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Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
First off, I would like to just stress the importance of doing microscopy. It can buy clues as to what is ACTUALLY going on in your body.

So many of us have difficulty knowing what is going on. Are we experiencing herxes, disease progression or something else?

I cannot imagine being a Doctor & not having the passion or desire to look at what is going on from within. I would not be able to sleep at night!!!

I have looked at my blood for quite some time & have gained considerable knowlege. Something that I can teach someone else in a day & save them some time. This way we can continue to progress forward and make new discoveries.

I bought my Microscope on ebay for $100 & other equipment for well under $100 (Glass slides, slip covers, oil immersion, diabetes kit for finger pricks).

We cannot waste more time. Had we done this years ago, we might be in a different place today. It is important for those of us who are trying various methods to see what the results are in front of our eyes & share them with one another.

To possibly help those professionals who are trying to help us.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I believe the organism we are looking at to be spirochaeta gallinarum. A very hardy and clever specimen that avoids ABX by encysting, budding spores, invading your RBCs & and your WBC, as well as just about any tissue in the human body.

These are just a few videos that I had just made after getting my new camera 2 days ago. They in no way reflect the best of what I have seen.

I have taken notice that they come in various sizes, shapes, and morphologies. Some are
short and stubby dumbbell shaped & are very active and move in a Brownian motion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkJEWv11__g&feature=autoplay&list=ULU7qCEnHhdP4&playnext=1

Others are medium dumbbell, with a longer middle line (thread). As if the older and matured version of the short and stubby dumbbell. Basically a line with two bulbous tips on either end.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkJEWv11__g

At times they appear as a long dancing string & can be seen exiting RBC's. One end is exposed and is bulbous, while the other end is still within the RBC. Initially not much can be seen, but if the live smear is left for an hour or more, they start to appear in the plasma & some can be caught in the act of exiting RBC's.

If the smear is left overnight, more can be seen the following day. The trick to see them the next day is to spread the oil immersion around the peripheral of the slip cover & let it spill over to the slide. In essence creating a vacuum seal for the smear & decreasing plasma evaporation. With this method the RBC's can be kept whole, but shrunk for days & those organisms can be seen for quite some time.

Others have a dotted body, besides the two dots on either ends, as if they are giving rise to new spores (dots).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7VUUk5M86c4&feature=channel&list=UL

The progression might be DOT--> DOT WITH TAIL-->STUBBY DUMBBELL-->MEDIUM DUMBBELL-->LONG DUMBBELL (STRING).

The LONG DUMBBELL can be even longer & the MEDIUM DUMBBELL can be dotted.

Some of these dots (spores) can be seen dancing around freely in the plasma & yet some have a very small tail. Basically a tear drop, or cigar shape with a tail.

Others are extremely long and wrap around. They appear to have grown longer with time. When I first started getting symptoms they were smaller & incidentally I felt the twitches within me smaller. Months into the progression I was able to observe how long they can actually get & this coincides with the feeling that something bigger and something that has grown within me. They have also grown in abundance and prevalence. This produces various burning pains, twitches and movement...Fibromyalgia type symptoms.

Here is an interesting find. I had been watching my blood for many hours & months. I had seen so many of those things come out of RBC's, but never once from a WBC. I had started to do Hot Baths & on day two I checked my blood. I noticed that my blood was more watered down and fluid. When I pricked myself for the smear, my finger did not want to stop bleeding. When I got my Bacillin LA shot, that too gushed blood (which is out of the ordinary).

Here is a poor video from my hand held camera of this, but it is hard to tell. You may need to expand the video fully. There are so many coming out of the WBC for the first time ever & this is with multiple WBC's.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA2KyvI30p4&feature=plcp
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
I am very, very interested in this!!! I have not even looked at the links yet.

This is my next step. I am currently in a Biol lab at school simply to learn how to use a microscope. The students are half my age and do not have borrelia in their brains, but I am determined to do my own research. I occasionally have a synapse in my brain fire, I plan to get them working again.

I will send you a PM and also give you my phone number. Maybe you can walk me through which scope to buy etc..

Also - maybe we could start a facebook page for people that are doing this. They could post their results there.
 
Posted by lax mom (Member # 38743) on :
 
Amazing!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Haley, yes we can talk.

Also note that my blood smears are using a standard Phase Contrast microscope, without the phase use & can be seen with a standard compound microscope. They are live & slightly more wet (so I can see things freely swimming) & NO STAIN!

Yes, the BB is hard to see inside RBC's without a stain, but once they come out they are easy to spot. If you look closely you can see some of the RBC's dancing around, indicating there is something inside. One can also see the cysts within WBC's, that look like specks.

Here is Dr. Andy Wright (from UK) making similar observations

http://lymerick.net/videomicroscopy.htm


http://lymerick.net/video/AndyWright2004-640.wmv (52 Mb, 4 minutes) video of spirochetes in more lenghts, granules, a moving granulated cellular structure, thus illustrating all the phases complex spirochetal lifecycle drawn on page 475 in this article by Hindle 1912 (PDF) printed in Parasitology (1912), iv, pp 463-477.
So far (June 2005) 98/98 of Andys ME/CFS patients with such structures in their blood tested positive on direct fluorescent antibody test for Borrelia burgdorferi ANTIGEN!

[ 10-03-2012, 03:22 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Catgirl (Member # 31149) on :
 
Very cool!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
For those that asked.

Things needed for BB microscopy:

1)A microscope such as this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/PRO-SWIFT-QUODMASTER-100-MICROSCOPE-4-LENS-MODEL-751447-SCIENCE-COLLEGE-/271073372960?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f1d3b6b20

or this one

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Unico-Binocular-Compound-Microscope-/130774823690?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e72c9730a

or this one

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Labophot-2-Binocular-Microscope-Objectives-Phase-Contrast-2-Condenser-LWD-/251160199098?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a7a507fba


-Things to look for:
-Get a Binocular instead of a single one. It makes things easier on your eyes when looking long term. If you can get a Trinocular, even better. It will allow you to place a camera without hindrance to the Binocular portion. I have a binocular.

-Make sure you get one with 100x (Oil Immersion) objective lens (the long tubes you swivel). Usually if there are 4x lenses they may be (20x, 40x, 80x, 100x). You need a min of 100x & coupled with the eye piece (usually standard 10x), you will be able to see 100x * 10x or 1000x.

-It would be nice to get anything over a 100x if you can. I dont even have one yet, but eventually will get one. Maybe a 200x, so I can see 200x 10x = 2000x.


2) Glass Slides: $10 (with ship)
Do a search on ebay for microscope glass slides
You get 75 slides & 100 slip covers with these. I bought more & a bulkier batch & have plenty left over. 72 Blank Microscope Slides and 100 Square Cover Glass - Karter Scientific


http://www.ebay.com/itm/72-Blank-Microscope-Slides-and-100-Square-Cover-Glass-Karter-Scientific-/380449007579?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58948727db


3)Oil for the Oil Immersion. Type B high viscocity. $15

On ebay do a search for oil immersion B microscope

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=oil+immersion+microscope&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=p2045573.m570.l1313&_nkw=oil+immersion+B+microscope&_sacat=0



4)A Lancing device, such as this Delica Onetouch system (under $20). You can draw blood anyway, but this makes it easy & pain free and can be bought at RiteAid or Walmart. It is a good idea to swab your finger with alcohol before drawing blood.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/LifeScan-OneTouch-Delica-Lancing-Device/15442746


Here is a youtube video on how to make a blood smear. Follow the video & then add the slip cover on top. Then you add the oil immersion on top of the slip cover (1-2 drops). Personally, I use the slip cover to do the smear & it works out fine & is fresher.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3d_4dkVVSE

I will make a video of a smear eventually & post.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is another video of my Phagocytes in action.

Notice one of the Phagocytes has larger speckles within the body. This is most likely the Borrelia Cyst or Speck. The other phagocyte has no such specks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tc6Lqi8kJi4&feature=plcp
 
Posted by dal123 (Member # 6313) on :
 
do you just use a drop of whole blood and view under the microscope or do you place a drop of blood on the slide, traumatize the blood cells by pricking with a needle then put the cover slip back on and view under the scope.Traumatizing the cells makes the bugs jump out of the cells into the extracellular space. If you are not doing this and u see the bugs in the extracellular space using a drop of whole blood then you are toxic, your extracellular space needs to be cleaned up before more detox.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I prick & manage to get about a drop out of me. Place it on the slide and smear it using the cover slip. I don't induce any trauma.

The blood smear looks clean and nice while fresh. Give it an hour & things start to appear. Give it a day & one would be suprised and perhaps SHOCKED.

I have seen the blood of others & have seen things come out of many people's blood smear. At one point I was similar to others, but recently things appear to have gotten worst.
 
Posted by seibertneurolyme (Member # 6416) on :
 
Have not had time to read the whole thread or view the videos.

But one quick comment. Was on the phone tonight with hubby's LLMD. The doc tried something I had read and took some pictures of their own blood with an iphone.

Do a finger stick and then do an ear stick and compare the results. The ear stick may show much more. At least that is supposed to be best when looking for babesia in dogs.

Bea Seibert
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
Is this a darkfield microscope? I'm wondering why the link you gave is a preferable microscope.

Is it possible to identify most of what you see? Can it help you diagnose exactly what is infecting you and so enable you to create a better protocol for yourself?

Wondering whether you really need a microbiology class to be effective.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Never heard of an ear test, would be nice if it held water.

Darkfield would be nice too. I have seen some Lyme blood online under Darkfield. You can actually buy a dark field condenser and turn a compound into a dark field.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Brand-New-Dry-Darkfield-Condenser-for-Biological-Microscopes-Live-Blood-Analysis-/170916320317?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27cb68143d

I think Darkfield is better for identifying Babs and Bart. One can more clearly see through RBC. I had my blood viewed at the peak of my sickness with a Darkfield, before a good set of ABX that actually worked for me. Nothing was spotted. Maybe now might be a better time to check.

It could help make a better protocol. For instance, I had shortness of breath and the one thing that held it back was Buaxin. I was on it for over a year.

I have switching LLMD and have now switched meds. Because of interactions I had to stop Biaxin. I had never seen Borrelia in my WBC, only after 2 hot baths did I see them AND after one week of stopping Biaxin.

Biaxin is a good intracellular ABX. Perhaps I released more Borrelia from skin surface and they were picked up by macrophages or mybe I removed Biaxin, what prevented my WBC's from backing up?

If we had an individual who we knew only had Babesia or Bart, it might be easier to distinguish based upon shared video. Right now it is hard for me and for doctors. I am trying to make it easier.

The Borrelia is clear cut to me, nothing else mimics a string with a bulbous tip. But for instance, can the specks inside WBC be Bart? Yea, it could be and only until we do a DNA test can anyone know with certainty.

My next step is to transfer some of them over to new media and observe them for a longer term. This should buy further clues.
 
Posted by seibertneurolyme (Member # 6416) on :
 
Another suggestion from hubby's LLMD -- do not use alcohol pads to disinfect your finger before the blood draw. Doc suggested using a red cleaner instead -- could not remember what it is called -- not betadine but something else that just washes off. Said results would be different if you use the alcohol pad.

Bea Seibert
 
Posted by sparkle7 (Member # 10397) on :
 
That's really cool (pardons that you may be ill from it) but how do you know it's spirochaeta gallinarum as opposed to something else?
 
Posted by a mom (Member # 23920) on :
 
Bea, were you able to get the video clips to the parasitologist in NY?
 
Posted by a mom (Member # 23920) on :
 
Bea,

Oh arrrggghhhhh....I can't figure out which button to click on to send you a private message. Would you call me when you have time and I can give you Dolores phone number?

HUGS,

Janet
 
Posted by seibertneurolyme (Member # 6416) on :
 
A mom -- Working on it. My computer is old as the hills and it would have taken over 2 hours to download dropbox. Am at Kinko's -- sending some of the video clips by yousendit.com -- still is taking over 5 minutes for each video clip (there were 27 in total). For now just sending 5 and will try to send more later today. If it works I will post the link in this thread -- think I can do that but not 100% sure.

