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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » WOOD kills pathogens

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Author Topic: WOOD kills pathogens
jamescase20
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Knowing that wooden cutting boards years ago where found to be unable to allow pathogens from foods like chicken for example to grow...and in fact the wood appeared to kill the pathogens, unlike plastic cutting boards.

I decided to look into wood on the slide smears.

I found larch tree killed everything on the blood smear about instantly...but seemed barts didnt die quickly but also died about 2 mins. I have not tested other wood products...but found any herbal products contain barks and woody plants and trees and many proclaim anti bacterial actions.

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TerryK
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This is a good article with links that explain the fiasco with wood cutting boards.

http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/cuttingboards/a/cutbrdwoodplas.htm

I would not use a wood cutting board. They are porous and tend to harbor bacteria. I use plastic and wash them in the dishwasher.

I do use larch. It boosts the immune system. I'm on bart treatment and noticed the streaks started to fade once I had added larch.

here is the blurb on the larch that I use:

"Supports Healthy Immune and Intestinal Function Jarrow Formulas Larix 1000 contains arabinogalactans extracted from the larch tree (Larix occidentalis).

Arabinogalactans are densely branched, high molecular weight, water-soluble polysaccharides that support healthy immune function, particularly macrophage activity and cytokine defense activity such as interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor, IL-1 and IL-6. Arabinogalactans also promote the growth of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria."


Terry

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jamescase20
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So the cutting board test is more or less a scandal, but yet your finding that larch is helping you by claims that it helps the immune system.

Can you explain how then that the lyme hatchlings died in seconds...and I applied a tiny dusting on my slide? Even abx cannot do that.

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jamescase20
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Further, cedar has so much anti bacterial and anti fungals in it it does not even rot...period.

thats not just luck, the wood contains things that pathogens cannot resist.

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treepatrol
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Try the cedars & spruces.

--------------------
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Remember Iam not a Doctor Just someone struggling like you with Tick Borne Diseases.

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Marnie
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Pycnogenol...French Pine tree bark.

$$$. Sorry. Dosage is 1mg for every pound you weigh...all in one dose, once a day.

This comes from an infectious disease doctor, so I feel comfortable posting this.

Will it help? It might. Will it cure?

I don't know.

Terry, your last sentence in your post is critical.

Lactobacillus acidophillus need Mn to grow. Bb needs Mn.

Who is gonna "win"? I would hope the "good guys".

Review the post about the new vaccine too...which beneficial bacteria did they alter to trigger the immune response...

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TerryK
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Sorry James - I am not intending to argue about your findings one way or the other. Just wanted to present the info that I know about regarding wood cutting boards because I think it could be dangerous to use them, especially for people with depressed immune systems.

Apparently the reason that the scientists could not find traces of the bugs - even the dead bodies, is because the wood is porous and the bugs likely were hiding in the crevices.

I don't mean to divert your post but just don't want anyone to get sick from using a wood cutting board.

Terry

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yanivnaced
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pau d'arco (a strong anti-fungal) is the bark of Ipe tree - the same wood used to make high end decking.

The alkaloids in tropical tree barks have known antibiotic properties (cinammon, cat's claw, quinolones, etc)

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GiGi
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DMSO, MSM, Dr. Jacobs - do a google. Wood by-product. Practitioners use it in many instances.
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Lymetoo
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Do I have to eat sawdust to get rid of my Lyme disease?? [Wink]

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Opinions, not medical advice!

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Marnie
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Eat sawdust? Naah...easier way.

Inhibit HMG CoA reductase and halt the cholesterol pathway...which IS one of the pathways Bb takes to build (and rebuild!) its cell wall.

Via (pick one):

Mg
Lauricidin - CH4 inhibitor
Benicar - arb drug
Condrosulf - via inactivating genes called Akt

This always has been the goal to destroy many pathogens...either damage their cell walls or stop them from forming in the first place.

That is step one.

Then osmotoic pressure changes (and I suspect even barometric pressure changes) can "finish the job".

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Dawnee
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wow! Thanks Marnie!
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groovy2
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Hi James

I saw Info that Copper and Silver kill germs
it is why it is used on door knobs --Jay--

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LymeMECFSMCS
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What about cypress? Very resistant to a lot of things.

A pine tree extract (not pycnogenol) was being hyped as an anti-cancer treatment and immune-balancing treatment for CFIDS years ago. I took it, along with some other immune-enhancing things, and it *did* shift my immune system in blood testing over a six month period quite significantly, including reducing pre-cancerous markers.

And cichona bark (quinine) of course.
Also Arjuna -- great cardiac treatment used in Ayurvedic treatments with a lot of science behind it -- is from tree bark.

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jamescase20
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Its okay terry, I went off the handle on you anyway, and I am sorry.

But seriously, plant compounds I am convinced are key to this problem where running into with bacteria resistence. Maybe I cant prove it, and I cant...but if cedar can resist like it can...one has to wonder.

And honestly, I do even right now believe that plastic cutting boards are dangerous. And wood is safe...but I cant prove it one way or another, but I do know that larch tree pill dusted on a slide appeared to kill lyme hatchlings and blebs within about 1 minute.

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TerryK
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No problem James.

The pacific yew is used in cancer treatment. Also green tea extract is useful for MRSA. I think I saw something recently from Dr. B. where he recommends green tea.

Yes, I think plants in combination with abx will likely be part of the answer. You may find this article interesting - written by the famous botanist who contracted lyme disease

Herbs with Anti-Lyme Potential by James Duke, PhD

Plastic cutting boards or any cutting surface that is not disinfected will be a problem if meat is cut up on it. I run my plastic cutting boards through the dishwasher. The few that are too big, I disinfect with bleach or various other disinfectants.

Terry

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Keebler
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-

A GLASS cutting board is the safest of all. There are several brands that are thick and shatter-resistant.


Still, it's best to dedicate one solely to raw meats/fish.


-

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jamescase20
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I find it impossible to believe with all the wood cutting boards in use today, that they harbor dangerous bacteria...there would be too many sick from it.

And how can you explain that redwood, and cedar for that matter dont need stain nor paint and can resist bugs, fungals and bacteria in open fencing for many many yrs?????

I find the research to be valid. And I am going with it.

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jamescase20
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EXPLAIN THIS AS WELL:

"A breakthrough cutting board with natural talents. Naturally anti-bacterial and as sturdy as hardwood, this eco-friendly board is shaped from the scraps of wine corks, then heated and pressurized in a patented method that produces a density similar to cork flooring. This superior cutting surface is naturally self-healing, recovering from blade compression better than other materials--and it won't dull knives. And the opposite of absorbent, it actually repels moisture, odors and bacteria. Replenishable harvesting uses only the bark."


From crate and barrels website

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Mo
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hmm.. that sounds interesting.

i need a new cutting board.

mo

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life shrinks and expands in proportion to one's courage
-- anais nin

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Ocean
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Very interesting. Yes, Cedar is great. Our home is cedar sided, it's held up very well, bugs don't bother it at all, no rot or mold, ect.

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Sick since 1996...Diagnosed 10/2008

IgM:23-25 IND, 31+++, 39 IND, 41 +++
IgG: 31 IND, 41++, 58+

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