LymeNet Home LymeNet Home Page LymeNet Flash Discussion LymeNet Support Group Database LymeNet Literature Library LymeNet Legal Resources LymeNet Medical & Scientific Abstract Database LymeNet Newsletter Home Page LymeNet Recommended Books LymeNet Tick Pictures Search The LymeNet Site LymeNet Links LymeNet Frequently Asked Questions About The Lyme Disease Network LymeNet Menu

LymeNet on Facebook

LymeNet on Twitter




The Lyme Disease Network receives a commission from Amazon.com for each purchase originating from this site.

When purchasing from Amazon.com, please
click here first.

Thank you.

LymeNet Flash Discussion
Dedicated to the Bachmann Family

LymeNet needs your help:
LymeNet 2020 fund drive


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations.

LymeNet Flash Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | directory login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » menopause and lyme

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: menopause and lyme
randibear
Honored Contributor (10K+ posts)
Member # 11290

Icon 1 posted      Profile for randibear     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
since i'm 57, i'm at that menopause age. i did have a hysterectomy when i was in my 40's and have been on hormones since then.

how do you differentiate between what is lyme and menopause? do hormones play a part in lyme?

i'm on cenestin which is a synthetic plant based hormone. is it ok to take this when taking lyme meds?

i have a friend who just stopped all menopause meds but i'm afraid to. my doc said i will probably be on them another 10-15 years. ugh...

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

Posts: 12262 | From texas | Registered: Mar 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Parisa
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 10526

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Parisa     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Look into vitex. According to a Mark Stengler's (ND) Natural Physician's Healing Therapies vitex helps to regulate hormones through menopause.
Posts: 984 | From San Diego | Registered: Nov 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tailz
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
After being diagnosed as being menopausal at the age of 41, only to learn it was infection that shut my hormones down - my doctors all perfectly fine and dandy with my early menopause - I will NEVER again believe I am menopausal - not at 41, not at 51, not at 81.

I imagine it is different for you with a surgical menopause. I'm not sure though.

But from what I've been reading, menopause occurs in the BRAIN, not the ovaries. So science is wimping out on us ladies again.

So be careful of what you accept as medical fact. I know I learned, and I will never forget this lesson for as long as I live.

IMO menopause is never normal. It's a sign that a very important part of your brain is damaged from infection and toxicity.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
beachcomber
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5320

Icon 1 posted      Profile for beachcomber     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
R-bear:

At 46 I had every MD I saw tell me my symptoms were all menopause. That was so not the case. I even went on HRT, which did not help. I was finally diagnosed properly with Bb.

Several years later I am now entering into the big M phase of my life. A couple of months ago my MD asked me how I am coping with the menopausal symptoms mixed in with the Lyme and Babs. I told him that I really believe Menopause will be my cure. He looked very perplexed and asked me to explain.

First of all, I am wiser at this age, less stressed. Secondly, no more PMS - yay! Thirdly, my hot flashes make me sweat out the little buggers. So, bring on the hot flashes, I say. It is my personal portable detox sauna.

Got to find SOMETHING positive about this or at least have a sense of humor about it.


Bc

Posts: 1452 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Catch 22. Estrogen helps us keep calcium in our bones. Good thing.

But estridol (one of 3 forms of estrogen) apparently activates PKC delta.

PKC inhibitors cause cell death. Tamoxifen, for breast cancer is a man-made PKC inhibitor.

Bb has a PKC inhibitor.

I suspect it is PKC delta.

If we upregulate PKC delta to "counter" Bb's PKC delta inhibitor, the cells in which Bb is camped out will survive...theoretically.

Posts: 9404 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
beachcomber
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 5320

Icon 1 posted      Profile for beachcomber     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Oh my, you lost me. English is my first language. Chemistry is not my second, unfortunately. [confused]
Posts: 1452 | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tailz
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
My brain is not comprehending that estrogen explanation either. I will tell you this...

My GYN put me on estrogen replacement therapy because he was convinced this was menopause during the height of my symptoms. I didn't care - I just wanted the sweats and anxiety to stop.

Premarin only served to INCREASE my sweats, anxiety, pain, and virtually every symptom I was having - except I think my skin looked a little better for a few days.

Nope - menopause is not normal. Ever.

I think you need to encourage your doctor to find and treat your other infections. Male-dominated science has really sold women short here.

This is why women ROUTINELY give up their reproductive organs by middle age, yet very few men (except those with CANCEROUS conditions) are missing their testicles.

You put a man in charge of a woman's body, that's what happens. All they care about is if it all 'works'.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bettyg
Unregistered


Icon 10 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
i was not on any hormones after my hysterectomy 10-15 yrs. ago.

2 yrs. ago went thru menopause, and woke up totally drenched! glad that is over. [Wink]

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 773

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Marnie     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Need you all to remember something.

Statistically women outlive men.

As we age, we all have tremendous hormonal shifts...downward.

In puberty they soar...times of growth, reproduction, etc.

Older women are not supposed to have children. The risks for DNA damage soar...Down's syndrome, etc.

Not enough "nutrients" for mom AND a developing baby later in life...so the hormones shift.

Posts: 9404 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tailz
Unregistered


Icon 1 posted            Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
If older women are not supposed to have children, then why can men father children into old age? And why can women in ancient cultures bear children at 80, yet we're done at 40?

I will NEVER believe that God messed up, gave women a good 40 years tops of safe pregnancy, but allowed men the capacity into old age.

We're doing something to cause this. I think these artificial electromagnetic fields were are inundated with affect women more so than men - perhaps because women STATISTICALLY are higher in COPPER than men are, a known conductor.

And though I hear women live longer, my own mother is dead - my sister-in-law just died at the age of 50. I'm not sure I believe those stats - they could be outdated, because I'm not seeing it.

