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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Microfilial Worms

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Author Topic: Microfilial Worms
mojo
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Are these treated with a regular parasite cleanse?

Are there tests for Microfilial worms?

Thanks
Molly

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adamm
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up


I assume you meant microfilarial worms...

do all Lymies have these? Or are these parasites

that all animals have and that only become

problematic for us when we're weakened by something

like Lyme??

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mojo
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Adam yes, that's what I meant, thanks.

I think that the tick actually infests you with them but not sure. Still learning about this.

Does anyone know?

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amk33
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I just lost a long post after typing, so I'm gonna make this short.

Treatment is one dose of Ivermectin.

There is a blood test for filiariasis (occurs in Africa) which is the cause of elephantitis. Preferred test is a skin snip.

Onchoceriasis is another type that also occurs in S. America/Mexico.

Supposedly, neither occur in the US. (Don't believe that one!)

I think that floaters may be microfilia. The eyes are one of the first places that they migrate to.

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SForsgren
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They have been found in ticks. Ivermectin/Stromectol is the current thought on treatment though I have generally not see it done as one dose. It is generally a three dose day 1, 5, 10 type of protocol.

--------------------
Be well,
Scott

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mojo
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Thanks for the replies. Very helpful

Are there any symptoms?

Molly

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amk33
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http://www.patient.co.uk/showdoc/40000890/

(Onchoceriasis)

"Ivermectin, single dose clears microfilariae from skin for several months. A further dose

every 6-12 months prevents progression. Ivermectin only treats

microfilariae and not adult worms. There is no treatment for the adult worms." (only surgical excision of nodules)

"Mild infection causes a localised maculopapular rash with itching. This may resolve or progress to a chronic and generalised form with severe itching.

Initial symptoms are usually a red, papular, itchy rash, followed by subcutaneous nodules. Larvae develop into adult worms within palpable

nodules, which are usually found over bony prominences in the chest, pelvis and knees. The lesions may heal with hyperpigmentation but

lichenified, hyperkeratotic lesions may become widespread and are very itchy and distressing.
A localised form in Arabia causes a chronic

papular dermatitis affecting the arms and legs.
Long-standing infection causes the skin to become very wrinkled. Skin begins to sag and

depigmentation of the pretibial areas is typical in older people living in endemic areas. Genital elephantiasis, hydrocoeles and a "hanging groin" may also occur.

Hanging groin is caused by lymphatic obstruction leading to swelling, loss of elasticity and atrophy of the skin, producing large folds of

skin. It may be unilateral or bilateral, and may also involve enlarged lymph nodes. Hanging groin increases the risk of developing an inguinal hernia.

Light-skinned patients infected on visiting a country may present a year later with intensely itchy, red macular or maculopapular lesions that may be either localised or generalised.

Fever, muscle or joint pains, weight loss and lymphadenitis may occur.
Rash sometimes lasts for several months after treatment.

Eye involvement: initially presents with lacrimation, photophobia and a sensation of a foreign body in the eye. Features of eye

involvement then include conjunctivitis, intraocular microfilariae, punctate keratitis (presents with " snowflake" opacities resulting

from an acute inflammatory reaction to dying microfilariae. Resolves spontaneously with no long-term sequalae), sclerosing keratitis,

anterior uveitis chorioretinitis, optic neuritis, optic atrophy, glaucoma and blindness

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Eight Legs Bad
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Hi Molly

I think our docs are still at the stage of trying to find out what role microfilarial worms play in Lyme and how best to deal with the problem.

This is also being discuaaws in anoher thread, but unfortunately can't seem to find it right now. I mentioned there that European LLMDs are starting to use Ivermectin and Mebendazole. I personally know four paediatric patients cured with Mebendazole. Also I heard anecdotally of an adult patient very recently who is able to write clearly for the first time in ages after being treated with Mebendazole.

Oxygenbabe mentioned that the scientist Eva Sapi has written about her findings on testing ticks in the northeast USA, and a major find was microfilaria. However I have also heard rumours that the powers-that-be are trying to stop her publishing this paper.

It's disgusting that they are suppressing what might be crucial information. Willi Burgdorfer found very large microfilarial worms in the famous batch of ticks from Shelter Island - this was what actually what made him examine each tick extremely painstakingly, hoping to find more worms, so leading him to discover Borrelia burgdorferi. He published a paper on the microfilaria, but no one followed up this work.

In the early 1960's Eli Lilly had scientists working on a drug that would cure both microfilaria and borrelia. I don't know why they chose that combination, especially as microfilaria and bacteria are biologically very very different from one another.

Elena


quote:
Originally posted by mojo:
Are these treated with a regular parasite cleanse?

Are there tests for Microfilial worms?

Thanks
Molly



--------------------
Justice will be ours.

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Eight Legs Bad
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Oh, one other thing I forgot to mention. Lawrence Klapow PhD is working on developing a test for a hitherto unknown lungworm which he calls Cryptostrongylus pulmoni. He found this worm in a very large proportion of his ME/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients, many of whom also have a Lyme diagnosis. He believes this worm may originate from Southeast Asia.

Elena

--------------------
Justice will be ours.

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mojo
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amk and eightlegs:

Thanks so much for the wealth of information. I also remember another thread but couldn't find it either.

Thanks again to everyone who posted.

Molly

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adamm
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Lily was working on a treatment in the 60's--I thought

Borrelia was first found in ticks in the 70's. [confused]

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adamm
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Also, how many folks here have gotten better

without treating for worms?

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Eight Legs Bad
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Hi Adamm,

Well, the borrelia Eli Lilly were referring to at that time was Relapsing Fever Borrelia, but as we now know through genetic studies, the distinction between Relapsing Fever Borrelia and Lyme Borrelia is pretty artificial.

For example, Borrelia lonestari ("Master's disease") which causes what CDC like to call a "Lyme-like illness", is genetically closer to Relapsing Fever Borrelia than to Borrelia burgdorferi.

Yet it causes an illness just like Lyme. Hmmmm.

Elena

quote:
Originally posted by adamm:
Lily was working on a treatment in the 60's--I thought

Borrelia was first found in ticks in the 70's. [confused]



--------------------
Justice will be ours.

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GiGi
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A wonderful friend of ours had these parasites. She changed sheets every day after collecting these threadlike things every morning. She was horrified!

She cleaned up her body - everything from metals to chemicals, diet, colon, etc. Did Alinia 20 days (1000 2/day) and followed it with Ozonated Rizol Oils. She took the now-or-never approach with 20 drops 2xday and kept doing it. Within 3 days she started to feel full of vigor and vitality. If I remember correctly, I think within a months the worms were gone, never to appear again. She is a happy camper now, several years later.

I have posted about the oils (Ozonated Rizoles) recently. They work on literally every type of infection and are easy to take.

Take care.


P.S. I have extensive research results that I will post sometime - when I have time. For now, the Rizoles are used in Germany by 100's of medical professionals, including hospitals


Sharing my experiences.

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