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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Prednisone affect testing results?

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Author Topic: Prednisone affect testing results?
TSTinaP
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My first Lyme/tick test results were negative (ELISA test after 10 days Doxy, so after 21 days of Doxy I've been referred to numerous 'specialists.' No-one can find anything.

This week Neurologist put me on 5 days Prednisone and 3 days painkiller just to try to knock out the headaches. Instead it has only increased the pain in my limbs (muscles and joints).

I've been researching to find a LLMD in my area, but before setting up an appointment I'd like to be sure prednisone won't affect a Western Blot. Anyone have any guesses for me?

Thanks. I've loved looking at this site and checking out the various links over the last couple weeks since I found it! You're greatly helping to empower me and believe I can beat this. [Smile]

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Keebler
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-
Did you by chance have a rash after a recent tick bite (not everyone gets a rash but a bulls eye can be a tell-tell sign)?

How long do you think you've been dealing with this?


ELISAs are a horrible test. You've not really been tested for lyme if you had an ELISA.

Are you NOW on prednisone? Seems, you are - for how many more days to total 5, no more, right?

That neurologist should know better than give anyone who might have lyme a steroid such as prednisone.

You need to find to a LLMD now. Yes, they should know about the steroids and yes, it could make a difference not just in the test but in making lyme much worse. You need a good treatment to get onto now.

When you find a LLMD, be sure to ask to talk with the nurse and explain that you are now on prednisone. Ask for suggestions of what to do now while you wait to get in.

They should be able to offer you good guidance.

Good luck.

--

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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-
http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Dr. Burrascano'sTreatment Guidelines (2008)


P. 4:

. . .

More severe illness also results from other causes of weakened defenses, such as from severe stress, immunosuppressant medications, and severe intercurrent illnesses.


This is why steroids and other immunosuppressive medications are absolutely contraindicated in Lyme. This also includes intraarticular steroids.

. . . .

From page 12:

Excerpt:

. . .

More evidence has accumulated indicating the severe detrimental effects of the concurrent use of immunosuppressants including steroids in the patient with active B. burgdorferi infection.


Never give steroids or any other immunosuppressant to any patient who may even remotely be suffering from Lyme, or serious, permanent damage may result, especially if given for anything greater than a short course.


If immunosuppressive therapy is absolutely necessary, then potent antibiotic treatment should begin at least 48 hours prior to the immunosuppressants.

. . . .

Page 20:

. . . and absolutely no immunosuppressants, even local doses of steroids (intra-articular injections, for example).

==========
==========

http://www.lymenet.de/literatur/steroids.htm

Antibiotics and Steroids

From: Lyme Disease 1991: Patient/Physician Perspectives from the U.S. and Canada - Lora Mermin, editor


by John Drulle, M.

Excerpt:

. . .

"Steroid Disaster" is a term coined by the pioneer of Lyme Treatment, Dr. Burrascano (see link at bottom of page).

Corticosteroids are immune suppressants, the last thing a Lyme patient needs is to lower immunity.


Can you imagine, your body trying hard to fight off the spirochete bacteria and suddenly and immunosuppressants is introduced, "freezing" your immune system, rendering it unable to battle, giving great advantage now to the Lyme bacteria to spread and go wherever it wants .

Corticosteroids can last in the body for months, usually around 6 months. In many bacterial infections such as LD, damage can be done.

Many Lyme patients (such as myself) triggered LD with cortisone shots, pills, inhalers, etc. I can tell you, it is a nightmare I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy.

It is imperative to NEVER take corticosteroid for pain if you know you have a bacterial infection.

Some bacterial infections are so severe that a shot of cortisone could kill you, although that would be unlikely with Lyme, but rule of thumb, bacterial infections and immunosuppressants do not mix!

. . .


Dr. Burrascano makes it clear in his treatment guidelines that steroid treatment is detrimental, these are excerpts from his guidelines:

"More evidence has accumulated indicating the severe detrimental effects of the concurrent use of immunosuppressants including steroids in the patient with active B. burgdorferi infection.


Never give steroids or any other immunosuppressant to any patient who may even remotely be suffering from Lyme, or serious, permanent damage may result, especially if given for anything greater than a short course.


If immunosuppressive therapy is absolutely necessary, then potent antibiotic treatment should begin at least 48 hours prior to the immunosuppressants.


The severity of the clinical illness is directly proportional to the spirochete load, the duration of infection, and the presence of co-infections. These factors also are proportional to the intensity and duration of treatment needed for recovery.


More severe illness also results from other causes of weakened defenses, such as from severe stress, immunosuppressants medications, and severe intercurrent illnesses.


This is why steroids and other immunosuppressants medications are absolutely contraindicated in Lyme. This also includes intra-articular steroids."

An easy explanation. Your immune system are the "soldiers" of your body constantly standing by to attack any foreign invader.


