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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » hip replacement

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Author Topic: hip replacement
mtree
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its been awhile since I've posted...... [Roll Eyes]

found out yesterday I need a total hip replacement after years of pain (since 2007).......focusing on all of my back issues have delayed the diagnosis of the deterioration of my hip. the x-ray was hard to look at but another relief that I knew it was something....

another misdiagnosis and unnecessary suffering.

I haven't been able to walk much for about 2-3 years without extreme pain....

keep fighting everyone!!....

any positive information to help with this new adventure would be appreciated.

thanks!!
[Frown] mtree

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worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

Posts: 968 | From Point PLeasant , NJ | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Robin123
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If it's any comfort, several women I've known who got hip replacements after years of pain said Why did I wait so long? They felt better after getting through it.
Posts: 12971 | From San Francisco | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mtree
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yes that is good to hear!

thank you

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worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

Posts: 968 | From Point PLeasant , NJ | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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The replacement has helped many I know. However, they did not have lyme . . . still, better to get all spiffy new . . . AND talk to your LLMD FIRST about any Rx to be given during afterward.

Now, I know when you look at what I've posted you may say "Oy, Vey" . . . still, because I've had issues with all of this over the years (not for hips, though, I hope this will help you plan for the very best environment, care, and whatever stuff goes into your body. It matters for healing but also to prevent stress that can bring damage to the adrenal system and the liver.

Do not underestimate how important ADRENAL SUPPORT is, too. Excess cortisol can hamper us in many ways.

Steroids & acetaminophen are both frequent with surgery and some anesthetics / anesthesia can contain epinephrine. Just become aware of all that and ask your LLMD how allowances may be made.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/100984?#000000

Topic: what do STEROIDS actually do to those with lyme? -- and how to work with it, when required (but it may not be so do ask about other ways to reduce inflammation, too).


Epinephrine is in many anesthetics (not sure about anesthesia, though). Some discussion on why epinephrine (EPI) can be a rough ride for someone with lyme (especially if they have adrenal issues):

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/120035

EPI & medical / dental procedures


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=030792;p=0

LIVER & KIDNEY SUPPORT & and several HERXHEIMER support links, too.

Also important for any surgical patient. A LL ND might be good to consult first about your options.

Often, a hospital will have some on staff, or acupuncturists (who are also often NDs). The cancer departments see this more frequently, so you may have to ask over there for names and then contact them separately. Acupuncture would be an excellent inclusion in your care, too.

ACETAMINOPHEN detail here, too. That's really important.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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If you happen to be SOUND SENSITIVE (see Hyperacusis Network website but know that lyme can have some unique factors beyond),

or light sensitive or even "sensory" sensitive, it's also important to work with that in advance so that you have the best experience possible to keep stress to a minimum and help your ability to heal. Be very clear that any of this is very real (physical), and not about your character or in your mind.

Beforehand if you need any more imaging:

MRIs can be ear damaging so be sure to the very best ear plugs for yourself (I do not think ear plugs are protective enough, though)

&/or insist on the special ear protective muffs that the MRI department SHOULD have. Ask what their decibel rating is. Or buy your own, they have to special for MRI's though, with no metal, and dB rated.

Ask in advance if you can bring in your own, that would be marked "MRI safe" -- this will also be more hygienic but keep them in a very clean bag.

Some departments have a headset that is both protective and also has MICROPHONE in it from the booth so you can hear their directions. Be sure to tell them in advance - AND right before if you are sensitive.

This really sent me to the moon once, but the MRI machine blocked my lift off and I was a messed up sardine. Plan ahead. Be sure they take you seriously and beforehand, ask to hear what it will sound like when they CLICK on the sound. That first click can matter. Do a practice run if there is a sound system right at your ears.

This is not at all to add to your burden (and I hope it does not) just knowing in advance can save the day, though.


FOOD is vital to healing, too. No time to let any gluten slip in, etc. but there is also more to think about and plan.

You might plan to have friends / family bring you food so you are certain to get healing foods . . . although some hospitals are getting on board with that, they are still very few. Check well in advance.


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=029690;p=0

Excitotoxins; MSG; Aspartame; & "Natural" Flavors (that are not likely natural at all). Hidden Gluten . . . .

See the doctor's post here: Why My Mother Refused to Eat Hospital Food.

You likely are not new to any of the information here and, truly, it is intended to make this all easier and more successful. I wish I had know some of this before some surgeries. It would have helped me. So, I hope this is of help. Even when preparing, be sure to add a few laughs where ever you can.

[ 07-10-2014, 09:57 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/89790

Topic: NATURAL SLEEP & ADRENAL SUPPORT

Of course, there are considerations regarding surgery and ANY supplement. That's why talking with a LL ND first (or if that is not possible, a regular ND) is so vital.

They will know all about which ones, other methods of delivery or methods that may be okay (or not) in what window of time.

They will also that specific hospital regulations regarding such approaches - and which doctors or staff members are more aware of all this.

Somehow, though, adrenal support has to be on board. And this is also where some nice visualization and selected music . . . massage (maybe) or acupuncture can help, too.