Bea Seibert
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am always willing to try. What is the red substance called?

There is no doubt in my mind what this is.

Did you guys watch this video from a DOCTOR who has seen and has described the same thing one sees in my blood smears.

Here is Dr. Andy Wright (from UK) making similar Observation.
http://lymerick.net/video/AndyWright2004-640.wmv

He also makes references to this species by other individuals in the early 1900's.
 
Posted by a mom (Member # 23920) on :
 
HELP!!

Bea called and asked me to post a New Thread. I don't know how to do that. Can anyone start a New Thread for Bea's info:

Steve is dying from ARDS or lung failure from unknown causes. Docs think his heart will give out but can't say when. For example something as simple as turning him over in bed can cause his oxygen levels to fall -- even on a ventilator at maximum (100 % oxygen).. Other times his heart rate slows to dangerously low levels instead of the oxygen falling.

The docs are pushing for me to change Steve's code status (now at full code) or even to pull the plug on the ventilator. Undecided what to do about code status right now -- but pulling the plug is NOT an option at this time.

I am trying to decide what to do next to help Steve.

Once I get the Clongen blood smear results I need to come up with a new plan of action.

Addendum:

Babesia meds are still on, WBC down to 11,000. She did not say if he had fever.

Bea is trying to reach a doctor Dolores recommended: Dr. Thomas W. Nash (Columbia Presbyterian). Pulmonary and ID.

Bea called, but office was closed. I sent an email for HELP. Is anyone friends with him and could reach him for Bea?
 
Posted by a mom (Member # 23920) on :
 
More Prayers Please. When i called Bea, the Pastor was in the room with them....
 
Posted by map1131 (Member # 2022) on :
 
a mom look towards bottom of this page see post new topic. Click that.

Pam
 
Posted by a mom (Member # 23920) on :
 
map1131: Thanks!

Can everyone see the 27 clips listed in this playlist?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0Er_tbztXw
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Blood parasite?

I think I might have finally captured a blood parasite. Judge for yourself.

Part 1:
Recording of one end of the parasite.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O3WteeGPVk

Part 2:
Traversing the field of view down the length of the organism. It did not appear to move, perhaps because it was sandwiched between the glass slide & the slip cover.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42K0sdQEQ7E&feature=youtu.be

This could be the something that I feel in me that has grown in size & or colonies. Something moving inside of me throughout my body.
 
Posted by derk diggler (Member # 31903) on :
 
that is crazy crazy, how you gonna kill it, or them inside of you, just prves that parasites play a bigger role in this than we think, would you teach someone how to do what you do on a scope
 
Posted by dal123 (Member # 6313) on :
 
Are you sure this is not an artifact, or food fiber? to tell if it's a parasite, staining would be more helpful, ie to differentiate between this better, can see the scolex & segments, etc. that's the best ID aspect of parasites in the bloodstream, tell if it's microfilaria.

by the way are you taking any enzymes? I noted lots of rouleaux, possible leaky gut issues. digestive enzymes with each meal, ie TPP Digest and then on a very empty stomach, Interfase plus or serrapeptase.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, I am willing to teach, just let me know.

I don't think a fiber would normally be:

-transparent, just like some of our own cellular material.

-have folds and ripples like it does.

-such finely tapered ends.

-looks to almost have a central tubule running across the one side. Almost as if a digestive or perhaps a reproductive tract.

I have never seen one of these before, but have seen bits and pieces of material, which I always associated with dead skin tissue and debris.

I just started serrapeptase a few days ago on docs orders. Here is my total regimen:

Doxy, Biaxin, Plaquinil, Malarone, Nystatin, Cryptolepis, A-Bio, & Colloidal Silver.
 
Posted by glm1111 (Member # 16556) on :
 
Someone here who had a microscope posted a stained blood smear a year or two ago and identified them as microfilarial worms.

Ivermectin and doxy were taken by people in a study who thought they had these microfilaria and said they had success with that protocol.

Remember that Willy burdorfer found Filarial Worms in the ticks he dissected, and also Dr Eva Sapi is finding them in over 40% of the ticks she is dissecting.

My own experience with this disease has shown me that I was LOADED with these parasites and then some. It amazes me that even the ILADS community has overlooked this and is soley focused on BB.

According to Dr. K. once the parasites/worms are eradicated, bb and the other co-infections are easier to kill. Antiparasitics have to be taken if anyone wants to get rid of this disease. Abx alone will keep you on a treadmill and never eradicate this infection known as Lyme disease.

Gael
 
Posted by debilyn (Member # 35753) on :
 
Wow LymedIn, that is amazing. Looks like a parasite to me. How do we kill blood parasites?

If this is a filarial worm, how do we kill them in our blood? Babs medicines?
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
I'm bringing this back up. Does anyone have pictures of parasites in their blood?

What do you think of this microscope and do you think I can do video with it also?

http://www.amazon.com/AmScope-40X-2000X-Trinocular-Darkfield-Microscope/dp/B004TP7KDM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1364858911&sr=8-1&keywords=darkfield+microscope
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I personally don't trust AmScope. Their units are sometimes unpredictable, but at that price range I would expect it to be ok. I believe it is the lower end ones that are riskier.

I believe LymeNurse or LymeTwister on here also bought an Amscope. It was unusable and he had to return and upgrade it. He got an awkward one with a built in video screen, but it did the trick. He posted his vids on youtube & you can check them out.
Here is one of them:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXRNH0lkiNg&list=UUR9kWYE08hN1pbvzIzwL3Dg&index=7

The clarity is not that great, but it could be due to his video recording.

I caved in and bought a Amscope 9MP microscope camera. I figured they can't go wrong with that, can they? The build quality is great, but the software and auto refocus is pure crap. At the end the worst piece of hardware I have bought in a very long time. My point & shoot camera took clearer images and video & was better with frame rate.

The only problem with my PNS cam is that I had to hold it by hand & it was shaky.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Haley, your PM box is full. Try & delete your older messages to make some room.


I don't see any Zeiss Trinocular microscopes on Ebay as of now, but here is a good & cheap alternative.

American Optics is a good brand used by many professionals. I would be bidding on this right now, if I needed a scope.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Optics-Trinocular-Microscope-Microstar-110-/130886762872?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e79758178
 
Posted by Dove7 (Member # 39546) on :
 
Lymedin, my LLND says if we have blood parasites, we also have them in tissues and organs.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I believe it. I have many disturbances and movement all over my body. In particular under my rib cage is a hot spot, that seems to have grown in size and disturbance.

This is right where the spleen & Liver is located. Once the spleen goes, I would imagine the immune sys gets knocked down hard & I feel as if mine is. Most of my blood work shows fine, except for slightly elevated Liver enzymes & they did notice immature granulocytes.

I think a source for parasites for me might have been the mosquito bites that ensued after starting treatment. I didn't know we had to be wrapped in a bubble while treating. If ABX knock down ones immune system, then you can really pickup anything and everything.

I feel like an AIDS patient, but with much more pain and inhumane disturbances.

I highly recommend watching the TV series "Monsters Inside Me." This will give you an idea of what others have been exposed to & how easily they got sick without any Lyme. With Lyme there are so much more dangers out there & they cannot necessarily all be attacked by the ABX we consume.
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
Thank you Lymedin2010. I will bid on that scope. Can a camera be attached to that one?

I'm so spaced out that I have no idea how I will do any on this, but I am very interested in looking at tissues in addition to blood.

I will read through this entire post later.

My mailbox should be open now.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Larger trinocular openings, such as that on this scope usually are meant for CCV cameras. I believe they are called C mount & size to be 30mm.

They also make adapters that will allow you to attach cameras and video cameras the size of the eye piece (23mm for example) to that opening.

Once you get it the best thing to do is find the dimensions of the opening & get the dimensions of the camera you are using. You can give a microscope store or B&H photo a call & provide them with your dimensions & they can help you find an appropriate adapter.

My Trinocular is a narrower openeing, same size as my eye piece, 23mm & the Amscope camera fits right into the trinocular adapter tube.

Look at this trinocular with a CCV cam opening:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Zeiss-Trinocular-Head-for-Axioscope-Microscope-/200914848967?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ec7754cc7

But this can be made into a smaller opening using adapters:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Zeiss-Siedentoph-Trinocular-Tube-Head-for-Standard-Microscope-w-Focusing-Tube-/390574037838?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5af006db4e
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Sent you a PM.

I am pushing to get a setup like this, just gotta figure it out. It basically uses a Samsung Galaxy S2 with an adapter to attach to the micro.

You get the benefits of a cheap & great camera with HD video & great clarity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9va0KPrVExs
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is a WONDERFUL video showing you spirochetes coming out of RBC's. It shows you the cyst forms, which have various shapes all depending on how they curl up.

It even shows the bleb or granualar forms, which is the smallest unit of the spirochete. In this form it basically consists of DNA packaged in a cell wall. This form is reminiscent of a virus, but much larger in size.

I have seen all these forms in my blood. I have seen them in individuals who have been bitten & function overall, despite some minor symptoms.

I also see them in individuals who claim perfect health.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_QO3QEr5W4
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
That last video is very informational.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Parasites in your blood? Reminds me of the one that I captured in my video that I put out.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRFTG35PdsU
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is one of the best ways to capture video & images from your microscope. It is a device that attaches directly to the eyepiece or trinocular port of the microscope. My trinocular is 23mm, so it is perfect.

The Samsung Galaxy S2 & S3 are amazing for picture & video quality. The iPhones & iTouches as well, but you can use many smartphones that fall within their size range. Keep in mind that some phones have better quality cameras. I give high praise for the Galaxy series of phones...amazing quality for a phone, at times better than your point & shoot cameras.

I did a manual shot using my Samsung hoovering over my eyepiece & despite my shaky hands I was impressed with the image clarity.

I have ordered mine & can't wait to get it & post many vids soon. Price of the unit is $75 + 5 shipping. Compare that to the $250 piece of garbage 9MP Amscope video camera I bought.


Skylight Introduction:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6WBeB0kvUM


Skylight designers early stage requesting KickStarter support.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmIYXzCtMHA


Really sharp images captured of cells:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3ze1SohOfM


Here is the official SkyLight website:
http://www.skylightscope.com/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
It looks like the world is catching up & are now realizing that Borrelia IS IN OUR RED BLOOD CELLS. For me Borrelia exists & continues to grow in numbers DESPITE ABX treatment & it is clearly & elegantly visible in blood smears.

Also a warning to those taking Doxy. It is the only ABX that keeps me from being in extreme pain, but over time it only does produce cyst forms & leads to more chronic lyme disease. I now stand by Dr. Sapi's test on the ABX.


A QUOTE & LINK:

"Filming the bacteria

The two scientists are pretty much alone in what they are doing: investigating samples of living blood under the microscope - over time. They have looked at the blood of a large number of people who suspect that they are chronically ill following a tick bite.

"We study the behaviour of the bacteria directly through the microscope. We have taken thousands of pictures, and we film their movement pattern in real time or with a time lapse. This allows us to see how the bacteria enter and leave the blood cells and swim around in the blood plasma. These are powerful methods, but nobody uses them any longer", says Laane. He himself is regarded as one of the foremost microscopy experts, and he has been studying bacteria for over 50 years.


http://phys.org/news/2013-06-classic-microscopy-reveals-borrelia-bacteria.html
 
Posted by terv (Member # 29410) on :
 
I apologize for not understanding this but what are the implications of it being in the RBCs?

Are the abx we take not sufficient to kill it?

[ 02-06-2014, 11:40 AM: Message edited by: terv ]
 
Posted by oxygenbabe (Member # 5831) on :
 
This seems unprofesional to me (just viewed the latest video).
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here are some of the implications:

____________________
1) You may not need expensive test or to be bounced around in the medical field. A half borrelia brain dead like myself can look under a microscope to find these.


It would be great to find someone who gives a hoot & have them do PCR on these organisms. It would be nice to know what particular species they are. As we all now know there are many species of spirochetes.


It would be nice & easy to simply place a blood sample in BSK spirochete growing medium & culture them. One can clearly see borreliosis in this manner.


