are on the right track.

If I had a time machine, I would have started with this grounding from the beginning, because the effect can be deep, I believe.

I agree!!!

My feet are too sore to walk barefoot anymore so I am returning to my all leather shoes til my feet recover!

Nearly finished "Born to Run" very entertaining and theres a lot about how shoes are very bad for you!

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lostintexas
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Hello all, I am a newbie. Just convinced our PCP to humor me and consider that my husband has Lyme and he agreed to humor me and started him on doxy. He also asked me to start earthing my husband. There is a book by Stephen Sinatra, MD called Earthing from Basic Health Publications. Also an article in february 2010 issue of Heart, Health and Nutrition on the topic. Interesting!
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Healing in Santa Cruz
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I received my Earthing bands yesterday from www.earthing.com Pain is better,more relaxed and sleeping 24/7. [Smile]
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Brussels
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Hey Wallace, in which country are you to walk barefoot? Isn't it all snowy in Europe now?

When I was kid, I used to walk basically barefoot, as I grew in a tropical country. My skin was sooo thick, that it started cracking. But then it grew back again.

I could step on any stone, no problem even on some broken glass sometimes. I used to play soccer barefoot on the street.

I can swear that we don't need shoes. Only sometimes the broken glass was too thin, and it did hurt then. When I moved to the city, I started using shoes more often, more because the city is dirty and no one walks barefoot. But when I was in the coutryside, walking barefoot never was problem (it was problem to wear shoes, in fact, specially in summer).

Now my skin is so thin too and it hurts even to walk slowly on pebbles. And winter is here. Now I only go out to touch the ground with my hands. I guess we need to build the earthed shoes as proposed on the video above!!!

Healing in Santa Cruz, long time no see! How are you doing?

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momlyme
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Earthing pad is great... I use it every day and pass it around to family members. My son rolls his eyes every time I ask him to sit or lie with it...

I feel the difference when I sleep or lie with it.

Bought scalar pendants for christmas gifts for LLMD, home health nurse, family members...

Found this today on google when looking for info to print out to give with the pendants (so people understand what they are). Thought I'd share it here. Mentions Einstein, Tesla --

http://biolifechoices.com/media/upload/18eb6c6ca651.pdf

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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Wallace
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its not snowing everywhere!


Nearly finished "Born to Run" very entertaining and theres a lot about how shoes are very bad for you!

http://chrismcdougall.com/blog

i hope to run barefoot; we are designed to run.

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daystar1952
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Not sure if this link was already mentioned http://www.healthymedicine.org/html/radio.html
It's an interview with 2 of the authors of the book Earthing. One of the authors is Dr. Stephen Sinatra. He lives in CT and treats or did treat alot of Lyme patients. He mentions Lyme briefly on this radio interview and how earthing can help the sludgey blood so common in Lyme

Just scroll down a little bit till you see the title of earthing

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rachellemarie
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Have been sleeping on my earthing mat now for a little over a week I believe. So far, I do not notice any affects, positive or negative. I don't fall asleep any faster, do not sleep any deeper, do not stay asleep longer and do not wake up any more restful. ?!?!? Was hoping for these result. Will continue to use it because I think it is beneficial even though I'm not physically feeling the affects yet.
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Wallace
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http://gettingstronger.org/2010/03/the-paradox-of-barefoot-running/

This reviews Born to Run book linking it to Norman Doiges book The Brain that changes itself that discusses stroke rehab.

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Wallace
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Its going to take a full week for my sore feet to heal. I am sure most of us have very badly conditioned feet. Mine are very tender.

Still sleeping a lot

Selma I bet you had no health problems when you were walking barefoot all the time.!!!!

On the above blog playing tennis barefoot is also mentioned.

Thanks daystar, john rateys work is also on your link on exercise and the brain but we need to exercise the 1300 nerve endings in our feet!

[ 12-23-2010, 09:09 AM: Message edited by: Wallace ]

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Wallace
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From Runners world barefoot forum:


Before we begin, Take OFF that FOOTWEAR! If you want to take baby steps in your transition to Running Barefoot, fine. But, no baby, Ive ever seen, was born wearing protective footwear, so they could run further, before they learned HOW to run - before their bare feet were strong enough for running! If your bare feet arent currently tough enough to run a mile while barefoot, then DONT run a mile barefoot, not yet! If you wear some kind of minimalist, or transitional footwear, before you have had the advantage of LEARNING how to run while actually barefoot, youre just asking for problems problems that occur when we try to do too much, too soon when we protect our sensitive soles from telling us how to run more gently, or when its time to stop for the day - problems that occur when were still running with bad technique, but without the support provided by those big clunky shoes that allowed us to learn how to run badly. Its a lot easier to LEARN to sing on-key, when we arent wearing earplugs, to block the pain of listening to ourselves singing off-key!

Will Running Barefoot Cure all my Troubles?

Many of you may be suffering from chronic running related injuries. I wont tell you that Running Barefoot will cure everything wrong with you, or magically make you the fastest runner in the world, or that you will never cut your foot while Running Barefoot.

What I will say is that many of the chronic foot problems, common in our shoe-addicted society, are practically non-existent in societies that do not wear shoes!

And, much to my own surprise, when I first started sharing my Running Barefoot experiences on the internet, thousands of other people were not only running barefoot, but many were running barefoot because they couldnt run in shoes without chronic and debilitating knee and back pain.
The ??Benefit?? of Pain!

So, why are you wearing your shoes? You probably believe your shoes are protecting you from injury, or at least from pain. And if you have knee and back pains from running with shoes, you might imagine that the impact contributing to these problems must even be worse without shoes!

However, what we often forget about Running Barefoot, especially if it has been many years since we ran, or played, barefoot, if we ever did, is that it is only comfortable to land with impact, while wearing shoes.

One of the reasons we have so much fear of Running Barefoot, is pain. Yet, it is by learning how to avoid pain that teaches us to run smoothly, and gently, and efficiently like so many runners from places like Africa, India, South America, etc..

Footwear blocks pain, not impact!

Pain teaches us to run gently!

Footwear inhibits our natural ability to learn to run gently!
Varied Terrain

But first a word from our sponsor, the Earth! Going barefoot, from the very beginning, should be on a variety of terrain. And you should definitely start short just standing at first and build distance and speed very gradually, NOT as you toughen up, but as you LEARN HOW to respond appropriately to the terrain. This concept should not be taken lightly!

You will NEVER toughen your soles enough, by running on grass, to run badly on rough, hard surfaces without pain and injury! Our soles were made with many nerve endings, so that, from the very start, as infants, we could learn how to stand, walk, and run gently, and gracefully, while barefoot. Since many of you never learned how to do these things as infants, you may need to think more like children, and take some additional time, to re-learn what the appropriate response to each type of terrain is. Now, back to our regularly scheduled program
Have we been Practicing How to Run Badly?

From the moment you start going barefoot, you will change the way you run. Unless of course, you already have learned to run barefoot as a child, like most Kenyans, and Ethiopians!

Its always good to start at the beginning. And the first thing we should assume is that we dont actually know HOW to run.