Qi Gong can also be done, even lying down.
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Keebler
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I hear that newer procedures are so much easier. I assume your doctor is up on all that but some may stick to older methods. The incision now (or with some cases) is far easier than even a couple years ago. Different methods. Of course, you'd want to discuss the benefits or the flip side of the coin, too, both with procedure and parts to become the new you.

The good news is that it should be easier these days. I hope your experience is as pleasant as possible -- maybe some laughter tossed in there, too.
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Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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Make sure you have a GREAT doctor doing the procedure. Good luck!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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Carol in PA
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Hip joints degenerate due to poor blood supply, because bone cells die without adequate nutrients (osteonecrosis).

Lyme Disease causes several problems that can result in poor blood flow to the bones.
Systemic infection results in excess fibrin, which layers the inside of the blood vessels.
The capillaries narrow, and fewer red blood cells circulate to the bone and other tissues.


.
Red cells stack up, causing Rouleaux (roll-oh).

 -

Caption: Typical mammalian erythrocytes: (a) seen from surface; (b) in profile, forming rouleaux.
(Source: Wikipedia)

Those stacks of red cells aren't going to make it single file through the capillaries to give up their oxygen to the cells!


.
The Lyme bacteria use up the available magnesium, depleting our cells.
The body pulls calcium from the bones to compensate, and this weakens the bones (osteoporosis).

Bad combination, can result in death of bone in the jaw, knees, hips.


.
Pulsed electromagntic therapy (PEMF) can help, as it breaks up the rouleaux, and the red blood cells can circulate easier.
More oxygen to the cells = cells heal.

This improved blood flow relieves muscle spasms, relieves pain, heals bone and tissue damage more than twice as fast as usual.


You may be able to relieve the pain by applying pulsed magnetic energy.
This worked for me, I fixed my severe knee pain this way with the SOTA Magnetic Pulser.

If you have any kind of surgery, PEMF will speed healing tremendously.
I am not a dealer. You can look for reviews of the product at Amazon.com.


.
Here is a list of scientific studies involving PEMF.
The last one, #48, is pertinent to your case.

http://www.earthpulse.net/pain.htm

48. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head treated by pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs): a preliminary report.
Hip. 1983;:306-30.
Eftekhar NS, Schink-Ascani MM, Mitchell SN, Bassett CA.

Excerpts:
This has been a preliminary report with a short-term follow-up of a small number of observations...

Of note was the pain relief, in 19 of 23 patients with moderate to severe pretreatment pain.

Also there was an improved function, which suggests that at least in approximately two thirds of the patients there was some clinical benefit from this mode of treatment.

This preliminary study suggests that further exploration of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) is warranted in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

PMID: 6671918 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Posts: 6922 | From Lancaster, PA | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mtree
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thank you all....

I haven't read all of this yet as my brain is a little overwhelmed [bonk] still processing from Wednesday... lol

but I will read all of it and any other helpful/positive information...

I have some time....I'm thinking September when the weather is not as humid and hot....

we'll see....waiting to hear from surgical staff...

[spinning smile] mtree

--------------------
worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

Posts: 968 | From Point PLeasant , NJ | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bonbon521
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You might want to check into a reputable doctor that does prolotherapy. My husband had bad knees.

They did a meniscus tear surgery on him and he wasn't better. They told him he needed 2 knee replacements.

My husband was 65 at the time and told the doctors he was too young for that and that he would get back to him.

My husband found a regular doctor that did prolotherapy for 20 years on pro athletic players with success. The shots are just sugar solutions but are painful.

My husband went mid Dec. to mid Apr. every 3 weeks for the shots. She told him that she would have 20 yr. old knees on him and she did.

You may have to have booster shots in 12 years but that is doable. It has been 2 years and he has had no problems with his knees. We walk 3 miles almost every day.

Unbelievable that my husband was going into Walmart and after 10 minutes needed the handicap cart because of the pain.

Now after the shots, he is good as new. Insurance doesn't cover the cost which is senseless and wrong.

It cost my husband $1,000 dollars a knee but it is money well spent.

He went back to the specialist to show him his knees were all better but I can guarantee you that the specialist is still doing the $30,000 knee replacements.

Ridiculous. We aren't trying to save money in our country.

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mtree
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Surgery went great!

Walking almost without pain. Still in PT.

My restless legs have been torcher though. Been tryng everything. What works one night doesnt the next.
Any thoughts would be appreciated.

[Smile] mtree

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worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

Posts: 968 | From Point PLeasant , NJ | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lookup
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I had a friend who got over the restless legs by supplementing with Folic Acid. I don't know how that might translate over into your Folic acid supplementation "situation."

We use Designs for Health brand of L-5-MTHF.

http://www.covenanthealthproducts.com/l-5-mthf-5mg-60-capsules-by-designs-for-health

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lpkayak
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I always took a lot of magnesium but after knee replacement restless legs kicked in anyway. I found CALM a mag powder you mix in water and drink really helped restless legs

Getting off oxycodone type meds helped too

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Lyme? Its complicated. Educate yourself.

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mtree
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Thank you...for your suggestions.
[hi]

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worrying about tomorrow takes its strength away from today

Posts: 968 | From Point PLeasant , NJ | Registered: Jan 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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