BUT even if they are correct, are women living healthier - or just longer? I know my own mother was not sick at my age.

IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Leelee
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19112

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Leelee     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This is an old thread, but upon doing a "search" for early menopause and Lyme I came across it.

I'm almost 53 now, but went through menopause at age 45. It has been a long 8 years of hot flashes only relieved by Prempro.

I thought it was odd for me to go through this at a relatively early age (for the women in my family).

Now that I suspect Lyme (maybe as far back as 1972) I wonder if anyone would care to share their thoughts on a correlation between early menopause and Lyme.

My first LLMD appointment is in about 10 days.

--------------------
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. Martin Luther King,Jr

Posts: 1573 | From Maryland | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lymednva
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 9098

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lymednva     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I've had Lyme since childhood. I just passed the official "one year" mark for menopause. I'm 57 now. So it was not early for me.

Of course, I am the child of older parents. My mom was 40 and my dad 58 when I was born. Then my brother was planned four and half years later. I was a surprise!

My mom went on to live to the age of 95. When I informed my daughter that I don't feel I am in the final part of my life she told me I was nuts.

I reminded her how old her grandmother lived to be. All the Germans in her family lived well into their 80's, and they were born in the 19th century.

My mother was half German, half Native American. Her mother died when my mom was an infant, due to an infection that would now be treated with abx.

By the way, my mom never knew when she went through menopause. She had a partial hysterectomy at age 46.

--------------------
Lymednva

Posts: 2407 | From over the river and through the woods | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TF
Frequent Contributor (5K+ posts)
Member # 14183

Icon 1 posted      Profile for TF     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Lyme can give a person a false menopause. It did that to me. Once I was PROPERLY treated for lyme disease, I was able to reduce the hormone replacement therapy, then end it, and then my body went back to its pre-menopausal state.

Then, a few years later at a more normal age, I went through the REAL menopause. It was a breeze compared to lyme disease.

I have been rid of lyme and cos for nearly 4 years now.

In helping other lymies, I have met others who have had the same experience. Once they get GOOD lyme treatment, everything reverses.

(When I got monotherapy for lyme, nothing reversed. The lyme was arrested, but my gyn systems were still turned off. It caused a lot of problems I will not go into on a public board.)

So, this is not uncommon at all. Burrascano lists "unexplained menstrual irregularity" as a lyme symptom. The false menopause falls under this category.

Of course the docs thought nothing of it when it happened to me and the other lymie women who experienced it. They just say it is an early menopause. But, it is the menopause from hell!!!

I was in my 40s when I got the false menopause. I know a girl who is 36 who, with proper lyme treatment, is now getting her cycles back. In both our cases, the gyns didn't think it was unusual. My ovaries shrunk to a tiny size, etc. and all signs pointed to menopause.

Since most gyns are not lyme literate, I don't expect them to realize this could be caused by lyme disease. But, my gyn knows it by having me as a patient and seeing my condition reverse!

You might try an Internet search using the words "lyme" and "false menopause" and see what comes up.

The lyme doc who got me well said it was not an uncommon lyme symptom--false menopause. But, he also said that it can be difficult to separate lyme symptoms from menopausal symtoms.

Look for migrating pains and cyclical symptoms to differentiate lyme from true menopause. That's what he said as best as I can remember. It was a while back.

Posts: 9931 | From Maryland | Registered: Dec 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Leelee
Frequent Contributor (1K+ posts)
Member # 19112

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Leelee     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Hi TF,

Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I had not realized what Burrascano meant when he said "unexplained menstrual irregularity". I assumed he was talking about women who still had periods so I never considered my personal situation.

Then, a day or two ago I was pondering my early menopause and remembering how dismissive the doctors were, stating that it was normal for some women to go through changes much earlier than others.

Having heard your story and re-assessing Burrascano's comments I am fully questioning my "non-functioning" body.

My first LLMD appointment is March 17. I haven't been diagnosed yet, but I can't imagine what else could be causing me so many symptoms.

Thanks again,

Leelee

--------------------
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy. Martin Luther King,Jr

Posts: 1573 | From Maryland | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
MY3BOYS
LymeNet Contributor
Member # 17830

Icon 1 posted      Profile for MY3BOYS     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
before lyme dx. my PCP happened to get into

bio-identical hormones and was seeing her more

often as my symptoms progressed, first one of

dx at 32 was perimenopause- early for my age

but not unheard of. my grandmother was full

meno. by early 40's. the bio-identical helped

symptoms some and i am using them now with

lyme tx. at first i stopped them when began

lyme tx, then did trial back on the bio's and

hubby and family all noticed diff. my LLMD

happens to be ob/gyn and is fully in agreement

that lyme will mess with hormones- men and women

at lyme gets to pituitary axis and hypothalmus

which in my case is affected, i happen to have

several areas of brain affected-- hoping IV

rocephin is frying those little critters in there

--------------------
i am not a Dr. any info is only for education, suggestion or to think/research. please do not mis-intuprest as diagnostic or prescriptive, only trying to help. **

dx in 08:lyme, rmsf, bart, babs, and m.pneumonia.

Posts: 422 | From TX | Registered: Oct 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | LymeNet home page | Privacy Statement

Powered by UBB.classic™ 6.7.3


The Lyme Disease Network is a non-profit organization funded by individual donations. If you would like to support the Network and the LymeNet system of Web services, please send your donations to:

The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey
907 Pebble Creek Court, Pennington, NJ 08534 USA


| Flash Discussion | Support Groups | On-Line Library
Legal Resources | Medical Abstracts | Newsletter | Books
Pictures | Site Search | Links | Help/Questions
About LymeNet | Contact Us

© 1993-2020 The Lyme Disease Network of New Jersey, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Use of the LymeNet Site is subject to Terms and Conditions.