____________________
2) Despite aggressive & varied ABX, with herbs, spirochetes in the blood still exist. We can break it down to the basics. If one cannot eliminate the infection in the blood, then there is no hope of eradicating it from the body. Just because you don't have symptoms does not mean you may not have borrelia in the blood. It is a good early warning sign.

It is easier and important to first discover how to kill it in the blood. The blood acts as the highway to infections throughout the body. What hope do you have getting rid of this, without clearing out the blood first?

Before I started treatment I only had a few symptoms. While treating I have over 2 pages now & what I have observed is an increase of organisms in my blood.

Blood can be kept alive for weeks outside of our bodies & experiments can be conducted on the blood. These would be cheap & easy experiments with blood drawn from Lyme subjects & would result in no harm.


____________________
3)Gives us the possiblity that we can treat the blood externally. We may be able to treat & get rapid improvement with things such as frequencies, ultrasound, & UV/LED spectrum lighting. Attempting to disrupt the various stages of borrelia in the blood first, so that your body can once again fight the rest of the infection in your body.

Without the proper use of your blood & immune system, the rest of your body is defenseless.


____________________
4) Indications of transmission. If borrelia is in your blood, that gives you clues as to where else it may be & how it can be transmitted. If it can be easily seen in the blood, then it is in every square inch of you, since blood & capillaries are spread throughout your body.

It is in your saliva, on the surface of external soft tissue (vagina & penis), eye fluid, mucous, and most likely is being shed as blebs on your skin.
 
Posted by SLML (Member # 42986) on :
 
Lymedin2010 - what antibiotics have you taken for Lyme to date?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is what I can remember & is a pretty solid list of what I took. I may come back here to edit in the future.

2011 (May part & June) Month 1: IV Rocephin 2g/day (at the end of 3-4 weeks I was 90-95% better with only head pain & I wished I had stopped there) (I could not find ANYTHING in my blood smears after HOURS & HOURS of looking)


2011 (July) Month 2: IV Rocephin 2g/day, Zithro & Mepron


2011 (Aug) Month 3: IV Rocephin 2g/day, Biaxin & Mepron


2011 (Sept) Month 4: Ceftin, Biaxin & Mepron


2011 (Oct-Nov) Month 5-6: Doxy, Biaxin (More & more Lyme symptoms with each passing week prior to adding Doxy. 2 pages worth of symptoms) (I started seeing things in my blood smears & accidentally discovered that if I cover the slides in oil, I preserve the smear longer & then I can see the spirochetes existing the red blood cells when conditions are properly met). In Nov I took my first major slide back after running out of Biaxin for 1 week.


2012 (Dec-Feb) Month 7-9: Doxy, Biaxin, Tindamax, I added Rulide the last month here (After 3-4 weeks of Doxy improved from 45% to 80-85%, still many minor symptoms but those I could handle. I was very gradually going back & some new symptoms)


2012 (March-April) Month 10--: Amoxicillin w/Probenecid, Biaxin, Flagyl, during the last week I added Rulide to this since I was just feeling worst & worst with new returning symptoms. This was a big decline on this combo for me & that I could never really recover from some of the new symptoms.


2012 (May) Month 11: Doxy, Biaxin, & Rulide.


2012 (June) Month 12: Doxy, Biaxin, & Rifampin (only for 1 week)


2012 (July) Month 12: Doxy, Biaxin, Ivermectin, Wormwood, & Salt C.


2012 (Aug) Month 14: Doxy, Biaxin, Ivermectin, Wormwood, Colloidial Silver, & Salt C.


2012 (Sept) Month 15: Bactrim DS, Doxy, Plaquinil, Nystatin, Malarone, Bacillin LA shots, Cryptolepis 1 teastpoon 3x day, Colloidial Silver, Detox 2


2012 (Oct-March 2013) Month 15-21: Doxy, Plaquinil, Nystatin, Malarone, Bacillin LA shots, Cryptolepis 1 teastpoon 3x day, Colloidial Silver(stopped in Feb), Detox 2, NT Detox
 
Posted by SLML (Member # 42986) on :
 
Wow, you are awesome! What a detailed list! :-) The one thing that I am seeing though is that your doctor only had you on a cyst buster for a couple months so based on my understanding of how lyme is most effectively treated (always being on a cyst buster) maybe that is why the spirochetes are still showing up in your blood??? My doc has me on a cyst buster for the whole duration of treatment. I know some doctors just prescribe cyst busters intermittently but to be honest, I would be scared to treat that way because of the potential for baby spirochetes to be formed during the months a cyst buster wasn't used. I understand cyst busters are really hard to tolerate. I was really scared to take them too because of their reputation. I did feel worse for a few months and have progressively gotten SO much better. Anyways, I would love to see my blood under a microscope. I wish I knew of someone here that could do it with the level or expertise yours was done with!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is another person who has also found spirochetes in their blood sample:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC3y-xq-LbM


When I took tindimax I felt nothing. I took Flagyl for 4 months the first time, just can't remember how the time frame overlapped.


Then again they gave me another 4 months in 2013. I must say that by the 4th month I did have slightly more energy, but by then they took it away.


I don't know why LLMD's are so reserved to give this right off the bat & I don't know why they don't keep us on it for longer? Maybe they know something we don't, perhaps there is great risk of neuropathy & cancer for them to withhold is as they do.


So I am taking Doryx, Penecillin VK, Nystatin, Plaquinil, Cryptolepsis plus, A-Babs, & detox. I decided to try Amoxi on top of all this. I remembered that I herxed on Amoxi the first time & even months after, but the herx did not last long.


I took 1g & within 45 felt different. I then took another 2g & then came the herx. So here we can be on many different ABX & it will not get to all the forms & get to all the tissues of the body. It is so important to rotate more often & aggressively.


I wish they would just give us flexibility to try this & that on our own.

[ 02-20-2014, 03:40 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good deal on a solid microscope for anyone who is looking.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/251469392997?ru=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fsch%2Fi.html%3F_sacat%3D0%26_from%3DR40%26_nkw%3D251469392997%26_rdc%3D1
 
Posted by Nancy L (Member # 42733) on :
 
I am going to have darkfield done out of state on 3-19 Wed.

I have seen videos of the Bb forms. Does anyone have the links to videos or pictures of other pathogens like Bart or babs or filarial worms that I could look at before I go?

Thanks.

This darkfield is in KY and if it is very helpful I will share the location if someone is interested. I found this on a site that lists darkfield locations/docs.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Babesia is harder to spot, but sometimes these crosses can be seen. I have never seen definitive babesia or crosses in my blood.

It is much easier to spot in dead blood stained samples.

I don't see many babesia videos & this one is rare.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRWtCPsBEN4


Maybe try to take some camera video of the video monitor as they find things in your blood for us...thanks!


Some info on babesia:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMWHW2w19pE
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Looks like this doctor found out he had Lyme through a blood smear!

http://aamdhealthsolutions.com/lyme_disease.htm

"My name is Dr. Allen Anderson. Almost four years ago, at age 65, a stroke rudely interrupted my busy ear, nose, throat and allergy practice. None of the physicians in the multi-specialty clinic where I worked could pinpoint a cause for the stroke.


I was not over weight, did not have high blood pressure, exercised regularly and did not smoke. My cholesterol was mildly elevated at 240. My diet was standard American with plenty of steak, french fries and diet soda.


After 3 months of rehabilitation I returned to practice. My problem was that I could barely drag myself through a work day because of chronic fatigue and severe pain in my shoulder and neck. These symptoms did not improve with time. I also noted that I was depressed along with problems sleeping at night.


With no help from my colleagues other than pills, in desperation I consulted a naturopathic physician who looked at a smear of my blood under the microscope. He pointed out many spiral like organisms called spirochetes along with yeast parasites. This was my introduction to the epidemic-like malady that is affecting thousands of Americans yearly.

I had Lyme disease, an infection caused by the bite of a deer tick infected with the spirochete organism Borrelia burgdorferi. "
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
"Sickest patients have most abnormal findings

This abnormal chemistry of the blood (the low amount of oxygen present, coupled with high levels of oxidative stress), then allows proliferation of what Professor Ali calls ‘Primordial Life Forms’ such as yeast, which clump with the microclots and worsen the problems outlined above.

In my experience, there is a correlation between the amounts of these anaerobic bugs seen and the severity of the illness.

Certainly my sickest patients have the most abnormal blood appearances on the video microscope. However these appearances are not only seen in CFS (ME) and Fibromyalgia (FM), but in many chronic illnesses. This is because at a cellular level the oxygen problems also exist in these illnesses. What I feel is important though is that the clots and yeast are a very important co-factor. "

http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=7681
 
Posted by Nancy L (Member # 42733) on :
 
SLML, GSE reputedly pops Bb cysts. I use the nutramedix brand and I have no bad reaction.

On the microscope screening, there is a place in Idaho if that is close enough to you in Wash.

I had dark field Wed and was amazed. I saw one long lyme spirochete, 2 short stick bacteria with knobs on each end (maybe newer Bb), some yeast blobs, some type of immune cells loaded with waste & proteins on surface, mycoplasm (did not know I had this also).

Also, I had a number of RBC's with "target" centers, which is from having thin-membrane outer cell walls. And a number of RBC's that were shaped like tear drops and some were paired with their points touching.

The tear-drop RBC pattern was explained to me as caused by incomplete protein digestion, and food enzymes must be taken with meals to correct this.

Dark Field microscopy is amazing to watch. You can really see the health/non-health of your red & white blood cells, and pathogens.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Be careful with GSE. If you are on Doxy or Zithro it can reduce the effectiveness of those ABX.


I am Doxy dependent & I know it definitely looses effectiveness when I try GSE.


It is always good to have visual verification & it is so easy to find. Look at this video from "Under Our Skin" & it comes on after Alan MacDonald speaks.

GO to 1:05 in the video to see it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCLwauRh2gQ
 
Posted by Nancy L (Member # 42733) on :
 
Do you have a reference for the GSE reducing the effectiveness of doxy (assume mino too) and Zithro?

When I see the LLMD, I assume I will be on one of those antibiotics.

Thanks.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Some GSE are made from grapefruit seed AND juiceless pulp from the grapefruit.


http://www.consumer-health.com/services/DontPutYourAntibioticsatRisk.php


Ciprofloxacin (Cipro®)Levofloxacin (Levaquin®)

Doxycycline (Doryx®, Periostat®, Vibramycin®) Especially with doxycycline hyclate (Doryx®). Drink a FULL glass of water to avoid stomach irritation.9
Tetracycline (Tetracyclin®, Sumycin®)

DO NOT take the above medicines with some drinks containing calcium or iron. These can make your medicine less effective.

Herbal teas
Popular flavored water
Smoothies
Orange juice
Grapefruit juice
Milk
Milk of magnesia


In another article on grapejuice & ABX. This applies to clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin derivatives (Azithromycin / Zithromax).

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050124010803.htm
 
Posted by Nancy L (Member # 42733) on :
 
Thanks for the GSE reference.

Lymedin2010 - You said in an early post that you thought you had spirochete gallinarum. Is this a lyme spirochete?

Do you still think you have this type?

I have some pics of my blood now, and could forward some of them to you by email, if you think you could identify a couple of things.

I am computer-illiterate and do not know how to post on Utube or anything like that.

Not sure if the pics sent show this, but there were two short-stick (thin stick) with rounded ends like dumbbells, but not too much fatter than the stick. Not stubby in width of stick. Were yours stubby in width of stick?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I would like to answer this better, but I am actually on a new protocol & herxing and feeling worst..yippeeee.


Here is the short answer.


The best & really the only definitive way to know is via PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Basically, we use a small portion of the organisms & it's DNA and we amplify & and make millions of copies of it's DNA. Then it is compared to known DNA sequences & the exact type of bacteria can be identified.


Being that I cannot perform PCR, I look for best fit descriptions. I also look for something visual in the form of pictures, illustratiosn or videos for comparison. It basically acts like a mug shot when there are no other resources


I have pondered how to approach this on many nights & concluded that we must approach things like our forefathers where we give best guess hypothesis on observations. Then we continue to find evidence & research on what others have to fill in the gaps & come to a more clearer truth. Ultimately this is how truth is reached in many fields of discipline. In my case it has to be more so with limited resources.