Yes, we may think we know how to run, and we may even think we are doing it correctly. We may even have been told by an expert that the way you run, is something you cannot fix, unless you have the right shoes and orthotics

But, if we couldnt run barefoot, with the same technique we use while running in shoes, then we obviously are not running the way we are designed to run. I will be the first to admit, that I have known people who were born without feet. But, I dont know of anybody who was born with shoes!

If we learned to run with shoes, without the benefit of our feet being allowed to feel the ground as we learned to run, its likely we could learn to run better, more gracefully, more efficiently, perhaps even faster and longer.

Think of it like this, if we wanted to learn arithmetic, it would not make sense practicing multiplication, again and again, so that we had it perfectly memorized that 2 X 2 = 5? Sure we have learned something, but if we try applying what we learn, were going have some problems!

No! First you must learn the correct formulas, before it makes any sense to spend hours and hours practicing.

The same is true of running before we go out and try to run for miles and miles, it makes sense to learn how to run correctly, otherwise, not only are we teaching our body running technique that is inefficient, but might also be dangerous!

SO STOP PRACTICING running BADLY especially if it hurts!
Our Two Personal Coaches

The really neat thing about Running Barefoot, is that we have a personal coach at the end of each leg. The soles of our feet have more nerve endings than any other area of the body (of the same size unless you are really well endowed elsewhere!). Those nerve endings, like all of our nerve endings, are not there to torture us they are there to teach us how to avoid danger. In the case of the soles, they want to teach us to walk and run gently, smoothly, and efficiently, by telling us to avoid techniques which cause pain.

Tension is the source of most pain.

Wait a minute, you might ask, didnt you just say that bad running technique causes pain?

Yes, but it is tension that often leads us to stiff, rigid, mechanically unresponsive, and dangerously incorrect running technique.
Training Schedule

LISTEN to your body and soles. They will tell you how much, when, and HOW to run better, more gently, efficiently, gracefully, naturally. The key is to learn to pay attention. Follow this advice, and you will build a solid foundation of knowledge, technique, and skill, on which to build. It may seem like the foundation takes a long time to build, but watch a building go up, and you will see that after a long time preparing the foundation, the building actually goes up very quickly (and hopefully doesnt fall down anytime soon).
Relax, Relax, Relax!

It is VERY important to Relax! Relax! Relax!

I do understand that while we are learning something new, it is very difficult to relax. Just remember these wise words;

Your tread must be light and sure, as though your path were upon rice paper. It is said, a Shaolin priest can walk through walls. Looked forhe can not be seen. Listened for he can not be heard. Touched can not be felt. This rice paper is the test. Fragile as the wings of the dragon fly, clinging as the cocoon of the silk worm. When you can walk its length and leave no trace. You will have learned. -Master Kan

While I can give you a few clues as to How to run, it is the sensitive soles of your feet that, like the delicate rice paper, will fine tune your wisdom and skill of running smoothly, gently, and efficiently.
Start Where you are Today

Rather than trying to emulate the training schedule of top Olympic marathon athletes, we should probably begin where we are today, as an individual.

The question you have to ask yourself, and seek the answer for yourself, is Where are you today? Have you always worn shoes, all day long, for as long as you can remember? Or do you kick off your shoes as soon as you finish work or school, and frolic barefoot in the grass, dirt, or even on hard asphalt and concrete surfaces?

In case you arent used to being barefoot, the first few days might best be spent, just getting used to not wearing shoes, and watching where you step, and other such things. Read through the articles in this Beginning section

Then before you go out and start counting your mileage or measuring your speed, focus on learning good running technique. How

Or, if you arent interested in running, focus on walking technique.

Chi-Walking

Remember, it may have taken several years to get used to wearing shoes. Even though going barefoot is very natural, it may take a significant amount of time to get your body reacquainted with your long imprisoned friends at the bottom ends of your ankles. So go easy, let your feet gradually get used to the light of day, and the feel of the ground, and the new stresses that will be put on your feet.
You are not Alone!

Consider signing up on our discussion group, if you would, to share with a wealth of people with various experience standing, walking, and Running Barefoot there are a lot of other people, who had similar, if not worse problems, than yourself, and many are now running marathons (26.2 miles) barefoot!

To find other barefoot runners in your area, to share ideas or just to go for a run with, look for a chapter of t the Barefoot Runners Society in your area

So take off your shoes, and find out if your feet really are more useful than you may have been led to believe.

But, most importantly

Have fun
Now, It it time to Begin, at the Beginning

Starting slow (which may mean walking, or standing barefoot for some of you tenderfoots), and easy, and focusing on learning to run safely, and efficiently, as described in this section, also gives your feet time to become conditioned. It is, as has been said by so many others, absolutely silly to run long distances until after our running technique has been sorted out. After all, you wouldnt want to race your car, if the mechanic had not finished aligning your tires! Why would you do worse to your own body?

If one considers for a moment, that we really, not a single person in the entire world, are designed to run with shoes blocking the sensation of our feet touching the ground while we run, then we might begin to realize, that if the way we are running is uncomfortable while barefoot, that it is not because we are barefoot, but, because we are not running the way we are designed to run.

The main reason we need shoes for running, in fact, is not because of modern surfaces, which are not as hard as many natural solid granite trails, which I have run comfortably on barefoot, running up and down mountains.

But we really only need shoes like any drug addict needs his/her fix, we have LEARNED to need shoes. Our feet have become weak and lazy, due to constant support and protection.

So you can expect a period of extreme difficulty and discomfort when kicking the shoe habit. Your feet will be growing stronger, from the exercise they have been deprived of for all those years or decades in foot coffins. And, your soles have probably become ultra-sensitive in a desperate attempt to feel the sensation of touching the ground through the thick soles of your shoes, whose main or sole purpose was to prevent your soles from feeling the ground!
Should I expect Some Pain?

So, expect some pain, some intense stimulation, and a great deal of adjustment. But, dont fear, for most of the fears are way over-exaggerated. Yes, you will step on things. Yes there will be some occasional cuts, bruises, etc.. In most cases, however, these injuries are not the end of the world. In fact, in most cases, these injuries, rare, minor, and fast-healing, are much preferred to the chronic injuries many of you suffer, or will suffer if you continue depending on shoes to protect you from bad running technique. So just watch where you step, start short, slow, build gradually (as an infant would), and let your feet grow strong and healthy and free!
Should I try to Toughen my Soles?

It is important to realize that conditioning of the feet is not simply a matter of toughening the soles to withstand the abrasive surfaces we will be running on. Over the years, your feet have been protected from exercise by wearing shoes. Obviously, our soles will be over-sensitive at first. But, perhaps less obviously, and more importantly, our entire foot structure has been weakened, even deformed, by the constant wearing of shoes.

Therefore, it is very important to take plenty of time to strengthen, not just our soles, but also the entire foot structure. Focusing on learning HOW to run, instead of trying to build distance, at the beginning also gives our feet time to adjust, to strengthen, to regain a more natural level of sensitivity.

