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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » FINALLY evidence why Lyme blood looks horrific

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Author Topic: FINALLY evidence why Lyme blood looks horrific
Lymedin2010
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FINALLY, I have captured why Lyme patients blood looks so riddled with artifacts & is so horrific.


I work backwards in the video & start slow. Allowing the Lyme denialists to think that the artifacts are unrelated to spirochetes & then show them what they really are.


This is hard concrete evidence ALL IN ONE BLOOD SMEAR & IN ONE VIDEO.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hbin5ZT6A5s&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


PLEASE, Like, Link, & spread to as many as you can.

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surprise
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Can you try to explain it to us briefly in written word?

When I hear 'play it backwards and figure it out' my mind went to Led Zepplin vinal records.

--------------------
Lyme positive PCR blood, and
positive Bartonella henselae Igenex, 2011.
low positive Fry biofilm test, 2012.
Update 7/16- After extensive treatments,
doing okay!

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Lymedin2010
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In essence, when you look at the medusa spirochetal collection, pay attention to the clear plasma surrounding it (before & after).


In this video & over time the spirochetes bleb themselves, break free as blebs, smaller pieces & chunks, & into larger pieces that then form cysts.


So in time the surrounding blood plasma is littered with parts of the spirochete, which represent the Infinite Morphological Forms. It has an infinite number of forms judging from how it breaks itself up. No two pieces are exactly alike.


This explains why when Lyme blood is left out for 24+ hours it becomes more & more ridden with debris. The spirochetes are invisible in the RBC's initially & then they come out. They break up into these infinite pieces & make the blood look horrific.

That is besides any "string-like" spirochetes that one may see in addition to the debri field.

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surprise
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Thank you.
I don't know why my mind is in the gutter, but I want to reply: What a cluster ****.

I hope I don't get a warning. But seriously. Between spirochetes breaking up and littering everything, multiplying, cyst forming, sludge of biofilm, Bart lining the red cells, parasites,

It's a cluster ****.

Sorry. I appreciate your wisdom.

--------------------
Lyme positive PCR blood, and
positive Bartonella henselae Igenex, 2011.
low positive Fry biofilm test, 2012.
Update 7/16- After extensive treatments,
doing okay!

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Razzle
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Surprise,

I totally, 100% agree with you!

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Lymedin2010
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Very true indeed, but we can still learn. If we are finding it to be even more complex & difficult to control/cure then instead of caution you may consider avoidance of tick areas or grass altogether. I know many who were re-bitten & new ones bitten after warning.


I rather know the truth, rather than guessing whether I am herxing. Throughout the months, I have only seen more & more of these damn things, where I could not find any at the onset.


Now this is where the BEAUTY comes in. We can use microscopy to diagnose people & we can all get the acceptance & understanding.


They can see this in your blood & you can say "How the F can you expect me to feel, anything other than what I am feeling." At this time we are aiming for recognition & what better way then to see visual proof with your own eyes?


This also opens up research, since they can withdraw human blood & keep it alive for days. They can experiment on our blood & they don't need animals. If you can't get it out of your RBC's with ABX, then how the heck do you expect to rid of the infection in the rest of your body?


First the blood & then the body MAY follow.


LLMD's may incorporate microscopy to get a hint at what is ACTUALLY going on with you!!!!!! It is up to you all to do the requesting & demanding so that this becomes common place. LLMD's will learn which ABX produce less artifacts & spiros in the blood over time as well.

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Razzle
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Lymedin2010,

Do you think a cellphone microscope would be sufficient to visualize the spirochetes, blebs, etc. in the blood? Or is a real microscope required? I.e., what magnification is needed?

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Lymedin2010
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Someone just asked me a similar question in my microscopy thread & here is my response.

"Yes, you can, but any slight movement will easily disrupt the video. So if you have patience, then you can do it...I found out that I don't for long term hunting.


Here is an Apple TV app:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lapse-it-time-lapse-stop-motion/id539108382?mt=8


Here is video taken with a Samsung Galaxy S3 older phone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9va0KPrVExs


It is best you DIY a quick setup like this.
http://www.aurelm.com/2014/03/09/diy-smartphone-adapter-for-microscope-photography/


There are pre-made phone adapters, like this SkyLight, but I bought one & did not have any patience with the sensitivity from any movement & the plastic holder warped over time, so that it does not hold the phone properly anymore. Easy fix with some clamps, but for an expensive piece it should not lead to this & that is why I say just build your own.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6WBeB0kvUM


So it is good if you just want to see it in your blood & make a quick capture. If you are serious & want to do long term hunting & proof, then just do a USB cam or video cam connected with an adapter. "

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surprise
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Yes, I was amazed at the end of the new movie
Under Our Skin 2: Emergence

the Dr./Scientist at the very end of the film (from Denmark, I believe?) showed us with salt and water, spirochetes were plain as day (visible) in blood with a microscope.

