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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Off Topic » Micheal Moore's movie" sicko" (Page 1)

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Author Topic: Micheal Moore's movie" sicko"
5dana8
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Here's a link about an article, wherein it says Micheal Moore paid his anti- fan's medical bills.

On the same page on the right under ""newsweek Audio & video" is the trailor to his new movie "sicko" "Micheal Moore takes on the health care industry"

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19113385/site/newsweek/

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5dana8

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Raqual
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I saw this movie today, and I was thinking I should move to Canada or France after I settle my law suit against my former employers.

I am seriously considering this now more than ever.

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heiwalove
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can't wait to see this film!

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CA quest
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Most of the people who come thru our support group need Universal Health Care. (that is single payer with NO insurance companies skimming off the top.) Few have private health insurance any longer.

Corporations have slowly been taking us (America) over in all areas (media, health & politics...and now the new corporate members of the supreme court are ruling on the side of corporations ....as opposed to people) grrr

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by Raqual:
I saw this movie today, and I was thinking I should move to Canada or France after I settle my law suit against my former employers.

I am seriously considering this now more than ever.

Before doing that, speak to Canadians about their health care system. I think you'll be shocked.

There are numerous Canadians on this site.

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just don
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Yes I agree,,,most Canadians come south across the border to get treated,,,so THATS not the answer!!!

I dont know what it is,,,the guy just turns be off like no other person ever has!! Dont trust him any further than I can throw him,,,and thats not far!!

I like to find the positive in people,just cant find it here!! maybe has to do with his LAST movie that was a coppled up bunch of garbage. The guy gets a GOOD topic to film and he has NO reputation left to spend on it!!!(and I havent see ANY of them and dont want to either)

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just don

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Meg
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I know that Canadians have it bad.....but I don't think we have "the best healthcare in the world" as most people say.

At least as far as lymies are concerned, we are truly struggling. Most of us can't afford the drugs or the insurance, let alone the Drs. IF you can get the proper help.

BUT, from the commercials I've seen for this sicko movie, all they show is Bush Bashing. Does he have to make several movies with supposidly differing themes as an excuse to Bash?

Why not just call them what they are?--the Bush Bash films?? #'s 1, 2,and 3!!

This was supposed to be about the medical industry.
I think MM let us down again.

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charlie
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He's probably still hung up on shopworn old silly socialist crap that doesn't work anywhere except in small doses in tiny countries....

What we have here is broken also, but returning to obsolete stuff isn't the answer....somebody ought to start innovating instead of listening to rabble rousers and out of touch academicians...

Anybody have any ideas? something new would be appreciated but whatever it is it won't come out of committee....

Charlie

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CaliforniaLyme
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When I was in my 20s I was raving happily about a utopian socialized medicine system that exists only in my fantasies when a Swedish family friend cut me down with a reminder that the downside of socialized medicine is that they come up with mass protocols where they decide the cuts should be taken so in Sweden they don't treat heart disease at ALL after a certain AGE because the person is considered to be expendable at that age. They do NOT treat everything and some things they will not treat at all and if you get them you are )([email protected]^@ (kind of like us*)!

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There is no wealth but life.
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All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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Lymetoo
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Right, CA! And if you need surgery, you might have to wait several MONTHS to get it!!!

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--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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LabRat
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Seems to me if we know where we've been and now know where we're going, all we have to do is figure out how to ease into what we must do sooner or later. We've discovered just recently that the earth is a very dangerous place to live what with big rocks coming in from where ever big rocks come from. Then there is the temperature thing, ice ages and being incinerated by the sun when it decides to die. We keep finding temples that are far older than man, (we thought), so we will never know the whole story of man on earth, what with mass extinctions happening from time to time. Temples found underwater in the Sea of Japan date back 14,500 years and would have been built during an ice age when the sea was much lower! We haven't even mentioned raghead crazies looking to cash in their ratty *** bodies for more virgins than they can handle, anyway everything else makes them look like ugly pikers not much worth worrying about anyhow.

Our history and our future lies in space, (where we have room to run), if we are to have either. I have no idea how to make it work but I'm pretty sure everyone's medical problem will have to be addressed and no one will be sleeping in passageways or under tables! How we successfully manage this migration will be a challenge and a half.

One thing for sure there will have to be some sort of incentive system in place. Using the earth as a base to start and then larger ships traveling in a group, much as a Navel Task Force. I don't suppose there is any limit to the size of a space ship or sky lab, just add on as you can afford.

I can't see any way around some form of socialized medicine. When I lived in New Zealand, my new friends use to brag about their cradle to grave health care, not like you poor Yanks, they would say. Then after a few weeks and a few beers, the horror stories would begin. On the whole, everyone seemed well cared for and healthy. I took a flight physical there and the only furniture I remember in the room was a chair and an eye chart. Not to worry, she got herself right!

There has to be incentive, a profit motive.

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CaliforniaLyme
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Well, just saw Sicko and cried during it, no, I'm not kidding, I did. I wish I lived in France or Canada right now!! I wish we had
universal health coverage. A mom in one of
my playgroups from England told me she would have a nurse from the NHS in Britain come sit with her at night when the baby was crying and wouldn't stop and the person would make her tea and take turns holding the baby and talk to her!!! Wow. What a different place, where that is taken for GRANTED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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heiwalove
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everyone i've talked to who has seen this movie has cried during it. seriously, our healthcare system here is so f*****!

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savebabe
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I just got back from Sicko, and my husband and I were both crying. Michael Moore really exposes the political and corporate corruption that surrounds our health care system.

It is criminal that people are dying and being dumped out on the streets while CEO's and stockholders are profiting from denying individuals treatment.

The system has to be changed. American people don't deserve this form of abuse, we deserve better.

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Lymetoo
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The Canadians will disagree with you.

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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kelmo
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There has to be a better system, but the one in England and Canada is horrific. Like Lymetoo, I have had conversations with other lymies in England and Canada. They all travel here.

Just look at British teeth, for crying out loud.

We also need to stop suing our doctors for everything. That is another reason health care is so high. John Edwards has been the power behind the closing of many doctors and hospitals. He's made a fortune from suing the health care industry. I wonder if he has an answer to make it better?

My guess is not.

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Vermont_Lymie
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I have not seen Sicko yet, and I cannot wait to see it. Great that Moore has taken this important subject on.