When I was hunting for answers on Borrelia I could not get a complete picture of what I was seeing. It does not mean it is not out there, just that I had not come across anything that completely satisfied what I was seeing. I saw the blebs, cysts, various size spirochetes and the string of pearls. I also hypothesised that we could be multiple spirochete co-infected (different types of spirochetes in the blood) & always looked at multiple angles.


There was nothing that I came across that mentioned string of pearls or gave me a clear & cut PICTURE of blebs or how they formed. I knew before I even read anything on blebs that these things HAD TO come from spirochetes. Over the course of months I saw more & more of spirochetes in my blood & these dancing dots (blebs).


More sickness-->more Lyme symptoms-->more spirochetes-->TONS more blebs in my blood. I knew with all my being there was a correlation & especially when I saw what FULL BLOWN LYME patients blood looked like (from multiple youtube videos).


I came across this one website with information from a DOCTOR. This DR. was angry at other docs & even mentioned spirochetes coming out of White Blood Cells. I fell in love with this guy, since this is exactly what I saw in my blood. This even showed blebs (they called them coccoid bodies). The link may be in my old laptop now, but I did download one of his links to a pdf document & paper written by another individual.

A quick search for this document name & here is the link. Check the diagrams of the spirochete formation.
http://lymerick.net/1912-01.pdf


At the time this doc & paper best fit what I was looking at. I thought to myself even if this was not exactly the spirochete, at least it gives us clues as to how other spirochetes function. Just like Alan MacDonald did between Borrelia & Syphilis.


The only trouble I had were these two. The cysts were not really mentioned & I assumed that he just did not focus on these & we all know spirochetes go into cyst mode. The other issue is that the spirochete drawing did not have bulbous tips, like what I have seen. I attributed this to artist drawing or the scientist trying to fit the spirochete to look more closely to what spirochetes look like.


All the older common notions of spirochetes are these aggressive & burrowing/drilling machines. What I see is more passive & go with the blood flow organisms. Perhaps that is what makes them so much harder to kill?


A few weeks ago I came across Alan MacDonalds videos & I nearly jumped off my chair. String of pearls, blebs , videos of passive spirochete with bulbous tips and with the title on the video that said "BURRELIA BURGDORFERI." This thing moves & looks EXACTLY like what I see in my blood. Now I can take what I learned from Gallinarum & apply it to know VISUAL proof from another Dr. or scientist & consider this as my most recent explanation of what I see.

I also think that one of the next important things we will learn is that the baceria is EVERYWHERE in the body & this will give more credence to contact transmission. Just because there is contact does not mean you will get Lyme. Look at it as if someone had just gotten bit & we know how differently everyone reacts. There are many other factors that lead to full blown Lyme than just getting the bacteria in your system. A simple enzyme or normal presentation of vitamins can keep it at bay.

Most people may have spirochetes in their blood, but they may not have all of the co-infections, metals, mold, or detox issues combined to cause complete disease.

Reportedly there are 3 types of Borrelia that can cause lyme disease: Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii , & Borrelia afzelii. I would not bet my money that these are the only ones. This is the new uncharted frontier or realization for humanity.

I would be more than happy to look at your pictures, videos & even look at your blood if you send it to me. I have a lot more to say, but I will leave it at this for now.
 
Posted by Nancy L (Member # 42733) on :
 
Lymedin2010 -

The spirochete shown in my dark field microscopy was also relaxed, long (not straight), some slight curves that changed, but definitely not spiral. And they ends (small, so might have missed some tail), looked somewhat bulbous.

I understand that the Bb go into spiral form mode when they are trying to move quickly. The spiral shape is for motility, to move faster.

Latest research (can't give link right now) shows that blebs somehow turn into small cysts and then form their dna into a spirochete that then leaves this form as a new spirochete in about 9 days.

There may be other cysts that are protective forms for the spirochetes too, when threatened. I'm not sure if that is an "also" or just older info.

Thanks so much for the link.

About contact transmission. If you have an active cut, perhaps that would be a source of contact Bb, but since Bb is mildly anaerobic, it would stay away from the surface of the skin, I believe.

I saw a picture of a test tube with different forms of bacteria in solution (still active and alive).

The aerobic bacteria were clustered at the top of the solution in the test tube, the completely anaerobic were at the bottom of the tube, and the Bb bacteria were about 1/3-1/4 of the way down the test tube solution, in a cluster band. So they stay away from direct contact with air.

Thanks for all the good info [Smile]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
There is a BEAUTIFUL video of Borrelia releasing a BLEB on one of it's end. So it looks like the bulbous ends might have two functions.

1) Burrowing into cells
2) Bleb formation


Don't forget blebs can also be formed throughout the length of the spirochete in the "string of pearls" formation.

Look at 6:40 on this video, the link below will take you right into the scene:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lODLLqLHNs&feature=player_detailpage#t=399


Nice view of L form of the bacteria at 5:20 into the same video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lODLLqLHNs&feature=player_detailpage#t=321


At 4:12 you can see the one of many, many, many forms of the cyst. So many & depends on how big the spirochete is when it folds in on itself & how it folds in on itself. The longer it is in cyst form I believe the longer it develops an outer protective layer & fortifies itself. Looking more bean or slipper like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lODLLqLHNs&feature=player_detailpage#t=253


Videos come directly from Alan MacDonald's website links from this webpage.

http://alzheimerborreliosis.net/videos/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I made a video on how to create your own blood smears for anyone who is interested in seeing borrelia spirochetes. I made dozens of blood smears & it did not come out the best in this video, but there were some waiting on me to make one for a while now so I just hit record & did a quick one.

I was going to wait for upgraded equipment, including a tripod, but enough waiting. I will make a better one in the future & more borrelia videos in the future.

My Lyme brain won't let me get out everything I wanted to say & I am too tired to do another take.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ1scQdbmtg&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Bigstan, I would buy this one right away (first link below) & then search for alternate means to make videos. I have a Zeiss microscope & got mine for $100, but I waited for 2-3 months before buying, as I scouted Ebay on the perfect bid. Then down the line I replaced the binocular head with a trinocular & then bought a camera.

I use an Amscope MU900 9MP camera, but it leaves much to be desired. I think my next camera will be a Sony Nex6, which is a standard point & shoot camera with HD video capabilities. This will be placed with an adapter on the trinocular & the built in time lapse capture will be used.

I have finally done some time lapse work & found it to be more revealing. Things opened up that I just could not spot before & it is amazing how much is missed otherwise. I think I finally found free swimming babesia in the blood.


331172161846
http://www.ebay.com/itm/AO-American-Optical-Spencer-Microscope-CE-0793-/331172161846


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Fisher-Scientific-Micromaster-Trinocular-Microscope-LED-Illumination-/111315449044?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19eaeaf4d4


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Trinocular-Microscope-with-Transformer-2-Bi-HKW10x-5-Nikon-Objectives-/251499403979?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a8e885acb


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-81107-Trinocular-Microscope-/171269214588?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27e070d17c


http://www.ebay.com/itm/OLYMPUS-BH2-BHTU-TRINOCULAR-MICROSCOPE-stb-/400689837573?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d4af9b605


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Optiphot-with-Trinocular-Head-LOC-H5-/141236423183?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20e258ca0f

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-40-1000x-Biological-Compound-Microscope-Trinocular-/140545858799?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20b92f9cef

http://www.ebay.com/itm/40x-1600x-Trinocular-Compound-Biological-Microscope-Biology-Chemistry-Lab-New-/260871839875?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cbd2c6083
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Check this video out at marked spot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=DEwVEN2kT_A#t=1091


Now answer this question. Do you know why the tick was able to pickup spirochetes from the mammal when human observation of tissues & tests could not pick it up?


Because the spirochetes are READILY IN THE BLOOD!!!! Think about it they must be readily available for the tick to be able to pick it up & spread the disease.


Also, how many spirochetes must one have for a small tick to take a small random bite, such a miniscule amount of blood, & from anywhere in your body & pickup lyme? BILLLIONS & BILLIONS of them!!!!!
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
Any opinions about this microscope?

http://www.amazon.com/AmScope-T490B-Professional-Trinocular-Biological/dp/B004QEFO1Q/ref=sr_1_26?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1397411994&sr=1-26&keywords=digital+microscope
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
When I first got into microscopy because of Lyme I had looked at Amscope microscopes as well. Just simply debating whether I should go with this one vs an older but true & tested model (like the Zeiss or Nikon). I have always been impressed with Zeiss lenses on camera equipment & so that it might be the best choice on a microscope.


There is another poster here (LymeTwister) who checked his blood with an Amscope. I don't see him posting anymore. I did tell him how to do it briefly, only he did not have the benefit of my slide video. I have an older private message from him & he says "Nothing would be moving on a smear after 24 hrs. Impossible ! "


I would imagine either he was not completely infected yet or by his comment that his blood smears dried up & as a result he could not see the spirochetes dancing around when this happens. This individual was a nurse & he made that comment, yet I am able to see my blood cells live after days & progressive exiting of spirochetes. I experienced the same thing though, in the beginning I could not see anything because my blood would dry up & by the next day it looked like a debris blood cell war zone.


Also keep in mind if the outside/indoor temps are cooler, then it will be preserved longer. I always have central AC running when it is 80 or above.


It was a learning process for me, but so easy for anyone to learn quickly once you tell them the details & what might have taken them a long time otherwise.


This lymenet poster bought an Amscope & he reported it was no good. He then called Amscope & reported this to them and they sent him another model that worked out for him.


My opinion of Amscope is that they are cheaper scopes & all depending which model you buy, it is hit or miss. I have their Amscope MU900 9MP video camera & it is the best option I have now, but it is a horrific camera overall. My old point & shoot cameras & cell phones take better quality video.


If there is any Amscope microscope that I would buy, it would probably be that one. Call them up & tell them what you want to do & tell them that you want to see the blood cells clearly. Also buy directly from them & if there is a problem make sure that you can exchange/return it for another one.

Microscope I use & I will make a video sometime this week.

-Zeiss Microscope "Standard 14" Laboratory Binocular Microscope:
47 09 14-9902/45 (Actual Microscope model).
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This guy uses the AmScope T490B. His images are at 10x & 20x (so 100x-200x what the eye can see). Video & images look better the bigger the object viewed is & lower the magnification. He does not provide us with samples of 100x oil (1000x), but based upon his lower mag slides, you should be ok with this microscope.

I like the adjuster on the trinocular, I wish I had that & you can see things smaller than I can. I can only go to 1000x, whilst you can hit 1500x & 2000x. Easy for me to get a 15x or 20x eyepiece & they are rather cheap. This higher mag is not always beneficial because of the VERY VERY narrow depth of field, but always nice to check & see.

Your biggest issue with this camera will be recording video, nothing to do with microscope, but the adapters & recording camera equipment choice.

Now look at video #1 & you can see how clear & beautiful the macro fauna is with his GoPro video camera. He has a DSLR video adapter on top of his trinocular port & just sits the camera on top...temporary setup for him.

Now look at video #2 & his first video as he shoots indirectly the video on his computer from the software. Horrific with the MU1000 (10MP Amscope) camera. Remember I have the 9MP version & I also have the same issues with my camera. The refresh rate & the AUTO exposure are HORRIFIC, it is like going back to when digital cameras were first invented.

You will end up using a cell phone & adapter or camera/video camera & adapter to get better quality video. If pictures tell a thousand words, then video can tell millions. I would stick with video recording if imaging & sharing is your intention.

To recap, I would take the risk on this EXACT model microscope, but stay far away from their cameras and be weary of some of their other model microscopes. Also, don't forget that your equipment will retain a certain value & you could resell for $150-$200 after Ebay fees.

Video #1)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoNQWg6T81M

Video #2)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrtrMXXOMJM
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So I have been experimenting with time-lapse photography & it looks like since things move a lot slower that more info can be extrapolated/observed via this method.


Expand the video to the fullest, look at the RED arrow & then the spirochete burrowing into the WBC.


