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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » breast implants

   
Author Topic: breast implants
katrinab
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I have been planning to get breast implants because I work as a stripper right now. It is the only job I can do at this time to support myself with all these supplements and doctors bills for this disease.

I am only 23 yrs old and I fully support myself so I am trying to do my best with this disease. Breast implants are encouraged at my job. You will make more money with them. I was planning to get saline, because i feel its safer than silicone in case silicone leaks into the body. I asked my LLMD about it and she said that saline implants still have a silicone shell.

I have had surgeries in the past, not major ones. I had my wisdom teeth removed, I had minor plastic surgery of the face, and I had an ovarian cyst that was removed larascopically. This was all in the past 2 years while I had lyme and was untreated. I dont believe that the surgeries made my illness worse. So right now I am wondering if it will be okay to get this surgery at this time, or if it is a bad idea. I dont see why it would matter if the implants have a silicone shell like my LLMD mentioned, but I may be wrong. I dont think she knows for sure and Id like to get opinions of those who have had surgeries before especially those with breast implants.

Posts: 723 | From boston,ma | Registered: Jan 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
randibear
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frankly i wouldn't do it. first, because of the lyme and the effect it will have on lyme.

my mother in law had implants. they ruptured and she had a reaction to the saline or something. they had to take them out. now she has some kind of systemic disorder caused by all this and is in terrible pain.

i wouldn't do it. i understand it's your job and all but in the future if you decide to change jobs, it won't matter.

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

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WhitneyS
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something to be aware of too is that sometimes infections get inside of the implant, and they then cannot be reached by antibiotics... there was an MTV doc on someone who has this happen to them.

you wouldn't want them becoming infected, sounds like you have enough health problems without giving your body more to handle

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Keebler
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-
I certainly understand why you'd want to be able to earn more money and am sorry that in our culture it comes to this. I would hope that you stand up for the integrity of your body, as it is now.

It saddens me to think that anyone is expected to cut and damage their body, their health - just for a job. You could not possibly recoup the money that this would cost you in the long run.

I'm not a guy but I think you should be able to flirt with your eyes, your smile - and play with that a lot. Maybe a few sessions with an acting coach could help you find ways to make what you have work better for you.

Even just the petroleum & chemical based / silicone shell that contains the saline can be very damaging to your health in many ways, for a life time.

Your immune system will not likely know what to do with foreign objects in your body - the immune system is just so overwhelmed and altered by lyme.

Chemicals from the shell are absorbed into your body, will circulate and can cause major endocrine disruption and could even lead to various cancers.

The anesthesia, too, can cause liver damage for someone with an infection as toxic as lyme. It can take a full year even for healthy person's liver to come back after anesthesia.

For some surgeries, steroids during and afterward are required. If so, that could be absolutely devastating and life-altering for someone with lyme (or any other chronic stealth infection).

While you may have made it through other procedures okay, with lyme - and the longer one has lyme - surgeries can cause a major setback of months to years. The risk is just not worth it.

Please stand up for the integrity of your body - you are complete just the way you are now.

How about taking whatever that would cost and investing it somehow - could you start your own business of some kind, etc?

You may be able to find a business mentor through the Small Business Administration groups in your town. I'd start by calling the business dept. at a college near you.
-

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WhitneyS
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PS-- you should DEF get muscle tested to see if you are sensitive to any ingredients in the implants.
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Keebler
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I didn't think about this, but you would definitely need more surgery later to replace or remove these. They will not last.

So, after your boss uses your body to hold on flirty balloons for a while, you'd be the one left to manage the maintenance.

Will they cover the surgery now and later, too?

Will they cover any complications and compensate you for time off?

Will they bring you chicken soup and pay the rent if something goes wrong?

Do they KNOW the possible health risks? Do they CARE?

At any time, you may need emergency surgery. That's something that would have to be budgeted and considered. Could happen any time.

As you build your research file, here's just one article to add to that:
-----------------------------

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/11/137682722/silicone-breast-implants-safe-with-caveats

[note: this is for the typical woman, not one with borrelia, etc.)


Silicone Breast Implants: Safe, With Caveats

- by Gretchen Cuda-Kroen

July 11, 2011

Silicone breast implants were pulled off the market in 1992 amid concerns that leaks from the implants could lead to cancer or autoimmune disease.

Five years ago, revamped products returned to the market. But now the Food and Drug Administration has evaluated the safety of the second generation of silicone implants and the results are mixed.