The health care system in Canada and the UK do some things well, and not others.

I have some experience as a consumer in both of those systems, and to generalize (maybe over generalize!), I would say the thing that they do well is what we so desparately need here in the US -- basic coverage for everyone. And better preventative health programs.

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heiwalove
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i think lyme disease is an anomaly. when it comes to lyme, the health care system everywhere sucks horribly, and (strangely enough) the US seems to be the best place to get care. i can't think of another disease in which that is the case.

GENERALLY speaking, socialized medicine is a far more ethical system, in my opinion. (and yep, i agree with you, vermont lymie.)

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MagicAcorn
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Oh it's ethical all right. Everyone gets too wait their turn for chemo. Sometimes you wait so long you're already dead when they call to schedule your treatment.

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heiwalove
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okay, so obviously it's not ideal. but at least it's not based on who has the money to pay and who doesn't, like it is in this country. FAR more poor folks die from disease/injury here than rich people with the same afflictions. in the US, medicine is all about money, power, and stuffing the pharmaceutical and insurance companies' pockets.

[ 02. July 2007, 04:48 PM: Message edited by: heiwalove ]

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SunRa
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most here in the US really defend our capitalist free market and have a knee jerk reaction to most socialized programs. and, not surprisingly, most Americans opposed to socialized medicine have jobs and health insurance.

yeah the waiting lists are a big problem, but people can wait a few months or alternatively, not get the treatment/surgery at all which unfortunately is often the case here.

of course it's not a perfect system, but I have family and friends in the UK and Canada that aren't complaining. Now lyme treatment is another story.

I hear good things about the film and look forward to seeing it. due to my symptoms though I can't handle movie theaters so I'll have to wait for it to come out on DVD [Frown]

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MagicAcorn
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1.) We wouldn't even have the medical staff to support this. Think of that in realistic terms. We have a doctor and nursing shortage already. This will only make it dramatically worse. And with the crappy pay that accompanies socialized systems fewer will go into those fields.

2.) You would have very little freedom in treatment or doctors. In fact you would have none. None, nada, nunca. Say goodbye to your lyme doctors completely.

3.) You think you wait long now to see a LLMD. What if you had to wait six months to see a dentist for a toothache? Three months to start radiation? Four months for a bypass?

Most people just see everyone getting treatment and that is great in theory, but they do not see the very real obstacles to that being a doable option.

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LabRat
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.....and that term ``free'' keeps popping up. Sorta makes your mouth water don't it! Sort of like a free puppy or surprise your wife with a free kitten! Then there's ``one month free, (with a ten year contract).... Then there's the story about the camel with the long nose...
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dontlikeliver
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Here in the UK healthcare is not totally FREE, but it's considerably cheaper than insurance premiums in the US. We pay our premiums through our taxes. Prescriptions are great though, I have to say. Flat fee for any drug of 6.80, which is about $13.60 and doctors make housecalls.

The system in the UK is great for some things - like broken bones and some other routine and common ailments/things, but NOT for "unusual things" like Lyme disease, which is why many of us go to the USA for treatment for that, if we're lucky enough to be able to afford to do that.

If you're above a certain age, there is discrimination. My father in law was told there was "no point" in another bypass op when he was 75 (he's now 85, so there was plenty of point!). Being the stiff-upper-lip Brit, taught not to "make a fuss", he didn't.

People here get much sicker or even die while waiting for treatment (chemo or heart ops for instance)- on the other hand many don't and they then get their free treatment. Waiting lists are long. I waited 6 months for an MRI and just waited 12 weeks to see a Gynecologist after being referred by my GP about a problem I had at Christmastime - but it was "free". My friend has breast cancer and she was on chemo in 3 weeks - what would have been the speed from point of lump discovery to chemo in US? (thankfully, I have no experience with that, although plenty of experience with US system pre-moving here.)

Also, if you go to the doctor for something and think maybe they'll do a test (blood/saliva, anything), usually they do not but take a wait and see approach, which I used to find very hard to accept coming from America. Even my English friends would joke that it takes an average of six visits to the doctor for the same persistent problem before they consider a blood test. (cost).

There is also rationing. You get better or worse treatment depending on where you live; called the "postcode lottery" (zipcode lottery). So, if you have cancer, you might get Tamoxifen or Herceptin in one area, but not another because the local Health Authority can't afford the drug.

There are health visitors who will visit a new mother and baby regularly to check on progress, but I honestly have not heard of one coming out to just "sit and make tea" and keep a mother company for a crying baby. Their purpose is to come and just make sure the baby is reaching certain milestones at certain points - a quick checkup. I suspect the health visitor was probably already there on a visit and the baby was crying - there is an increasing shortage of resources. That would be extraordinary; certainly not routine.

There are also terrible problems here in the hospitals with (lack of) infection control. People go into the hospital, maybe with something minor or minor operation, and not too infrequently catch MRSA or C Difficile while in there and either get very sick, or die.

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MagicAcorn
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Labrat Free! [Roll Eyes]

It comes at an enormous tax burden on the working folks. In Canada besides the normal Federal Income Tax each Province has Provisional Taxes (like our State taxes) and additional Provisional Health Premium taxes on top of that leaving many people in Canda in the 50 percent tax bracket. That is an outrage.

In England I would be in the 40 percent tax bracket and in Ireland the 42 percent tax bracket.

When I add up the cost of insurance with our current tax bracket here the math says I will take a much bigger hit. I must admit money speaks to me here. We work hard for the money. I already carry a big burden with folks that don't have coverage that need medical attention. For me to take a bigger hit in the pocket, get substandard care compared to what I'm used to isn't all that inviting either.

No, our system isn't perfect far from it but the solution doesn't lie in adopting other countries models that aren't any more efficient/beneficial than our present one.

Like Charlie said I wish someone had something new to add to this debate.

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Lymetoo
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Thank you Acorn and liver....You said it best!

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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charlie
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This is an absolutely excellent thread.
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SunRa
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Yes there is a shortage of doctors but the problem could be more about how they choose to distribute their time.

more drs here are seeing less and less patients and many are gravitating towards the higher-paying jobs (sports medicine, etc) that only serve the wealthy and those with good insurance plans.