123 images taken 15s apart (123 * 15s) = A little over 30 min of pictures, so it took it that long to burrow into the WBC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMaDBl_my28&feature=player_detailpage
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Im so done with antibiotics...
Almost 2 years of straight antibiotic usage, and still large motile spirochetes swim in my blood:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKZc2EKc1q4

I actually took a break from antibiotics 2 days a go. The blood was drawn today. I allowed the blood to sit for 6 hours on the slide before the video was made. The spirochetes seem to come out of hiding after a few hours. I can only imagine they hide in the red or white blood cells like Lymedin2010 has also shown.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Beautiful video & it is very clear cut what that is.


It is so funny that HUNDREDS of years worth of doctor experience can't tell us much & such a simple technique can be so revealing.


These things simply won't die. I honestly believe that certain cells do not allow for (or allow much) contaminants (ABX) within the cell, doing so would disturb the integrity of what it was designed to do....carry O2 to the rest of the body.


I am doxy dependent & if I go off of Doxy, then I slide backwards rather quick. What I have noticed is the spirochetes are more motile, they move around a bit more rapidly, when I am off Doxy.


I have done this off & on a few times to be able to say it with confidence. So Doxy does appear to inhibit protein synthesis, making it more sluggish, but does not kill it. If they are sluggish within your cells it may be a lost cause, your WBC never get to it to kill it.


The biggest impact to the spirochetes that I have seen is when on Doxy AND Penicillin VK. They appear to be more sluggish & just all bent out of shape and look very deformed. There are more quantities of smaller spirochetes & they too look deformed.


Some reports indicate an antagonistic affect between the two, but experienced LLMD's know from REAL WORLD lymie tests that they work synergistically.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
I agree, the damn things just wont die with conventional abx.

Btw, i used an old cheap Olympus binocular E-series microscope. Dark field up to 400x (and bright field up to 1000x immersion) which is good enough for clear recognition of spirochetes.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
WOOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


I have the recognition & attention of a well known Lyme researcher. This person sees the same thing in my videos & one of their students is trying to capture the same thing with the WBC's & spirochetes.

[ 09-08-2014, 10:57 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
My "String of Pearls" borrelia video find.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7Sa8lg9HbU
 
Posted by springshowers (Member # 19863) on :
 
Lymedin2010

One of your posts you mention treating from outside body with rife or led or lasers type things.
Have your tried anything like that and looked at blood as a response. Curious
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I actually exchanged some information with someone on here that was not too far away from me & who had a rife. I could not wait to start testing on that actually & then at one point we lost contact. I don't think this person ever responded to my last PM.


The above testing I mention would be too tedious to do on the blood initially & directly. It takes time to prep, hunt, record, edit all the material. It is so much easier to do things for your own eyes, but at the end we don't exchange info & others don't learn anything.


I have seen so many more things, but I have no proof of it because I did not have a camera at that time to record it.


What I would first do & this requires more money & resources, is to buy BSK medium & culture the bacteria from my blood. Which means I also need a temp controlled refrigerator.


Then we can just focus on the bacteria & see how they respond to external stimuli (LED wavelengths, ultrasound, rife, & UV light....and my other one heat or maybe a combo of these). Even if one or combo methods work, it does not mean it will cure you. It will AT LEAST clear your RBC's & WBC's & let your body exchange O2 more easily, giving you a fighting chance.


Then the next set of experiments would be strictly on infected human blood externally. We treat with what we observed to work with just the bacteria & see how the human cells fair & the bacteria within cells. This part takes longer & that is why we do it in 2 phases. You may have to do this gradually too, all depending on how much of a herxer you are.


If successful we then we can focus on the rest of the body & other methods.


My other thought & what I could do right away is HEAT. This idea comes to me from the fact that many of the sickest people who recovered from Lyme also incorporated sauna, so then why not just heat the blood up. I heard 108 for 20 min should do the trick


Basically I could work with blood directly with this method. I would need something safe & sterile to contain the blood. I will have to make a video describing all this.
 
Posted by springshowers (Member # 19863) on :
 
I have though heat would work well but how to safely get body up to temp is the hard part.

I have been using cold laser for same reason to affect the cells and give them accelerated oxygen and also cleanse and detox and so the body can do the job.

I have a rife as well and led applications and Infared done for heat. The cold laser is most recent and has been getting to what others haven't or in ways they couldn't. It is rough due to herxes but as I treat I can see the herxes slightly less per area I treat each time. I know hope to change the terrain but who knows if it will put my over the line where the body can kick back in. They are smart and strong and resistant.

Your doing cool stuff. I wanted to get some equipment at one point and I just had too much going on.

I admire your hard work in this and posting it and reporting too. Would be cool if we could starting a bank of patients blood to post and just grow it so big nobody could ignore it.

Why doesn't one of these docs studying the blood just ask for us to send in blood. To do something at that level. We all would do it. Money I assume. But.....
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am trying to get LLMD to do it. I spoke to someone & at one point they had that aha great idea moment. What happens is that LLMD's are sooooo busy & inundated with patient load & work that it is not feasible for them to do it. Not to mention some of them go to conferences, rally's & interviews.


I also mentioned that they did not necessarily have to do it themselves. The microscopy methods become rather robotic once you get the initial know how & they can easily pay someone minimum wage. Then it is just a matter of the one behind the scope hunting & hitting a record button. The doctor can then more quickly review a recap from the recordings & not have to spend a whole lot of time physically sitting down & hunting on their own.


This is another video I was planning on making to inspire & spark a fire for them to do so. This is also why I have chosen to add references from other docs or scientists to my newer videos to support what I see & give credence.


There is no doubt that what I see microscopy wise is continuation of infection & it is clear cut. Call it whatever organisms you want at the end, it simply continues to grow in number & pleomorphic forms. I can't believe to this day I am still discovering new forms. It is easy to show you one organisms or a few, but much harder to show you what I can barely find at the beginning of chronic illness vs continued infection and what shows up in the blood.


This goes back to what I said at the beginning of this thread. I CANNOT STRESS ENOUGH THE IMPORTANCE OF DOING MICROSCOPY!!! It provides us insight into the guessing game & would provide immeasurable insights to those directly in contact with numerous Lyme patients.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have now captured borrelia coming out of a RBC & releasing a thin filament. There can also be seen other borrelia moving in the blood plasma.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFlZxnf-3wk&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Good work Lymedin!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks.


Patient #2 is my wife & lately she has been feeling very tired. Always tired & tired and some sleep disturbance on & off. When she rests she feels better, but she quickly tires out & is nowhere near what she was. Gradually & over the years (as gradual as my progression was) she is becoming more like me.


I have also noticed her joints started to make some light noise & crackle here & there, where she never had that before.


I did not see this many spirochetes in her two years ago & I only saw a very few & mostly they were small ones.


She is like..."I don't have Lyme!." She does not like the outdoors like I like the outdoors & rarely goes. Me on the other hand I jumped into anything & everything. Not anymore though. Then she goes on to say "if I do, then you GAVE IT TO ME!!!!"


Very long spirochete.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAmEMz-t1dA
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
You don't have to believe me on contact transmission, but listen to this NOBEL PRIZE winner on contact transmission. Just because you acquire the bacteria does not mean you develop Lyme right away though.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WozrCFW0mRM&feature=player_detailpage#t=2818


Lida H Mattman, PhD, has spent seven decades studying the different forms that bacteria can take. Her contributions to medical science can be summarized best by noting that in 1998 she was nominated for the highest honor attainable in her profession: The Nobel Prize in Medicine. Professor Mattman graduated with a M.S. in Virology from Univ. of Kansas and a Ph.D. in Immunology from Yale. She has taught Immunology, Microbiology, Bacteriology, Virology, Pathology, and for 35 years worked in these fields at various schools and institutions including Harvard Univ., Howard Hughes Institute, Oakland Univ. and Wayne State Univ. where she is Professor Emeritus. She is currently working for the Nelson Medical Research Institute studying the relationship between spirochetes involved in MS, Lyme disease, and ALS.
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
Is it possible to examine your spit instead of blood. The idea of being punctured frequently doesn't appeal to me a lot.

I might be taking a microbiology class this summer. Perhaps they would allow me to culture my blood if that is available. Do you know what constant temp would be required?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I tried viewing saliva once or twice, but deemed it too difficult to find anything, due to the mixture of debris, bubbles & the likes. It may also be that the saliva enzymes force the spirochete into cyst mode.


A high school or college microscope would be perfect for many, if they had access. You can obtain the slides, cover slip & oil on your own. Make your slide & go in with slide already prepared for viewing.


I leave my blood smears at room temp, which is typically 70-75 in my house.
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
I went to a local community college today and spoke with the microbiology teacher about microscopes so I thought I'd do a rundown.

The school has a new science building with some new microscopes. There are bigger microscopes but the smaller ones are Olympus CX 31. Apparently this model has a blue filter but I don't know what that means. Anyhow, they were very pleased with the optics and with the microscope. Magnification is 1000x and a halogen light is used. They did not like the LED lights.

The teacher showed me how to do an oil inversion on a slide that I looked beforehand. She used a gram stain and put a drop of oil on it and the oil really made the bacteria stand out, kind of like 3D.

A couple of places where one might get a microscope for less money are Carolina Biologicals and Edmund Scientific. Another suggestion was that I might try to get ahold of a demo scope. Then they gave me the number of a company rep.

The teacher will try to get ahold of a retired professor who knows a lot about microscopes and see if he will speak with me. The guy has a lot of his own microscopes and he is in love with them and with microscopy. Sounds like just what I need.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
That is great!

That looks like a good microscope to be able to check for borrelia, just use 100x oil.

Stains are great for babs, bart & many other organisms. However, you do not get a high hit ratio most times. The more infected you are the better, but nothing compares to lack of stain.

So live blood on a slide, no stain, & oil. Some stains may prevent the bacteria from coming out of cyst mode or force them into cyst mode. What you want is to see them swimming in your blood, then you can clearly say AHA that is a spirochete and there is no confusion with fibrin or other string like substances.

I would prepare a slide before you go in, this way you give time for the spirochetes to come out. When you get there you can make another fresh slide, so that you can see both the few hour old smear & the new fresh smear.

[ 05-23-2014, 11:20 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Has anyone seen Lymedin2010? Hope you are doing well! Hope things with you or your wife have not gotten so bad you aren't posting.

Good thoughts and concern heading your way!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hi TNT, thanks for the concern. I have not been on here for days. I have been out of my house after a mold outbreak that caused my lungs, throat, & nose to burn & I became toxic & ill.


I was looking up some new mold nose spray info today & by sheer coincidence found your post & IM here.


It had slowly developed & I was not aware why I was feeling worst & then I found the leak.


I planned on doing some great microscopy work & collecting new video proof, but instead my microscope is collecting dust & mold spores [Smile] back at the house.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Sorry to hear that. What a nightmare! I hope you can get it completely taken care of. I am much more sensitive to mold or anything toxic like that. Car exhaust is terrible; there are days I can't go in my laundry room even.

Thanks for taking the time to respond to my PM in spite of your circumstances.

Keep posting new videos once you get things taken care of and are settled back in. I am subscribed to your channel!

I had live microscopy done in Feb. by an amish man who supposedly has a lot of experience. He didn't see any spirochetes, but I don't think he did it with oil like you do, and didn't look at it very long.

He said I had low levels of candida, and there were crystal like things that looked like salt I thought. I did wonder if those were from him not swabbing my finger before sticking me. I didn't like him sticking me like that, but that day I was quite out of it.

Keep up the good work!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yea, me too. After this mold exposure my chemical sensitivity went through the roof & everything bothers me now & makes me feel more toxic & sickly.


Thanks for the positive feedback.


On another note.....WOOOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOOO (look at the link below)!!!!!!!


This is exactly what I have been preaching all along & I cannot stress enough the importance of checking your blood via microscopy for Lyme patients. I have diagnosed my wife & simply by looking at her blood & observing the many few & subtle, inconspicuous and intermittent symptoms.


Doctors & LLMD's in particular can see your blood & know for a fact that the ABX that they are giving you are not doing squat if you still have many symptoms & are still questioning herx vs disease progression.