Then he got banned! Mysteriously they took his microscope!

--------------------
Lyme positive PCR blood, and
positive Bartonella henselae Igenex, 2011.
low positive Fry biofilm test, 2012.
Update 7/16- After extensive treatments,
doing okay!

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Lymedin2010
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Yup, they need our help on this & they cannot do it alone. If LLMD's see that their own patients are seeing borrelia in the blood, they will follow suite & more discoveries will be made.


I think I might have discovered something new too, the fact that the string of pearls can forms cysts or curl up on itself. I have never heard of that before.


I have always wondered too about the blebs with tails & took notice of them early on & I just watched a Alan MacDonald video today where mentions tailed blebs. I am ecstatic about this, just to find out that I am right. I have pieced together all this stuff on my own really & then found confirmation from others thankfully.


The only one I did not find on my own was the thin birthing borrelia from a mother borrelia, but I happen to capture a video after watching a video of what one looks like.


I am sure there are more discoveries to be made. If you guys want I can put the very original video file & you guys can watch it more closely. I am sure I missed something, that you guys can discover. It is hard to watch the video in different sections over & over again to look for proof & easy to miss something.

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Razzle
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Thanks for the interesting links...

Actually, I was referring to the cellphone and a simple lens being used as the microscope - see http://www.aurelm.com/2014/03/09/diy-smartphone-adapter-for-microscope-photography/ for an example.

Would the cellphone's camera and lens set-up like in the above link work for filming blood smears and watching spirochetes emerge from the blood cells? Or would the magnification be too low to be able to see that detail?

Thanks,

--------------------
-Razzle
Lyme IgM IGeneX Pos. 18+++, 23-25+, 30++, 31+, 34++, 39 IND, 83-93 IND; IgG IGeneX Neg. 30+, 39 IND; Mayo/CDC Pos. IgM 23+, 39+; IgG Mayo/CDC Neg. band 41+; Bart. (clinical dx; Fry Labs neg. for all coinfections), sx >30 yrs.

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Lymedin2010
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The short answer, Yes & you will get better images/video than I have.


The longer answer is dependent on you. The "magnification" will be dependent on the objective lens & eyepiece of the microscope & not the phone really. The phone will act & see the same thing your eye does when it looks into the eyepiece of the microscope. So in this respect it will be dependent on your microscope & any good lab micro will be good for this.


I know the Galaxy S4 & S5 & the iPhone 5c were reported to have a narrow Field Of View (FOV) & focus to infinity & hence better at maximizing the video capture. How much better or worst they are compared to each other is dependent on a phone by phone basis, but most phones should be able to capture video.


*****TRICKY part #1:*****
This will depend on you. All dependent on the attachment method (Skylight vs DIY setup) the phone may be susceptible to movement, shakiness & displacement, which may force you to constantly readjust.


For instance I tried the Skylight & each time I go to hit the record on the phone the whole setup gets displaced by the slightest movement, forcing me to readjust. The DIY setup should hold it in place better, but it is still up to you to create a solid DIY. I always wanted to make one, but have not as of yet.


*****TRICKY part #2:*****
When you hold the phone up to the eyepiece manually, you don't just hold the phone up to the eyepiece. You have to hold it up & move it up & down until you get the optimal spot. Too high & you get video of the black tube in the peripheral & you lose sight of subject. Too low & you lose more video of your blood cells, so for example you capture 100 cells instead of the normal 200 cells with optimal distance.


The DIY tube will rely on your precision at optimal distance & that is DEPENDENT ON YOU & how well you can do this. The Skylight too, which has clamps for up & down (Z direction) & sliders that EASILY move in X & Y direction (don't forget it can easily get bumped & moved).


If you make a DIY setup, you have to find a PVC or plastic tube that is the right size to fit the eyepiece & just the right size/distance from the eyepiece (precise length cut).


If you build the DIY perfectly to your specs, as based on your test from manually holding the phone, then it will be a more solid choice...less movement.


*****TRICKY part #3:*****
Which is LIGHTING & is true for just viewing with a microscope, as well as with any type of camera attached. You can do a DIY LED light setup or use the bulb setup I showed you in one of my videos. BE WARNED that LED lights are powerful & can burn your retina, especially the small DIY ones. The Cree bulb I show in my video & use has frosting on the bulb & it does not bother my eye, although still use caution.


The same is true for any camera you have (Point & shoot cameras (PNS) or DSLR's), in that you should be able to hold it up with your hands to the eyepiece & record video. There are devices that you can purchase to hold it in place though.


Now compare all this to the other method, which is what I use a Amscope USB cam that just slides in the eyepiece or the trinocular port. Advantage is that it is cut to specifications & all I have to do is just slide it in. Disadvantage is that I cannot capture as beautiful images with crappier resolution & price for better resolving ones.


So all this depends on you!

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