As far as freedom of doctors, I don't know enough about it in other countries (although I'm pretty sure the French have more freedom ?), but I can't imagine that universal coverage is more restrictive than some of our HMOs. One of my best friends is Finnish and she's stunned at how I'm being treated here. when she had an injury she was able to see a top specialist over there, one who treats their famous hockey players,etc. Although I know it's not exactly fruitful comparing Finland to the US.

I'm not sure but the impression I got from my UK relatives was that the long waiting lists were only for 'elective' procedures. of course I know that determining what's 'elective' could get very controversial.

But my cousin in the UK was able to see a specialist rather quickly for something important while I had to wait months to see a neurologist even though I was having seizures. And I've actually had to wait longer for a GYN appt than the 12 weeks that DLL mentioned. So I don't think America is all that much different.

Except...families there aren't going bankrupt, losing their homes, or watching their children die just because the insurance companies want to make an extra buck.

we do have a higher quality of health care available, but only a select group are able to receive it and therefore we have some of the worst health care stats of any industrialized country (lower life expectancy, higher rates of infant deaths, etc,)

Both France and the UK have lower rates of death from cancer and heart disease too. Partly because we have more of it, but also because people there are more likely to go to a dr early on since they can.

I'm personally in favor of universal coverage with the option of private coverage. I think Germany has something like that. I'm not sure, I have lots more to learn about all this. But for those fortunate enough to have money or a good job and who wouldnt want to be caught dead going to the same dr the poor see (gasp!), then let them pay their own way....(as long as they can do without a 6th car and pay the extra taxes for the 44 million or so that currently have no coverage at all).

whew! it's rare when I'm having a good head day and could think and sit here writing for this long...it's fun [Smile]

oh and I appreciated reading DLL's first hand experience with their system and by all means, correct me if any of my info above is wrong.

I'd love to hear from the French or Germans about their health care experiences as I know their systems are set up differently than that of Canada and the UK.

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heiwalove
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SunRa - you said absolutely everything i wanted to say, and then some. thank you!

especially this:

I'm personally in favor of universal coverage with the option of private coverage... But for those fortunate enough to have money or a good job and who wouldnt want to be caught dead going to the same dr the poor see (gasp!), then let them pay their own way....(as long as they can do without a 6th car and pay the extra taxes for the 44 million or so that currently have no coverage at all).


absolutely. i agree 100 percent. you make me feel less alone. [Smile]

xo.

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Geneal
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I pay an incredible amount of money for health insurance.

It is private as I have been unemployed since Katrina, but was a contract employee

Prior to the hurricane.

We have gone without a lot of stuff. I made a choice to not go without health insurance.

Thank God. I would have been dead if I didn't have it prior to being dx. with Lyme disease.

Now, I would never let my children starve, but

I certainly wouldn't want them to inherit an outstanding bill for medical services.

It is about money. Not about our health.

Shoot, half the time you don't get the "care" that you are paying for.

Lawsuits, malpractice insurance, and basically uninsured people

Have all contributed to driving up the costs of insurance.

I know that in New Orleans Charity Hospital was basically a "free" hospital.

Flooded and ruined by Katrina.

Another hospital in the area has just filed suit with the state of La.

Stating they have lost over 10 million dollars by treating patients that used

To go to Charity. They want that money back from the state as the state funded Charity hospital.

Let's also remember that insurance companies have a contracted rate for reimbursement.

Let's say a doctor who has a contract with BC/BS for services charges 100.00 for an office visit.

Let's say contract reimbursement rate is only 42.00.

I think prices for medical services are hyper-inflated.

May be a means of upping contractual reimbursement monies.

Who knows?

It is my belief that every child till the age 21 should get free health care in the US.

However, that would limit my abilities to make a decision as to which specialist I may

Prefer or a second or third opinion.

Darn frustrating situation. I am not sure if it can be fixed.

Just like social security.

Hugs,

Geneal

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David95928
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Does anyone have any information on what percentage of people in these countries (mentioned Canada, England, France, Germany, Finland) would prefer to be under our system?

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Dave

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heiwalove
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that's an interesting question, david, and i'd like to know the answer too. however, i'm not sure an unbiased poll has been, or even could be, done.

from personal experience, i have several friends from canada and england who live in the US now, and ALL of them far prefer their home healthcare systems to ours.

[ 09. July 2007, 02:46 PM: Message edited by: heiwalove ]

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heiwalove
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i just saw Sicko, and cried my eyes out. no joke.

EVERY SINGLE PERSON WHO LIVES IN THE US NEEDS TO SEE THIS FILM.

and meg, bush appears only a small handful of times in the film (as do references to him). the current failing system of american healthcare dates back to nixon, which mr. moore clearly elucidates in the film.

AMAZING AMAZING AMAZING film.

kudos to michael moore. i wish i could give him a giant hug and thank him personally for making this movie.
*

(raqual, i am seriously considering moving to canada as well. part of me thinks i should stay here and fight to make things right, and part of me just wants to get the hell out as soon as i can. i certainly don't want to raise a family in this country, that's for sure.)

[ 09. July 2007, 11:28 PM: Message edited by: heiwalove ]

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I can't wait to see it. Anybody live in the Kutztown, PA area and want to go see it with me?

I think this guy has guts. I think I'll cry, too, during this - either that or feel Lyme rage.

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Soleilpie
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I don't think our health care system in the US is perfect but I don't think it means we should completely revamp the entire system because 15% of our citizens are uninsured. Right now we have many choices that other countries do not. We probably need to take a little bit from every system and incorporate it into ours. We also need to consider tort reform.

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Boomerang
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Excellent points in this thread. I just find it appalling to read that people are considered expendable because of their age. Pitiful.....

I agree, soleil.....I don't think we want to limit our choices in the U.S.

Acorn, I didn't realize those enormous tax percentages. 50%?? Duh to me.

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heiwalove
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soleilpie, moore's film doesn't advocate universal healthcare because 15 percent of people are uninsured.. in fact, he ONLY focuses on insured people in his film. you get to see firsthand how, despite the fact that these people have insurance, their insurance companies fail (or deny) them time and time again, all in the name of profit.

this is NOT an uncommon experience. our healthcare system, even for those who are insured, is shamefully, horribly flawed.

[ 10. July 2007, 11:43 PM: Message edited by: heiwalove ]

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Soleilpie
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heiwalove

I agree that it is a terrible shame when those who are insured cannot get approved for necessary treatment.

(Anyone have the stats on how often that is the case?)