I also think that the future of Lyme will be in blood treatment. So one can use an IV line & let the blood be stored in an external container, heated & treated (with things such as ozone), dialysis type filtration & then transfused back into the blood stream in a continuous loop.


One can start out with small volumes of blood & depending on your responses, increase the volume to one pint, then one one quart at a time. This may not be a cure for all, but at least it will clear your Red Blood Cells & White Blood Cells & afford your body the opportunity to fight back. Otherwise the infection has hijacked your blood & if you cannot clear the blood, there is no way in hell you can clear it from your body.


"Classic microscopy reveals borrelia bacteria "

http://www.apollon.uio.no/english/articles/2013/2_borrelia.html


This will ultimately be common knowledge!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
New microscopy preparation balloons RBC's for easier viewing.

http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/intracellularspirochetes.html
 
Posted by Rumigirl (Member # 15091) on :
 
About the paragraph on Lida Mattman: that must have been written a while ago. She died a number of years ago, sadly.

The process that you describe doing with the blood being treated outside the body and returned via a circulatory treatment has been done quite successfully.

But it is not done in the US, and requires 2 medical personel and very specific equipment. It's called Reciruculatory Hemotherapy.

Anyone trying to do it in the US would be prosecuted, sadly, unless it is completely below the radar. And I do mean completely!! Otherwise, you're looking at jail----arghh!
 
Posted by Andromeda13 (Member # 8314) on :
 
This is the best microscopy I've seen so far - and it's very important because it shows the borrelia are intracellular, inside the red blood cells.
The string of pearls morphology is amazing to see, especially on the videos.

http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/intracellularspirochetes.html

A.
 
Posted by Eight Legs Bad (Member # 13680) on :
 
Nothing Steven Spielberg could conceive of could outdo these films and photos for HORROR - all the more horrible because it's real.

Elena
ps It seems that shortly after the British microscopist Peter Kemp published this web-page, which also contains a link to the excellent work of Norewegian researcher Prof Laane, further sabotage was done to the page in the medical journal which has Prof Laane's article.

The Professor had described in great detail a method for seeing Borrelia in live blood and related it to chronic Lyme borreliosis.

I think we need some kind of response to this defacing of his site and will write about that in a separate thread.

quote:
Originally posted by Andromeda13:
This is the best microscopy I've seen so far - and it's very important because it shows the borrelia are intracellular, inside the red blood cells.
The string of pearls morphology is amazing to see, especially on the videos.

http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/intracellularspirochetes.html

A.


 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Thank you to those who mentioned my page on intracellular spirochetes. There was a lot of luck in getting those results, but in general, observing spirochetes is not difficult with a bit of practice - as Lymedin and others have helped to show. I am writing a page on how to do blood microscopy with pictures and (hopefully) simple instructions. Will let you know when it's ready.
Best Wishes,
Peter
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I will have to look into Reciruculatory Hemotherapy & yes Lida Mattman has been dead for a while, but she knew a great deal & at such an early stage in the Lyme game & she was able to cure herself of Lyme as well.


Interesting that one can get prosecuted for this, yet no one has been sentenced for scientific & medical acts of crime against humanity and the misinformation on Lyme and stealth diseases in general.

This is a video clip from Under Our Skin 2: Emergence. A biologist from Oslo University (Oslo, Norway), Morten Laane, discusses his findings & observations.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTlcgCql2k0
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Those ARE great videos, BUT we will have trouble getting the non-believers to accept:


1) That spirochetes can appear less spiral & more docile in movement. The solution that they are in affects their ability to spiral or drill.


2) Accept the "String of Pearl" very existence. I have seen many morphologies myself, but have only seen the string of pearls about 3 times or so in the blood plasma (outside of the RBC's) & perhaps because this phase exists more readily within the RBC. My method of preparation & observation does not lend itself to ample strings in the plasma.


These great videos show mainly the string of pearl morphology & I wish they would show more of the standard spirochetes as well. It would be too easy for the non-believers to discredit these very important findings.


3) Accept that they are within the RBC & can be found so readily, especially in chronic infection. They would particularly find it shocking to discover the spirochetes in the RBC's after extensive ABX therapy.


Peter, I look forward to your microscopy instructions. I find the bulbous tips on the spirochetes rather interesting. It is almost as if they are similar to the pearls & are made of phospholipids that can more readily penetrate a cell wall. I have not witnessed the spirochetes burrowing out of RBC's any other way other than bulbous tip first & this may hold a key to controlling the spirochetes. Inhibit the bulbous tip entry/exit into cells & we can hope to control it more efficiently.

The resulting breakup of the string of pearls is the blebs. At times when the blood is left long enough, I see thousands of these blebs, which must have burrowed out of the RBC's. They must have similar properties & composition to the bulbous tips. Perhaps the bulbous tips are indeed blebs or modified blebs that remain?
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Thanks Lymedin. I haven't time at present to address all your interesting remarks, but there is one that I think is really important. In thousands of observations I've seen only a few 'corkscrew' spirochetes in blood. There are actually a few on this page from an experiment I did earlier this year:
http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/ExperimentLgfont.html

Mostly I only see corkscrews in long-term culture in BSK like these ones: http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/bskculture3.html

The known morphology of spirochetes goes back over 100 years. I would be surprised if anyone who knows spirochetes denied that the videos show them, but it might actually help if they did; especially if they got their own microscope out of the attic!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks for your feedback. Actually I have been trying to contact the youtube user with those spirochete videos. If they are yours, then it appears I have been unknowingly trying to contact you.


Those are collectively the BEST photos & videos I have seen to date!!!


Prof. Laane's blood smear concoction lends credence that spirochetes behave more or less spirally in motion depending on the solution they are in. You & I both see the spirochetes readily in blood, but Prof Lanne's solution allows him to see them in their full spiral mobility.


He too readily finds spirochetes in Lyme patients blood, but when the general scientific community looks at this evidence, they are more inclined to believe when they see the spirals. The typical spiral behavior in blood is a notion we have to dispel & allow the floodgates that accept that chronic Lyme patients blood is inundated with less active (less spirally) spirochetes.


I would imagine when the solution becomes less viscous & more watered down, such as with Prof Laane's solution or BSK media, then the spirochetes assume their "typical" & widely accepted, but archaic movement.


Lanne has been met with resistance & understandably so, from a community designed to mask the truth.


Have you encountered resistance as well? I would imagine that the medical & scientific champions of Lyme see your work as God sent, while the opposition continues to follow suite at any cost?
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Thank you! I do get some supportive feedback from Lyme doctors/researchers, though I have yet to hear from any who think they are artefacts.

I think there are a number of reasons why the establishment Lyme people are against microscopy, and none of them are good.

Microscopy has the potential to show that the 2 tier testing system is completely useless. That would hit the manufacturers of test kits; who currently make claims for sensitivity and specificity based on how they compare with other kits that work in an identical way - which is completely crazy.

It would also harm the reputations of those who have claimed that the 2 tier testing is reliable. I suspect that these include people who consider their egos are more important than the lives of patients.

Microscopy might be able to show whether the new vaccine actually works. Vaccinated people might have antibodies, but they might also have spirochetes as well, due to borrelia's ability to evade the immune system.

These and other possibilities have patients asking why microscopy is not used more. Even if it were not used for testing, it could be used for testing other tests; monitoring the effects of treatment and learning about the behaviour of borrelia inside the body.

Conversely, there are no good explanations for not using microscopy. They may frown upon alternative therapists who use microscopy, and in that I am somewhat in agreement; but it is no reason to discard such a valuable resource entirely when the world is dealing with an uncontrolled epidemic.

Best Wishes,
Peter
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Ive seen the same shapes in my own blood, the thing that resembles the string of pearls:

 -

There is actually a smaller motile borrelia visible (the lower arrow). The upper arrow shows the string of pearls. The left and right arrow show larger "pearls". Some of these strings i see are not made up of pearls, but look like longer worms actually (a single object).
One thing that strikes me is that these objects grow quite fast. Basically within 6 hours it goes from seeing nothing (the time the blood is drawn), to these large strings. Im not sure if borrelia is capable of growing this fast? Could there perhaps be other parasites or fungal forms involved with these string like objects?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am glad that you share with us the importance of microscopy in chronic infection. Imagine where we would be if LLMD's monitored their patients blood, especially after administering ABX. They can know with some relative degree of certainty whether the ABX are having a positive or negative effect.


I have also noticed in some of the videos that the spirochetes are fairly long. I have seen some jaw dropping long spirochetes & I am amazed that they can grow to that length.


Here is one such spirochete that I captured, but in no way represents some of the longer ones that I have seen. At times I see them 40-60+ microns long. Do you notice that at times some of these spirochetes are longer than what you thought possible? At one point the spiro in the video loops on itself & then two ends spiral into each other. In the video you can see the spirochete line double, thicken & darken where they meet & spiral into each other.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ1scQdbmtg


Also, how readily do you find them in WBC's? Early on in my investigation, I would see WBC's with rather large specks. I was always suspicious of their origins & wondered if they could be cycsts.


One fine day I happened to check my blood right after a hot bath soaking. I managed to get my body temp to 102+ that day & after some recouping from the after effects, I made my blood smear & noticed that many of the WBC's had a large quantity of specks. More so than what I have ever seen before this hot bath.


I had left the smear out for a few hours & then checked again & I could not believe it. For the first time ever I so many of the WBC's with spirochetes burrowing out & again some of these were VERY long.


I tried to capture one of them with a hand held camera, the only way I had at that time, but they are difficult to discern in this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FA2KyvI30p4&list=UUWvWnpbjZzD33_2CH6xLZBg


This might give evidence to the belief that many spiros & cysts lodge themselves on skin surfaces & perhaps heat forces them back into the blood stream, where they can be more readily picked up by WBC's.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
S13, I have seen your work before & I think they are spirochetes as well. You have a beautiful image there showing the spirochetes emerging from the RBC's. Looks like some blebbing from the tips & blebbing from the string of pearls. Even that beautiful more spiral like smaller one.


Whenever possible, I would always do video first. It is so much easier for the naysayers to dismiss these as artifacts without them desiring to investigate this further.


As far as I am concerned, if one sees the bulbous tips, the undulating motion, and sheer abundance of such objects, then that is a dead giveaway. I think it is hard to logically dismiss that as random artifacts & should force the general scientific/medical community to AT LEAST be interested in further investigation.


Also, do you see that many of your RBC's are studded & bumpy? In the very beginning I thought they may have been cysts trying to burrow out, but after finding no evidence of them coming right out of the cells succinctly, I then concluded that it must by the hypertonic nature of the blood being out of the body.


The blood is at 96-98.6 & some h2o evaporation occurs. Over time the blood plasma becomes hypertonic & water travels from a higher concentration to a lower one. So in this respect water rushes out of the internal RBC & finds its way to the blood plasma. As a result the RBC's shrink a bit & appear studded.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
I also made a timelapse from what i think is a spirochete burrowing out of a RBC:

 -

The timelapse is done manually, with intervals of 30mins to an hour.
Its interesting to see that the RBC deforms where the potential (bleb-form?) spirochetes burrow from the RBC, and in the final image the RBC takes its normal round shape again.


Also some morphology in the next picture.

 -

Red arrow: shows a long solid worm-like entity initially, which then breaks up in segments (string of pearls?) over time.
Green arrow: shows a segmented string of pearls which converts to a more solid spirochete over time. The endpoint remains a bleb or cystform?

There is about an hour between each image.

These spirochetes are weird and "intelligent". Looking at it alive under the microscope is like seeing a very bad horror movie. Especially when you consider this is taking place inside your body!
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Also, do you see that many of your RBC's are studded & bumpy? In the very beginning I thought they may have been cysts trying to burrow out, but after finding no evidence of them coming right out of the cells succinctly, I then concluded that it must by the hypertonic nature of the blood being out of the body.


The blood is at 96-98.6 & some h2o evaporation occurs. Over time the blood plasma becomes hypertonic & water travels from a higher concentration to a lower one. So in this respect water rushes out of the internal RBC & finds its way to the blood plasma. As a result the RBC's shrink a bit & appear studded.

