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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Collagen Supplements, could I take?

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Author Topic: Collagen Supplements, could I take?
Dux
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Hello, I'm new here and just found about the decease.

I've searched in the forum, but only found 2011 specific topics about collagen.

From what I've read, Lyme loves collagen, but we should take supplementation, nevertheless.

Does this consensus still holds today? Can I take Collagen (or should I take)?

1 - Particularly type 2, non-hydrolyzed (allegedly) for the joints?

2 - How about Glutamine?

3 - Chondroitin?

Thank you, very much!

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Keebler
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Do NOT take glutamine / glutamic acid / glutamate in supplement form.

Check all supplements, all of them. Be sure that if it's included, - maybe just in one supplement like multivitamins - it's a tiny, just a very tiny amount and balanced with lots of other amino acids so to keep it steady..

Many powder proteins have this sky high. Those should be avoided.

Also be mindful as to how much you get naturally in foods. Some we all need. But those with neurological conditions can be damaged beyond the basic need.

It is extremely excitatory to nerve action, stressful to adrenals and can be very wrong for those with any kind of neurological issues as with lyme. It can cause damage to the nerve fibers & myelin sheath that protects the nerves..

It can also cause anxiety or make it worse & lower seizure threshold which, for those with lyme, is truly of concern.

If being considered to help heal stomach lining, there are other options such as DLG, slippery elm powder, marshmallow root, assess h. pylori, etc.

For stomach issue, other things first and only if they don't do the job, if glutamate seems necessary only the tiniest amount in a little water on empty stomach to coat for a little while - and then add some foods not too long afterward to balance the glutamate "hit" so to speak.

Magnesium can help balance it in such a case as magnesium helps the nerve fibers not fire too much but I do not know if magnesium can prevent the glutamate from eating away at the myelin sheath.

That's another question to consider if using it for anything other than short term to help gut lining. It does help heal gut lining but it just needs careful thought. GABA might also need to be taken but that tricky to get right dosage.

Detail:


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/113775?#000000

Topic: Amino Acid Information Link

See post: Caution: Aspartate; Glutamine; and Phenylalanine (3 excitatory amino acids that can be wrong for us when added as supplements, beyond a normal dietary level)

Seaweed has its own natural MSG (monosodium glutamate) and can be very excitatory
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Keebler
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I have a question I've not yet researched as to if adding collagen would give the spirochetes a feast but I've come to realize that it's never good to starve our bodies of anything required.

And some of us really need to supplement this for the integrity of our cell structure and joints.. To not add what is needed is to deprive our bodies and that's just never going to work out well.

Lyme, other infections will eat whatever is in their way. If they are said to like one body part, say, and that's being blocked, they will just move on. Better strategy is to give body nutrients it needs but then

also be very deliberate, assertive and direct in addressing lyme, etc. so that it just stops attacking and rides off into the sunset.

FWIW, Stephen Buhner, an extremely lyme literate master herbalist

does suggest collagen can be helpful. Only a special brand of clean sourcing. Great Lakes Collagen Hydrolysate.

He says he prefers the porcine (pig) over the bovine (cattle).

I have that in files notes but am toast now. Later. Or cross search with Google for:

Buhner, collagen


Good Organic Bone Broths best source for it, though. Easy to make at home. I don't use much water so the pot can be smaller. I just make it very condensed and add water at needed when consuming. Be sure to use organic meat bones, though. And if beef, from grass fed beef.
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Keebler
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Chondroitin?

I've studied this less. However, if I recall correctly when I took it long ago, it really tore up my stomach. Anything that might do that - avoid. Always. There are always other ways.

If this does not do that for others, continue researching it. But, ultimately, food sources are best.
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Keebler
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From my file notes:

https://draxe.com/what-is-collagen/

Collagen - different types, how each help -- Dr. Axe


https://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=30&m=3570003

Q: Buhner, collagen support?

A: Posted 1/18/2016

In his new Lyme book, Buhner lists the following for collagen protection:

1 tablespoon daily Great Lakes gelatin powder (he prefers pork)

https://www.vitacost.com -- or www.iherb.com

Great Lakes Gelatin Collagen Joint Care Porcine Gelatin

Unflavored -- 16 oz - good price. at VitaCost, may aslo be at iHerb. Amazon likely has the Bovine version.
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Keebler
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Keep in mind that for the body to produce proper collagen, a good night's sleep is required. Eight hours needed for good collagen production. A dream for many, I know.

So, it's most likely not just that lyme can go after it, for many with lyme, sleep is a big problem and that then causes so many other breakdowns in body structure.
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Jane001
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quote:
Originally posted by Dux:
Hello, I'm new here and just found about the decease.

I've searched in the forum, but only found 2011 specific topics about collagen.

From what I've read, Lyme loves collagen, but we should take supplementation, nevertheless.

Does this consensus still holds today? Can I take Collagen (or should I take)?

1 - Particularly type 2, non-hydrolyzed (allegedly) for the joints?

2 - How about Glutamine?

3 - Chondroitin?

Thank you, very much!

Maybe it`s late to write here. In my opinion, you should ask a nutritionist, because only he can help you with this problem. I really know that some studies show that taking collagen supplements for several months can improve skin elasticity, (i.e., wrinkles and roughness) as well as signs of aging. Others have shown that consuming collagen can increase density in weakened bones with age and can improve joint, back, and knee pain. However, The way your collagen supplement is made is just as important. Traditionally, supplemental collagen was taken in the form of gelatin. Gelatin is actually made of collagen, but it's in the form of huge proteins that can cause gut pain and aren't absorbed very well. Studies show that taking a hydrolyzed collagen is best.


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[ 11-04-2020, 12:59 PM: Message edited by: Jane001 ]

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