An FDA report, released in late June, says silicone implants are generally safe. But complications from implants are frequent things like hardening of the skin around the implant; ruptured, wrinkled, or lopsided implants; scarring, pain and infection.

As many as half of patients will need to have additional surgeries or have the implants removed in the first decade.

It also turns out that the longer a woman has the implants, the more likely she is to experience these complications.

Ruptured Implants Can Require Surgery

Take Kate Marion. She had silicone implants for breast augmentation in her late 20s. Just shy of two decades later she noticed something unusual.

"When I was crossing my left arm across my body for instance, to put lotion on my right arm I would make a little noise from my armpit, the way little boys do when they stick their hand in their armpit and pump their arm up and down," Marion says.

"A little tooty noise."

An MRI showed both her implants had burst. Her doctor immediately recommended removing them, which she did.

Marion hasn't suffered any apparent harm from her ruptured implants, and she even confesses to having an occasional twinge of regret that she didn't have them replaced when she had the old ones removed. But ultimately she decided she didn't want to go through more surgery.

Well, how long would these next ones last? I would be in my 60s when I had to do this again, and who wants to have surgery unnecessarily when you are 60 something?" says Marion.

. . .

"There is a huge deficiency of long-term data at a time when we know that the longer these devices are in, the more problems ... occur," says Wolf. . . . .

. . . Schulman says that the rates of complications for silicone implants are roughly the same as for saline though he feels these complications can be minimized by choosing an experienced surgeon.

Still, he warns his patients that no procedure is without risks and additional surgeries are a very real possibility.

"Your young breast implants don't last forever," says Schulman.

"They may leak, they may rupture, you may decide you want a different size. So you have to at least expect that sometime in your life, you are going to need a reoperation.

And if you are 100 percent against having another surgery related to these implants, then it's something you should reconsider." . . . .
-

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poppy
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"As many as half...????"

Good grief. Why is this even legal?

Being a stripper is your only choice?

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WhitneyS
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I think its important that we not judge her occupation-- or reasoning behind wanting to have breast implants. We all have different situations, and you do what you have to do to pay your bills.

Lets try to focus on helping her get the answers to her medical questions.

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Keebler
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I had mentioned acting lessons might help you enhance a flirty nature with your eyes, smile, expressions . . . and it occurred to me that maybe someone who teaches Belly Dancing might be the first to consult.

You might also seek out someone trained in Burlesque. Look for older theatre instructors. Call your city's performance halls for lists of teachers, etc.

With neither of these styles does size matter. And, you may find a new line of work. Many women take Belly Dancing classes for fun - you might want to become an instructor.

Maybe explain the situation and see if a dance instructor has other ideas. I'm sure there are creative ways to approach this.

Adding style, a persona - and play - would likely also make it more fun for you, and for the audience.

I truly believe that personality & fun CAN triumph.
-

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lymenow
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I certainly understand why you'd do this. To even have a chance at getting well, you NEED financial resources.

Saying that, I frequented these places quite a bit when I was working. And my buddies and I never like the girls w/ implants. Maybe I'm wrong but I always gravitated towards natural.

I personally look at risk/reward and don't think it's worth it right now.

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katrinab
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I would get my implants removed by the time im in my 60s. no need for them then. yes stripping is my only option right now. keebler, silicone implants were recalled off the market for a short time because there was a concern mostly from consumers that they lead to autoimmune disease. they are back on the market now after there were no findings to any link for autoimmune disease. ruptured implants are payed for by the maufacturer of the implant. i would just have to pay for the surgery room fee. I already have a piece of silicone in my body from plastic surgery ive had in the past.

yes it is unfortunate that women feel the need to do this, but I have made this my career and if i i am smart with my money i will be able to retire in my 30s sick or not. if im still sick then, i would appreciate the retirement. Implants are a way to make more money, since in out society we often think bigger is better. i am who i am regardless of getting plastic surgery, and thats what matters. i would like to hear from others who have had surgeries. anyone out there?

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tiffagoo
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I wouldn't do it.

Mainly because I have a friend that has literally been through hell and back to get properly diagnosed. Before she knew she had Lyme she had strokes at age 19, she has had her gallbladder removed, a hesterectomy, a gastric bybass, and a boob job.

After all these surgeries she just got worse and worse. When she had her boob job, it took ALONG time for them to heal properly. And after all that she had them taken out because she thought there was a leak.

Then, finally, she was diagnosed with Lyme/ and other co's and now her body is VERY weakened and she wishes she would have known before all the suregeries that she had Lyme because she would have never of gotten them.

I hope this helps you!!!