Yeah, a lot of RBCs become dehydrated over time and will show bumps and crenation, but that is different from the cyst burrowing out like in the timelapse above.
If all RBC's that show these bumps would have cysts inside them, then my blood is extremely infected. Virtually all my rbc's show the bumps over time.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
These are just great! I'm fascinated, but totally freaked out. Definitely the worst horror shows I've seen in some of those youtube videos.

Have you ever seen any biofilm?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Crenated RBC's is what I see in normal folks blood & without any spirochetes, as well as those with Lyme. Here is a "normal" cell after it has been outside the body for some time.


Your beads of string time lapse is precious. On the first picture from the set, I wouldn't have spent much time without seeing clearly defined bulbous tips. Yet the specimen identifies itself as a spirochete via blebbing.

 -

The stringy fibers are just that, fibrin.

 -

Note that the bulbous tips can bleb themselves & that is why I say they must be underdeveloped or modified blebs. Both the blebs & spirochetes (via bulbous tips) can readily penetrate the RBC's & perhaps many other tissues (as they have been found in many varieties of tissues).


Watch video at 6:40 to see the tip blebbing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlOSJcGiv1o#t=403


He may have some biofilm at the top right clusters of cells. I have seen patches of goo & what appears to be biofilm in my blood. At times they accompany spirochetes & other times they appear to be absent.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Have you ever seen any biofilm?

Not that im aware of. The biofilms would be difficult to diagnose from a simple live bloodsample.
I think it requires a blood culture with fluorescent markers to identify clear biofilm colonies of spirochetes and blebs / granules. Like what Macdonald has done before.

quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Your beads of string time lapse is precious. On the first picture from the set, I wouldn't have spent much time without seeing clearly defined bulbous tips. Yet the specimen identifies itself as a spirochete via blebbing.

Thank you! Yes, it was not a specific RBC i was tracking with the timelapse, but rather a large area at 400x mag. Within this area there was a lot of growth of these blebs and string of pearls. Literally in the hundreds. Strangely it is only this one area on the slide where it happens. Other areas stay clean without any growth. Somehow the infected RBC's seem to clump up together on the slide?
Ive seen these infected areas on more slides before, but it puzzles me what the mechanism is. Perhaps while making the slide, the diseased RBC's stick to a certain area and the healty RBC's flow away to other areas?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
In reference to the biofilm, that is exactly why I use the word "may" & "appears." At the end anything that we simply observe without testing can be discredited & obvious testing is required. We as simple microscopists continue to make observations that hopefully allow us to gather evidence that increases the likelihood of what we believe is there to actually be there.


What I have noticed is when I start a fresh smear, that there are relatively few biofilmed looking areas. The ones that don't have spirochetes and/or blebs I tend to dismiss. The ones that have them, I am more likely to accept & be further suspicious of.


If that same fresh smear is left over time & I make observations a few hours later, then I notice that there is a significant # of WBC's that have lysed & release their lysosomes and internal contents.


Over more time the WBC's lysosomes degrade adjacent RBC's, initially causing them to be sticky at their contact area to the resulting debris & at times the end result causes ghosting of the RBC.


Ghosted RBC's loose their internal content & it can appear rather dramatic at times. At times the end result of ghosted cells looks like candida all mixed in a field that can be mistaken as biofilm.


I found this more evident after doing some time lapse on WBC's & making comparisons from initial cell death to hours later. For this reason what I thought might be candida from my initial findings a few years ago, I now have a reference point of what might be their true origin.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
On another note, I am surprised that we can't simply add a sample of our blood to BSK media & watch the spirochetes flourish? Why do we need methods such as xenodiagnoses, of a sterile tick biting a human to pickup the infection & then testing indirectly. There must be some mechanisms at work, or more likely something missing in the BSK solution?


What if we take a combination of BSK media & rabbits or sheeps blood filtered through the smallest filter possible? Or the heck with it, just take the very infected persons blood & filter it & mix that with BSK media.


Perhaps then we can culture them from our very own blood & use that as a basis for proof.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Blood added to BSK will allow spirochetes to grow, but so will other things that are much cheaper. BSK is really useful when you want to do long-term culture, perhaps aiming to grow corkscrew spirochetes which I found can take months.

For short-term culture on a microscope slide, normal saline can be bought ready made or prepared at home with distilled water and salt. Sodium Citrate (as used by Mysterud and Laane) is cheap to buy on Ebay and this can also do the job.

Using a duluent separates the cells which makes for easier observation, but as others have remarked, it can also affect the shape of the cells.

Just putting blood onto a microscope slide subjects the cells to numerous stresses which can break them or make them misshapen. Other than doing thin-film smears which dry instantly (videos on how to do this on Youtube); it is questionable how much can reliably be told from blood cells in a wetdrop - though they are still fascinating to observe.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
What i would be interested in, is where to get the BSK medium? Also fluorescent markers like the ones macdonald uses would be very interesting to experiment with!

Since string of pearls is an interesting topic, and i seem to find a lot of in my blood, ive decided to share some videos. The first video is actually the same string of pearls as the one in the first picture from me, a couple of posts back:

http://youtu.be/AM1Pev0iWbg

Also a rather large colony which ive found, really horrific to see this in your blood. Again, all videos and pictures are taken after several hours of culturing, so you wont see this in freshly drawn blood!:

http://youtu.be/GutyD4mvNAw

What you can see is; crenated RBC's (from the dehydration), many string of pearls, some medusa heads, probably lots of cystic forms (the smaller roundish forms? approx 1/2 the size of the RBC?), and perhaps it is clumped together by biofilm, but that is just speculative. Fluorescent microscopy would be very helpfull in this case!

So im starting to think now my blood is literally filled with borrelia cystic forms. Blarghhh...
Good thing is that there are hardly any motile spirochete forms.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Hi S13. I found your photos and videos very interesting. The time-lapse morphology is amazing.

Sigma-Aldrich stock BSK but will not sell to the public as it is shipped frozen with dry-ice. I found a laboratory supplier that ordered it, thawed it out and then sent it on to me.

To prevent drying of the slide, the edges of the coverslip can be sealed with immersion oil (a pipette is handy for this) or I sometimes use Bostik glue which can be removed. These should keep a slide usable for at least a week. To avoid getting immersion oil underneath the coverslip a sample is needed that takes up the whole area. Sealing the coverslip might prevent it from settling-down and giving a nice shallow sample that is easy to focus. Blotting the slide with paper-towel before sealing the edges can help.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Thank you PeterKemp. Im looking in to more advanced camera system for my microscope, so that i can do automated long term timelapses. Now i have to make each photo by myself each hour or so, which is very time consuming, inaccurate and i get only a very limited amount of photos.

Thanks for the tip on immersion oil. I think it could prove helpful. But is it possible the immersion oil is pulled into the bloodsample?
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Timelapse can be done with a computer program if a camera is connected to the computer via a TV or Video Capture card (PCI card). The program is free and called VirtualDub.

In capture mode it displays the AV output from the camera and can record frames at the required rate. It can also do editing of the recorded videos or videos uploaded from the camera; though it does produce very large AVI files and needs plenty of hard-drive space.

I have made timelapse videos by manually recording a few seconds of video each 30 minutes or so. It is a nuisance to do, but the results have the benefit of showing any motion present which can be quite informative.

Lymedin and myself have both found problems with the scope losing focus when doing timelapse, so it might be that regular checking is necessary. I find this is due to the light being left on. The lamp I use heats up the scope which expands, losing the focus. It probably does not do the microbes much good either!

I have not had contamination problems using immersion oil to seal a slide. If there is enough volume in a sample to cover the whole area beneath the coverslip, the edges will dry out quite quickly and form a barrier. If you try it, make sure to blot the slide before hand to make a shallow sample for observing as drying will be slowed down.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have the Amscope MU900 camera & at first it was horrific. When they finally updated the software it was much better at auto detect, but the lag & video refresh was intolerable for this type of work, where we are constantly hunting & changing views on the slide. It would simply take too long for the video to refresh on the monitor.

You would love the time lapse on the Amscope software though, it is very convenient.


Another researcher has told me that clear nail polish can be used to better affix the slip cover, but I have not tried that as of yet.


Here is a link to the BSK from another researcher, but I have never tried to order it.

http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/sigma/b3528?lang=en®ion=US

ATCC Medium: 1914 Revised BSK Medium
ATCC currently uses Sigma # B
-
8291
BSK
-
H Complete
medium. This medium
is purchased in 500ml volumes and stored frozen at 80ºC. The medium is thawed
and dispensed as required.
If prepared from components:
HEPES
(Sigma H
-
3375)...................................5.64 g
Neopeptone..................................................4.7 g
Sodium citrate................................................0.7g
Glucose........................................................5.64 g
NaHCO3......................................................2.0 g

TCYeastolate (BD 255772)..............................2.0 g
Sodium pyruvate............................................0.75 g
Nacetylglucosamine.......................................0.37 g
Bovine Serum Albumin, Fraction V.....................47.0 g
CMRL 1066, 10X (w/o Glutamine or NaHCO3)......100.0 ml
Rabbit Serum (heat inactivated).........................60.0 ml
DI Water........................................................840 ml
Dissolve ingredients up to and including bovine serum albumin one at a time in
distilled water. Adjust to pH 7.5 with NaOH and filter sterilize. Aseptically add
CMRL 1066 and rabbit serum. Mix well and aseptically dispenses into
appropriate vessel. Final pH of complete medium should be
7.5-7.6.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
I think it worth remembering that although the BSK formula looks very complicated, borrelia can grow successfully just on a drop of blood and whatever else it can find in a tick's gut.

Ticks regurgitate some of the liquid part of their meal, which I guess probably gets rid of some of any antibodies present and concentrates the cells. Borrelia can convert chitin (which the tick's exoskeleton is made of) into glucosamine; which suggests that it likes/needs it. Prof Brorson found that it also likes extra zinc.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Do they use a standard media, such as BSK, as a reference point, which allows for all things being equal other than the variables in question? In theory a great concept, albeit it is a pitfall with the complications of Lyme & in particular when making observations of virile drilling spirochetes vs more docile ones and the efficacy of growing spiros directly from human blood. The long growth rate of BB only adds to the complication.


Personally, I was going to obtain rabbit blood from a local butchery & make do with that using micro filtration. If that failed then I would have sought out BSK.


It is interesting about the chitin conversion & perhaps that is why LLMD's suggest glucosamine for joint support. What supplements do you think BB is more likely to deplete in the body & would you supplement at the risk of feeding & propagating infection?


Also, I never quite understood the notion that O2 would kill the spirochetes, especially when they are lodged into the very cells that act as O2 transports???? Isn't this contradictory, unless they enter cyst mode or bleb lengthing (forming blebs along the length of the spiro) upon making contact with in the blood?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
S13, given that you have many spirochetes in your blood, what are your symptoms like?


I have checked the blood of various people who have been bitten & some only have a very few symptoms. For instance one person has only headaches & stomach pain that come & go. They have pains from time to time, but they come & go and it is difficult for them to consider ongoing infection.


Yet when I check their blood, I am left to wonder why they don't have consistent, more, & more pronounced symptoms. It is during these times that I often wonder how important detox pathways are to the manifestation of the disease or perhaps some other factor such as inflammation & immune response?
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Thats the thing, i dont have many spirochetes in my blood. With fresh blood i can hardly see any spirochetes at all! I think they are all cysts and blebs and they emerge after a short while of culturing.

My symptoms are very diverse. Mainly neurological, derealization, brain fog, cognitive difficulties, emotional/rage attacks, severe fatigue, nausea, twitching muscles, weight loss, jaundice, palpitations, SOB, night sweats and a few others.
When im doing antibiotics or mhbot i dont have any pain at all. Besides borrelia, bartonella and babesia also play a big role in my disease.
The borrelia, im thinking, is just keeping the other infections ongoing without doing too much damage by itself.
But knowing what i know now, i will be focusing more on borrelia as well. First the cysts (never had a cyst buster before) and then the cell wall.

With the people you are helping, do you find loads of motile spirochetes in freshly drawn blood?