However, I'm not sure how universal health care is going to be better for those who are already insured?

It's entirely possible that they will still not get the treatment they need even with a universal health care plan.

The only difference may be lesser out of pocket expenses for the same kind of care or lack there of.

But honestly, I think our taxes would go up to equate to the amount people are currently paying for their premiums.

If it's not about the 15%, then honestly I think the best way to help our system is to put a cap on malpractice settlements,

which would then decrease the cost of malpractice insurance, which would then decrease the amount doctors charge, which

would then decrease the amount of our premiums, which would then pave the way for the uninsured to become insured.

Also, the cost of medications needs to come down considerably.

Take what I said above with a grain of salt because I honestly don't know if malpractice settlements is the real cause of our premiums being sky high.

It's a given that if they also put a cap on what doctors can charge for necessary procedures, that would help immensely.

But then we would be allowing the gov't to step in to get control of something they don't control now. But maybe that's ok?????

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The best index to a person's character is how he treats people who can't do him any good, and how he treats people who can't fight back.
-Abigail van Buren (Pauline Esther Friedman) (1918-2002)

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SunRa
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quote:
Originally posted by Soleilpie:

But then we would be allowing the gov't to step in to get control of something they don't control now. But maybe that's ok?????

they do control it now.

the government, pharmaceutical industry and insurance companies are more connected than we want to know.

with universal health care, the pharmaceutical industry will take a big hit as will many of our good friends. Just look at who some of Bush's biggest campaign contributers were.

the govt puts tons of money into keeping private health care alive, yet consistently pulls money from federal and state health (those who need it most).

God Bless America.

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David95928
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I've read reports, but can't site them at the moment, that nearly half ofall personal bankruptcies are triggered by major medical among people who are insured.

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lymedad
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First let me identify myself - I'm a social conservative, right wing Christian, registered Republican, retired military. Now no one has to guess.

My thoughts on socialized medicine; if the government were to handle my family's medical care like they have Social Security, federal income taxes and immigration, I'll stick with what we have, choices.

My daughter has been extremely ill. We, as a family, have had to dig deep financially, research this disease thoroughly, hunt diligently for the right medical care, work more than I care to, longer than I wanted to; but we have had the freedom to do it all without government intervention or controls. I'll stick with what we have - freedom.

My thoughts on Michael Moore - ever see one of his movies where both sides of an issue were thoroughly covered? Sicko (haven't seen it, don't care to); any interviews with a broad range of citizens from socialized medicine countries? Or was it another hack job at our government and GWB in particular??

Did Mr. Moore have any thoughts on how to fix the problems? Had he thought through the issue enough to offer a plan for a better way of continuing with our freedom to choose?

Mr. Moore seems to enjoy the freedoms and money he makes for his efforts, yet never has anything constructive to add to our society.

For those who have been fighting Lyme and other TBD; did we need Michael Moore to tell us about our troubled health care system? Have we not seen the problems with "government" controls concerning Lyme already, e.g. the CDC guidelines being directly responsible for the misdiagnosis of Lyme in hundreds of cases?

Don't mean to be harsh, but for those who would choose to move to another country just for their health care; I'll donate what little money I have left to help defray your moving costs (do me a personal favor and take Michael Moore with you, please).

Troubling times, heh?

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heiwalove
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lymedad, michael moore went up to totally random people in canada, france, and england and asked them about their healthcare systems. he got positive responses ACROSS THE BOARD. in fact, in canada he was TRYING to find someone who would tell him something negative about universal healthcare - he went to a couple small, conservative towns and sauntered into an emergency room waiting area (the longest someone waited to see a doctor? 45 minutes). no one he talked to could imagine being under a system like the one we have in the US, in which if you didn't have insurance you'd be billed hundreds or thousands of dollars to see an ER doctor.

he even went to a golf course and talked to a random older man golfing there and asked him about the healthcare in canada. the man replied something to the effect of 'i wouldn't change it for the world. in this country we help each other out. those who can afford it pay more taxes so that everyone, including those who can't, gets free healthcare.'

michael moore responded with a chortle - 'what are you, a socialist? you must be a member of the green party, right?"

and guess what? the man said, 'no, actually, i'm a member of the conservative party.' he went on to explain that in canada, universal healthcare isn't a party issue. it's accepted as the better option by pretty much everyone, regardless of party affiliation or status as a liberal/conservative/something in-between. in fact, i think he even said that if anyone tried to take away universal healthcare, there'd be a HUGE uprising - involving everyone, conservatives and liberals alike.
*

the first step in changing something that needs fixing is admitting something is wrong, that it needs to be fixed, and identifying WHY it needs to be fixed. moore's film does just that. his personal solution is universal, single-payer healthcare (with which i agree) - we are the only industrialized nation in the entire world that has yet to adopt such a system. no, he doesn't spend a lot of time detailing exactly how that would work (maybe because we have tons of working models in other countries from which to choose?); but his film will get people talking, thinking, debating - just like in this thread and the one in 'medical.' even people who think he's the devil incarnate will join the debate, we'll all start talking about the travesty that is our current healthcare system, and we'll start brainstorming what to do about it. THAT is democracy at work. that is what mr. moore is contributing to, and even, it could be argued, making happen.

personally, i'm glad michael moore still lives in this country. he's dedicated his life to exposing what's wrong, in hopes of changing things for the better. i think that takes a LOT of guts. i struggle with that - wanting to stay here and fight and work for what i think is right, and just feeling in my heart that a country that refuses to take care of its children is no place to raise a family.

people accuse moore of hating america - he doesn't. the fact that he's working for change indicates just how much he loves this country.
*

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." - Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

"May we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

"To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public."
- Theodore Roosevelt

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heiwalove
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by the way, in countries with universal healthcare, you CAN choose. if you have the money to do so, you can go wherever you want, just like in this country. for example, i think france has the option of buying private health 'insurance' - it doesn't replace the existing system, it just gives more options to those who can afford it.

like SunRa said earlier in this thread:

I'm personally in favor of universal coverage with the option of private coverage... But for those fortunate enough to have money or a good job and who wouldnt want to be caught dead going to the same dr the poor see (gasp!), then let them pay their own way....(as long as they can do without a 6th car and pay the extra taxes for the 44 million or so that currently have no coverage at all).


indeed.

