This is topic Please help this person!!!! THANKS! in forum Medical Questions at LymeNet Flash.


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Posted by Lymetoo (Member # 743) on :
 
I've been trying to help "susanschn" here through PM's and other threads. Seems I'm the only one responding to her and I don't have the answers she needs.

If you have any info on hemobartonella, please go here to help:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/88534


I'll bring her other threads here too. Please look for them so you can help her. It's her mother who is very ill and needing help.

Here they are:

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/88531

http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/88539
 
Posted by Tincup (Member # 5829) on :
 
Tutu...

Your so sweet, horseflies keeping hanging round your face. Buzz, buzz, buzz.

Susan....

I am NOT a doctor, but it looks like the doctor has indicated hemobartonella. Rather than me explain it.... cause like Ehrlichiosis, its name has changed and it is being reclassified...

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_feline_infectious_anemia.html

With this infection, which can come from the tick bite she had, you can have other markers indicated as positives on other tests.

For example, you would expect anemia, possibly. Maybe the throm- whatever it is I can't think right now- would be indicated, etc.

Anyhow.. I do not know Fry Labs at all. Don't use them and don't read their results.. but it appears all other coinfection tests show negative at this time.

The doc said.. "BARTONELLA POSITIVE, HEMEX POSITIVE, EVEN WITH NORMAL CD57, EVERYTHING POINTS TO LYME."

The doc also has a detailed history and the benefit of examination etc... that we don't have access too.

Hemex being positive- clumpy blood basically- would be expected, especially if coinfected (Lyme, Bart).

My GUESS and totally an uneducated GUESS... is like the doc said...

Bart and most likely Lyme. Treatment would be most likely based on using meds that will address both infections.

Often Lyme meds will address Bart and vise versa. Since the bite was less than a year ago, there is a good chance to lick this stuff. At least see some good improvement.

Sorry to hear your mom is feeling so badly Susan, but good to know she has someone who cares and is willing to help her... YOU!

[Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lymetoo (Member # 743) on :
 
Thanks, TC... I'll post this on her thread.
 
Posted by treepatrol (Member # 4117) on :
 
Mycoplasma haemofelis (formerly Haemobartonella felis)

Test code: B0047 - Ultrasensitive qualitative detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis by real time polymerase chain reaction

B0047 is included on P0021 - feline bloodborne panel



Hemobartonellosis in cats is caused by Mycoplasma haemofelis, previously known as Haemobartonella felis. Cats infected with this organism typically develop regenerative anemia as the bacteria attack the cat's red blood cells.

Similar to Mycoplasma haemocanis, the bacteria can be transmitted from one animal to another by blood-feeding arthropods such as fleas and ticks. M. haemofelis can also be transmitted from female cats with clinical disease to their newborn offspring in the absence of arthropod vectors. The severity of disease produced by M. haemofelis varies, from cats that are mildly anemic and without clinical signs to cats that are markedly depressed and die as a result of severe anemia. The most common clinical signs in ill cats are depression, weakness, anorexia, weight loss and pale mucous membranes. Studies have estimated the prevalence of this bacterium in the feline population from 0.9 to 28%.

Mycoplasma haemofelis has not been successfully grown in agar or cell cultures due to its fastidious growth requirements. Traditionally, diagnosis relied on microscopic identification of organisms attached to the surfaces of erythrocytes in Wright-Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smears. However, this method not only lacks sensitivity but also is not adequately specific because the morphology of M. haemofelis can easily be confused with other microorganisms such as rickettsia. Molecular detection by PCR is the best way to detect M. haemofelis in blood of infected cats. Using PCR analysis, it is possible to detect the pathogen in blood samples obtained from cats during parasitemia, during most of the carrier phase, and even after challenge with immunosuppressive drugs which would prevent detection by serological techniques.

Its a mycoplasma
There have been multiple recent discoveries in feline infectious diseases associated with fever. Notable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma) infections, feline ehrlichiosis, bartonellosis and toxoplasmosis have been made.

Haemobartonellosis. Haemobartonella felis is now classified as a mycoplasma. The small variant of the organism has been designated the California strain (Hfsm) and the large form has been designated the Ohio strain (Hflg). The proposed name for Hflg is Mycoplasma haemofelis. The proposed name for Hfsm is Mycoplasma haemominutum. In at least two studies, the Hflg strain was apparently more pathogenic than the Hfsm strain; all Hflg inoculated cats became clinical ill whereas Hfsm inoculated cats were subclinically infected. Coinfected, naturally exposed cats have been detected; coinfection is clinically more severe than infection by either organism alone. United Kingdom isolates are similar genetically to those of the United States.

Haemobartonella felis has been transmitted experimentally by IV, IP, and oral inoculation of blood. It is unknown whether blood-sucking arthropods like fleas and ticks can transmit the disease. Clinically ill queens can infect kittens; whether transmission occurs in utero, during parturition, or from nursing has not been determined. Transmission by biting has been hypothesized. Red blood cell destruction is due primarily to immune-mediated events; direct injury to red blood cells induced by the organism is minimal. Positive Coomb's tests are common.