More importantly, our feet will toughen, as we use them, as we build up gradually, to walking and running longer and faster, whether we focus on improving our running technique or not. However, if we focus on improving our Running Technique, not only will we be running more efficiently, gracefully, and naturally, but also, our feet, wont need to be as tough, as you might first believe because we are no longer running as dangerously as we did in shoes.

So, physical strength, toughness, and conditioning, are way less important than retraining our mind. And focusing on strengthening, or toughening, to withstand abuse does little to teach us not to abuse our feet. We will never improve our running technique, unless our mind is relaxed and open to listening to our newly bared soles.
Stand, Walk, and Run (barefoot) on Varied Terrain

Another important consideration is what types of surfaces we will be running on.

Each surface has different benefits. Soft, smooth, uncluttered lawns, for example, are simply more comfortable to run on barefoot. However, soft, smooth, unlittered lawns, or rubber tracks, do little to condition the soles of our feet. But, they will help, to some extent, to strengthen the structure of our foot. That is the muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, etc

Hard and rough surfaces, while not all that comfortable to run on barefoot, are quite tolerable IF we use good running technique, and keep our joints fluid, not tense. RELAX! RELAX! RELAX! These surfaces are great for developing and helping to maintain a wonderfully fluid, and relaxed running technique, which will help us on every other surface we run on. So, while it isnt necessary to run exclusively on hard, rough surfaces, it isnt productive to avoid these surfaces.

In the real world, you are going to run (hopefully barefoot) on all sorts of surfaces, dirt, grass, asphalt, concrete, granite mountain stream beds, hard packed clay, mud, rocks. While not all will be the most enjoyable, sometimes its the variety that we can take pleasure in. Each type of surface, helps us with different facets of our running, technique, strengthening the muscles, toughening the soles, or just learning to relax while running. Each surface provides a different type of massage for our feet. And therefore, I suggest not being afraid to seek out and run or walk barefoot on each of the different grades of surfaces.
Final Reminders for Beginners

Always keep in mind where you are beginning. Dont overdo. Start short, slow, and build gradually, on each new type of surface or terrain. And relax, relax, relax. Dont turn the Running Barefoot adventure into a chore.

Ive always done a significant percentage of my Running Barefoot, so I may not be the best person to ask what kind of schedule a newby barefooter should start with. In general, what I have seen as others begin to run barefoot;

* One schedule does not fit all,
* as your body adjusts (or not), the schedule should probably fall by the wayside anyway
* Start SHORT
* Start SLOW
* build GRADUALLY.
* LISTEN to what your feet and body tell you.
* ADJUST how long, how far, how fast, how often you run/walk/stand/wiggle your bare feet according to what your feet and body tell you.
* Success is the journey, not the end.
* The more you hurry to succeed, the longer it will take to succeed.

Where to Begin

My recommendation is to start, simply by standing on a rough surface, or sharp gravel. Play, experiment with how to spread your weight over many points, rather than tensing up and trying keep most of your foot off the ground, we want to use all of our sole to support our weight. Thus distributing our weight over many points, rather than pushing with all of our weight, onto just a few sharp points.

When you can relax (bend your knees, relax your calves, lower your shoulders), and stand comfortably on some of the roughest gravel, then you are ready to start lifting your foot, and setting them, carefully. Again, play, experiment, discover, and learn. Thats what Running Barefoot (or walking barefoot) is really about.

more posts about Beginning to Run Barefoot

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hoot
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rachellemarie--
have you checked to make sure your grounding device is actually grounded?

here is my report so far--
*I wake feeling less groggy/confused
*I seem to have more dreams that I remember
*my hubby's foot neuropathy flairs with sugar exposure. He had to eat something quick due to hypoglycemia (took too much insulin). It had sugar in it and his neuropathy got worse. It seems that the neuropathy is going away more quickly now that he is using the pad. He has used for about one week now.

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linky123
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I ordered the pad and used it at the computer without any noticeable results. I'm very sensitive to EMFs.

Slept with it under my lower legs last night. Woke up feeling like I'd been hit by a truck. Also have a really nasty headache.

Anyone else experience anything like this?

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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hoot
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Just like any other treatment, I think all people will respond in a different manner. For the super sensitive, it would probably be good to go slowly. Maybe, in your case, use when you know you are exposed to EMFs or for only an hour a day instead of sleeping on it all night. Gradually work up to sleeping all night. This may take you months...

Studies show that it is causing changes in the blood, hormones, and EEGs, etc. so I'm sure it is causing *something* to happen for you. Your body might need more time to adjust to the changes.

HTH [Smile]

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hoot
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Hubby commented about the pad...
"I think it is doing something. My feet feel pretty good." (he is suffering from neuropathy due to diabetes that was just diagnosed this summer)

He started sleeping gounded on December 15th.
[woohoo]

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Wallace
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Dont let the snow stop you!

http://www.facebook.com/pages/RunBare/169108271528#!/video/video.php?v=161387009669

I now alternate between days barefoot and using all leather footware. it gives my feet a rest!

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Wallace
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Glad to hear the good news hoot!!
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Wallace
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http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php?topic=36.0

more on barefoot running and hormeticism

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Wallace
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Daystar on another thread you mention ordering the mat because the wrist band is awkward. I was thinking of buying the wrist band. Any thoughts?
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Wallace
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I agree with this advice on livingbarefoot. info
Great site with radio interviews etc


The Dangers of Barefooting
How to start off on the right foot:
By Al Gauthier

Have I got your attention with my suggestive title? Is barefooting really dangerous? The short answer is that it can be! Just about any activity can be dangerous if done the wrong way

I would like to propose that as of the moment you read this article you let yourself think critically about your feet and your body rather than assuming that everything youve been told is correct. Some of it undoubtedly is true and some of it is not. Much of it will depend on what is true for you.

Let me also suggest that listening to your body, rather than taking anyones advice, is the most important key to any part of your health. Advice is only great when it happens to match your needs perfectly, and no one is inside your body but you.

Having now put you into an active role in your new barefooting experience, lets discuss the various dangers of barefooting.

The Biggest Danger

The biggest danger is your own excitement and enthusiasm. Having been introduced to the idea that spending time barefoot can be beneficial to your health, you cant wait to run outside and give it a try. Perhaps you have a new pair of fancy minimalist shoes and you want to go for your first jog in them. No problem, you think, Ive been running for years! Wrong!

We get a huge number of emails from excited newbies who cant wait to try out their newly rediscovered feet only to end up in pain.

Lets step back and think about the history of your feet. The average person has grown up living in shoes. Some have even worn shoes inside the house. Your feet have grown, quite literally, to be adapted, as best they can, to shoes. Toes have grown pointing inward to conform to the shape of a shoe and your arch has had years of plush comfort riding on the support given by your ever more advanced footwear. The muscles, tendons, and joints of your feet, legs, and body have all grown accustomed to these conditions.

Im not suggesting for a moment that many, if not almost all, will find barefooting to be a wonderful experience. I am, however, suggesting that one should not jump foot-long from one extreme to the next. You wouldnt start your training for a marathon by running for four hours when you havent run for 10 years, so dont start going on long barefoot walks when you havent had the time to adjust. The body is an amazing adaptable machine, but it does take time.