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LabRat
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Be careful what you wish for. I'm very happy where I live and with my medical care and I don't want a change. If you want a change, would you accept a single provider with the restrictions that would surely come in the interest of economy as Hitler did with ``the useless eaters''? How about a single employer for the whole country to guarantee full employment? The best medical care in the world cannot protect you from starvation if you have no money for food! One could possibly lead to the other.

If you rely on moore to help you form your ideas, like on Cuba for an example, did he fail to mention the number of Cubans that drowned trying to make it to this horrible country.

When Americans start fleeing America then I might be interested in what moore is selling.

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Boomerang
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Nothing Michael Moore does is "random." No way the people in his movie were "randomly" selected.

Good posts, lymedad and labrat. I agree!

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heiwalove
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boomerang:

how do you know that? where is your source?

labrat:

this is exactly what the 'red scare' tactic is all about. i see it's still in full effect, decades after the cold war has supposedly ended.

does no one else find it ABSURD that we are the only industrialized nation in the entire world without universal healthcare?? do you truly believe it's because we're 'the best' and we know the one and only 'Truth and Way'? are you seriously that arrogant and that prideful? canada, france, england, switzerland, denmark, finland, and on and on and on.. they've all got it wrong! WE ARE NUMBER ONE GOD BLESS AMERICA ETC ETC!
*

also, the debate over the cuban revolution is a whole other topic, but which cubans, exactly, fled cuba? that's right, the rich ones. they were terrified of having their money and power and status as the ruling class taken away from them.

and that's where i'll stop, because by now you probably all think i'm a (gasp) communist! (i'm not - a social democracy is my ideal. which we are so far from having in this country it isn't even funny.)
*

michael moore may indeed have an agenda with his movies - of course, he's trying to prove a point, he's trying to get americans to see that our healthcare system is SERIOUSLY flawed, and that switching to universal healthcare is something concrete we can do to improve it. obviously, his film is trying to make that argument. HOWEVER, that said, his facts are solid. look on his website for proof (his sources are almost entirely government cited):

http://www.michaelmoore.com/sicko/checkup

he's taken on some big guns in his career (no pun intended) - the NRA, and now the healthcare industry. his facts must be one hundred percent accurate, otherwise he risks being sued by these industry GIANTS. michael moore against the insurance industry? i'm sorry, but anyone who thinks he would have a chance in hell in that case is seriously off their rocker.

he has not been sued ONCE, because his facts are too solid. every single statement he makes is checked and checked and checked again. he has no other choice - his very livelihood is on the line.

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LabRat
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Christ! Have I got another one to raise!? I'm guessing you've never experience socialized medicine, I did for some twenty odd years and thought it was great and I defended it against all comers, much as you do Moore. While I have no intention of engaging you in an argument, we are just too different to even pretend to try to see the others point of view.

I can offer you one classic difference between socialized and private practice with financial incentive. I don't know if you have ever experience the ``joy'' of an ``arterial stick'', where blood is drawn from an artery deep in the wrist. In private practice a little deadener is used over the injection site followed by a new disposable needle. It is virtually painless. When checking for blood gas, this is repeated every four hours or so.

With socialized, you can probably forget the pain killer unless your ``somebody'', The stick will probably be from a large gauge re-sharpened, re-useable needle wielded by a novice.

Now in the overall scheme of things it all works out the same, health wise, it's just how you get there!

Youshi in Japan likes his fish, rice and sake and would be lost with out the sound of the wind chimes late at night. He works his *** off to provide for his family as best he can.

Patty in Ireland likes his beer and believes in Leprechauns, he also believes he has good medical care. Here at home, you believe in moore and think our system sucks. I'll tell you the truth, the Leprechauns are looking better. At least more believable!

We will have socialized medicine in this country, sooner or later, later is better. If it happens slowly enough, where we can tweak it as we go and we can make it acceptable to all I would think. Time for me medication.

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just don
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MY favorite oxemoron--

I am from the government,,,and I am here to help!!!

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just don

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LabRat
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Yes, and it's right up there with, "and your fair share is"....

Don't you just hate someone else diciding what "your fair share is".

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MagicAcorn
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I am from Ireland but became a naturalized American.

Here is a sampling of just how terrible the socialized Irish system is and at a tax rate of 42 percent it is dispicable.

Your money or your life?

In January 2005, Michael X, a courier driver, went to see his GP complaining of recurrent diarrhoea and passing some blood. Following an examination, his GP sent a letter to arrange for an appointment with a gastro-enterologist for specialist assessment. His appointment arrived in the post - he could see the consultant in July, six months later.

He duly attended in July and was told by the specialist he needed urgent hospital investigation. He was given a date for admission three weeks later but a week before this date, his admission was cancelled as there was a bed shortage at the hospital. He was subsequently given a new appointment for late October. However, only two days before this booked admission date, he was again phoned and his appointment cancelled; the reason this time was an outbreak of 'vomiting bug' at the hospital. The secretary who phoned him apologised for the delay.

He was given a new appointment and finally, 11 months after he first sought advice, he had his 20 minute bowel test. Unfortunately, he was diagnosed with cancer of the bowel. (The very thing his GP said he needed to go to hospital to be tested for). He was operated on two days later and made a good recovery. However his diagnosis was complicated by the fact that the cancer had spread beyond the wall of his gut. He remained optimistic but just before Christmas 2006 he became quite ill and had to give up work. He died last month.

It has since emerged that if 'Michael X' had had private insurance he could have seen the consultant within a few weeks of his GP visit in January of 2005. In all probability his cancer would have been caught in time and he would still be alive. It is worth mentioning that he is sadly missed by his wife, three children, and all his friends.

So What Do We Do?

With a general election looming in the Republic, a key issue is likely to be the ongoing problems in the health service. Long waiting lists, a shortage of beds and the persistant threat of catching the MRSA bug, have all contributed to a widespread sense that something is not right. Add to this, the scandals around the Leas Cross nursing home and the Neary case in Drogheda - two widely different cases which nonetheless underline the poor treatment that can sometimes be meted out to vulnerable patients. The key question is what is to be done and where lies the solution?

One powerful lobby group, aided and abetted by the PD Health Minister, Mary Harney, has been ably promoting the 'private health care' model. Their vision is similar to what's available in the USA, where the quality of health and medical care received is tied closely to the reality of 'what can you pay for'. In other words if you can't afford care, it's 'tough luck'.

