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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » 'LYME MALARIOTHERAPY'

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Author Topic: 'LYME MALARIOTHERAPY'
Mo
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Just thought this was interesting for discussion, NOT suggesting it!

Most bacterium/blood parasites/viruses die at an internal temp of 106. Dangerous temps for the patient, tho -----

This is interesting...


''LYME MALARIOTHERAPY''

scientists investigated for
infecting AIDS patients

http://lymeblog.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=268

Lexington, KY USA
December 3, 2005 11:25 am
By Staff
LymeBlog News


Cincinnati's Dr. Henry Heimlich still says malaria can
be used to cure AIDS, cancer and Lyme disease through
a process called malariotherapy. Dr. Heimlich has been
sharply criticized by state, federal and international
health organizations for these experiments.

His hopes for testing the illness to cure cancer and
Lyme disease was thwarted in the early 1990s after the
Mexican authorities shut down a clinical trial in
Mexico City, according to Heimlich's friend Harry
Gibbons. So Heimlich-who trained as a thoracic surgeon
and has no background in immunology-gambled that
"malariotherapy" would solve the AIDS puzzle. To some
researchers, including Dr. Victoria Wells Wulsin, the
theory held some intuitive appeal.

"I was curious about malariotherapy, because infection
can be an immune booster," says Wulsin, an
epidemiologist hired by Heimlich in August 2004 to
study the theory's plausibility. "You get sick, and
your body responds with white blood cells. That's what
you need to fight off HIV, right?"

Wulsin was hired by the Heimlich institute to analyze
data on AIDS patients with malaria.

"There was a firewall," Victoria Wulsin says of the
problems she faced getting information from the
Institute. "I said, 'No, I'm not going to place any
stock in these results.' "

Wulsin was fired when she presented her findings.

But more than 10 years earlier the Centers for Disease
Control had declared that "No evidence currently
exists to indicate that malaria infection would
beneficially affect the course of HIV infection." And
since malaria might be harmful to a patient whose
immune system is already compromised by HIV, the
agency added that clinical trials "cannot be
justified." The CDC warning had come in direct
response to Heimlich's first malariotherapy
experiments in China-work that, like the subsequent
trials in Africa, is shrouded in mystery and which
continues to raise serious questions about its
efficacy and the apparent disregard of basic ethical
standards in medical study.

Last January Dr. James Kublin, who analyzed the
connection between malaria and AIDS in the East
African nation of Malawi, published his findings in
the respected British medical journal Lancet. Kublin
reported that malaria infection can actually
exacerbate the speed of HIV's attack on the body.

"Malaria causes immune activation, and immune
activation is associated with, of course, an increase
in the number of immune cells," says Kublin. "But
that's a transient increase in CD4 cells. The problem
with that is when you increase the number of CD4 cells
you also increase the number of potential targets for
HIV. And those CD4 cells are then infected by the
virus-and then turn out more virus."

"It is clearly deleterious to people with HIV to get
malaria. It can accelerate their mortality," says Mark
Harrington, executive director of Treatment Action
Group, which analyzes AIDS research. "Using malaria as
a 'therapy' is really malpractice and probably should
be criminal."

"Using malaria as a 'therapy' is really malpractice
and probably should be criminal." says Mark
Harrington, who analyzes AIDS research.

Heimlich's first clinical trial took place at Yishou
Hospital in Guangzhou, China, in 1993. In advance of
this experiment, Heimlich circulated a study protocol
that called for two groups of HIV-positive volunteers
to be infected with malaria, which would then be
allowed to go untreated for either two weeks or four
weeks. It stipulated that the volunteers should be
treated for malaria only if their temperatures topped
106 degrees.
At that time two prominent Los Angeles AIDS
researchers were investigated for taking part in the
controversial medical experiment to infect AIDS
patients in China with malaria.

A medical oversight board at the University of
California Los Angeles wanted to know whether doctors
John Fahey and Najib Aziz violated university policies
that regulate tests on humans.