For most, walking barefoot is a comfortable and happy way of being. Most dont do any barefooting outside their home, barring perhaps a wash of the car a few times a year or a quick walk out to the mailbox. It would be natural to assume that spending even more time barefoot is no different, but the truth is that it can be very different for the body.

Walking at a faster pace and for a longer period of time puts different stresses on your feet, legs, and body. The key to avoiding injury is very simple: start very gradually. Here is where listening to your body is key. Everyone will have a different pace, but I can almost guarantee you that you will let yourself beleve that you are capable of more than you really are. As you start gradually, your feet will build strength and your feet will start to adapt. Feet are very complex. Dont underestimate how very different barefoot walking is compared to shoes. The skin on the soles of your feet will also need time to adapt. Some adapt more quickly than others, but the protective layer that will build eventually will take time.

When you are ready to start barefooting, here are my suggestions:

1) Dont run! For runners who want to try running barefoot this is going to be nearly impossible. It is important however. Dont do it. Not yet!

2) Take your regular shoes with you. Youll want them if you find yourself getting sore.

3) While walking barefoot, stop immediately if you have pain or anything beyond slight discomfort. Walking on what will feel like rough surfaces will feel a little uncomfortable, but if you find it painful, stop.

4) Start very slowly. Go for a barefoot walk around the block for the first day. Stop.

5) Increase your barefoot time very slowly over a period of weeks.

6) Even if you find it comfortable, be careful not to go on long walks. You may find your feet sore for days or weeks afterwards, undoing all your effort. Dont push yourself too quickly.

7) If you are new to being barefoot completely, be very careful as you start out as the skin on the soles of your feet may be very easily cut.

8) Practice walking in a new waylet your midfoot touch the ground first, not your heel. Walking in this way decreases the impact of walking and is a much more pleasant way to walk barefoot. It takes time and conscious effort to change, however, and this is the perfect time to let your body memorize a new way of walking.

As you go out on these important first walks, you will start to build strength in different muscle groups in your feet and legs. Your feet will become accustomed to the rougher surfaces of the ground and will slowly start to build more protection. The change will be almost imperceptible, but over time youll notice that you can walk on areas in comfort that used to be too intense.

When you can routinely go for walks of up to 45 minutes barefoot without pain or discomfort, you are probably ready to start running. The same suggestions apply for barefoot running. Start slowly, very slowly! Running barefoot is a wonderfully freeing sensation that is shockingly different from running with shoes. This is due to a very different running stride that naturally evolves from barefoot running. It is less impactful for your body and many report it is much easier and more efficient. I certainly find it a vastly more enjoyable way to run.

Because it is so different, however, it is also important to start with only a few minutes of running. Remember the history of your feet. Your feet have probably never been used this way before and need to build strength. You have laid the foundation with walking and now you can start to build on that foundation, but it must be done gradually.

1) Run for only 5 minutes the first time.

2) Stop if you have any pain.

3) Increase your barefoot running time very gradually, working it into your regular shod running schedule until you can run the entire distance barefoot.

4) Dont let yourself go too long! Youll regret it. Do it gradually.

5) Focus on your running technique. Dont hit the ground with your heel firstever!

What about walking and running in Vibram FiveFingers, Vivo Barefoot Shoes, Feelmax Shoes, or other minimalist shoes on the market?

Virtually all the same principles apply. So long as your footwear is truly minimalist, most of the same new muscles will be used when walking and running barefoot for the first time. You should follow all the same advice for using these shoes. If your intention is to spend some of your time barefoot as well, you may want to do this during your first barefoot adventures. While the shoes do allow the feet to move in a much more natural way compared to traditional shoes, they still provide protection and cushioning that will make it easier to maintain old habits of heel striking. You will also not get the benefit of strengthening the soles of your feet, which will require a whole new set of training steps if you should decide to toss your shoes and let your feet free at a later stage. Only you will know what your path might be. Taking time to think about it before you start could be beneficial.

The Other Dangers of Barefooting

It would not be accurate to say that barefooting has no risk. There are pieces of glass that if hit the wrong way could cut your feet. There are other sharp objects on the ground, and yes, the ground is a dirty place.

The largest threat to getting injured is your own lack of attention. Walking or running barefoot does require constant attention. Scanning the ground of obstacles is a required part of barefooting and becomes second nature over time.

Despite popular belief that the ground is a minefield of danger, almost all barefooters report that they have very rarely hurt themselves. In fact, I would argue that the lack of attention paid to being barefoot in your home is far more dangerous than when outdoors and at attention. I myself have never been hurt beyond tiny cuts from glass a couple times per year. Those dont even require attention beyond cleaning.

While the ground contains bacteria and other nasty things, almost none of this enters through your feet. Diseases that we find in our modern parts of the world almost universally enter through the mouth and nose. So long as you keep your feet away from your mouth, clean them when you get home to avoid getting them on things you would touch and then put in your mouth, you should be safe.

There are, of course, no guarantees. You will find the sentiment is, however, widespread that barefooters in general suffer very few injuries or illness caused by being barefoot. One might even argue that those who wear shoes are far more likely to find injury through sprained ankles and other shoe-related problems.

Finally, there is one more danger to letting your feet discover the world without shoes

You may fall so completely in love with the practice that you will find shoes intolerable. All joking aside, most of us that spend time barefoot do find traditional shoes far more of a problem than we did before being barefoot.

Your feet will likely grow slightly, although there is debate about whether feet actually grow or whether the owners simply become intolerant of tight-fitting shoes and thus require larger sizes.

So now that you know about the dangers of being barefoot, you can avoid them easily. Let your feet be free. Make sure you tell us about your adventures. Contact us through the website, post your stories in our forums, or call our feedback line. We want to hear all the stories: good and bad, short and long.
Enjoy More Living Barefoot Articles and Reviews

* An Interview with Corrado Giambalvo: Living Barefoot Show 26
* Barefoot Australians; How far back does that go?
* The Living Barefoot Show Episode 25 We Interview Barefoot Michael
* The Living Barefoot Interviews: Barefoot Angie Bee
* The Living Barefoot Show: Episode 23: We Interview Rachelle Kurimoto
* Foot Changes after Two Years Living the Barefoot Alternative
* Charlie Weingroff Barefoot Interview
* We Interview Daniel Howell, Author of The Barefoot Book on The Living Barefoot Show
* Video: The Barefoot Professor
* How Barefoot Running Helps Common Running Injuries
* Living Barefoot Show We Interview Dr. Michael Nirenberg
* Review: The Barefoot Running Book by Jason Robillard
* Better off Barefoot? What do Podiatrists have to say?
* Living Barefoot Announces: The Worlds First Barefoot Search Engine
* Harvard professor Daniel Lieberman on Barefoot Running (Video)


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36 comments for The Dangers of Barefooting How to start off on the right foot

Facebook comments:

1.

I like how there is an advertisement for shoes with springs in the heels on this website.

Posted by KevinT | March 18, 2010, 11:57
2.