As the 'Michael X' case shows we are already someway down the road to having this US health care model. Right now "in the Republic" there are two health services in operation. One, provided by the health insurance system (VHI, Quinn-BUPA and Vivas), guarantees immediate and top level care. The second, paid for through our taxes, is also top notch - the problem is accessing it. Long waiting lists, under- funded staffing levels and reduced resources insure long and sometimes tragic delays for patients.

Two Tiers

This Republic's two-tier heath system is established government policy, allowing some people to buy their way to the top of the treatment queue. It's a disgrace but it is by no means the end of the story. What is now becoming increasingly obvious is that there is also a government policy to under-fund the public health care system so as to build demand for 'private' health care. Sounds cynical? Look around and see what's happening. (Eighteen months to get your dodgy knee seen by a specialist in a public clinic. Not happy? The same doctor can see you privately next week!)

Another example of this policy has come to light in the Cork area in the neo-natal care unit. The unit has become the focus of a HSE reorganisation plan which, on face value, looks great: the unit is to be doubled in size to 50 beds, and moved to a new modern location. But there's one problem. Although the unit is doubling in size the staffing levels are not - they're being left as they were! So the nursing staff already completely over-stretched in what is an intensive hands-on job, are now being asked to accept intolerable and potentially dangerous conditions in the name of a 'business plan'.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Across the health service problems abound to do with understaffing, contracting out of work, casualisation and poor pay. Workers are fighting back, particularly in areas that directly concern their own particular sections, but the overall problems facing health workers, as well as the massive problem of access, is not. Health care should be a right, after all, not something to be costed and delivered according to your income.

How can we fight back? The fundamental issue is that the forthcoming general election will have no impact. The present government and the 'government-in-waiting' all accept the basic two-tier system we now have. Whereas what we need is to get rid of this!

An important first step that could be made is to work towards the coming together of a network of health workers who can link workers struggling in the service across a wide number of areas, sections and issues. Such a network is desperately needed in terms of extending solidarity between workers. But it could also play a big role in laying the basis for the promotion of a model for health care that is a real alternative to the present mess.

Kevin Doyle

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MagicAcorn
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Did anyone notice in my article how Ireland is looking into adopting our model because theirs is failing miserably.

I sure hope so.


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LabRat
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Informative post magic, I was thinking of my treatment here where I was diagnosed, a doctor made a phone call and I was on my way to the heart hospital where I had a team forming to do a procedure on me. I guess it's true that you don't know what you've got till it's gone!
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just don
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Magic one,
Sounds as if Ireland would have LESS patients to treat. Most of them are dead before their time!! Sounds like our system isnt so bad!! And my understanding is the poor and needy (and uninsured)get treated anyway and written off!!

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Boomerang
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I did notice that part of your article, Magic. Thanks for sharing.....

Very sad story about Michael X. I am sorry.

Labrat, glad you got the quick treatment you needed!!

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LabRat
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Me too! I thought of another irony. My GP is a little Cuban. My cardiologist is Lebanese! I'm teaching him Blackjack, (a little at a time) so long as he keeps me alive, we have each other by the short and curl lies! If I go he's left with only part of a system!
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Boomerang
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I am speechless. Is your doctor a rich cuban?

lol... just kidding.

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LabRat
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A gold medal swimmer but these foreigners are like cockroaches, they come over here and live off the smell of an oily rag, suck up all this training, take up all the good jobs and us locals have to .......
Posts: 1887 | From Corpus Christi, Texas | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymedad
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LabRat,

I think I've finally met my match. Here all these 60 years I thought I was the world's biggest cynic.

Thank you for the breath of fresh air. I don't feel so lonely now.

At times I think the liberals have actually taken over the earth, but you have given me hope.

Please keep your Lebanese MD healthy so that he/she (there I go being PC) can keep you around a long time.

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LabRat
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Thank ye! The libs are gaining tho. They are trying to get the voting age lowered to grade school. They got this same thread going over in medical. I thought we had "won" but the suckers just packed their ditty bag and went over there to a warmer crowd. Like my old pappy use to say, " you can't pin a ballarina's skirt while she's dancing".
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David95928
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No comment.

--------------------
Dave

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CaliforniaLyme
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The idea of foreigners is interesting. I have a funny story!!!

When my ex husband and I bought our house o' doom here in Aptos (where I got Lymed clearing the brush from it) we threw a HUGE party!!! A big BBQ!! This was about 2 weeks prior to me getting sick!!

I had just met this redheaded Christian woman local from Aptos at the park and I invited her too.

We had so many people there- friends- friends- friends!!!! About 60 people!!!

So this redheaded woman comes up to me with a hunted look during the BBQ, which was going beautifully, stares around at everyone and says,

"How come you have so many foreigners here? There's only ONE American couple."

The ONE "American" couple was the only Anglo couple- Todd, a friend of my husbands, and his girlfriend who was and is Swedish, not American- and who, despite her blondeness and bluedness, was the ONLY foreigner there.

Anyway, it was a weird moment. I realized that some people in this world are very racist!!!

Deja vu!!!

Thank god for immigration. I am a descendant of one of the first 500 as they are called, if I wanted I could be a member of the DAR. I am blonde and blue myself.

I am actually a conservative in CA for my views on illegal immigration because I am against it and don't think people should be rewarded for illegality- BUT I think legal immigrants are some of the best citizens we have!!! South Asia in particular has contributed amazing people to our culture!!

There are so many Americans who ARE unwilling to do work that other people WILL do gladly.

We are all immigrants to this land unless you're a Native American.

But we all have different opinions!!! That is why politics are best left off this board!!!

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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LabRat
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Cal. I'm in agreement with you. You can't hate someone till you give them a name and put them in a group, after that I think it gets easier. Then every time you get around ``those people'', or they start protesting the temperature of tap water in subsidized housing, you have to work at not being ****ed! So long as we sound pretty much alike and our custom or superstitions don't poke anyone in the eye, we should be having fun! Diversification, makes life interesting and keeps it from being boring, especially interracial marriage, where the wife hides a machete for those ``beno'' meetings. There'll be no more of this BS and there will me no more or that BS! A guided discussion really, but you'd best keep up!
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CaliforniaLyme
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We agree on that Labrat- I am ashamed to say that I have put a group of people in a group called IDSA and "Steerites" and I do find myself soemtimes hating them- and then I have to PRAY for them to find guidance and all that stuff!!