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sixgoofykids
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My sister had to have hers removed. She later got new ones, but the original ones caused problems for her (I don't remember the issues). Your breasts are even smaller after removal.

Being close to 50, I can tell you, you won't stop being concerned about your looks as you get older ....

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

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rera2528
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I also have a sister who has had it done. She hasn't had any health impacts of which I am aware, but she does not have Lyme.

The only "thing" that has come up with hers is that, when she had a baby, she could not breastfeed. The plastic surgeon believed it would be possible, but in her case, it was not.

I'm not sure whether that matters to you [Smile] . My sister is happy with the implants.

All of that being said, I know that about a month ago, I hit my head on a wall. It sent me into a terrible spiral for a couple of weeks. I had heard of injuries/surgeries making the Lyme go haywire, but it was my first experience with it.

I admire that you are being so honest, especially with your LLMD! Good luck with your decision!

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dal123
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Don't do it! Once u have breast implants surgery will be needed more than one time. I know too many people with implant issues, some had theirs removed and feel LOTS better. I know a FA who's implant exploded on a flight and had to be rushed to the hospital upon landing.........
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Sammi
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I do not have implants, but when I had a mammogram recently the tech told me that it is difficult to get good images of breasts with implants.

This never would have occurred to me. Just something to consider.

Good luck with your decision.

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sammy
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I have not had breast implants but I understand why you are wanting and feeling like you need them.

I hope that you will chose a size that will make you happy personally and not just improve your professional profile.

Try to get a referral to a reputable, well renowned surgeon and make sure that you feel comfortable and confident in their care. This is your body, your health, so make sure that you are going to be taken care of by the best.

Good luck to you [Smile]

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Keebler
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One major concern is the liver. As part of your research file, you might want to copy & paste these sets for a search at Google:

anesthesia, liver+damage

anesthesia, effects+on+heart

and

Living+with+liver+disease

Then be sure to find a LL ND (naturopathic doctor) to help you with an herbal protocol prior to and afterward.

Be sure your LLMD is informed about EACH medication likely to be used prior to, during, and after surgery.

Even acetaminophen can damage the liver.

For a couple weeks before the surgery, most (maybe all) supplements must be stopped so the liver will have no protection during surgery but, find out from a LL ND how soon afterward you can start back on some kind of liver support.

===========================

http://cassia.org/essay.htm

When To Suspect Lyme Disease by John D. Bleiweiss, M.D.

Excerpts [relating to surgery issues]:

. . . Patients have described clinical deterioration when steroids were used . . .

. . . In a private communication, a physician related that one of his LD patients succumbed to fatal cardiomyopathy after receiving steroids. . . .

. . . Many patients have symptoms intensify or reappear with physical and emotional stress, if sleep deprived, after exercise, in a hot bath, . . . with fasting (hypoglycemia). . . .

. . . Immunosuppression due to LD has been reported. . . .

Lyme hepatitis occurs in approximately 15-20% of patients. . . .

. . . In many of my patients, cysts are found not uncommonly in various locations: . . . breast, liver, . . . Breast Disease may be LD manifestations. . . .

. . . Cardiac complications arise in 8-12% of LD cases. Conduction defects and heart block, of which first-degree is the most common . . . .

Sudden death can also result from arrythmias. Fast and slow heart rates occur, usually at the time of symptom flares, and sometimes in the manner of Sick Sinus Syndrome (tachy/brady).

Ventricular tachycardia has been documented to attend LD infection in the heart, confirmed on cardiac biopsy. The cardiomyopathy may be complicated by congestive heart failure (CHF) as the following case might illustrate. . . .

. . . Mitral valve prolapse is not uncommonly found in LD. MVP can be associated with confounding chest pain and ventricular arrythmias. . . .

. . . Breast pain due to mastitis . . . [has] been described by some of my patients. . . .

. . . Lyme patients tend to heal slowly . . . .

. . . .
-

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Keebler
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Although it sounds like your LLMD's opinion is to not have the implant surgery.

However, if you decide otherwise, your LLMD still needs to be totally on board - at least regarding your medications and how to coordinate all that, especially with STEROIDS, often used in surgery.

Steroids can make lyme MUCH worse, perhaps even causing a fatality (it's happened more than once). The LLMD must be consulted prior.

Your LLMD may know of a LL ND for you.

It's essential that you have such a professional to help you explore all the possible options of support & protection:

----------------------------------------

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/2/13964

How to find an ILADS-educated LL:

N.D. (Naturopathic Doctor);

L.Ac. (Acupuncturist);

D.Ay. (Doctor of Ayurvedic Medicine);

D.O.M. (Doctor of Oriental Medicine);

Integrative / Holistic M.D., etc.
-

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Lauralyme
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I wouldn't do it.