When an immunosuppressant is used, it is like killing off or knocking out most of your "soldiers", now your body is open to all foreign invasion and while your immune system is knocked out, those invaders can go anywhere, your heart, liver, brain - everywhere.

. . . .
-

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Keebler
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-
http://cassia.org/essay.htm

When to Suspect Lyme - by John D. Bleiweiss, M.D.

=====================

www.lymeinfo.net/medical/LDSymptoms.pdf

Lyme Disease Symptoms

==================

This explains WHY you need an LLMD - ILADS-educated doctor.

www.clinicaladvisor.com/Controversy-continues-to-fuel-the-Lyme-War/article/117160/

From the May 2007 issue of Clinical Advisor

CONTROVERSY CONTINUES TO FUEL THE "LYME WAR" -(author's details at link)

As two medical societies battle over its diagnosis and treatment, Lyme disease remains a frequently missed illness. Here is how to spot and treat it.

Excerpts:


Meet the players

The opponents in the battle over the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease are the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the largest national organization of general infectious disease specialists, (and)

and the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS), an organization made up of physicians from many specialties. ( www.ilads.org )


IDSA maintains that Lyme disease is relatively rare, overdiagnosed, difficult to contract, easy to diagnose through blood testing, and straightforward to treat ( www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/issues/v43n9/40897/40897.html - Accessed April 6, 2007).


ILADS, by contrast, asserts that the illness is much more common than reported, underdiagnosed, easier to contract than previously believed, difficult to diagnose through commercial blood tests, and difficult to treat, (especially)

especially when treatment is delayed because of commonly encountered diagnostic difficulties ( http://www.ilads.org/guidelines.html - Accessed April 6, 2007).

. . .

" . . .To treat Lyme disease for a comparable number of life cycles, treatment would need to last 30 weeks. . . ."


`` . . .Patients with Lyme disease almost always have negative results on standard blood screening tests and have no remarkable findings on physical exam, so they are frequently referred to mental-health professionals for evaluation.


"...If all cases were detected and treated in the early stages of Lyme disease, the debate over the diagnosis and treatment of late-stage disease would not be an issue, and devastating rheumatologic, neurologic, and cardiac complications could be avoided..."


. . . * Clinicians do not realize that the CDC has gone on record as saying the commercial Lyme tests are designed for epidemiologic rather than diagnostic purposes, and a diagnosis should be based on clinical presentation rather than serologic results.


- Full article at link above, containing MUCH more detailed information.

-===

Co-infections (other tick-borne infections or TBD - tick-borne disease) are not discussed in this article due to space limits. Still, any LLMD you would see would know how to assess/treat if others are present.

-===========

TESTING

You should also be evaluated for coinfections. Not all tests are great in that regard, either, but a good LLMD can evaluate you and then guide you in testing. One of the top labs is:

www.igenex.com

IGENEX

-----

There are a couple other good labs for certain tests: Fry; Clognen; Focus. Your LLMD will know.

========================


Dr C's Western Blot explanation is discussed here:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/42077?

Be sure to read the full post - it's very long and a great help.

Excerpt:

. . . "With most infections, your immune system first forms IgM antibodies, then in about 2 to 4 weeks, you see IgG antibodies. In some infections, IgG antibodies may be detectable for years.
Because Borrelia burgdorferi is a chronic persistent infection that may last for decades, you would think patients with chronic symptoms would have positive IgG Western blots.

But actually, more IgM blots are positive in chronic borreliosis than IgG. Every time Borrelia burgdorferi reproduces itself, it may stimulate the immune system to form new IgM antibodies.

Some patients have both IgG and IgM blots positive. But if either the IgG or IgM blot is positive, overall it is a positive result.

Response to antibiotics is the same if either is positive, or both. Some antibodies against the borrelia are given more significance if they are IgG versus IgM, or vice versa.

Since this is a chronic persistent infection, this does not make a lot of sense to me. A newly formed Borrelia burgdorferi should have the same antigen parts as the previous bacteria that produced it.

But anyway, from my clinical experience, these borrelia associated bands usually predict a clinical change in symptoms with antibiotics, regardless of whether they are IgG or IgM."

===========

TREATMENT

www.ilads.org

ILADS

The International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) provides a forum for health science professionals to share their wealth of knowledge regarding the management of Lyme and associated diseases.


links to treatment:

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/treatment_guidelines.html

ILADS Treatment Guidelines


and

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Dr. Burrascano's Treatment Guidelines (2008) - 37 pages


Sections regarding self-care:

Go to page 27 for SUPPORTIVE THERAPY & the CERTAIN ABSOLUTE RULES

and also pages 31-32 for advice on a safe, non-aerobic exercise plan and physical rehabilitation.