But sometimes I do hate that group!!!

I do-

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

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lymedad
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I know this is more of a thread concerning Michael Moore than it is about true health care, but I thought I'd relate an experience I recently had with my new primary care physician:

After two visits with this new guy and exhaustive lab tests, he said I was doing "fairly well for a man my age", I turn 60 in October.

A little concerned about that comment, I couldn't resist asking him, "Do you think I'll live to be 80"?

He asked, "Do you smoke tobacco or drink alcoholic beverages?"

"No," I replied. "I don't do drugs, either."

Then he asked, "Do you eat greasy foods like rib-eye steaks and barbecued ribs?"

I told him that, "No, my other doctor said that all red meat is unhealthy!"

He then asked me if I spent a lot of time in the sun, like playing golf, boating, fishing or relaxing at the beach?"

"No, I don't," I told him.

He then asked, "Do you have a lot of sex at this point in your life?"

"No," I said. "I don't do any of those things."

Then he looked at me and asked, "Then why do you give a crap if you live to be 80 or not"?

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Meg
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[Big Grin] [lol] ...amen!

--------------------
Success Stories---Treatment Guidelines

Posts: 10010 | From somewhERE OVER THE Rainbow | Registered: Oct 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CA quest
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I think we need to define our terms very carefully.

As I understand it, and as MM reiterated: Universal Health Care is not Socialized Medicine.

Universal Health Care just eliminates all the insurance leeches (the skimmers) who produce...nothing. (opportunists should not be defined as capitalists either) And the single payer(administrator) could (but probably won't I admit) be other than Government.

Socialized medicine is what the VA has: hospitals owned by the government and doctors hired by and employed by the government. That is not what we will have.

I am all for capitalism. (small c) I am not for International Corporatism... There is a growing difference...and if you are unaware of what is happening and who is taking over our government you should look again. (just follow the money...who is paying our politicians? who is profiting?) Our Pharmacies (BIG PACS that wrote the 2003 NEOCON Medicare rules) are INTERNATIONAL CORPS. (International OIL Companies helped write our Energy POLICY for pete's sake..which is why the VP won't release the records) And Our Corporate Media is/are almost all in that same international category now. PEACE is now WAR dont' you know?

Things to ponder:

Currently the infant mortality rate in the US is way below other westernized countries and closer to what we term third world countries. Is this what we want? Is the better?

Currently the longevity in the US is less than that found in other westernized countries. Is this what we want? If this is better, it is a weird definition of better.

My aging sister in the UK cannot afford to return to the US because of the cost of health care here. By the way, because she pays a little out of pocket she gets top notch care over there...but still couldn't afford the cost of health care here.

I meet people everyday... with jobs, but without health insurance, who are just holding their breath and praying they don't get sick. I know one who died of breast cancer because she couldn't afford treatment.

I also know people who have been denied care by their insurance companies.

Let's start talking the WE instead of the ME like MM says and do the best for the most.

In the final anaylysis: Nothing will change for the upper eschalons: them who can pay will still pay for top notch care...and get it.

But everyone else will be at least above the water level. They currently are below it.

glub glub as I go down for the third time

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RoadRunner
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CA quest


Great post

Thanks

RR

--------------------
"Beep Beep"

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lymedad
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CA quest,

I've just got to take exception to several of your points:

quote:
1. Universal Health Care is not Socialized Medicine
Semantics - Even you stated
quote:
And the single payer(administrator) could (but probably won't I admit) be other than Government.
Walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, must be government funded, government controlled, government administered health care = Socialized Medicine!

Pretty typical of our day and age of Political Correctness; illegal aliens are now undocumented workers, etc., etc. Socialized Medicine is now Universal Health Care.

quote:
Currently the infant mortality rate in the US is way below other westernized countries and closer to what we term third world countries.
Just not true. From our stellar Center for Disease Control (in and of itself reason not to want government run healthcare), comes the following statistics:

(The infant mortality rate (IMR) is the reported number of infants dying under a year of age, per one thousand live births)

173 Cyprus 6.89
174 Northern Mariana Islands 6.85
175 Israel 6.75
176 Guam 6.68
177 Lithuania 6.68
178 Belarus 6.63
179 Croatia 6.60
180 United States 6.37
181 Korea, South 6.05
182 Cuba 6.04
183 Faroe Islands 6.01
184 Isle of Man 5.72
185 Italy 5.72
186 New Zealand 5.67
187 Taiwan 5.54
188 San Marino 5.53
189 Greece 5.34
190 Monaco 5.27
191 Ireland 5.22

Please note the following map provided by the CDC:

 -

Notice that most of the Socialized Healthcare countries are categorized by the CDC as being in the same range in infant mortality as the U.S.

My biggest problem with your input is; how does infant mortality relate to who provides health care in any form.

Infant mortality would seem to be more adversely affected by individual living conditions, health of the mother etc rather than whether the baby is being treated by a private doctor or a government controlled doctor.

I also have a map of life expectancy provided by the CDC and again we rank in the same category as most of the "Universal Healthcare" countries.

 -

But again, I just don't see the analogy between longevity and who is providing healthcare. Longevity has got to be more adversely affected by life-style, diet, environment, and heredity.

I'm plagiarizing now, but I love the thought process:

quote:
Logic cannot support the premise that health care is a right. Health care is a service that is administered by another human being with the requisite skills and knowledge. To claim that healthcare as a "right" is to claim a right to the services of the health-care provider. In effect, this means you are claiming a "right" to a portion of that person's life - both a portion of the time already spent developing his skills, and a portion of the time spent practicing those skills on you.


Thanks for listening
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heiwalove
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lymedad,

the US is ranked 37th by the world health organization in terms of quality of healthcare, just one slot (ONE) above cuba. source: here

canadians live three years longer than we do, according to the UN human development report. source: here

according to the united nations statistics division, a baby born in el salvador has a better chance of surviving than a baby born in detroit. source: here

cuba has a lower infant mortality rate and a longer lifespan on average than the US. source: here and here

we could (and should!) do SO much better.

--------------------
http://www.myspace.com/violinexplosion

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RoadRunner
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poor people need to be insured in this country. health care should be better and for all people in U.S.A. no one should be without health care in U.S.A. rich or poor shouldn't make a difference everyone should have it.
health care in this country needs to get better no matter how it gets done.