I am kind of new to the barefooting/minimalist shoe community. Ive started by walking my dog around my neighborhood in my VFF KSO Treks & have certainly found that after a couple nights in a row of 30-45 minute walks my calves & arches ache slightly from the neglected muscles getting their first real workout in many many years. I hope to build up to some trail hiking/running & Im currently out of shape enough to have no choice but to take it easy. I am anxiously awaiting the warmer weather to get my feet, and the rest of me, in better shape. This was a very well written article. I enjoyed reading it quite a bit. Thanks!

Posted by Guy | March 18, 2010, 12:27
3.

Only the FiveFinger Moc review link worked.

Posted by Seth | March 18, 2010, 14:05
4.

We find that amusing as well!

Posted by Al Gauthier | March 18, 2010, 14:16
5.

I first tried barefooting it back in fall of 2008 and managed to push myself way too hard way too fast. I went for an 8 hour hike over really hot packed trail and lots of gravel. I had blisters all over my feet and couldnt go barefoot for a month.

Just a few weeks ago, I got up the courage to go again. And although Im going barefoot 24-7 for the most part, Im not doing any long walks or hikes barefoot yet. Im letting my feet slowly acclimate to being barefoot all the time by not wearing shoes when doing basic chores and going to/from work. For anything else, right now, I wear shoes.

Posted by Joyce | March 18, 2010, 14:25
6.

Thank you The footers are being updated and all links will work shortly!

Posted by Al Gauthier | March 18, 2010, 14:29
7.

Hi Joyce! Thanks for your comments. Your experience will help others be more careful. Glad you are back to enjoying barefoot again.

Posted by Al Gauthier | March 18, 2010, 14:31
8.

I started barefooting cold turkey, and got blisters as I sped up (the first week was agonizing and I did little walking, then I sped up and got blisters, for the next month). But I didnt care. No matter how bad the blisters were, having had to wear shoes all those years was far far worse. But I expect Im an extreme case. Plus Im not a runner. Yet.

Posted by Anemone | March 18, 2010, 18:13
9.

Would you say you got blisters from pushing yourself faster than you should have? Was it avoidable for you?

Posted by Al Gauthier | March 18, 2010, 18:23
10.

I totally agree with all of this. I got some VFFs six weeks ago and started running about 20 miles a week in them. Yesterday the pain just got too much and Ive been unable to put any weight on my left foot since. X rays today showed that no bones were fractured, but Im going to have to get some crutches to get to work. I wish Id been more patient!

Posted by Paul | March 19, 2010, 06:23
11.

I got blisters because I walked differently on my feet the tender areas that had been immobilized by my shoes took a beating once they got into gear. The ball of my foot under my big toe did not blister at all, only the previously unused areas below my other toes, and the outsides of my heels.

I have no idea if going slower would have made any difference or not, but since I had no intentions of going any slower I dont really care.

Posted by Anemone | March 19, 2010, 08:21
12.

Hello there,

Arround 2 months ago, I bought my first pair of Terra plana lesotho to go to work. The change was so amazing that I did not put my feet in a traditional shoes from that time, adding 2 other pairs for work and leisure.
I dont know if it is only an idea, but I feel my feet are much more bigger than before.

As an Ultrarunner, I try to do the same for my running shoes, but as you said the progress need to be very slow. I moved from high heeled shoes to nike free first arround 10 months ago, then moved to lasportiva crosslite where I am now performing most of my training and races. In the same time I run more and more with Inov8 F230, and add a 20-30 mn barefoot training on tread miles every 2-3 weeks, at low speed .

So far so good, my body accepted the transition with some complain some times (on achil mainly) but nothing serious or leting me stop running.

The road is long before I can finish UTMB barefoot (or at least with VFF) but I can say it is for sure a realistic goal.

Bipdy

Posted by Bipedy | March 19, 2010, 20:52
13.

isnt this common sense?

Posted by sirloin furr | March 21, 2010, 07:22
14.

I think that most people understand there is a mild chance of injurey but dont realize how significant the difference between walking and running in shoes and walking and running barefoot really is. Its common sense only when you have all the information.

Posted by Al Gauthier | March 21, 2010, 14:31
15.

I was so excited to get my first pair of Vibram shoes that I WAY over did it! I suffered. Hes right: take it slow. Im baby-stepping, and wont give up. Great article!

Posted by Pamela Boudreau | March 28, 2010, 12:15
16.

Especially for runners it is very difficult to dial the mileage and pace down to a safe place to start barefoot/minimal training. From looking at a lot of boards I can see that most of us (myself included) tend to get really excited when we first lose all the padding and can really feel the world below us. I ran 30 miles in my VFF KSOs over the first week that I had them and my left foot got pretty tender: hobbling around and holding tightly onto the banister going down stars. But if you are serious about doing it make sure to do it right. Bite back against that urge to lose the shoes and keep up your shod routine so you can slowly log more and more minimalist/barefoot time. It is worth it. Getting hurt stinks!

Posted by Jesse Lindsey | March 31, 2010, 13:51
17.

I originally went to barefoot shoes in the hope they will help build some strength in the arches of my flat feet, and also help ease pressure on my knees.

Being a person who has not ran anywhere in the past 12 years who has just signed up for a 3 mile fun run, I am taking it very carefully with my barefooting, because I am not fit enough and get out of breath after 100-200 yards anyway! So I thought I may as well start from scratch with my running and my fitness and build them both up at once. [Smile]

I bought a pair of Vivo Barefoot Lucys in black leather last year, so I could wear them all day, every day while around the office with trousers/shirt and the usual smart clothes and it not be noticeable.

The first week I wore the shoes my foot muscles and bones literally felt like they were cracking and breaking out of ice and they ached so much!! My calf muscles and achilles tendon also felt like they were constantly stretching. I was still stumping my heel down, which I soon learned not to do as it was uncomfortable. I now take shorter strides when walking. The shoes are really comfy to me now, and by contrast my trainers feel like they are crushing my toes.

I am going to do the whole run in my Barefoot shoes. Im not going to run crazy fast, if I get out of breath I will walk for a time, or if my legs hurt I will walk for a time. Rest assured I am going to pace myself. [Smile]

Posted by Kris | April 1, 2010, 04:07
18.

I have endured nagging plantar faciitis for almost 2 years now. It has never reached the point of sharp or unbearable pain as I have heard others go through. It has been more of the nagging, dull burn and ache. I have been going to PT for a while and think I am coming through it finally and may be ready to run again. Im a lifelong runner and former marathoner. Little by little, I have been convinced that barefoot running is the way I want to resume my running. Chris McDougalls book and lots of reading and research have convinced me that it is the most sensible and intelligent way to run.
Id like your opinion on this: do you think that walking and running barefoot will slowly strengthen the whole foot and thereby alleviate the plantar faciitis? I have a pair of VFF KSOs and I am planning most certainly to heed all the wise advice to go slow. I do plan to start out totally barefoot on grass and work up to the VFFs once my feet are accustomed to walking and slow jogging barefoot. But mostly my biggest apprehension is exacerbating the p.f. condition. Any insights would be appreciated.

