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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Lyme and gaining weight

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Author Topic: Lyme and gaining weight
littlebit27
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Again-asking for my friend here. I have gained weight too but not that much-

My friend has gained a lot of weight-not sure how much total-but in the last week alone she has gained 7 lbs and She does have Lyme.

She is scared because she doesn't know why.

I think it's Lyme related-I've gained 7 lbs in one week before. But that's all I can say is-I think it's the Lyme and it's happened to me.

So someone give me some thoughts on weight gain and Lyme that I can pass onto her...Thanks

--------------------
*Brittany Lyme Aware on FB*
http://littlebithaslyme.wordpress.com/

Posts: 2310 | From Southeast | Registered: Feb 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lightparfait
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much of this is related to killing the bugs...and not being able to detox. This is my personal experience. I started gaining as soon as I was put on abx. Fluid, toxins and debris from the die off collect in some individuals. Especially those with Phyroluria issues. (KPU).

Also some people stop moving...or exercising.

Gotta keep your body in some sort of motion.

Also people get slack with eating correctly as their "gut" is leaky and not absorbing food correctly, and food sensitivities develop. This is not lyme, but a part of the chronic mix of other issues usually pre-lyme.

Also, if any meds are given, the body can be put off balance. Many on this board are on anti depressants or other drugs that cause weight gain too. Each person has an individual situation, so hare to give recommendations that would be specific. Just generalities that I seem to notice.

But...there is hope to re-balance, as I have done. I am now detoxing and my body is back to the original weight...2 years later. Got rid of the issues, which took time...and now my body is clearing on its own, gradually.

best wishes,
lp

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littlebit27
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Thank you for the response. Sent you a PM

--------------------
*Brittany Lyme Aware on FB*
http://littlebithaslyme.wordpress.com/

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imagine2
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Great explanation LP...i was also told by LLMD that lyme causes capillaries to leak fluid into the tissues.

I've gained 30 pounds and am UNhappy about it. I barely eat anything so I'm sure it's not calorie intake. It's very stubborn wait. [Frown]

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imagine2
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Great explanation LP...i was also told by LLMD that lyme causes capillaries to leak fluid into the tissues.

I've gained 30 pounds and am UNhappy about it. I barely eat anything so I'm sure it's not calorie intake. It's very stubborn wait. [Frown]

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LightAtTheEnd
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Lyme messes with my hormones, which I believe can affect insulin, blood sugar and metabolism.

--------------------
Don't forget to laugh! And when you're going through hell, keep going!

Bitten 5/25/2009 in Perry County, Indiana. Diagnosed by LLMD 12/2/2009.

Posts: 756 | From Inside the tunnel | Registered: Jan 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
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-
While substantial weight gain has been observed in those with TBD (tick-borne disease) . . . also consider EDEMA, water weight. But don't jump on the diuretic boat too fast, either. It's complex. Infection causes inflammation and that causes edema.

Lyme can cause either loss (early on) or gain (usually later). Whichever, adrenal support is key to normalizing that. (With the assumption that everyone already has a healthful eating plan).

This book is specific to lyme and other chronic stealth infections. The author discusses the endocrine connection and effects of STRESS on a person with such infections. You can read customer reviews and look inside the book at this link to its page at Amazon.

One LLMD describes a patient who gained a great deal of weight (undeservedly) . . . when the lyme and coinfections resolved, the weight nearly melted off.

TREAT INFECTION - the number one key to infection-related weight gain. SUPPORT the body with nutrition from food and key supplements. Move gently, doing something that brings joy. Massage can be very helpful, for many reasons.

===========================

http://tinyurl.com/6xse7l

THE POTBELLY SYNDROME: HOW COMMON GERMS CAUSE OBESITY, DIABETES, AND HEART DISEASE - 2005

by Russell Farris and Per Marin, MD, PhD

==========================

In addition to the usual coinfections from ticks (such as babesia, bartonella, ehrlichia, RMSF, etc.), there are some other chronic stealth infections that an excellent LLMD should know about:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=069911#000000

TIMACA #6911 posted 03 August, 2008

I would encourage EVERY person who has received a lyme diagnosis to get the following tests.

- at link.

========================

Remember that lyme really messes up the HPA axis (Hypothalamus/pituitary/adrenal network). The pituitary has much to do with weight/growth. Mess up any part of the endocrine system and other parts suffer, too.

http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

See page 4 where Dr. Burrascano describes a bit about the considerations of the dysfunction with the HPA Axis

===========================

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez

PubMed Search:

infection, obesity - 2433 abstracts

viruses, obesity - 388 abstracts

viral, obesity - 464 abstracts

bacteria, obesity - 889 abstracts

------------
One of those:

J Dent Res. 2009 Jun;88(6):519-23.

Is obesity an oral bacterial disease?

Excerpt:

. . . It seems likely that these bacterial species could serve as biological indicators of a developing overweight condition.

Of even greater interest, and the subject of future research, is the possibility that oral bacteria may participate in the pathology that leads to obesity. . . .

================

ADRENAL SUPPORT can make a difference so as to minimize the cortisol damage.

Cordyceps is recommend here:

This is included in Burrascano's Guidelines, but you may want to be able to refer to it separately, too:

http://www.lymepa.org/Nutritional_Supplements.pdf

Nutritional Supplements in Disseminated Lyme Disease

J.J. Burrascano, Jr., MD (2008)

========================

Great information about treatments options and support measures, including those to help adrenal/endocrine function:

http://tinyurl.com/6lq3pb (through Amazon)

THE LYME DISEASE SOLUTION (2008)

- by Kenneth B. Singleton , MD; James A. Duke. Ph.D. (Foreword)

You can read more about it here and see customer reviews.

