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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » thinking of pulling root-canal tooth - thoughts?

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Author Topic: thinking of pulling root-canal tooth - thoughts?
WPinVA
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Hi everyone,

I have one root canal tooth and I'm thinking of having it pulled. This started in the winter of 2011 with a cavity that I had filled by a new dentist in my regular office, not my usual dentist. (That was mistake #1.) He drilled too close to the root and a routine filling turned into a route canal. (Allowing him to do the root canal was mistake #2.)

That tooth was never right after that root canal. It hurt for months. And in that same time period -- I came down with an acute case of Lyme.

After the pain become unbearable, I finally had the root canal redone correctly by an endodontist.

The pain went away, but that tooth has always been sensitive since off and on. And over the years, I have read accounts on here of the link between teeth and chronic infection and have wondered if this tooth is contributing to my ongoing Lyme issues.

Today, at the dentist, he discovered a new cavity in the same tooth. Not directly related to the root canal - in a different part of the tooth -- but still, it's the same tooth.

We had a great discussion about whether that root canal is contributing to my ongoing health issues. My dentist said that even the best root canal can't clear out all the bacteria. A healthy person's immune system can deal with the rest, but it can be an ongoing problem for those of us that can't.

He said he can't give an official recommendation but that he would be supportive of removing it and he knows anecdotally of several people who have been helped by this. (love my dentist for his honesty and openmindedness.)

So I think I want to have it pulled. Does anyone have thoughts or advice? My specific questions are:

- any reason not to have it pulled at this point?
- should I go to a biological dentist, an oral surgeon or my regular dentist?
- what would a bio dentist offer that the others can't?
- what to put in place after it's pulled? It's about halfway back, so it is visible.
- any tips on having it pulled? I'm sensitive and allergic to a lot of things.

Posts: 1737 | From Virginia | Registered: Aug 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dogmom2
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I had a infected root canaled tooth removed. My symptoms didn't change after, but it had to be pulled due to the infection. I didn't replace it due to my strong mcs.

I had a oral surgeon do it who also used ozone to treat the infection. I did poorly with the nitrous(depression, crying)and would avoid it if there is a next time. I had pain meds during the procedure, only advil needed after.

If you have mcs, meds can be used that clear the body more quickly, can't remember what they were.

take care

Posts: 857 | From northern california | Registered: Dec 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Brussels
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I would certainly pull this exact tooth out.

My story was very similar to yours. One molar many times reinfected. Dentist never did anything else than re-open the root canal.

I had dull pain for decades there.

Regular dentist will not do that for you. If he does, he will not treat the CAVITATION that destroys the bone.

Unfortunately, I do not know any other solution, except, a biological dentist.

Just pulling the tooth and leaving infection in the jawbones will not make any big difference, I think...

I pulled out 7 teeth so far. All dead. Each tooth has a different story. Some, I felt barely anything different. Two, I think, saved my life.

All 7 had CAVITATIONS. All 7 dead teeth!! It's unbelievable.

A bio dentist shall know about cavitations, how to test the bone energetically for more bone infection (more than the eye can see).

A normal surgeon can only take out what he sees: visual infection. But the problem is that there are microcanals in the jawbone that are full of bacteria, and the normal surgeon will not be able to see them. He will stop scraping the bone, and will give you some antibiotic and tell you 'this will deal with your problem well, go home'.

My surgeon worked hand in hand with my lyme doctor. Both were present during extraction. The lyme doctor tested me energetically, the surgeon removed the infected bone.

Then the surgeon used my extrated teeth to prepare a nosode with the EXACT pathological strains that are present in those teeth.

They use a machine for that. In a few minutes, the homeopathic nosode is done, and I take it home for ingesting it (in fact, that one was a radionic version, not a nosode, but I could take my own tooth and prepare my own nosode home, as my doctor knows me enough to know I can do that on my own. Any child can, it's easy.)

I in fact realized how much burden some teeth were when they were out. It was like I was carrying a heavy burden, day and night for decades. Only when the burden was not there, I realized how much the tooth stressed my body.

My jaw felt like totally light. The dull pain I had got for decades disappeared the day of the surgery, never to return. That was amazing.

I didn't get healed from lyme immediately after that. But I didn't care much: I was sad to lose a tooth, but as I felt like a true relief in my face, jaws, I think it was worth.

Less than 2 years after those first extrations, I went into remission.

I had still 2 dead teeth inside, that I left. They didn't feel bad, or felt nothing, and I was fed up with lyme treatment and doctors, so I just wanted to forget about them.

about 5 years after that, I had 5 dead teeth instead of 2: infection spread through the jawbones, I suspect, killing other teeth.

about 1.5 years ago, I took them all off. All dead teeth. All with cavitations. Neither me, nor the surgeon knew whether I had cavitations. Only after extraction, he could SEE bone infection with his bare eyes.

I decided to take them all off due to HEART symptoms that started. Insomnia, high blood pressure, missing beats, fast beats, I felt very bad.... My lyme doc told me 'it's the teeth'. In fact, it was ONE tooth, out of the 5.

