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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » General Support » Eradicating the source of Lyme Disease

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Author Topic: Eradicating the source of Lyme Disease
nextlevelprotocol
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30 October 2020

There is no known cure for Lyme Disease at least not yet.

How do we eradicate Lyme disease? We must stop it at its source.
Lyme Disease is essentially spread by ticks. The best way to eradicate Lyme disease is to eradicate the ticks which transmit it.

Although, I have concluded that it is spread in other ways including (albeit rarely) sexual contact.

Ticks only seem to thrive in areas where there is a lot of deer. Remove deer and you remove the ticks and you stop the spread of Lyme. Where this is not possible, we must think of an alternative approach.

First and foremost, we should use tick tubes which will greatly reduce the number of infected ticks in an area. That should be done routinely. However, It’s not enough.

My approach

I have come to believe that deer attract ticks because they have a nutritional deficiency which other animals do not share. A large population of deer in a small area may lead to the exhaustion of key nutritional sources (specific food plants) and leads to a weakness in the animals which creates a vulnerability to ticks.

If these deficiencies are addressed hopefully this vulnerability should disappear and the number of ticks feeding on deer should also decrease and hopefully come down to a manageable level. Combined with the tick tubes the number of infected ticks should be very small or at least that’s my hope.

Essentially my plan is for certain plants to be made available in abundance in areas where there is a population of deer. These include Artemisia and Asteraceae species. Also, some Minor Plantago, Helianthemum and plenty of Plumbaginaceae (Leadworts) and Salix.

Salix being aspirin containing plants. But I think Plumbaginaceae (Leadworts) and possibly Artemisia species are very important, and they should be provided in great abundance for the deer, possibly grown on purpose in special clearings for deer to eat.

Hopefully by giving them these important nutrients their vulnerability to these bugs will be decreased, and they will cease to be attractive to ticks, combined with the tick tubes the number of infected ticks will be very small and the risk for Lyme disease in these areas should drop.

This is an economical and environmentally friendly way to deal with an emerging vector-based disease. I suspect it’s going to become a much more significant problem in the future, and more and more people are coming down with this infection.

The cause of vulnerability to this infection has several factors. One of the most important is oral health. Gum disease, cavities and jaw cavitations seem turn up again and again in the Lyme patients especially in serious cases.

These dental infections make people extremely vulnerable to the progression of Lyme Disease. People should make sure they have no such infections before begin living in a Lyme endemic area. To do otherwise invites too great a risk of infection.

Many things have been suggested to treat/cure Lyme Disease. There are some candidates I have identified which I believe would be of use, there are also some drugs which seemingly would be very useful.

As a general principle the mouth should be kept very clean if you have Lyme. The use of floss and toothpicks or a Waterpik for cleaning the mouth is advised, keeping the mouth as clean as possible.

In terms of treatments the key thing is treating the spleen. Any herbs that clean the spleen should be beneficial although most cannot be used for a great length of time. Herbs that are milder for the constitution are better depending on how severe the infection is.

Some herbs which look promising include the Poria mushroom which is good for the spleen. Other candidates include white atractylodes. Chinese medicine also could be used with Poria containing formulas. Blue citrus and lemons and oranges could be used for Lyme.

The peel of Lemons and Oranges contains pectin and oils which have anti-spirochetal activities. I read of one case where a man who ate lemons and oranges including the pith and peel while fasting (along with supplementary vitamin C) considered himself cured in a short time. I also believe the Plumbaginaceae (Leadworts) are worth investigating for use as anti-spirochetal agents.

There are a number of different treatment protocols and effective supplements. I will just mention a few worth further research with regards to Lyme: Knotweed, Stellaria and the drug Fenbendazole.

Western Fence Lizard

There may be a way to use this idea without causing problems or harming the eco system. When the ticks feed on the Western Fence Lizard the Spirochetes in the blood are destroyed, it effectively removes Lyme Disease from these ticks.

Someone should seriously study whether introducing the reptile will reduce the prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in ticks in the local area. It is worth investigating further.

[ 11-12-2020, 05:23 AM: Message edited by: nextlevelprotocol ]

Posts: 2 | From North Springfield | Registered: Jun 2020  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ann-Ohio
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I am glad you are looking into this problem, HOWEVER ....

Ticks get on deer as adults when they are strong enough to climb up on bushes and other brush and hook onto deer as they pass by. They use the deer's blood as nourishment.

Ticks are attracted to the chemicals exhaled by mammals as they breathe, as well, so they can move to a good area for snagging onto the deer or other animals, including us.

Getting rid of deer can be helpful, but ticks can thrive by feeding on many other annimals including all that pass their way, such as birds,
rodents of all kinds, foxes, coyotes etc, and pets and farm animals and you.

They actually get tick-borne diseases first from feeding on infected mice. I think the "tubes" you refer to are the ones that are helpful in controlling them.

(You can use cardboard tubes like the ones from toilet paper with cotton treated with permethrin. The mice use the cotton for nesting and kill off ticks that way. You can put them around your property.)

I am very wary of all the remedies you cite. Those need to be checked with a reliable physician before trying any of them.

You wrote:
"I have come to believe that deer attract ticks because they have a nutritional deficiency which other animals do not share.

A large population of deer in a small area may lead to the exhaustion of key nutritional sources (specific food plants) and leads to a weakness in the animals which creates a vulnerability to ticks.

If these deficiencies are addressed hopefully this vulnerability should disappear and the number of ticks feeding on deer should also decrease and hopefully come down to a manageable level.

Combined with the tick tubes the number of infected ticks should be very small or at least that’s my hope."

--------------------
Ann-OH

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nextlevelprotocol
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Ticks feed on all sorts of animals its true but they have an strong affinity for cervid species.You can wipe out a tick population by culling all of the deer in an area. This has been done before with great success.The other species are not as critical to perpetuating tick populations.

Yes the mice carry the Borrelia burgdorferi and the ticks get the infection from them. The permethrin based tick tubes will help with this side of the equation.

The deer seem to act as tick producing factories. they are key to reducing the number of ticks in a given area.I think by imrproving their diet they will cease to be a pernicous source of these creatures.

This is all for further research. No one should take medicine without consulting a Doctor first.

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Ann-Ohio
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Also should have noted that ticks get on large animals to meet and mate.
The male dies eventually after mating,

the female falls to the ground usually in leaf litter and lays the 3000 or more eggs which hatch in the early spring and hitch a ride on any animal that comes by.

--------------------
Ann-OH

Posts: 913 | From Ohio | Registered: Aug 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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