Web site: www.lymedoctor.com

======================

http://www.prohealth.com/ME-CFS/library/showArticle.cfm?libid=14383&B1=EM031109C

http://tinyurl.com/detwtt

Underactive Adrenal Gland - Stresses and Problems with the Body's 'Gear Box' - by Dr. Sarah Myhill, MD

=======================

Many libraries carry this book and you can read 95 customer reviews here (average 4.5 star out of 5) AND see inside the book:

www.amazon.com/Adrenal-Fatigue-Century-Stress-Syndrome/dp/1890572152/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1263516913&sr=8-1

Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome

~ James L. Wilson, ND, DC, PhD, Johnathan V. Wright, MD

About $10. And qualifies for free shipping with a total $25. Purchase at Amazon

======================

http://tinyurl.com/y8bd9k2

Curcumin Prevents Some Stress-Related Changes
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[ 06-11-2010, 12:59 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
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-
http://www.ilads.org/lyme_disease/B_guidelines_12_17_08.pdf

Advanced Topics in Lyme Disease (Diagnostic Hints and Treatment Guidelines for Lyme and Other Tick Borne Illnesses

Dr. Burrascano's Treatment Guidelines (2008) - 37 pages

------------
As important as any supplements, sections regarding self-care:

Go to page 27 for SUPPORTIVE THERAPY & the CERTAIN ABSOLUTE RULES

and also pages 31-32 for advice on a safe, non-aerobic exercise plan and physical rehabilitation.
-

Posts: 48021 | From Tree House | Registered: Jul 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Keebler
Honored Contributor (25K+ posts)
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-
Food should be enjoyed and there should be plenty of it - mostly from vegetables. Too many people starve themselves trying to loose weight. Food - in the true definition - is required by the body.

Here are some good cookbooks - while none is specifically gluten-free, adaptations can be easily made.

A gluten-free diet can really help reduce some swelling in the body.

==================

www.christinacooks.com

CHRISTINA COOKS - Natural health advocate/ chef, Christina Pirello offers her comprehensive guide to living the well life.

Vegan, with a Mediterranean flair. Organic.

She was dx with terminal leukemia in her mid-twenties. Doctors said there was nothing more they could do. Among other things, she learned about complementary medicine and she learned how to cook whole foods. She recovered her health and is now a chef and professor of culinary arts.

She has program on the PBS network "Create" a couple times week. Check your PBS schedule.

To adapt: in the rare dishes where she uses wheat flour, it can just be left out for a fruit medley, etc. In moderation, now and then, Brown Rice Pasta can be substituted (Tinkyada or Trader Joe's). Black and Red Rices are a better choice, nutritionally speaking.

Regarding her use of brown rice syrup, just leave it out and add a touch of stevia at the end.

==================

www.rickbayless.com

Rick Bayless is a very good chef for MEXICAN meals that are healthy. These are heavy on vegetables.

====================

http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/

Spoonful of Ginger site

Books: http://www.spoonfulofginger.com/pages/books.php

A SPOONFUL OF GINGER (1999)

From Nina Simonds, the best-selling authority on Asian cooking, comes a ground-breaking cookbook based on the Asian philosophy of food as health-giving. The 200 delectable recipes she offers you not only taste superb but also have specific healing . . . .

. . . With an emphasis on the health-giving properties of herbs and spices, this book gives the latest scientific research as well as references to their tonic properties according to Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda, the traditional Indian philosophy of medicine. . . .

You can find this at Amazon, too.

=========================

http://www.simply-natural.biz/Cure-Is-In-The-Kitchen.php

THE CURE IS IN THE KITCHEN, by Sherry A. Rogers M.D., is the first book to ever spell out in detail what all those people ate day to day who cleared their incurable diseases . . .

==========================

http://www.ecookbooks.com/p-4293-from-curries-to-kebabs.aspx

FROM CURRIES TO KEBABS - RECIPES FROM THE INDIAN SPICE TRAIL - by: Jaffrey, Madhur

==========================

Mediterranean Diet (minus the wheat and the wine) is also good. Quinoa and pomegranate juice can be substituted.

==========================

In addition to a search about Quinoa, see this site for BLACK RICE, RED RICE - see nutritional content, it's excellent.

www.LotusFoods.com

Chinese Black Forbidden Rice & Bhutanese Red Rice

---------

Lundberg Farm is another site with darker varieties of rice, too, such as Japonica, etc.

==================

Protein helps our bodies make glutathione and that helps the liver detox . . . protein's amino acids help our brain, our hearts, our muscles, etc.

Taurine (found mostly in muscle meats) is vital, too. Vegetarians and vegans should consider supplementing taurine, as well as B-12 and L-Carnitine.
-------------------

http://icmr.nic.in/ijmr/2006/august/0804.pdf

THE REQUIREMENTS OF PROTEIN & AMINO ACID DURING ACUTE & CHRONIC INFECTION . . . - 20 pages

Anura V. Kurpad - Institute of Population Health & Clinical Research, Bangalore, India 129. Indian J Med Res 124, August 2006, pp 129-148.

Excerpt:

" . . . In general, the amount of EXTRA protein that would appear to be needed is of the order of 20-25 per cent of the recommended intake, for most infections. . . ."

- Full article at link (or google the title if it does not go through).
-

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