I would say use any of the Doxycycline,Tetracycline,or Minocycline and maybe a Blood transfusionand absolutly NO predisone any steroids.
If she has this she possibly has lyme to.

fibrinogen= NormalRange 180-310
Yours is high Fibrinogen Activity >800mg/dL

Platelet Activation Index Abnormal
2+
Blood cells are dying faster than normal.
its thick and sticky,lyme trait.

Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 387 pmol/L
(monoclonal) stressing the heart and muscels.
Consistant with lyme and poor redblood cells not able to carry good oxygen to any muscels including heart.

Human CD62P appears on the surface of activated endothelial cells or platelets and likely is involved with regulating the recruitment of leukocytes to areas. shes infected.

In the past, the primary screen for platelet dysfunction was the bleeding time. However, the bleeding time procedure has fallen from favor in recent years. Many hospitals are no longer offering it, and several national organizations have issued position statements against its routine use as a pre-surgical screen. The bleeding time is not sensitive or specific, and it does not necessarily reflect the risk or severity of surgical bleeding. It is poorly reproducible, can be affected by aspirin ingestion and by the skill of the person performing the test, and frequently leaves small thin scars on the forearm.

The PFA-100 (Platelet Function Analyzer - 100) is a testing device that many hospitals are using as a platelet function screen, in place of the bleeding time, to mimic the clotting process. To do the test, a tube of blood is drawn from a vein in the arm and then a portion of the blood is put into a test cartridge. Vacuum is then used to draw blood through a very thin glass tube that has been coated with collagen and with either epinephrine (EPI) or ADP. This coating activates the platelets in the moving sample and promotes platelet adherence and aggregation. The time it takes for a clot to form inside the glass tube and prevent further blood flow is measured as a closure time (CT). An initial screen is done with collagen/EPI. If the CT is normal, it is unlikely that a platelet dysfunction exists. The collagen/ADP test is run to confirm an abnormal collagen/EPI test. If both tests are abnormal, it is likely that the patient has a platelet dysfunction and further testing for inherited or acquired bleeding disorders is indicated. If the collagen/ADP test is normal, then the abnormal collagen/EPI test may be due to aspirin ingestion. This is the most frequently encountered abnormal collagen/EPI result as a single dose of aspirin can affect platelet function for about 10 days

What I see here is shes got a raging infection on her blood ie= Hemobartonellosis and possibly lyme disease.
Thats the best I can do .
 
Posted by treepatrol (Member # 4117) on :
 
I would take a asprin everyday until they treat her for a while.
Keep her blood thinner.
 
Posted by treepatrol (Member # 4117) on :
 
Fibrin specifically binds the activated coagulation factors factor Xa and thrombin and entraps them in the network of fibers, thus functioning as a temporary inhibitor of these enzymes which stay active and can be released during fibrinolysis.[3] Recent research has shown that fibrin plays a key role in the inflammatory response and development of rheumatoid (((arthritis))). That would be lyme.
 
Posted by JamesNYC (Member # 15793) on :
 
I can't keep up with the multiple topics. I posted in the other one and my opinion is different from youse guys.

Check it out and let me know if response is on base or not.

James
 
Posted by treepatrol (Member # 4117) on :
 
Hi JamesNYC its Its a mycoplasma
There have been multiple recent discoveries in feline infectious diseases associated with fever. Notable advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma) infections, feline ehrlichiosis, bartonellosis and toxoplasmosis have been made.

Haemobartonellosis. Haemobartonella felis is now classified as a mycoplasma. The small variant of the organism has been designated the California strain (Hfsm) and the large form has been designated the Ohio strain (Hflg). The proposed name for Hflg is Mycoplasma haemofelis. The proposed name for Hfsm is Mycoplasma haemominutum. In at least two studies, the Hflg strain was apparently more pathogenic than the Hfsm strain; all Hflg inoculated cats became clinical ill whereas Hfsm inoculated cats were subclinically infected. Coinfected, naturally exposed cats have been detected; coinfection is clinically more severe than infection by either organism alone. United Kingdom isolates are similar genetically to those of the United States.

Haemobartonella felis has been transmitted experimentally by IV, IP, and oral inoculation of blood. It is unknown whether blood-sucking arthropods like fleas and ticks can transmit the disease. Clinically ill queens can infect kittens; whether transmission occurs in utero, during parturition, or from nursing has not been determined. Transmission by biting has been hypothesized. Red blood cell destruction is due primarily to immune-mediated events; direct injury to red blood cells induced by the organism is minimal. Positive Coomb's tests are common.

I would say use any of the Doxycycline,Tetracycline,or Minocycline and maybe a Blood transfusionand absolutly NO predisone any steroids.
If she has this she possibly has lyme to.
 
Posted by JamesNYC (Member # 15793) on :
 
So, then WHY is the Fry slide tests used to dx bartonella since that isn't what is does????

(I posted more in the other topic)
 


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