Posted by John | April 1, 2010, 15:53
19.

Hi John,

Going slow would never be more important than for a situation like yours. If things hurt, stop.

It is of course impossible to say what would happen for you as there isnt any solid data on things like this, however, I have spoken to and read about at least 50 cases where people had problems with PF and they were completely resolved with a more barefoot lifestyle.

Please let is know how you progress.

Who has had personal exerience with this?

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rachellemarie
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Hoot - Yes, the mat came with a ground tester for outlets, and the outlet I'm using says it's properly grounded. I also purchased a volt meter, but realized I do not know how to use it and can't find anyone who know how! I wanted to test my body voltage without and with the mat to make sure the mat is working. Anyone know how to use a volt meter to test body voltage? I have a black and red lead and don't know which goes where!!! [Smile]
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Wallace
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Sorry no idea!

http://runnatural.org/transition/program1/

Gives a slightely different view of transitioning to barefoot

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Brussels
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Rachel, see the videos I posted, Max is holding a voltmeter. Just hold one electrode with one hand and another with the other and see what is the measure.

Wallace, interesting info, thanks. Amazing the guy running barefoot on snow. No way I can do that as I have a bad circulation problem, real bad. I'm trying to heal that with acupuncture and eating RAW grains (MANY grains like barley, millet, buckwheat, some African grains etc).

Kind of funny way to do it, but I think I'm getting results. I get awful pain in cold, and my toes change color to dark purple even with winter shoes.

who knows one day I will be able to run on snow?

When I was kid, I hated shoes and my skin got used to walking barefoot, run barefoot, play soccer or any other street game barefoot. I only wore shoes to go to school, and that was just the morning!

The only problem I had were with broken glass when they were very sharp. I still have dreams about broken glass, can you imagine? These were my only obstacles to movement then and in my dreams I get trapped with broken glass all around me and I can't get out because I'm barefoot!

Somehow city life (big metropolitan areas, I mean) and barefoot don't match together (too much dirt and broken glass) but contryside and beach areas are wonderful places for being barefoot!

Do you know that in Switzerland many people go shopping barefoot? Yes, mostly kids, but I saw a couple of adults too.

It is very popular to be barefoot where I lived and the parking lot or the supermarkets are so clean, you really only need shoes to drive (because of legislation). But kids don't drive, so many come barefoot.

Not in winter though...

Well, I moved to the ground floor, but my flat is not grounded! So I still have to use the copper wire to sleep. And guess, here is SO dry that I can't just stick my copper wire outside in the earth! There's not a good connection. So I decided to ground me again on the water pipes. This works if there's metal.

I didn't sleep grounded for about 3 days and boy, I do feel the difference. I feel more relaxed, the pull feeling is always good.

But I suspect that if people have EMFs around, it won't be a great change for them. You GOT to block bad EMFs, you got to be sure your bed has no bad field from under the earth so that grounding feels good. This is my opinion.

The grouding doesn't protect you against EMRs!

The most noticeable change in sleeping patterns for me happened when I cut the EMRs. Dr. K. says it takes about 2 weeks to sleep well again once you cut EMRs at the bed area but in my case, it was very fast.

Grounding while one is surrounded by EMRs could help, I suppose, but it won't be enough, in my feeling.

Just one last thing: I play a bit of guitar and when I don't, it takes about 1 month to lose all the skin that is built on the tip of the fingers. REally, it is very fast. If I practice it every day, only a bit, the skin will be kept and the more I practice, the thicker it gets. It is very visible.

I suppose it must be similar to the soles. We need constancy, not exageration! If I play too much guitar while my skin is not built, I will have pain and will stop playing!

Anyway, great to read about other people's experiences!

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GiGi
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http://housebarra.com/EP/ep02/11shoe02.html

The old Roman shoe!

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Wallace
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just bought some marbles to give myself a foot massage. some more natural ideas here:

http://frescamari.posterous.com/massaging-the-plantar-fascia-videos

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Wallace
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That was michael sandler in the video and he was told he could never run again after his near death accident. He also used earthing products. I have decided to order his book on running barefoot. We need someone to inspire us all!! .

Daystar can you mangage now to walk barefoot for long?

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daystar1952
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Wallace....I am still waiting for the pad to come. The wrist band seems to work fine...its just that I am up and down so often that I forget to always put it bak on. I figure that the pad will always be there under the keyboard for my wrists to lean on?

I was just thinking....let's say that I want to go outside in the snow and ground with all my clothes and rubber boots on. Would all I have to do to ground be to bring a rod with me that's hooked to a wrist band and then stick it in the ground outside where I'm sitting? This way you get more negative ions and sunshine?

I must confess Wallace...I have not been walking barefoot outside in the snow or on frosty ground. I just wear my soft stars when its dry and cold. I have kind of given up on total outside grounding until spring. I can't wait because I do remember how good it felt.

I would walk a mile(wearing a pedometer) around our yard on the uneven grass and then I would sit and read for an hour or so with bare feet on the ground. This year I am going to try and garden a bit more barefoot. So...my feet have not toughened up during the winter. I will have to start all over again in the spring.

Yesterday I went clothes shopping and tried on turtle neck shirts...on and off...on and off over the head. Wow did that create static electricity! I had a headache immediately after that.

I'm thinking it was the static buildup? Any thoughts?My husband said I should take my shoes off outside the store and stand on the grass but I didn't :-)

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hoot
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I am *experimenting* with my earthing pad...and here is what I am finding...

My son that is 11 has autism. He is very sensitive to things (food, emfs, chemicals, etc). I just recently noticed that his ears get red and he gets irritable when he uses his laptop computer (Dell). On his own he has figured out that he must feel better when he uses his brother's laptop (HP) so he keeps trying to take his brother's computer. My son is not conversational and can not tell me how he feels but I can go by signs (red ears vs. no red ears, behaviors, etc).

Today, he started using his Dell computer and within 10 minutes he was getting irritable and his ears became red. I brought down the earthing pad and had him sit on it while using his computer. The redness in his ears has gone away and I have not heard a peep out of him since (when he gets irritable he screams, yells, hits and/or bangs his head).

Pretty interesting, I think.

Another interesting thing...I took my grounding tester to make sure his pad was grounded (after checking to make sure the outlet was properly grounded). I stood on the basement floor (concrete covered with natural stone tiles) and tested to see if I was grounded. When I stood on the tiles in my cotton socks and placed the tester on my hand, the green light came on indicating that I was grounded. When I stepped on the thick wool rug, the light would go off indicating that I was no longer grounded.

Fun stuff! [Wink]

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momlyme
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quote:
Originally posted by hoot:
I am *experimenting* with my earthing pad...
I stood on the basement floor (concrete covered with natural stone tiles) and tested to see if I was grounded. When I stood on the tiles in my cotton socks and placed the tester on my hand, the green light came on indicating that I was grounded. When I stepped on the thick wool rug, the light would go off indicating that I was no longer grounded.

Fun stuff! [Wink]

That's awesome about your son, the grounding and how much more calm it is making him.