For AIDS experts the study's most galling
aspect-recorded in the final published report-was its
rule that the HIV-positive volunteers express a
"willingness to not participate in other HIV therapies
for [the] duration of the treatment and follow-up
period." This meant the volunteers would go as long as
two years without treatment. Somehow Heimlich and his
colleagues found eight HIV-positive patients to enroll
in the study.

Xiao Ping Chen, the Chinese researcher who oversaw the
study on Heimlich's behalf, claims that the patients
all survived and "remain clinically well" as of the
follow-up period's close. But the study does not cite
data for six of the eight patients' past six months,
nor does Chen explain the omission. Heimlich refused
to provide me with Chen's contact information, nor did
Chen respond to questions sent to e-mail addresses
cited in his published material.
This is the same Dr. Heimlich who developed the
Heimlich maneuver, used to expel food from the throats
of choking victims.

His experiments - which seek to destroy ...


HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, by inducing high malarial
fevers- have been criticized by the Centers for
Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration
and condemned by other health professionals and human
rights advocates as a medical "atrocity.''

MALARIOTHERAPY
Cincinnati's Dr. Henry Heimlich says malaria can be
used to cure AIDS, cancer and Lyme disease through a
process called malariotherapy. Dr. Heimlich has been
sharply criticized by state, federal and international
health organizations for these experiments.

This is how he explained the process at a conference
in October:

His theory is based on tests performed in 1918 by
Nobel Prize winner (medicine) Julius Wagner-Jauregg,
who reported that malariotherapy cured neurosyphilis.

The idea is to inject AIDS patients with malaria to
induce high fevers that will kill the HIV virus.

After 10-12 fevers and after approximately three
weeks, the malaria is cured with drugs.

The fevers allegedly spark an immune reaction, which
reverses AIDS' attack on patients' immune system.

In one study, malariotherapy was performed on eight
HIV-positive men, ages 23-40, in China. After the
malaria was cured, the patients were monitored for two
years.

Heimlich contends that malariotherapy is affordable
and available to patients who would not normally have
access to expensive drugs.

For years, Dr. Heimlich has been criticized bystate,
federal and international health organizations over
malariotherapy. Despite this, Heimlich proudly
continues his work in China and says he wants to
expand malariotherapy to Africa.

From his Cincinnati institute on Straight Street, the
83-year-old Dr. Heimlich solicits private donations
for malariotherapy research and distributes a
quarterly newsletter about his work to "promote
peaceful solutions to international problems." He is
the father of Hamilton County Commissioner Phil
Heimlich.

He often is at odds with medical professionals. One of
his most public fights has been with the American Red
Cross over the agency's refusal to adopt the Heimlich
maneuver as the first response in drowning rescues
instead of traditional CPR.

Dr. Heimlich says his critics are motivated by
politics rather than legitimate medical concern.

Malariotherapy research was the topic of Heimlich's
presentation to the respected Pan Africa AIDS
Conference in Nashville, Tenn., last October.

"They don't question my work," he says, adding that
his tests offer a chance to end the scourge of AIDS.

Officials with the Pan Africa Conference could not be
reached. However, Peter Lurie, a former AIDS
researcher and now a physician with Public Citizen's
Health Research Group in Washington, D.C., calls the
malariotherapy studies dangerous and unnecessary.

Public Citizen is a 32-year-old, nonprofit group
founded by consumer advocate Ralph Nader. The Health
Research Group provides oversight concerning drugs,
medical devices, doctors and hospitals and
occupational health. It works to identify and ban
unsafe or ineffective drugs, medical devices and
procedures.

"It is charlatanism of the highest order," Dr. Lurie
says of malariotherapy. "It is exploiting the lack of
decent medical care in China."

Dr. Heimlich began soliciting funds for malaria
treatment of cancer, AIDS and Lyme disease in the late
1980s.

"Ever since then he's been coming up with new
maneuvers," Dr. Lurie says. "Many or most of them have
not worked. Some are incredibly grandiose."

Dr. Lurie included Dr. Heimlich's malariotherapy
studies in a September 1997 New England Journal of
Medicine article about "exploitive" medical procedures
in developing countries.