----

http://www.lymepa.org/html/dr__j__burrascano_september_20_15.html

Burrascano's Powerpoint presentation 9-20-08

-------

This is included in Burrascano's Guidelines, but you may want to be able to refer to it separately, too:

http://www.lymepa.org/Nutritional_Supplements.pdf

Nutritional Supplements in Disseminated Lyme Disease

J.J. Burrascano, Jr., MD (2008)

=======================

http://www.klinghardtneurobiology.com/LymeProtocolOct09.pdf

A Treatment Guide: Lyme and other Chronic Infections

by Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, PhD

October 2009 - 87 pages

---------

http://www.klinghardtneurobiology.com/library.htm

Klinghardt's Neurobiology page


==================
==================


Find your local SUPPORT GROUP for help in finding a doctor, borrowing books, etc.:

www.lymenet.org/SupportGroups/UnitedStates

=================


Post in: SEEKING A DOCTOR

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=forum;f=2

=======================

This book, by an ILADS member LLMD, holds great information about treatments options and support measures:


http://tinyurl.com/6lq3pb (through Amazon)


THE LYME DISEASE SOLUTION (2008)

- by Kenneth B. Singleton , MD; James A. Duke. Ph.D. (Foreword)

You can read more about it here and see customer reviews.

Web site: www.lymedoctor.com

===========================

http://tinyurl.com/5crsjv


Cure Unknown: Inside the Lyme Epidemic (2008) - by Pamela Weintraub

This details what an entire family went through. Having this knowledge of their journey will help others to get better, faster treatment.

http://www.cureunknown.com

======================

a good video that explains the controversy, go to this link:

http://www.kettmann.com/Lyme

It is a tape of a great show on lyme disease done by a Boston TV station a few months ago.

=========================

FILM:

http://www.underourskin.com

UNDER OUR SKIN

You can purchase a DVD, here: http://www.underourskin.com/store_home.html

---------

http://underourskin.com/blog/?p=450

UOS wins top award at International Health Film Festival

UNDER OUR SKIN was just awarded ``Best Feature Film-Silver Award'' at the 1st International Health Film Festival in Kos, Greece. The tiny island in the eastern Aegean sea was the home to Hippocrates, father of medicine. Over 80 films competed and were juried by industry professionals as well as physicians.
-

[ 10-22-2009, 08:22 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Lymetoo
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Yes, it can affect the test results. I'm not sure if it will ALWAYS affect them or only soon after taking them.

You could call Igenex Lab and ask that question.

www.igenex.com

Glad you found us!

neurologists are SO lame

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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TSTinaP
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Thank you! With the increase in pain after starting Prednisone on Monday (only tomorrow left) I didn't think it could possibly be doing me any good.

I have the name of a good LLMD and one word-of-mouth referral...however, patient also says he's no longer taking new patients. Have ordered the Under Our Skin DVD and hope to share with my general prac. Am wondering if LLMD and my local Dr might be able to work via consult. Just not certain which route to go first. Have jumped through all the hoops with referrals and gotten nowhere. Now it's time for me to be in charge.

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Keebler
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-
If you want to be in charge, go to the expert, the LLMD. Your GP may be able to work with you but you need someone with knowledge and experience NOW.


If your GP had been on his/her toes, what in the world were you doing at a neurologists who prescribed steroids for a possible lyme patient, for crying out loud. Your GP is supposed to protect you from that - so he obviously is not lyme literate. True, not every doctor can know everything and your doctor may be interesting in learning but I hope you don't have to teach him in order to get care.


If that LLMD is no longer taking patients, call anyway. Explain your situation and ask if they can suggest another doctor. Also ask if there may be a time soon when they will have room for a new patient and could you be put on that list?

Talk to people in your local support group and all the support groups within a radius that you could travel - or where friends of family live with whom you could stay with while there.

Good luck.
-

[ 10-22-2009, 11:20 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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Pinelady
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I would call and ask on the pred. Most lyme

patients get worse on treatment so this may be a

good time to plan ahead just in case. Ready to

eat meals. Electrolyte replacement drinks.

Someone to help out if you get down like a lot of

patients do upon initiating treatment. I will

tell you strait up this illness is one bad bug.

Things to replace sugar, like stevia products. I

love lemon aid made with half a lemon and stevia

and ice. Epsom salts alternating with Baking soda

for soaks. Vitamin suppliments to improve your

fighting ability. Foods to increase Alkalinity.

Most Lymies are acid. Just some suggestions. Hope you

find a great LLMD to help.

--------------------
Suspected Lyme 07 Test neg One band migrating in IgG region
unable to identify.Igenex Jan.09IFA titer 1:40 IND
IgM neg pos
31 +++ 34 IND 39 IND 41 IND 83-93 +
DX:Neuroborreliosis

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Lymetoo
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quote:
Originally posted by TSTinaP:
Now it's time for me to be in charge.

Absolutely! Get on the LLMD's waiting list. I'll PM you.

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

Posts: 95811 | From Texas | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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