RR

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"Beep Beep"

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CA quest
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Lyme Dad quoted something about healthcare not being a "right". That is just a red herring thrown in to push buttons and has nothing to do with the topic at hand that I can see, because we are not talking about "rights".

We are talking about the benefits of having a healthy society vs the dangers of an unhealthy society and how best to attain that. When large portions of a group/population do not get adequate health care, ...it has the capacity to hurt the rest of the group: contagious diseses & other Public Health issues spring most readily to mind. But it probably impacts other areas of society too: For instance, it is difficult to work or learn if you are ill...much less be a contributing member of society in almost any capacity. Most of us here have experienced that.

In conclusion: Not only do I think that Universal Health Care is a moral imperative (people vs corporations), I think it will benefit all of us....even the rich.

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Boomerang
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A Review of Sicko.......not my review. Just an FYI.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I drove to the local multiplex the other night to see Michael Moore's latest movie. My wife came along, but she wisely choose to see the latest Harry Potter flick instead. I envied her.

Michael Moore has always seemed to me to embody the essence of the middle-class socialist as described by George Orwell. "The underlying motive of many socialists, I believe, is simply a hy pertrophied sense of order," Orwell wrote. "The present state of affairs offends them not because it causes misery, still less because it makes freedom impossible, but because it is untidy."


That certainly seems to be the case with Moore. He has no real empathy with the forlorn characters he puts up on the screen. They are just vehicles for his enduring urge to have the government run things. And in Moore's world, the government always runs things better.

The supposed high point of "Sicko" is a trip to Cuba he makes with some rescue workers who claim various injuries from responding to the 9/11 attacks. After a quick tour of Havana, he trots them off to a gleaming hospital where they receive top-notch medical care. Moore assures us that the care is exactly the same as a typical Cuban would receive.

Not quite. Anthony Boadle, the Havana correspondent for Reuters, reported that the hospital featured in the film was "Cuba's flagship hospital with a view of the Caribbean sea, a sharp contrast to many Cuban hospitals that are crumbling, badly lit, and which lack equipment and medicines."

Moore also glosses over the fact that the average Cuban lives in conditions that would appall the typical American. When I traveled there in 1994, I was amazed to find people raising pigs and chickens in the halls of what had once been gracious apartment buildings. The livestock supplements a diet of rice, beans and not much else. This points to the sole unique accomplishment of the Cuban socialists in the area of health care: They have cured obesity. I kept waiting for just one lighthearted moment during which Moore would contrast his own immense bulk with the trim physiques of the Cubans.

But there are no light moments in "Sicko." Moore pounds his points home the same way those immense hams of his pound the sidewalks as he visits Canada, Cuba, France and England.

The central premise of the movie is Moore's assertion that "we remain the only country in the Western world without free and universal health care." This is nonsense. Moore spends day after day in France, for example, without discovering that the French do not have a no-fee system like the English, but in fact have a system of basic insurance, supplemental insurance and co-pays. The typical resident of neighboring Germany, meanwhile, has 14 percent of gross pay deducted for a so-called "sickness fund." The big difference between other countries and the United States is not that they have free health coverage. It's that they have mandatory health coverage.

And even those countries that have entirely state-run systems are not quite as "free" as Moore makes them out to be. Early in the movie, he highlights the case of an American couple with a deaf child whose insurance company would not pay for cochlear implants in both ears. Being able to hear from just one ear was sufficient, the company said.

That may sound cruel, but according to a recent article in the Nottingham Post, an English family was told the same thing by the national health service there. The big difference was that the American company eventually relented and let the kid have his implants. As for the English kid, his parents had to shell out $63,000 for the second implant.

Moore highlights an American cancer victim who died after he was denied a bone-marrow transplant. But that patient might not have fared any better in England, where a so-called "post-code lottery" either awards or denies treatment to patients based on how much money is in the budget of the health care district in which they live.

There is indeed plenty wrong with the American health-care system. But the government takeover Moore advocates would not cure it. Later in the movie he notes that 65 percent of American kids don't know where England is. In other words, the same government that can't teach kids to read a map is going to somehow be entrusted with our lives.

This sort of thing might be amusing if Moore had a lighter touch. But the movie didn't induce a single chuckle in the audience the other night. Perhaps that's because there was only one other person in the theater with me. The other theater-goers were all off watching something the English really are good at: acting out the Harry Potter books.

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Mo
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moore gets people facing and talking about these isues. that's always a good thing.

i wouldn't begin to know how to fix our healthcare system, but i'm fairly certain that it pretty much bites overall.

i would consider this a universal concern, for many reasons.

my guess from the thread responses is that moore simply comes with a load of political baggage, pulling down the Bush administration's pants and all..
clearly, his other films are somewhat politically un-poopular to some folks.

nevertheless, we all suffer these hardships, and their impact on society, in the same way.

mo

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LabRat
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Issues?
Anyone has a thought on socialism? Le'me get'ch started! Socialism is when you see your neighbor coming to borrow the lawn mower you just got out of the shop from the last time he borrowed it and you know he knows your home. While he's getting ready to ask you for the mower, he mentions that you didn't buy any cookies from his girl scouts and they said you wasn't very nice. (Actually happened!)

A friend in need is a pest!

They get theirs, and most of mine!

It is my understanding that a 22 year old with a liver burnt out from drugs, goes on the same waiting list just like a captain of industry. Much fairer than the old way where your value to the community was considered, eh comrade?
Any thoughts?

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heiwalove
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boomerang -

perhaps you should actually see the film yourself and draw your OWN conclusions. hmmm?

also, Sicko was heartbreaking, yes - but it was damn funny, too. moore has a great sense of humor, and there were many lighthearted moments throughout.

labrat -

how, pray tell, is one's 'value to the community' taken into consideration in this fabulous country's healthcare system? if you're a millionaire and all you've ever done is screw people over all your life to get richer and richer, you get AMAZING health coverage, no questions asked! if, however, you've TRULY served your community - maybe you're a community organizer in the Bronx, you empower people in your neighborhood to take control of their lives, demand fair working conditions, better wages, housing, etc; you work 12 hour days and are available to anyone in your neighborhood in need, anytime of the day or night; and, guess what? you have no health coverage! none! zip! zero!

ahhh, god bless america indeed..

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