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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Wavelengths involved in photosynthetic Bb

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Author Topic: Wavelengths involved in photosynthetic Bb
Marnie
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If you are serious about understanding this photosynthetic pathogen...look at a very simple picture in the following link which shows how Bb gets his energy from light:

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2006/pp/b603846h

Cut and paste the "circles" on a word file and print it out...in color.

Look at the left circle.

Rhodopsin is visual purple or is the combination of red and blue and (follow the circle starting with blue at about 1 o'clock position)

it absorbs blue and green.

Can you trace blue to red to green to blue?

Rhodopsin is an "accessory pigment" (sort of a helper) that transfers energy to chlorophyll.

Bacteriochlorophyll is found in photosynthetic bacteria.

See the wavelengths in the colors?

Notice they go from 446 to 370 to 350 nm back to 446 nm.

The shortest wavelength has the most energy.

350 nm is the "cut off" for photosynthesis...green...to us...chlorophyll.

Did you "catch" hydrogen going in and out? H goes in between blue and red and out between green and blue. Hydrogen transfer.

About those wavelengths starting with 446 nm...

The Carotene content is expressed as ppm of beta-carotene and it is calculated with an appropriate mathematical correlation with

absorbance at 446 nm.

http://www.cdr-mediared.com/food-diagnostics/chemical-test-food/dobi-carotene-palm-oil

Beta carotene -> vitamin A -> retinal = pigment

(which binds with a opsin = protein = rhodopsin)

Next...370 nm

Simple ***retinal*** Schiff bases with an alkyl substituent on the nitrogen have an

absorption at 370 nm

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/ja00252a010

Next...350 nm ...the cut-off point for photosynthesis

The energy of light increases with shorter wavelengths and decreases with longer wavelengths.

Thus 350 nm as the cut off wavelength for photosynthesis ***has more energy*** because the wavelength is shorter.

Green pigments are in a class called chlorophyll. Chlorophylls a and b are found in most green plants.

Bacteriochlorophyll is found in photosynthetic bacteria.

http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Biological_Chemistry/Photosynthesis/Photosynthesis_overview

Chlorophylls, the primary pigments in photosynthesis, absorb
violet, blue and red light very readily but not much of the lighter blue, green and yellow light.

The lighter blue, green and yellow light that is not well absorbed by chlorophylls is reflected back to your eye and that is why chlorophyll looks green to us.

Besides chlorophyll plants have other pigments, called accessory pigments, which collect the energy from different colors of light and

transfer that energy to chlorophyll.

Carotenoids are one group of these accessory pigments. Carotenoids absorb light blue and green light very readily but not much of the lighter green, yellow, orange, and red light.

(Remember Rhodopsin absorbs blue and green.)

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~msheila/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20Why%20are%20plants%20green.pdf


Bacterial Rhodopsin (which is visual purple or red plus blueabsorbs blue and green).

Thus Rhodopsin maybe the accessory pigment which transfers energy to chlorophyll. Remember, bacteriochlorophyll is found in photosynthetic bacteria.

Sooooo Bb is a photosynthetic bacteria that has bacteriorhodopsin which helps transfer energy to bacteriochlorophyll.

Bacteriorhodopsin and bacteriochlorophyll are in the MEMBRANES, not cell walls.

Which means when Bb is cell wall deficient
...time to hit it.

[ 05-22-2012, 08:03 AM: Message edited by: Marnie ]

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Marnie
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Up for those into using light therapy from a wavelength perspective (as opposed to a frequency of light therapy).
Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Razzle
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So what are you trying to communicate? Are you saying that we need to avoid being in sunlight, or are you saying we need to go out into the sunlight, or are you saying something else?

Please simplify your message for those of us who don't have the higher level scientific background that you seem to have... Thanks!

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Marnie
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I am trying to prove to you that Bb is a photosynthetic pathogen (once again) and show you how "he" gets his energy...when he has and when he does not have a cell wall.

The light activated pigments and proteins(bacteriorhodopsin and bacteriochlorophyll) are in Bb's MEMBRANES - not in his cell walls.

Which means the CWD pathogen can live on...

Photon therapy = pure *light* ENERGY therapy or Rife therapy = using the FREQUENCY of *light*.

VERY specific...VERY targeted! Which is the point of my post...look at the wavelengths of light Bb depends on.

Sunlight...to make vitamin D for ALL cells to use... IS important.

But the infected cells (esp. the macrophages) have the receptors blocked for vitamin D (= VDR) and the macrophages are targeted to die...with CWD Bb in them in biofilm.

When the macrophages do die...eventually...slowly because too much die off too fast of any cell is toxic/sepsis...allows CWD Bb to be released.

Ongoing infection.

Our body has done a pretty good job destroying Bb's walls, but has left CWD Bb.

We have to figure out how to not only prevent Bb from building his cell walls, but also how to impact the nutrients "he" needs to survive as a CWD form...

Bb has both a cell membrane and cell walls (gram positive bacteria have one cell wall, gram negative have two cell walls...Bb has 2 and is gram negative). Generally speaking gram negative pathogens are thus harder to destroy. One exception is anthrax which is gram postive I.e. ONE cell wall.

How to impact a nutrient Bb absolutely must have to survive?

In steps berberine chloride...impacting glucose metabolism.

Bb needs glucose (and amino acids).

We need both too!...but in a JAM, we can substitute ketones to make OUR ATP.

Posts: 9402 | From Sunshine State | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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