The exact one that died during lyme. That one, reinfected again without my knowledge, but I only felt cheekbone pain. It was the tooth, because the day I pulled it off, all heart symptoms disappeared. Insomnia disappeared completely on day 2 after extraction.

I had to make a partial, with metal alloys (gold and other metals). Each metal was tested individually, because I'm too sensitive too. And get easily allergic to metals. So, another reason to use a biological dentist.

sorry this was too long.

Posts: 6196 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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I would have it pulled. And for me .. I would NOT have an implant. I will be toothless one day!!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94770 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
dbpei
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I have a friend with Lyme who went to a biological dentist to have a tooth pulled and it was a nightmare for her! It lasted 2 hours and the novocaine stopped working half way through.

Her dentist was with a very reputable group of biological dentists in our area. I am not putting down biological dentists. But I think that for certain, difficult teeth, it may be better to use an oral surgeon, as long as he/she understands the need for debridement.

It is a tough call. I just wanted to let you know about my friend's experience so you can make the best decision for yourself.

I still have one root canaled tooth that I don't believe is the source of my symptoms. It is on the opposite side of where I have most of my neuro symptoms (tingling, buzzing, sizzling and hearing loss). It would be major to get it out because it is wedged in between two molars that are crowding it [Frown] .

I don't have the nerve to upset the apple cart at this point. But from what I have read, it is best to get ALL of our root canals out. Perhaps in the future when I am feeling stronger.

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Brussels
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The surgeon that took all my 7 teeth, was not in fact a biological dentist. He was a normal dentist, surgeon-dentist, with an open mind.

My lyme doctor knew him, he knows this surgeon tried to use less toxic anesthetics, and was open to let him (lyme doctor) do the energy testing.

The surgeon was open to accept giving me nosodes made from my infected teeth. So an open guy, really.

Note that will all those 7 invasive surgeries (I mean, scraping the bone is not fun), I never took a single day of antibiotics! Not a single day.

I pulled them out in pairs, or single. You can't pull them all at once, unless you are superman /super woman and ready to be with your mouth open for hours!! No way, 2 is enough.

You stir infections and each tooth can have a different set of problems (infections).

When I took my last 2 teeth last year in February or so, I went to the surgeon like I would go to any dentist appointment.

I got so used to the procedure, and was relaxed the whole time. No anxiety whatsoever.

A few MINUTES after the intervention (about 30 minutes when I leave the dentist), the whole anesthetics wear off. I'm still not home when that happens, but in the train.

My lyme doctor uses only homeopathy for that procedure (which is lighter than herbs), so you may suppose I would fee a lot of pain.

Well, I did feel pain, at times, specially the first 2 teeth I pulled off about 10 years ago.

But the last 2 teeth, due to high frequencies I had been using, I got ZERO pain. No pain at all, which was the WEIRDEST thing that ever happened after such surgeries.

It still feels unreal, when I think about it.

Anyway, to tell you guys, it looks invasive (which I suppose it is), but when you get used to it, it's almost like just going to the any dentist for a cavity treatment!

Posts: 6196 | From Brussels | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lymetoo
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Oral surgeon for me.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 94770 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
WPinVA
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So you guys have me thinking more about an oral surgeon. But then what about the cleaning of the cavitation? How would that work? I would imagine most oral surgeons don't have ozone, etc.
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sparkle7
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Not all infected teeth have cavitations. I think it depends on the person. Cavitations are pretty extreme. They aren't infections that can be treated in a standard way. I'm not sure how they are diagnosed but not everyone has them.

I had a dark colored tooth. It didn't hurt but it had a shadow under it on the Xray. I had it pulled by a regular dentist. Nothing changed in regards to my health. I probably could have just left it. It was like that for 40 years...

They wanted to do a root canal but I just figured I should pull it. Root canals harbor bacteria. Nothing natural about having a dead tooth in your jaw.

Read up on Weston Price's studies about it.

I'm kind of disgusted with dentists these days. They drilled too close to the nerve on a couple of my teeth & I had one pulled rather than get a root canal. Now I have another one that may have to go due to that.

I'm trying to heal it with golden seal, oil of oregano & oil of clove. I don't want to loose it if possible.

I trusted a regular dentist to pull my tooth. She studied at Columbia NYC so she is pretty good. She's very conservative when it comes to any holistic concepts, though. I don't see how anyone can think having mercury in your head is OK but she was on my dental plan.

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sparkle7
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fyi - http://www.westonaprice.org/holistic-healthcare/dental-cavitation-surgery/
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WPinVA
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Thanks so much to all who gave advice. I now have consultations scheduled with both an oral surgeon and a biological dentist. Ideally, I wish I could find a biological oral surgeon! Guessing that doesn't exist.

I'm leaning towards the oral surgeon though... this is a molar and the tooth may crack since it's been root canaled. Think I'd just be more comfortable with someone who does this all the time.

Plus, they can get me in a lot sooner and the tooth is hurting, AND they take insurance.