Keebler gave you some excellent advice. Learn some different dance styles and be unique from the other girls.....in your own way. Like she said it might spin off to being a dance instructor and open doors to other opportunities.

Because you tolerated the other surgeries with no issues doesn't mean you will tolerate yet another one. This next surgery might be the straw that breaks the camels back.

During lyme treatment I had emergency surgery and the setback was horrific. I was at the end of my treatment and feeling good. It turned out my liver was overwhelmed from all the drugs the hospital administered. It was really hard to cope feeling sick all over again when I thought I was done treating.

Being sick with lyme is bad enough.....it would just be so awful to pour fuel on the fire if we didn't have to. The risk just isn't worth it.

Also.....people with breast implants can not go in FIR saunas and as Sammi said implants make breast cancer difficult to detect.

Dare to be different from your co workers and don't do it.

--------------------
Fall down seven times, get up eight
~Japanese proverb

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sparkle7
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Jeeze, I wish I could just get out of the chair without having a major back spasm... I used to do ballet when I was a kid. I wish I could even think of dancing now.

Anyway, what you feel is good at 23 is probably not what you will feel good about at 50. We all have to make our own choices. I would not get surgery to make extra money - especially with Lyme. Actors do it all the time but look at how messed up some of them are - physically & emotionally.

There's always a risk when you go under a surgeon's knife. With implants - the risk could be many years from now, not just the anesthesia or a stupid or screwed up plastic surgeon.

Maybe you could look into other areas of adult entertainment? I used to know a Japanese lady who worked in one of those Japanese bars & would socialize with the guys - sort of like a geisha. It's a different culture, though.

How about the film business? Not necessarily being an actor but maybe working on the films, cameras, editing, etc.? Websites? I had a web design teacher who had a business doing a foot fetish website. I think she made good money from it.

Good luck to you!

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sparkle7
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re: Anyway, what you feel is good at 23 is probably not what you will feel good about at 50.

---

PS - I have to add that sometimes we may make very good decisions when we are in our 20's... So, it's not all negative. We just have to be careful to make decisions that will be helpful rather than harmful. Everyone makes mistakes (not that the implants would necessarily be a "mistake") but we have to use our mistakes as learning experiences.

Just going for a walk in the woods, could be life threatening these days... It's all a calculated risk. Money comes & money goes - health is something worth protecting.

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Keebler
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Other important considerations.

If there is a problem with the implants, it may not be so easy to get coverage for removal.

It can be nearly impossible to "prove" cause & effect and you may be left on your own to cover costs.

Even if the company may be liable, the company might not still be in business. It's happening all around us with companies just disappearing or getting a new name to avoid responsibilities, etc.

The company may fight you on it, delay payments, demand you have the procedure first and then wait for reimbursement, etc.

And years from now when it comes time to remove them, you may not have insurance coverage that would cover it - or your health may not be strong enough to endure a surgery (for whatever reasons).

The ability to obtain a life insurance policy could be affected by this decision, too. If you decide to start a family, life insurance is important to protect children in case you are no longer here.

And long-term care policies may also be denied. This all may seem so far off now but the years will zoom by and it's vital to think of all this now.
-

[ 03-22-2012, 03:27 PM: Message edited by: Keebler ]

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randibear
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that's an interesting point. i don't think my insurance would cover breast implants. it's cosmetic.

but then as big as i am, i don't need them.

but insurance would not cover his mom or the cost of the repairs afterwards cause they didn't cover the initial implant.

i'd look into the insurance aspects. they might be so forgiving if you have problems.

--------------------
do not look back when the only course is forward

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sparkle7
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I was just watching a Frontline (PBS) documentary on YouTube last night about health insurance. What a headache... They were refusing coverage for kids who had too many ear infections.

One lady got insurance coverage for a month or two - then, she got cancer. They figured out a way to weasle out of coverage for her by saying that she had some "spotting" that she disclosed on her questioneer.

Unfortunately, it's a big mess with insurance... They have teams of people who just look for anything to get out of covering an illness. They are probably observing this message board. I know they use private investigators.

It's not a good thing that capitalism includes people, companies & industries who just want to use others & spit them out when they are finished extracting money, life force, what have you. It good to be aware & protect yourself. They aren't looking out for your best interest.

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Lymetoo
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Moving to general support

--------------------
--Lymetutu--
Opinions, not medical advice!

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