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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » New Abstracts on Red and Near-IR Radiation

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Author Topic: New Abstracts on Red and Near-IR Radiation
Dave6002
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Mitochondrial signaling in mammalian cells activated by red and near-IR radiation


Author(s): Karu TI (Karu, Tiina I.)
Source: PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOBIOLOGY Volume: 84 Issue: 5 Pages: 1091-1099 Published: SEP-OCT 2008

Abstract: Mitochondrial signaling is an information channel between the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the nucleus for the transduction signals regarding the functional state of the mitochondria. The present review examines the question whether radiation of visible and near-IR (IR-A) radiation can activate this retrograde-type cellular signaling pathway. Experimental data about modulation of elements of mitochondrial retrograde signaling by the irradiation (mitochondrial membrane potential Delta Psi(m), reactive oxygen species ROS, Ca2+, NO center dot, pH(i), fission-fusion homeostasis of mitochondria) are reviewed. The terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain cytochrome c oxidase is considered as the photoacceptor. Functions of cytochrome c oxidase as a signal generator as well as a signal transducer in irradiated cells are outlined.

Posts: 1078 | From Fairland | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Dave6002
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Effect of gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser therapy (660Nm) on recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats following neurotmesis lesion and epineural anastomosis: functional analysis

Reis FA (Reis, F. A.), Belchior ACG (Belchior, A. C. G.), Nicolau RA (Nicolau, R. A.), Fonseca TS (Fonseca, T. S.), Carvalho PTC (Carvalho, P. T. C.)
Source: REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE FISIOTERAPIA Volume: 12 Issue: 3 Pages: 215-221 Published: MAY-JUN 2008


Abstract: Context: Peripheral nerve injuries result in sensory and motor losses in the innervated area and can hinder individuals' daily activities. Objective: The objective was to analyze the influence of applying gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) laser (660Nm) on the functional recovery of the sciatic nerve in rats. Methods: The sciatic nerve of 12 Wistar rats was subjected to injury consisting of neurotmesis and epineural anastomosis. The rats were divided into two groups: control and laser therapy. After the injury, a GaAlAs laser was used (660Nm, 4J/cm(2), 26.3mW and 0.63cm(2) beam) at three equidistant points on the injury, for 20 days. Footprint impressions were obtained from the animals before and seven, 14 and 21 days after the surgical procedure and the sciatic functional index (SFI) was calculated. Results: Comparison of the SFI did not show any significant difference (p>0.05) between the two groups, Conclusions: The parameters and methods used for the laser therapy did not produce any effect on the SFI over the period evaluated.

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Dave6002
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Effects of continuous-wave (670-nm) red light on wound healing

Erdle BJ (Erdle, Brandon J.), Brouxhon S (Brouxhon, Sabine), Kaplan M (Kaplan, Martin), VanBuskirk J (VanBuskirk, JoAnne), Pentland AP (Pentland, Alice P.)
Source: DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY Volume: 34 Issue: 3 Pages: 320-325 Published: MAR 2008


Abstract: BACKGROUND Recent work suggests that injuries can heal faster if treated by lasers emitting 670-nm red light. LED lights emitting 670-nm light are now available. This suggests that inexpensive and easy-to-use 670-nm LED lights might help accelerate cutaneous wound healing.

OBJECTIVE The objective was to evaluate the effect of 670-nm LED light on wound healing in SKH-1 hairless mice.

METHODS To study 670-nm light effects on incisional injury, animals were left unexposed or exposed to equal doses of high-, medium-, or low-flux light. Burn injuries were treated with high-flux light or left unexposed. Healing was assessed by measurement of the burn area and the gap remaining to closure of incisional injury.

RESULTS Rice exposed to 670-nm red light showed significantly faster healing than control mice. High, medium, and low fluxes of light were all effective after incisional injury. In burn injury, there was improvement in wound healing initially, but the time to repair was unchanged.

CONCLUSIONS A 670-nm LED red light source accelerates healing in skin of SKH-1 hairless mice after incisional injuries, but is not as effective for burn injuries. These data that suggest red light exposure may be helpful in postoperative wound repair.

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Dave6002
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Depth of penetration of an 850nm wavelength low level laser in human skin

Esnouf A (Esnouf, Alan), Wright PA (Wright, Philip A.), Moore JC (Moore, Joan C.), Ahmed S (Ahmed, Salim)
Source: ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RESEARCH Volume: 32 Issue: 1-2 Pages: 81-86 Published: 2007


Abstract: Low Level Laser Therapy is used for a wide variety of conditions including superficial skin sores, musculoskeletal and joint problems, and dentistry. Knowledge of the penetration depth of laser radiation in human skin is an essential prerequisite to identifying its method of action. Mathematical simulations and estimates from the literature suggest that the depth of penetration of laser radiation using wavelengths from 630nm up to 1100nm may be up to 50mm. The aim of this study is to directly measure the penetration depth of a Low Level Laser in human tissue. Human abdominal skin samples up to 0.784mm thickness were harvested by dermatome following abdominoplasty procedures. These samples were irradiated by a Gallium Aluminium Arsenide Laser (Wavelength 850nm near infra-red invisible light, 100mW, 24kHz, 0.28mm diameter probe) and the transmitted radiation measured with an Ophir Optronics 'Nova' external energy meter. The intensity of laser radiation reduced by 66% after being transmitted through a 0.784mm sample of human abdominal tissue. In this study most laser radiation was absorbed within the first 1 mm of skin.

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