Dr. Heimlich insists that he has approval to conduct
his studies through a review board of doctors that is
supposed to ensure federal regulations for ethical
research are met. But that review board was disbanded
several years ago after the Food and Drug
Administration sharply criticized the China malaria
experiment.

The review board overseeing Dr. Heimlich's China
experiment was formed by an "alternative medicine"
group called the Great Lakes College of Clinical
Medicine.

In 2000, an FDA compliance director described Dr.
Heimlich's procedures as inadequate. He said the
experiments would not be permitted in the United
States, that researchers failed to consider community
attitudes in China and that there was no description
of lifelong risks facing patients injected with
malaria.

Dr. Heimlich called the report biased.

"We ask you," Dr. Heimlich wrote to FDA Commissioner
Jane Henney, "to take immediate action vis--vis your
employee and the unwarranted harm to our research that
his bias and false accusations are causing."

In 1993, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention questioned Dr. Heimlich's research. Carlos
Campbell, CDC's chief of malaria studies at the time,
said there was no evidence to support Heimlich's
conclusions.

"No evidence currently exists to indicate that malaria
infection would beneficially affect the course of HIV
infection," Campbell wrote. "In fact, substantive
concerns have been raised regarding the possibility
that malaria therapy could (worsen) the course of HIV
infection."

Los Angeles physician Paul Bronston, who serves as the
national chair of the Ethics and Professional Policy
Committee for the American College of Medical Quality,
says there is still no evidence that the experiments
have any merit.

"Indeed, there is evidence that it is very dangerous,"
he says.

Dr. Bronston organized a petition against Dr. Heimlich
in 1994 over malaria experiments to treat Lyme
disease, which were being conducted in Mexico. The
experiments resulted in a groundswell of protest from
the medical community.

Dr. Heimlich contends the China experiments have
proved that malaria works to combat AIDS. He says that
malaria strengthens the immune system and increases
T-cells in AIDS patients.

T-cells are a common way to measure the severity of
HIV. In a healthy person, T-cell counts are usually
above 1,000. When counts fall below 200, patients are
considered to have full-blown AIDS.

Dr. Heimlich says before being treated with malaria,
eight male AIDS patients in China had T-cell counts
that ranged from 269 to 1,868. Two years after
malariotherapy, the T-cell counts in those patients
were 570 to 2,063.

"These results ... confirm malariotherapy is safe and
can be effective for HIV infected patients," Heimlich
said in his Pan Africa presentation.

Both Dr. Lurie and Dr. Bronston say they are surprised
that AIDS researchers would continue to be involved in
malaria experiments after all of the continued
negative publicity and criticism that Dr. Heimlich
receives.

While researching her report Dr. Wulsin, who has field
experience with AIDS in Africa, says that Heimlich's
assistant, Dr. Eric Spletzer, gave her data that had
been gathered from Africa-CD4 counts, apparently from
HIV-positive patients who also had malaria-but would
not disclose the usual contextual information. There
was no signature from the researcher who took the
data, and no explanation of how it was gathered. This
struck Wulsin as strange; she needed that information
to make sure the data wasn't biased. When she asked
Spletzer for it, he refused. "I think Eric and Hank
[Heimlich] knew things that, for a variety of reasons,
they didn't want to share with me," says Wulsin, who
declines to say more about what those reasons might
be.

Wulsin's report, based on information gathered from
inside the Heimlich Institute, offers the best glimpse
into the size and scope of Heimlich's malaria
endeavors. It refers obliquely to "an American
sponsor" (Wulsin says she was never told the sponsor's
identity) who in 2000 collaborated with the Heimlich
Institute in conducting a malariotherapy study in East
Africa. In 2003, says the report, this unnamed sponsor
"commenc[ed] infection with malaria among 12-13
HIV-positive East African patients."

A footnote says that this study "lost" four or five
subjects during the follow-up period, which would
reduce the number of patients in the study to eight.