Do you have a link to that tester?

I have the one that tests the outlet... but I don't think you are talking about the same thing.

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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hoot
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The outlet tester and grounding tester came with the grounding sheet and pad that I bought at http://earthing.com . You can also buy the grounding tester alone at the same site. Just snoop around. If you can not find it, let me know and I will tell you where it is at.
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lou
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Bare feet and hookworm:

http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/articles/241/hookworm-disease-in-mississippi%3A-the-importance-of-wearing-shoes

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momlyme
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I got the grounding pad from earthing.com

It came with the outlet tester and the Earthing book.

Is this the grounding tester you are talking about?

http://www.shop.earthing.net/Earthing-Connection-Product-Tester-RPTSTR.htm

--------------------
May health be with you!

Toxic mold was suppressing our immune systems, causing extreme pain, brain fog and magnifying symptoms. Four days after moving out, the healing began.

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hoot
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Yes [hi]
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Healing in Santa Cruz
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Thanks for posting that Lou. I am also concerned about pesticides,dog,cat,bird poop etc. Some kind of shoes for me. Poor Mother Earth isn't as clean as it was years ago. [Frown]
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linky123
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Still feel like I got kicked by a mule. I only use the pad for short periods of time while at the computer.

I am so disappointed. No progress noticed at all. But will keep trying a little at a time.

I was gonna try this with my kids. My son in particular doesn't sleep that well, but am now leery of it.

Am happy for those of you who are getting results.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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'Kete-tracker
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I "grounded" the tin roof of the rough wooden cabin I lived in... a few years prior to the Lyme.
In fact, I did most of my recovery while still living in that place.

Can't say it helped with EMF issues as I lived "off-grid" and the inverter downstairs was alive & "buzzing"
only when my small refrigerator called for it. Otherwise, it was a pretty quiet EMF environment.

I did notice that the static buzz in the TV picture on the lower channels (2 & 4) was less afterward "earthing" the roof [Remember analog TV?], but my recovery stagnated in mid-Spring of '06. I was on 400mg/day doxy & with no further improvement after month #2... no matter What I tried; Herbs, exercise (when I could), massage or diet.

The hi-level amoxy protocol I was put on in April helped me the most to really get energy levels back to normal.
I suppose I protected myself from radio/micro-waves coming in from space, though, with the grounded, solid-metal roof!

Personally, I think that if you have any metal of any length in you (i.e: bone braces) it might be god to keep EMF levels down. But if you're "metal-free", I'm not convinced recovering from Lyme would be any faster by using those pads & such.

It's a personal call though. Not like you're wasting a ton of $$, like 'some' docs make ya do.

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rachellemarie
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For those of you with the grounding mat: Are you noticing a difference when you use the slip it comes with as opposed to using it without the slip? I read somewhere that it's more effective WITHOUT the slip, where your bare skins comes in direct contact with the rubber. Can those with the grounding detector test this? See if you're still properly grounded when your skin touches the slip with rubber mat inside instead of the rubber mat alone?
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linky123
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Rachellemarie,

As I posted above, I have had some ill effects since using the pad. I called the company and the lady told me to use the pad without the cover. So I am assuming it works better that way. I did not test it.

Just a footnote, I felt really rotten after using the pad; so I felt like I had stirred up some toxins. I took some cholestyramine I had on hand and it helped.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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Wallace
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Trying just to walk 2 hours daily on grass/sand barefoot at the moment. concrete is a bit of a struggle at the moment.


michael sandlers website is www.runbare.com

He writes on facebook:

RunBare Staying Warm: When the going gets cold, LESS is MORE; in supportive shoes, the feet dont have to work & the body shunts blood AWAY from them. Yet in minimalist shoes or toasty-warm mocs theres no support & the feet have to work, so the body pumps MORE bloodflow to them. In winter, look for flexible, unrestrictive, un...supportive, full-coverage footwear with protection b/n you & a rubber sole (rubber transmits cold).

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Wallace
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quote:
Originally posted by daystar1952:
Wallace....I am still waiting for the pad to come. The wrist band seems to work fine...its just that I am up and down so often that I forget to always put it bak on. I figure that the pad will always be there under the keyboard for my wrists to lean on?

I was just thinking....let's say that I want to go outside in the snow and ground with all my clothes and rubber boots on. Would all I have to do to ground be to bring a rod with me that's hooked to a wrist band and then stick it in the ground outside where I'm sitting? This way you get more negative ions and sunshine?

Great idea!!

I must confess Wallace...I have not been walking barefoot outside in the snow or on frosty ground. I just wear my soft stars when its dry and cold. I have kind of given up on total outside grounding until spring. I can't wait because I do remember how good it felt.

I would walk a mile(wearing a pedometer) around our yard on the uneven grass and then I would sit and read for an hour or so with bare feet on the ground. This year I am going to try and garden a bit more barefoot. So...my feet have not toughened up during the winter. I will have to start all over again in the spring.

Thats the problem we need to go barefoot to really toughen our feet. My feet are very sensitive so its not an easy process!! Not yet received my soft star shoes.

Yesterday I went clothes shopping and tried on turtle neck shirts...on and off...on and off over the head. Wow did that create static electricity! I had a headache immediately after that.

I'm thinking it was the static buildup? Any thoughts?My husband said I should take my shoes off outside the store and stand on the grass but I didn't :-)

yep get grounded!
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Wallace
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just finished this book by Roy wallack. Very interesting. He has a book on barefoot running out this spring.


Editorial Reviews
Review
Lots of inspiration here. Run for Life is filled with advice that should interest athletes of any age who are trying to stay in the game as long as possible. What attracted me to the book is that the author is not only a credentialed athlete, but that he did lots of homework. The medical/technical information is cutting edge. Research shows that we can generate the stuff of youth (growth hormone) with specific kinds of training. The author has surveyed the field to see what has and is working for athletes who defy the aging curve, and is not shy about exploding myths and confronting the fact that the endorphin high that addicts so many to long workouts and high carb diets has a steep downside. Without the muscle mass preservation of resistance training, the postural, range of motion, and meditative benefits of yoga, and the hormonal drive enhancement of interval training, the very long slow stuff will grind one down. Get this book to find out how to remain fit in a balanced, tech-savvy way. Roy has done a ton of reading and research for you. --rickstrongcafe.blogspot.com

Run for Life is a 'must-read' for any runners who want to run the rest of their lives. It's chock full of legitimate and innovative methods aimed at offsetting common running injuries like pool running, barefoot running, and midfoot/forefoot techniques, as well as a few radical concepts like high-intensity all-out, 30-second "Ultra-intervals" that purportedly build speed on limited training time. The book is replete with expert testimony and examples, and has a rich collection of interviews with the likes of Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers, Helen Klein Rod Dixon, and Dr. Kenneth Cooper, among others. --Running Times magazine June 2009

This entertaining blizzard of information, with how-to training guidelines and photo sequences of effective exercises, includes a wide range of advanced training strategies for long-term running health. But what makes it ultimately worthwhile, and not just a fascinating opinionated blog, is that Wallack submits these cutting-edge ideas to rigorous proof and expert testimony, in each case provides examples of big-time people who have succeeded with them. --Slowtwitch.com

