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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » bullseye rash 100% lyme?

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Author Topic: bullseye rash 100% lyme?
Wimenin
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I was talking about this on another thread but thought I would ask the topic on its own..

**Is getting a bullseye rash after a tick bite a 100% indication of lyme?

**Can you get the bullseye rash and not get lyme?

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disturbedme
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It's a 100% indication of lyme.

If people get the rash they are lucky because then they (should) KNOW and don't have to get tested and possibly get a negative test and still wonder if they have it...

--------------------
One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.
~ Helen Keller

My Lyme Story

Posts: 2965 | From Land of Confusion (bitten in KS, moved to PA, now living in MD) | Registered: Jun 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
adamm
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1. Yes

2. No

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Rianna
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1. Yep 100%
2. No

Rianna

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lightfoot
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1) Yes

2) No

And you can get a bulls eye during treatment or again with no treatment. It's to your advantage if you have a bulls eye......get pix of it and get it witnessed by a doctor pronto. This will help with obtaining treatment now and in the future.

Run don't walk to a knowledgeable LLMD.

--------------------
Healing Smiles.....lightfoot [Smile] [Smile] [Smile]

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Keebler
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-

check out the NEWBIE links at the top of the medical posts.

======================================

**Is getting a bullseye rash after a tick bite a 100% indication of lyme?

YES

**Can you get the bullseye rash and not get lyme?

NO

However, Lyme may not become apparent - subsiding to return later, when under stress or another infection. The lyme bacteria, a spirochete, can become disseminated and change form to elude the immune system.

That is why even a person seems fine and feels fine, if a bulls-eye rash is present, prompt and aggressive treatment is vital.

Bb, the bacteria, has several stages and forms and can change back and forth. Different drugs - and combinations of drugs - are required for each stage.

Early aggressive treatment can help to prevent that.

Also know that the rash does not always appear for everyone infected . . . and, while the bulls-eye is right on, lyme rashes can have various appearances and characteristics.

--

CO-INFECTIONS, too.

Even if a characteristic bullseye rash is clear for lyme, the patient must be also evaluated for coinfections. This would be both clinical evaluation and labs tests by a LLMD who is expert in all tick-borne diseases (TBD).

The timing of the tests, as well as a patient's exposure to certain meds can alter the test results. Be sure a LLMD guides testing.

www.Igenex.com - is a specialty lab and more information can be found there.

Co-infections can sometimes be treated with the same drugs as Bb, however, some co-infections require different drugs and the timing of treatment is important.

=======================================

www.ilads.org ILADS

INTERNATIONAL LYME AND ASSOCIATED DISEASES SOCIETY

=======================================

AMAZON BOOKS - just search for lyme - many titles will come up. You can read many patient reviews there.

The newest book by a LLMD author is The Lyme Disease Solution by Singleton.

=======================================

http://tinyurl.com/2dmvs2

From the May 2007 issue of Clinical Advisor (home page: www.clinicaladvisor.com )

CONTROVERSY CONTINUES TO FUEL THE "LYME WAR"
By Virginia Savely, RN, FNP-C

*****
As two medical societies battle over its diagnosis and treatment, Lyme disease remains a frequently missed illness. Here is how to spot and treat it.

Excerpts:

`` . . .Patients with Lyme disease almost always have negative results on standard blood screening tests and have no remarkable findings on physical exam, so they are frequently referred to mental-health professionals for evaluation.


"...If all cases were detected and treated in the early stages of Lyme disease, the debate over the diagnosis and treatment of late-stage disease would not be an issue, and devastating rheumatologic, neurologic, and cardiac complications could be avoided..."

. . . * Clinicians do not realize that the CDC has gone on record as saying the commercial Lyme tests are designed for epidemiologic rather than diagnostic purposes, and a diagnosis should be based on clinical presentation rather than serologic results.

- FULL ARTICLE AT LINK ABOVE.


-

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randibear
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my new doc says a rash is 100 percent proof you have lyme -- no further explanation needed.

and yep you can get it at any time.

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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