"There was a firewall," Wulsin says of the problems
she faced in getting information from the institute.
"I could see from Heimlich's point of view why they
wanted to protect their sources, but it was certainly
a disagreement that we had. I'm pretty Western, and I
said, 'No, I'm not going to place any stock in these
results.' "

Posts: 8337 | From the other shore | Registered: Jul 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
welcome
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7953

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"Heimlich contends that malariotherapy is affordable
and available to patients who would not normally have access to expensive drugs."

All the other BS aside...the above is why the establishment call this dangerous.

Having AIDS is T-E-R-M-I-N-A-L!! What could be more dangerous than that?

Hot baths might have a similiar effect.
See link here

[ 05. December 2005, 06:57 PM: Message edited by: welcome ]

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AlisonP
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I also know of a Lyme expert who has seen lyme patients get better/go into remission after a high fever.

If the medical community is condemning this, then my guess is it works. I hope this research is continued. Maybe I should go to Africa and start wandering around some swamps. Or take a field trip to Plum Island and ask if they would be so kind as to infect me with malaria.

It's too bad babesia doesn't cure Lyme since it's a relative of malaria. Darnit lol.

Alison

--------------------
 -

The obscure we see eventually. The completely obvious, it seems, takes longer. --- Edward R. Murrow

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vitch
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I went to Mexico in 1990 to get Malaria under the Heimlich program. Some in the program had a temporary remission but it did nothing for me (except that I lost a pound a day while sick). Overall, I recommend you do not do it.

--------------------
[email protected]

www.lymediseaseassociation.org/Conflicts.doc

Worthless tests & labs, a dangerous vaccine, insurance companies refuse to pay, undertreatment the norm, all about money. MO.

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Lymetoo
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NO way I would infect myself with one illness to "cure" another! Especially one so similar to BABESIA!! UGH!

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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HEATHERKISS
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Reminds me of Dr. B from North Jersey who saved many people from Lyme and other tick borned deseases in the 1980's.

Didn't he give himself malaria?

Amyone know this doctor?

God rest his soul.

--------------------
HEATHER

 -

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pq
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the idea is interesting on its face, but, imo, is sophomoric. sophmore = wisefool.

heimlich should retire before he becomes "heimlich himmler."

to test his theory,he doesn't have to deliberately infect africans with malaria, he can just go to the malaria belt in africa, and find those infected with both malaria and aids.
those with both malaria and aids, can be one group in a study of different groups of individuals with and without disease, against which he can compare groups.

for example,a study design would be something like the following:

group I = patients with both malaria and aids.

(this group might include klempner, mc sweegan steere, some prosecutors,insurance industry executives, and fauci,for example, or; their subordinate colleagues who think like they do, and want their jobs. this would be a good way for them to get rid of their internal competition.)

group II = malaria patients only(this might include marques,members of the cdc,and/or the idsa, for example)

group III(e.g. of one kind of control group) = normal healthy individuals with no diseases.


group IV = aids patients only

group V = baronella only

group VI = lyme + bartonella + babesia

group VII = babesia only

and so on.

[ 09. December 2005, 12:32 AM: Message edited by: pq ]

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pq
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all i need is another infection [Roll Eyes] [loco] [lol]
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Mo
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Ya.. it reminds me of when I used bobcat urine to deal with the munchers in the garden..

and then didn't know what to use to get rid of the bobcats [Roll Eyes]

Nevertheless, I find the theories interesting and that this was used in syphilis..

but they have found no safe way to raise body temp to 106 degrees..

(ICHT was based on that idea, and that did not pan put as a viable methid of treatment overall)

I would also think it would need to be an immune induced fever..not artificial..
one that we might get with some of these TBD's if they didn't trick/supress the immune system ??

Interesting points, PQ..
I imagine in some AIDS/Maleria coinfections or Lyme/Maleria..
there is just an insideous chronic condition..

each immune sinario patient to patient would be a huge variable and a veritable crap shoot as to who would have that fever response, and a chance to clear both diseases.

Too risky, for sure...

Mo

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