LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » stage 1?? Stage 2? what are they?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: stage 1?? Stage 2? what are they?
EWT1638
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 11315

Icon 1 posted      Profile for EWT1638     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've read posts here talking about being stage 1 or stage 2 lyme, what is this and where can I read about the stages?

Thanks!

--------------------
When you reach your "wits-end" remember this: "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give you. I do not give as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid." John 14:27

Posts: 395 | From Loudoun County Virginia | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Beverly
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 1271

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Beverly     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi EWT1638,

This is an older post by pacbird, but it explains the stages very well. I hope this helps. [Wink]

Here's one explanation of the Stages of Lyme:

Stage 1 / Localized Infection
The most common clinical manifestation of Lyme disease is the rash, erythema migrans, formerly called erythema chronicum migrans (Figs. 6-9). The rash typically occurs 7-10 days after the tick bite and is present in 60-80 percent of patients with Lyme disease. Because over half of the patients with Lyme disease do not remember a tick bite, absence of a history of a tick bite does not exclude the diagnosis.

The rash typically has an erythematous annular border that gradually expands and has partial central clearing (Fig. 6, 7). The rash can occur anywhere on the body, is typically warm to the touch, and is occasionally pruritic. The median diameter of the rash is 15 cm. Over time the central portion of the rash may become necrotic or vesicular (Fig. 8). The rash usually resolves within 3 to 4 weeks; if antibiotic treatment is given, the rash usually fades by 1 week. Borrelia burgdorferi has been isolated from the outer rim of the skin lesion at this stage.


During this patients may also have flu-like symptoms, regional lymphadenopathy, and other non-specific complaints.

Stage 2 / Disseminated Infection
Several weeks after the tick bite, hematogenous spread of the spirochete may occur. Although all regions of the body may be affected, the skin, nervous system, and joints are most commonly involved. Stage 2 skin lesions occur in about 40 percent of patients.

These annular lesions are multiple, smaller than primary erythema migrans lesions, and are less migratory (Fig. 9).

Central nervous system involvement at this stage occurs in less than 20 percent of patients and begins weeks to months after the initial tick bite. Neurologic manifestations include acute meningitis, cranial nerve abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients with meningitis typically reveals a lymphocytic pleocytosis with an average white cell count of 100 cells per cubic millimeter.

Unilateral or bilateral facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is the most frequent cranial nerve abnormality. Peripheral neuritis may be motor, sensory or mixed; electromyographic results often suggest axonal nerve demyelination.
Intermittent migratory musculoskeletal pain or arthralgias may begin at this stage. Arthritis is generally more predominant in Stage 3 disease.


Cardiac involvement occurs in less than 10 percent of patients, but is the most threatening acute complication of Lyme disease. Atrioventricular block is the most common cardiac manifestation and can progress sequentially from first to second to third degree. Progression beyond first degree heart block is more likely if the patient's PR interval is longer than 0.30 seconds. Heart block gradually resolves spontaneously, but temporary pacemakers may be indicated.


Stage 3 / Chronic Infection
Although late manifestations of Lyme disease are often caused by persistent infection with B. burgdorferi, chronic symptoms in some patients may have an autoimmune mechanism. For this reason, stage 3 disease presents major diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to the clinician.
Months after the initial infection, patients may develop intermittent attacks of monoarticular or oligoarticular arthritis, most commonly in the knees and shoulders.

In contrast to subjective migratory arthralgias typical in earlier stages, patients show objective joint involvement at this stage. Steere carefully studied untreated patients with erythema migrans and found that approximately one-half developed intermittent attacks of arthritis, but only 11 percent developed chronic synovitis, and less than 5 percent had erosive joint destruction.

Steere also discovered that chronic Lyme arthritis may have an autoimmune component; patients with HLA-DR4 often did not respond to multiple courses of antibiotics. Nevertheless, even persons with sustained arthritis rarely have active joint inflammation for longer than several years.


The spectrum of nervous system abnormalities with chronic Lyme disease is broad. Distinct syndromes include: encephalopathy, polyneuropathy, and encephalomyelitis. These manifestations occur months to years after the initial illness, and are variable from patient to patient. Subacute encephalopathy is the most common chronic neurological syndrome and is manifested by disturbances in mood, sleep, and memory.

Polyneuropathy is generally manifested by sensory disturbances including spinal pain, radicular pain, or distal paresthesias.

Axonal polyneuropathy maybe confirmed by electromyography. Rarely, patients may have a leukoencephalitis that mimics multiple sclerosis or dementia. Patients with late Lyme disease may also complain of severe fatigue. Chronic neurologic involvement may persist for 10 years or longer.


A small subset of patients develops acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. This uncommon chronic skin lesion has been observed predominately in European patients and often develops at a previous site of erythema migrans; it is characterized by skin swelling and a bluish-red discoloration. Additionally, atrophy of the skin may develop and mimic cutaneous scleroderma. Isolation of B. burgdorferi from acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans skin lesions has provided strong support for the presence of persistent infection.


This monograph was produced for the World Wide Web by the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Health. It was adapted from the original print version. See bibliography for acknowledgements

Posts: 6626 | From Michigan | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
EWT1638
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 11315

Icon 1 posted      Profile for EWT1638     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thank you Beverly. Now I know that I am stage 3, having been misdiagnosed/undiagnosed for years.

--------------------
When you reach your "wits-end" remember this: "Peace I leave with you, my peace I give you. I do not give as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid." John 14:27

Posts: 395 | From Loudoun County Virginia | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Beverly
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 1271

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Beverly     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Your very welcome, I am glad it helped. [Wink]
Posts: 6626 | From Michigan | Registered: Jun 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
CaliforniaLyme
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 7136

Icon 1 posted      Profile for CaliforniaLyme     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Stage 1 can be the flu for a few days- or mono-!!

Stage 2 is fibromyalgia, CFS, "a case of bad mono", etc

Stage 3 is MS, ALzheimers, ALS, Parkinsons, Gullain-Barre, a progressive neurological syndrome somehting that can kill you-

--------------------
There is no wealth but life.
-John Ruskin

All truth goes through 3 stages: first it is ridiculed: then it is violently opposed: finally it is accepted as self evident. - Schopenhauer

Posts: 5639 | From Aptos CA USA | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymebytes
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 11830

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lymebytes   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Read page 18-19 of Burrascano's treatment guidelines for reliable explanations of the different stages:
http://www.ilads.org/burrascano_0905.html
Take care.

--------------------
www.truthaboutlymedisease.com

Posts: 2003 | From endemic area | Registered: May 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bettyg
Unregistered


Icon 10 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
beverly, thanks for finding that in-depth explanation! a nice reminder.

too bad i still haven't gotten my address line back, so i can't copy it to my newbie's links/advise ... that is what all want to know! [Wink]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.