LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » what about cesium chloride for lyme?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: what about cesium chloride for lyme?
citruslyme
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7851

Icon 1 posted      Profile for citruslyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I read that cesium chloride alkalizes your body to the max and supplies it with lot's of oxygen/
it's a natural supplement but has it's side effecrs in that you have to take potasium supplements with it.

It has been used as an alternative for cancer b/c cancer cells are like borrlia, they hate oxygen and love glucose and an acidic state.

I thought it may be good for lyme ? It depletes cells of glucose and acidic , low oxygen states.
so maybe it can knock the ketes down?>
any thoughts?
thanks

--------------------
citrus

Posts: 248 | From student | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
citruslyme
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7851

Icon 1 posted      Profile for citruslyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
up for thoughts

--------------------
citrus

Posts: 248 | From student | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
stymielymie
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 10044

Icon 1 posted      Profile for stymielymie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
cesium is radioactive!!!!!!!!
must take that into account
can have half life of minutes to 1000's of years.


Isotopes Used in Medicine
Reactor Radioisotopes (half-life indicated)
Molybdenum-99 (66 h): Used as the 'parent' in a generator to produce technetium-99m.
Technetium-99m (6 h): Used in to image the skeleton and heart muscle in particular, but also for brain, thyroid, lungs (perfusion and ventilation), liver, spleen, kidney (structure and filtration rate), gall bladder, bone marrow, salivary and lacrimal glands, heart blood pool, infection and numerous specialised medical studies.
Bismuth-213 (46 min): Used for TAT.
Chromium-51 (28 d): Used to label red blood cells and quantify gastro- intestinal protein loss.
Cobalt-60 (10.5 mth): Formerly used for external beam radiotherapy.
Copper-64 (13 h): Used to study genetic diseases affecting copper metabolism, such as Wilson's and Menke's diseases.
Dysprosium-165 (2 h): Used as an aggregated hydroxide for synovectomy treatment of arthritis.
Erbium-169 (9.4 d): Use for relieving arthritis pain in synovial joints.
Holmium-166 (26 h): Being developed for diagnosis and treatment of liver tumours.
Iodine-125 (60 d): Used in cancer brachytherapy (prostate and brain), also diagnostically to evaluate the filtration rate of kidneys and to diagnose deep vein thrombosis in the leg. It is also widely used in radioimmuno- assays to show the presence of hormones in tiny quantities. Iodine-131 (8 d): Widely used in treating thyroid cancer and in imaging the thyroid; also in diagnosis of abnormal liver function, renal (kidney) blood flow and urinary tract obstruction. A strong gamma emitter, but used for beta therapy.
Iridium-192 (74 d): Supplied in wire form for use as an internal radiotherapy source for cancer treatment (used then removed).
Iron-59 (46 d): Used in studies of iron metabolism in the spleen.
Lutetium-177 (6.7 d): Lu-177 is increasingly important as it emits just enough gamma for imaging while the beta radiation does the therapy on small (eg endocrine) tumours. Its half-life is long enough to allow sophisticated preparation for use.
Palladium-103 (17 d): Used to make brachytherapy permanent implant seeds for early stage prostate cancer.
Phosphorus-32 (14 d): Used in the treatment of polycythemia vera (excess red blood cells). Beta emitter.
Potassium-42 (12 h): Used for the determination of exchangeable potassium in coronary blood flow.
Rhenium-186 (3.8 d): Used for pain relief in bone cancer. Beta emitter with weak gamma for imaging.
Rhenium-188 (17 h): Used to beta irradiate coronary arteries from an angioplasty balloon.
Samarium-153 (47 h): Sm-153 is very effective in relieving the pain of secondary cancers lodged in the bone, sold as Quadramet. Also very effective for prostate and breast cancer. Beta emitter.
Selenium-75 (120 d): Used in the form of seleno-methionine to study the production of digestive enzymes.
Sodium-24 (15 h): For studies of electrolytes within the body.
Strontium-89 (50 d): Very effective in reducing the pain of prostate and bone cancer. Beta emitter.
Xenon-133 (5 d): Used for pulmonary (lung) ventilation studies.
Ytterbium-169 (32 d): Used for cerebrospinal fluid studies in the brain.
Yttrium-90 (64 h): Used for cancer brachytherapy and as silicate colloid for the relieving the pain of arthritis in larger synovial joints. Pure beta emitter.
Radioisotopes of caesium, gold and ruthenium are also used in brachytherapy.
Cyclotron Radioisotopes
Carbon-11, Nitrogen-13, Oxygen-15, Fluorine-18: These are positron emitters used in PET for studying brain physiology and pathology, in particular for localising epileptic focus, and in dementia, psychiatry and neuropharmacology studies. They also have a significant role in cardiology. F-18 in FDG has become very important in detection of cancers and the monitoring of progress in their treatment, using PET.
Cobalt-57 (272 d): Used as a marker to estimate organ size and for in-vitro diagnostic kits.
Gallium-67 (78 h): Used for tumour imaging and localisation of inflammatory lesions (infections).
Indium-111 (2.8 d): Used for specialist diagnostic studies, eg brain studies, infection and colon transit studies.
Iodine-123 (13 h): Increasingly used for diagnosis of thyroid function, it is a gamma emitter without the beta radiation of I-131.
Krypton-81m (13 sec) from Rubidium-81 (4.6 h): Kr-81m gas can yield functional images of pulmonary ventilation, e.g. in asthmatic patients, and for the early diagnosis of lung diseases and function.
Rubidium-82 (65 h): Convenient PET agent in myocardial perfusion imaging.
Strontium-92 (25 d): Used as the 'parent' in a generator to produce Rb-82.
Thallium-201 (73 h): Used for diagnosis of coronary artery disease other heart conditions such as heart muscle death and for location of low-grade lymphomas.
docdave

Posts: 1820 | From Boone and Southport, NC | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
citruslyme
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 7851

Icon 1 posted      Profile for citruslyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
[Dave,
you goof ball!
nooooo Not the radioactive kind!

this kind
http://www.essense-of-life.com/info/cesium.htm

--------------------
citrus

Posts: 248 | From student | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.