Thanks again for all the advice.

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dbpei
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Good luck, WP! I sure wish I could find a biological oral surgeon too! It is good you will be able to consult with both.
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Brussels
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Yep, the problem is cavitation. In my case, it was not an extreme problem, but all dead teeth had big cavitations (one was huge and the oral surgeon could not clean, as it went too deep).

If there is PAIN, like a dull pain, it could be cavitation. Dead teeth shouldn't feel anything, but the bone, in which they are, can be still a bit sensitive.

From all 7 dead teeth, only about 2 felt pain. One was a sharp pain + dull pain (the one with huge cavitation). The others, either I felt nothing or a bit like a constant, low dull pain.

X-rays saw just a bit, I think. MOst cavitations do now show up in X-rays, no matter how many x-rays you do.

If you do not have cavitations, I would leave the tooth there, for the moment. I mean, unless you have nothing else to treat (then, better all of them out).

But if you are fighting LOADS of other things, the tooth is not bothering, it doesn't test bad energetically or by EAV, I would leave it for treating later.

I left some that were not bothering, and kept having ozone injections when the doctor thought they could have bits of infection.

The only problem is time: letting dead teeth there for too long is no good. Not for people with low immunity, like us.

Each dead tooth is like a time bomb.

You may die before all of them turn real bad, but they may turn bad before that and even kill you.

My lyme doctor said clearly: a dead tooth can kill you, and that can happen pretty fast. Lyme alone will rarely kill, and when that happens, it takes usually long.

He is an adept of ozone injections too, but in my case, he recommended pulling them off.

The only good thing in pulling teeth out is that now it's one problem less to ponder about. At least there, critters won't be hiding to the EXTENT they were hiding there before I pulled them off.

And those poisonous mercaptans and thiothers, very bad neurotoxins, are not anymore being released from dead teeth. So really, it's one heavy bag less for my immune system to carry!

But I also left 2 dead teeth during lyme. I took the worst 2, and left 2 dead teeth, just because I wanted to avoid such invasive procedure. It is invasive, because a tooth is an organ!

And I did miss my teeth, once they were off. But in my case, there was no choice... Either them or me. That is when I decided to pull them off.

It's been a year, and the whole dying cascade of teeth stopped. I think one dead tooth was just causing the death of others (?), if that makes sense. Like infecting from the bone, to the next tooth, etc....

[ 03-17-2016, 10:17 AM: Message edited by: Brussels ]

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WPinVA
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Am going to go with the oral surgeon -- figure he is the expert in pulling teeth. Plus I told him about Lyme and he was open minded and supportive of pulling it. He was really nice an dput me at ease.

Said the same thing as my dentist -- that there is likely a low level infection there taxing my overall system and that he has seen lots of people feel better after getting a tooth out of there.

No cavitation showing on x-ray. He said if he sees infection after he pulls it, he will "rinse it out." Doesn't use ozone.

Again, wish I could have a biological oral surgeon, but since that doesn't exist, think I am more comfortable with oral surgeon. And with everything else going on in my life at the moment, I no longer have time to do multiple consults. Just have to get this tooth out of there and hope for the best.

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hopingandpraying
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I found you a biological oral surgeon in Virginia Beach, VA (don't know if that is near where you live):

https://iaomt.org/search/dean-e-kent/

Here is a link for you to find biological dentists and other dental specialists:

https://iaomt.org/search/

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Haley
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Brussels - I have several teeth that could be pulled. I don't want to be toothless. Not only am I too young to not have any teeth, the bone begins to disintegrate if one pulls several teeth. I guess I am waiting for an implant that will be perfect.

Do you ever regret having pulled so many teeth? Did you have to pull front teeth?

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WPinVA
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Tooth is out! In the end, I didn't love the oral surgeon. But at least it's done. It had become a constant ache.

Next step, orthodontist consult, then eventually an implant.

He said he didn't see any infection. We will see if this helps.

For now, lying here all day clenching a gauze pad.

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dbpei
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That is great, WP! I hope you have a good recovery. You must be relieved. [Smile]
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claire oliver
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I also had a tooth extraction and the dentist that did this also cleaned all the canals and removed my root.

--------------------
Hi there.

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payne1
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So sorry for you. It's awful when you have a toothache but the worst thing is when it hurts for months. I don't know how you endured your toothache, I'd probably die. I also had a tooth removed recently, it was a wisdom tooth. I ate only at one side for two months and then I went to a dentist that I found here jeffreygrossdds.com and he said me that my wisdom tooth was developed incorrectly and he removed it. I go to Dr. Jeffrey Gross twice a year just for checking if everything is alright. He also helped me to achieve beautiful and healthy teeth and now I'm proud of my smile and I'm happy with the result.

[ 02-02-2021, 08:38 AM: Message edited by: payne1 ]

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Life is about creating yourself.

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Tryal - one of the 6% cured of LD
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In my experience, removing any tooth is not necessary. However I have chemical and electronic resources.
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