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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » foul taste in mouth since infection

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Author Topic: foul taste in mouth since infection
adamm
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The subject line says it all--just wondering if

there was a causal relationship there. I assume it's

the result of bacterial overgrowth due to

immunosuppression and a reduction in saliva

production...any particular TBI that this is

associated with?

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Tincup
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Hey adammmmmmm..

I don't know of any specific bacterial infection or virus this is related to.. but it occurs like you said .. in folks with lowered resistence.

It also can be due to yeast overgrowth due to antibitocs use.

Also to toxins "coming out".

[Big Grin]

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Posts: 20353 | From The Moon | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
sixgoofykids
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I don't know either ... be sure you're drinking lots of water ... maybe even squeeze some lemon into it.

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timaca
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A foul taste in the mouth can be due to viral infection. Do a google search on this. Follows is some info I found from googling. For testing on viruses, see www.hhv-6foundation.org.

Timaca
here's what I found:

In the United States, there have been an increasingly greater number of individuals suffering from neurological complications stemming from viral infections. For many, finding ways in which to treat the symptoms is often more important than curing the viral infection which, in most cases, lies dormant and latent within the body for many years.

Dysgeusia is believed to be a neurological condition in which the sufferer experiences a spectrum of abnormal taste sensations including a complete lack of taste, irregular taste and even the perception that some foods or liquids taste like metals. For many patients the taste irregularity is inconsistent and progressive each day but, for some, the irregular taste pattern may come and go.

In medical research, it is has long been theorized that dyspepsia may be related to hormones, medication reactions or even chronic conditions such as halitosis or dry mouth. However, in more recent research, we are finding the neurological condition may be attributed, and secondary, to a viral infection, similar that the herpes virus strain that attributes to Bell's palsy and Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS).

Because dysgeusia is now believed to be related, in some part, to a viral infection, some healthcare professionals are more commonly turning to the therapeutic treatments used to treat conditions such as Bell's Palsy and Burning mouth syndrome; steroids and anti-viral such as acyclovir.

Posts: 2872 | From above 7,000 ft in a pine forest | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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