This is an awesome book that I actually read in one sitting! In a witty and conversational voice, Roy Wallack has crafted a very informative book in Run for Life, which details a life plan for running. A great read, it's full of oral histories of stars and everyday runners, and packed with practical how-to information --ncrunnerdude.blogspot.com
Product Description
Over 35 and want to win your age group and run injury-free for the next 50 years? Run for Life lays out a plan for remarkably fit athletic aging that can increase strength and speed on less workout time and leave you in a position to, as author Roy M. Wallack says, "Run to 100. Not just live to 100 and shuffle along when you get there, but do what few, if any, have ever done: Actually run a 5k, 10k, or even a marathon on your 100th birthday." Traveling the running world from Kenya to Tahiti and Boston to Badwater in search of the keys to super-fit running longevity, Wallack talks to the world's top coaches, athletes, and researchers and synthesizes new running methods, products, and fitness regimens into a life plan for runners that he summarized as: * Run Soft * Run Less * Run Stronger * Run Flexible * Run Straighter * Run Faster. At the core of the science-backed Run for Life plan is a one-two punch that addresses the two oft-ignored factors that cripple all runners: the natural muscle and VO2 Max deterioration that starts at age 35, and the joint deterioration caused by running itself. Featuring 10 extensive oral-history interviews and advice from all-time greats such as Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers, Rod Dixon, Helen Klein, Laszlo Tabori, Bobbi Gibb, and Dr. Kenneth Cooper, Run for Life brims with innovations: Soft Running form: The proven way to cut knee-shock -- and injuries --by 50%; Barefoot Running: Why it strengthens feet and lessens impact. Vertical Arm Swing: Why replacing cross-chest swings with a perfect pendulum adds instant speed, cuts injuries; HGH Strength Training: High-intensity exercises that fight aging and injury by raising growth hormone release; Ultra Intervals: Short, hard sprint workouts that cue rapid speed gains; High-tech Water Running: New joint-safe pool tools used to set the half-marathon world record; Runner-specific Yoga: Exclusive from famed multisport yogi Steve Ilg; Bionic Hips and Knees: New operations restoring broken-down Baby Boomer marathoners to their 30-year-old selves; Perfect running posture: a renowned postural therapist straightens you out for speed and safety; Runaway Weight Loss: How slight changes in diet timing can cut fat and race times.
See all Editorial Reviews
Product Details

* Paperback: 320 pages
* Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing; 1 edition (February 24, 2009)
* Language: English
* ISBN-10: 1602393443
* ISBN-13: 978-1602393448
* Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.4 x 0.9 inches
* Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
* Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars

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Wallace
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oughening Feet
From Running tips for everyone from beginners to racing marathons and ultramarathons
Jump to: navigation, search

It is beneficial to have tough skin on your feet for both ultrarunning and barefoot/minimalist running. I have tried a number of techniques for toughening the skin over the years. What is written in this entry is purely my personal experience, rather than specific recommendations.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Pressure
* 2 Bathing in salt water
* 3 Bathing in strong black tea
* 4 Rubbing Alcohol
* 5 Rubbing Alcohol, Witch Hazel and Olive Oil
* 6 Side note - calluses
* 7 See Also

Pressure

The skin on your feet grows thicker primarily in response to pressure and friction. Walking or running barefoot on rough surfaces can produce rapid adaptation. I have found that even short barefoot walks have thickened the skin on my feet.
Bathing in salt water

Salt water will dry out the skin, causing it to thicken slightly. I have found that this technique works, but the effect is very slow. Bathing the feet in warm salt solution can also be very soothing, a benefit beyond any toughening. I found using Epson salts rather than table salt is no more effective, but it does boost your magnesium intake.
Bathing in strong black tea

The tannin in the tea is supposed to bind with the protein in the skin and make it tougher. I tried it a few times, but found no real change.
Rubbing Alcohol

Like salt water, rubbing alcohol will dry out the skin. However, the effect is much more dramatic, producing results quite quickly. This drying effect will thicken the skin, but the drying can also make the skin crack.

Note: Rubbing Alcohol (AKA surgical spirit) is either Ethyl Alcohol or Isopropyl Alcohol, with additives to make it undrinkable. Ethyl Alcohol is the alcohol you find in beer, wine, etc. Isopropyl Alcohol is different and has a higher toxicity. Both are absorbed via the skin, so I chose to use Ethyl Alcohol.
Rubbing Alcohol, Witch Hazel and Olive Oil

I mixed Rubbing Alcohol, Witch Hazel and Olive Oil in equal parts and applied it to my feet over night. I put it on my feet generously and then covered in thin socks. I found that this not only seemed to help the skin thicken, but it also make the skin very flexible and 'leather like', without the cracking that comes with just rubbing alcohol. Update: I have found that using alcohol hand sanitizer gel produces a mixture that applies much easier. The thick consistency allows a thicker layer, plus the mixture does not seperate.
Side note - calluses

A callus is a localized thickening of the skin. A callus is a bad sign, as it indicates localized pressure or rubbing, which means your shoes are probably not fitting well. The best thing to do for calluses is to remove the root cause. I keep any calluses filed down and moisturized. I have found that moving to primal running has removed the root cause of my calluses, and they are disappearing now.

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Wallace
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http://www.mindyourheadcoop.org/blog/

A chaplain claims that barefoot walking and running help traumatic brain injury!

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Wallace
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Daystar have you ever tried running in your soft star shoes?
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linky123
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Is there some other company that sells this stuff besides Barefoot Sales Corp? I am having problems with them and would like to do business with someone else.

--------------------
'Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.' Matthew 11:28

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Wallace
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Trying wet sand!
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rachellemarie
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Linky, if you look on YouTube, there are videos on how to make your own grounded shoes out of shoes you already have. It's very simple, you just need to mave copper or silver come in contact with your bare feet and also comes in contact with the ground. Just go to YouTube and do a search for making your own grounded shoes.
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daystar1952
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Wallace

I mostly walk.....all the time...whether I walk in my Soft Star shoes or in any shoes.I used to run around when I was pretty young but constitutionally I never felt comfortable running. It always felt kind of awkward. Wlking feels better to me. When its dry out I walk a couple miles a day in the Soft Stars

I can't remember if I heard about the following book here or not but I just finished The Ion Effect....an older out of print book and I found it fascinating. I always knew I felt better and liked the feel of natural materials better than synthetic but I never knew why until now!

Alot of it has to do with synthetics creating a positive ion environment. I'm changing all of my blankets and many of my clothes...in the future...to natural materials

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Carol in PA
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Although I have not read the book, I've been following this with interest.
Discharging positive ions by grounding is a good idea, from what I can see.

One person said that she grounded herself to the water pipes.
Isn't there a danger of getting electrocuted if the house is hit by lightning?

Carol

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jackie51
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Water pipes are typically grounded. There should be a water company sticker on the electrical panel. You can't get an electrical final without it (at least where I live).
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