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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Cholestyramine with Aspartame

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Author Topic: Cholestyramine with Aspartame
Annelet
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Given that you have to be very careful to avoid taking meds close to Cholestyramine because the CSM will just "bind" everything.....what is the big deal about using CSM that is artificialy sweetened with Aspartame?

Won't the CSM just bind the Aspartame and stop it being absorbed, just like any other med?

Anne

Posts: 250 | From canada | Registered: Oct 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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Do not take this.

Do not take anything with aspartame in it - eve a breath mint, cough drop or gum.

Aspartame can be absorbed through the mouth as you drink it and can affect the brain long before toxins could be rounded up - but chances are there is no way to do that with aspartame.


Aspartame can trigger all sorts of brain problems, within a minute of taking it, even. And it can take a very long time for the brain to return to normal afterward. Some stay it actually stays in the brain.


Unknowingly, I've had this a few times and within an hour, a seizure has hit. I have learned to never trust food at a potluck again. When asked, people seem to forget all what they put in stuff and it can it show up in the most unlikely foods - even salads.


If you already have some, I'm sorry you are stuck with this dilemma. It's important to return it for a type that is free of any artificial sweetener.


You can get plain cholestyramine and add a drop of stevia (from a plant source) if you need sweetening. Someone here in the past has posted a source for the pure product.

The really sad part is that, insurance will often pay for the stuff with the poison added to it. There is nothing that can make that okay for anyone.


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[ 02-07-2009, 09:15 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Keebler
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This is just a start to the research about the neuro-toxic effects of aspartame.

http://tinyurl.com/avq449

Excitotoxins - The Taste That Kills by M.D. Russell L. Blaylock

This is the 1997 edition

No customer reviews at this link but you can look inside the book and read (59 customer reviews) at the link for the 1996 edition of that book - http://tinyurl.com/as6je7

The customer reviews, in themselves, are an education.


=======================

This book, by an ILADS member LLMD, holds great information about treatments options and support measures:


http://tinyurl.com/6lq3pb (through Amazon)

THE LYME DISEASE SOLUTION (2008)

- by Kenneth B. Singleton , MD; James A. Duke. Ph.D. (Foreword)

You can read more about it here and see customer reviews.

Web site: www.lymedoctor.com


p. 362 states:

". . . (MSG) and . . .aspartame (Nutrasweet) can also contribute to anxiety . . . need to be avoided."


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Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
Member # 12673

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

aspartame - 938 abstracts

aspartame, neurotoxin - 3 abstracts

----------------------------


Relief of fibromyalgia symptoms following discontinuation of dietary excitotoxins.

Ann Pharmacother. 2001 Jun;35(6):702-6.

PMID: 11408989 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


CONCLUSIONS: The elimination of MSG and other excitotoxins from the diets of patients with fibromyalgia offers a benign treatment option that has the potential for dramatic results in a subset of patients.


=====================

http://tinyurl.com/bs7ck6


Excitotoxins in foods.

Neurotoxicology. 1994 Fall;15(3):535-44. Review.


PMID: 7854587 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


==================================

http://tinyurl.com/28of7y

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Aug 8; [Epub ahead of print] Links


Direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain.


Humphries P, Pretorius E, Naud H.

[1] 1Department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa

[2] 2Department of Anatomy, University of the Limpopo, South Africa.


The use of the artificial sweetener, aspartame, has long been contemplated and studied by various researchers, and people are concerned about its negative effects.


Aspartame is composed of phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%).

Phenylalanine plays an important role in neurotransmitter regulation, whereas aspartic acid is also thought to play a role as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Glutamate, asparagines and glutamine are formed from their precursor, aspartic acid.


Methanol, which forms 10% of the broken down product, is converted in the body to formate, which can either be excreted or can give rise to formaldehyde, diketopiperazine (a carcinogen) and a number of other highly toxic derivatives.


Previously, it has been reported that consumption of aspartame could cause neurological and behavioural disturbances in sensitive individuals.


Headaches, insomnia and seizures are also some of the neurological effects that have been encountered, and these

may be accredited to changes in regional brain concentrations of catecholamines, which include norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine.


The aim of this study was to discuss the direct and indirect cellular effects of aspartame on the brain,


and we propose that excessive aspartame ingestion might be involved in the pathogenesis of certain mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR 2000)

and also in compromised learning and emotional functioning.

--

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 8 August 2007; doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602866.

PMID: 17684524 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


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