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» LymeNet Flash » Questions and Discussion » Medical Questions » Gains from genetic testing results?

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Author Topic: Gains from genetic testing results?
ohioperson22
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Are any of the polymorphisms tested in commercial saliva-genetic testing services, and plugged into various third-party programs for things like methylation, "detox," etc, truly meaningful for lyme?

Just wondering if anyone out there got their results, changed something, and saw DRASTIC improvement, or something to that effect?

Posts: 200 | From Ohio | Registered: Apr 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jordana
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It's interesting but I think it's a crock.

Half the population of the world has MTHFR which means the people who treat it have a customer base of half the population of the world.

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WPinVA
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I thought it was interesting but never got any benefit from it. I ran my results through a couple of the interpretation website and the problem is that the advice for one mutation (ie take x supplement) would conflict with the advice for another mutation (DON'T take x supplement.)

So I didn't know what to do. I gave it all to my LLMD who didn't know what to do with it either. He said the science just isn't quite there yet.

Maybe I/we missed something. Maybe if you find a doctor who knows what to do with it, it could be helpful. I think they are few and far between.

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Robin123
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I found it very interesting to get an accurate report from 23andme about the various genetic SNPs, and it's very helpful to my doctor, who does know what to do with the information.

There's a map of the methylation cycles, about 4 or 5 of them linking to one another. I think this can be seen online as well.

The enzymes are in boxes in this map, so by seeing your SNPs - single nucleotide polymorphisms, ie your missing enzymes, you can see where your cycles are compromised.

The treatment plan is to try to boost the precursors or actual missing chemistries for that enzyme function and cycle.

So, yes, with a doctor who knows what they're doing, this information is great to have.

My doc will work with people over the phone, but he requires seeing anyone initially in his office in San Francisco.

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kms1990
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Did the tests but my doctor and I both think its not the solution to the problem. It might predispose someone to getting sick, but is only a small piece of recovery.
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ohioperson22
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Yeah, it is so complicated. Some polymorphisms do nothing to enzyme activity. Others, in combination with other ones (called haploytypes, I think) cancel each other out. But at the same time, some SNPs and haploytypes are very bad and reduce enzyme activity.

Then there is homozygous and heterzygous.

Further, it should be noted not all genetic diseases deal with single polymorphisms (or even combinations of them). Some are deletions (frameshift mutation), or additions of post-gene nucleotides (as in the case of mytonic dystrophy type I).


Yeah, I totally agree with the problem that some SNPs say to "take X" but then others day "don't take X"

Yeah, there's just not a lot of info out there about so many of these polymorphisms. There is a little info out there on some of them (such as enzyme kinetics consequences of certain SNPs).

Some of the for-profit doctors out there putting out info about some of the pathways and having their "programs" are loaded with BS. (not all of it is always BS, but a lot is) And as soon as an enzyme is compared to a "broken toilet," it is time to run the other way (but at least you can be sure that the doctor got an excellent writing score on his/her MCAT!!!!!!!!!)

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Keebler
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Genetic Testing for CELIAC would be very helpful - for all on the planet, actually. Many other kinds of tests can miss it, big time. Even with a genetic test, that may not always be clear but a much, much better chance at finding out if one has the genes.

This is not just for gut health, in those with celiac, gluten can cause all kinds of pain, damage - even brain damage. It's certainly worth considering.

Best to research through two or three of the very top celiac patient advocacy organizations.
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sixgoofykids
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I found out some interesting things.

I am homozygous for MTHFR c677t. I also have relatively high homocysteine, which is caused by it. I've been taking supplements for it. It's been a little rough (digestive symptoms from detox) since I've gone over 50 years without methylating well.

I'm moving heavy metals and other toxins. The heavy metals showed up in heavy metals testing. I've chelated before, but still test as having heavy metals. We'll see when I get retested whether methylating properly has changed my ability to get rid of them.

I also discovered that I have a genes that make me produce little DAO that processes histamine. I knew I had histamine issues and eat relatively low histamine (I've been able to add things back in as long as I don't overdo it). It's good to know it's genetic because my doctor wasn't sure if it was caused by improper gut balance, which I also have.

I do not have the main two genes for celiac disease. However, all the less important genes that point to celiac, I do have. That explains why I'm gluten intolerant.

So yes, interesting information. It's also good for my daughters in their child bearing years to know they likely don't process folic acid properly so they can take the right form of it. Prenatals made me feel really sick .... I wonder if it's because of the extra folic acid and my MTHFR mutation.

--------------------
sixgoofykids.blogspot.com

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