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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » MARSHMALLOW ROOT

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Author Topic: MARSHMALLOW ROOT
Keebler
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MARSHMALLOW ROOT POWDER (Althaea officinalis)

INFORMATIONAL LINKS SET

Everyone is invited to add articles or experience notes yet if a question - best to start your own thread so it can have proper discussion and this can be a resource listing.

[Slippery Elm would be a near "twin" helper in many - though not all - regards and a separate links set to accompany]

1-18-2019 note: In a lecture I just say yesterday on YouTube by Sally Norton, MPH, she says that Slippery Elm is VERY HIGH IN OXALATE - so that in no longer a recommendation I feel comfortable with).


Any of the links below can also be used for other herbal searches.
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[ 01-18-2019, 01:20 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Althaea_officinalis

Althaea officinalis (marsh-mallow . . . )

is a perennial species indigenous to Europe, Western Asia, and North Africa, which is used as a medicinal plant and ornamental plant.

A confection made from the root since ancient Egyptian time evolved into today's marshmallow treat.[3] . . .

[poster's note: yet, keep in mind that contemporary commercially available marshmallows no longer contain Althaea officinalis. . . .]

. . . Herbal medicine

The leaves, flowers and the root of A. officinalis (marshmallow) have been used in traditional herbal medicine.

This use is reflected in the name of the genus, which comes from the Greek, meaning "to heal."[6] In traditional Chinese medicine, . . . .

Marshmallow is traditionally used for irritation of mucous membranes,[7] including use as a gargle for mouth and throat ulcers and gastric ulcers.[8] The root was used in the Middle Ages for sore throat.[3]

. . . Culinary . . . .
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Keebler
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http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/

The ONE EARTH HERBAL SOURCEBOOK (Tillotson, et al)

http://oneearthherbs.squarespace.com/diseases/herbs-for-treating-lung-conditions.html

Herbs for Treating Lung Conditions [end of second paragraph: . . . .

When lungs are too dry . . . lung-nourishing herbs which soothe: . . . slippery elm bark, and marshmallow root (Althaea officinalis).] . . . .


http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mallow07.html

Botanical.com - MALLOWS


http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mallow07.html#mar

Botanical.com - MALLOW, MARSH

Botanical: Althaea officinalis (LINN.)

[Extensive article]
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Keebler
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PubMed Search - US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Marshmallow+Root

Marshmallow Root - 21 abstracts


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Althaea+officinalis

Althaea officinalis - 85 abstracts


Of course, cross searches of symptoms or body systems / organs can also be done at PubMed to zero in.
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Keebler
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https://draxe.com/marshmallow-root/

Marshmallow Root (Althaea officinalis): The Ultimate Gut and Lung Protector

By Dr. Josh Axe

7 Benefits of Marshmallow Root
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Keebler
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MOUTH TISSUE can also benefit both in comfort and integrity.

I just started using this for my mouth and it is really helping. I don't know why I waited so long to use this. I think it's better for an ulcerous mouth than slippery elm.

Soothes BURNING MOUTH so nicely, too.

About 1/2 teaspoon in about 1/2 cup water. Mix and sip.

Can add other herbal medicinal ingredients, too, as long as they are not caustic / too acidic as you want the marshmallow "gel" to sit in mouth for a while and bathe the tissue.

Do not use lemon as it's too caustic to tooth enamel. However, Lemon Myrtle Tea, diluted, would be good as it has some good antimicrobial properties.

Strand Tea in Oregon carries Lemon Myrtle Tea. Do not use just any "lemon" tea and certainly never any in tea bags with "natural ingredients" as all bets are off as to what those are.

Green Tea, Peppermint tea also a good choice.

I have also started using it as a tooth powder for brushing as it does not burn.
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Keebler
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Where I get mine:

Mountain Rose Herbs - in Eugene, Oregon
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