I think borrelia mostly causes symptoms in already weakened parts of your body. Parts that me be inflamed from previously existing infections or inflammation, or coinfections. If the detox pathways function properly and you eat well enough i think you can compensate a lot of the damage that borrelia does by itself. Like collagen replacement.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
MOST do not have motile spirochetes in FRESH blood, but they come out eventually. Even with my own blood most of the time I find a few motile spirochetes, but every now & then I find a suprising amount from a fresh culture. I have realized that I have not paid much attention to when the blood has been drawn (before/after eating, caffeine consumption, abx usage...etc) & my next goal is to be more mindful, since it could buy clues.

This one person was on 2x ABX & with only 2 major symptoms, headache & stomach pains. When I drew their blood, I was shocked to find so many free swimming spirochetes from a fresh smear. I only drew this persons blood once & it was early on during my microscopy ventures & it just left me bewildered as to why not more symptoms & why so many free swimming? This person does indulge in extensive amounts of carbs & sugars and could be one possible explanation.

Maybe one explantion is that their immune sys is not compromised YET. The carbs & sugars bring out the chetes to the plasma & the WBC's are able to pick them up & rid of them because the immune system is still functioning normally.

I have all of yours except derealization, which I did experience for one day & it was such a crazy & inhumane experience, so I feel for you.


I also don't have emotional/rage attacks, BUT I do have exacerbation of anger. So for instance if I get angry or stressed, then the chemicals that calls for anger or stress get released & since the body does not detox or process them quickly enough, they linger at greater concentrations for longer periods of time.


The end result is that anger in me breeds anger 10x to the point where I can rage and I find that I can get explosive. Before chronic Lyme I was a very subdued individual & people knew me as a laid back guy & knew that nothing bothered me.


This I can also associate with chemical & food sensitivity. So if I eat or breath something & it enters your blood stream, it takes my body much longer to detox & remove the foreign particulates, so I go on feeling sick & toxic for hours after exposure or food intolerance.


Also with sleep. I used to not be able to sleep & it was difficult for me to sleep for years. Now if I lay down & sorta force myself, I can feel the melatonin kick in & I then feel as if I just took a sleeping pill & it knocks me out to the point where I have to sleep.


All these things that I mention above are more pronounced after the mold exposure that I just experienced. Just a few months ago, before the mold exposure, sleep was hard to get to, but falling asleep was seamless & now it feels like I have been drugged to sleep. Again because the concentrations build up too quick & are not handled properly by their respective pathways.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Do you have any of the following that I have?:

-food allergies
-chemical sensitivities & mold sensitivity
-internal vibrations
-sudden onset of stroke like symptoms
-sudden onset of muscle tightness, for me it is the neck, which then leads to brainfog, but it then releases.
-jaw tighness
-ear ringing
-migrating joint pain (it took me years to develop joint pain & only after 1-2 yrs of ABX usage did it become pronounced).


Do you have any one of these too?:

-You engage in physical activity & if you perform it too quick, then you get shortness of breath & at times accompanied heart palps? To me that is a sign that the blood is loaded & parts of the body get devoid of oxygen & call for the heart to compensate.

-At times do you talk to fast & all of a sudden you can get shortness of breath?

-If you don't sleep enough then you get aggravated symptoms & in particular vibrations through the roof?
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Although borrelia prefers oxygen at low levels, inside the red blood cells the oxygen is bound to the heme so it probably does not have much effect on the bacteria. Babesia (which also infects erythrocytes) has very similar oxygen preferences to borrelia, i.e. very low levels.

I have found the same phenomenon of spiros sometimes being present, but mostly needing some culture time before they appear on a slide. One of my pet theories is that the drop in temperature, pressure, movement etc on a slide 'tells' the spiros that they have been ingested by a tick - so it is safe for them to grow.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So it does not easily "accept" the O2 from the hemoglobin...hmmmm.


So HOB therapy binds more O2 to heme or makes more free floating o2? My oximeter used to read 99% before the load of bacteria grew & now 98% mostly & at times drops to 97%, but that is not such a big change? I know others who run around in their 60%'s due to other medical issues.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter, we have seen the new research on sexual transmission. Knowing all that you know & all that you have seen. Knowing that borrelia can be found, all depending on what stage of the infection one is in, in the RBC's readily & that blood flows through the entire body. What do you feel is taking place?


Is sexual or contact transmission likely? I have seen the studies that describe contact transmission in animals & our microscopy observations lend itself to this likelihood of transmission?


Is Lyme perhaps by itself not as potent, but has a greater impact with co-infections? A person who has been bit, can go on for months, years, & even a lifetime without many symptoms, even if multiply co-infected. So is it not possible if contact transmission occurs that the partner may not necessarily acquire all the co-infections & therefore may take longer or never be symptomatic?
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Hi Lymedin. I have no medical or science training so any ideas I have should be taken with a big pinch of salt.

I'd say that the areas you mention need a lot of urgent research. Borrelia is in the blood. That is something that the CDC/IDSA, PHE and other authorities seem to be avoiding. So either they know that it is in the blood but have reasons for suppressing this information; or they simply haven't bothered trying to locate borrelia in the blood - which seems incredible.

Incredible.

I think that every point you make is credible or even likely - so where is the large-scale research needed to protect the population; to understand P2P transmission, other vectors, infection that starts with virus-sized propagules rather than motile spirochetes?

There are no good answers to these questions. The pittance spent on researching LB suggests to me that the CDC and others have cobbled together their theories and are sticking to them. They either already know the answers, or don't want to know them. We are left trying to figure them out for ourselves and for the sake of others including our loved ones.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yea, it truly makes one wonder how the CDC & company do not bother to take a closer look at the blood of those chronically ill, especially in a BLOOD BORNE disease. It is just pure abhorrent idiocy on their part & I don't think they are that stupid and for that reason I think they MUST BE withholding what they really know?


I think the reality might be that they have identified this organisms as being:

-widely spread.

-involving and influential to billions of medical dollars.

-very hard/impossible to kill. Those who are in remission might be pushing time back to a phase where they were bit but asymptomatic & this can go on for months, years, & even lifetimes without any major complications. I have even heard of a story just this year of an older (70's) year lady coming into the hospital with only slight symptoms from a lifetime of Syphilis, but these types of stories are know near & far.


-Can create resistant specimens from ABX treatment readily.


One only need look & there is consistency across the border for what we see in the blood. The blood of those who are not treated look a lot worst & it makes one wonder...how is it that they are alive?


So coming from a psychotherapy background, what prompted you to take that first look? For me it was 2 months of entering chronic stage, realizing what my daughter was developing, the symptoms of many family members, & the people around me. It seemed only logical that I look.
 
Posted by glm1111 (Member # 16556) on :
 
Excellent thread and info Lymedin! Just thought I would mention what Bryon Rosner has to say about parasites protecting the spirochetes and other bacteria. I will bring up the thread that gigimac posted for those interested in reading what he has to say about the antiparasitics being effective.

Gael
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks Gael!


I have heard of the theories of parasites protecting borrelia. I can find borrelia in the RBC's despite aggressive & varied ABX treatment & it looks like borrelia does not need any parasitic help, although it is quite possible given the aggressive & tactical nature of the spirochete.


Very cunning & surprisingly adaptable in a host of creatures. So I wouldn't be surprised if they are found to be protected in masses within the parasites.


Peter, have you done any more MMS experiments? So in essence, MMS had an affect on the spirochetes & many could be found with their motility impacted? Where the blebs affected at all?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5SICYHIhnI&list=UUgSqyR4ZdGGcmu6GDhUFJLg

[ 09-17-2014, 01:22 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Hi Lymedin and All. The MMS experiment used the chemical (chlorine) as a highly toxic antimicrobial. The aim was just to demonstrate that the spirochetes were living organisms and not 'artefacts' which Lyme denialists claim. To test its effect on blebs would be much more complicated and require reculturing the sample; though chlorine is so powerful that it is probably reasonable to speculate that with the levels used they would no longer be viable but neither would human cells.

Propagules are very tough. I attempted some DNA extraction (for PCR) on a sample full of these tiny round-bodies. The bacterial lysis kit I used only worked when I accidentally used 20x the specified amount of enzyme to dissolve the cell wall.

I also tried a microwave protocol which called for 6 minutes at 600 watts under pressure - to break endospores (very tough organisms). I could only simulate pressure by using a tightly sealed tube but gave it 10 minutes at 900 watts. Whilst many RBs shattered, around 25% of the propagules looked perfectly intact under the microscope (though they might actually have been dead).

Some nematodes have extraordinary immune suppression abilities. If memory serves, there were some doctors considering giving people with arthritis a single strongyloides worm which could reduce the inflammation in the joints of a person with arthritis. Just one worm could suppress part of the immune system!
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
So, ive got my new automated timelapse microscopy setup running. Like you said Peter, the image will go out of focus when the lamp stays on for a long time. So i made a system that turns the lamp off in between the frames. That also should preserve the sample.

I was fiddling around a bit, and decided to try your method of sealing the blood sample on the slide with some immersion oil. That works perfectly! I do notice the borrelia bacteria is not forced out of the RBC as fast as before. I think the dehydration in my previous samples triggers the spirochete to mobilize and seek another living area.
So for a fast culture i will use the dehydration technique (so no immersion oil seal on the slide) and for long term culture i will use the sealed technique.

I found a bizarre phenomenon today when looking at the long term culture:
http://youtu.be/rlAYKAR9X2Q
I have never seen this before, and it could very well be contamination from my finger or something. But it looks like fungal growth of the blood. Perhaps a lost candida cell?
Each frame of the movie = 5minutes. Total of 7,5hours of growth is shown.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Im wondering if this picture i have taken a while a go actually shows a budding yeast cell?
 -
If so, perhaps that eventually causes the fungal growth from my previous video.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Hi S13, I use 50mm coverslips and often just seal the long sides which keeps the sample viable for up to a week, but still allows it to 'breathe'. Mysterud and Laane attribute their successful culture on a slide to the fact that certain regions of the sample develop the correct oxygen levels. This is what Dr Lida Mattman said years ago, that at a certain depth in a culture the oxygen level would be ideal for borrelia growth.

The video is very impressive and looks like it could be candida albicans which might have come from the air or could have been present in the sample. I used to find a lot of fungal growths on blood slides, but strangely, after taking long course of abx I rarely see them now.

Your timelapse set-up gives wonderful results. It would be fantastic to see a spirochete actually emerge from a blood cell and morph into a string of pearls. That would really stand the accepted 'wisdom' about borrelia on its head. I have tried to do this, but no luck yet.

Best Wishes,
Peter
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
I have smaller coverslides, 18x18mm, so i will try leaving open 1 side for breathing.

I think the fungal forms are probably a result of a suppressed immune system. So by dealing with the bacterial infections, the immune system should become more active, and fungal forms will be eliminated more quickly from the blood.
Im still not sure if my fungal hypha is the result of contamination, or if it was present in the sample.

I will do some more experiments with the time lapse setup, so i hope to provide more results soon.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here are 2 good candida vids & yours may as well be just that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsIxw5LWXvI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDRC0JOjkc0&feature=player_detailpage#t=41

_______________________________________
The video reminds me of this Streptomyces coelicolor video. This is a gram-positive bacteria that is typically found in the soil.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tq72FdV06g
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Do you guys see smaller versions of the spirochete, as represented by a dumbbell. It basically looks like a rod with bulbous tips on either end, sorta like this but connected together •-•


I see all sorts of these at various sizes & when we consider them all collectively, they can represent the various growth stages.


Also, do you guys see blebs with tails, basically a footed type of bleb? I think these are the blebs forming into the smallest spirochete, a dumbbell, & I am trying to get time lapse proof of this. There are various thickness & thinness of dumbbells too.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6crB-IvSFlY&feature=youtu.be


It is so difficult to do, since they constantly move in the Z field via Brownian motion and escape consistent focus. With time they also escape the entire field of view & force me to re-position & re-adjust the slide constantly.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
S13, thought of your candida video when I found this article.


"First direct blood test for yeast, T2Candida, gets FDA nod"

http://outbreaknewstoday.com/first-direct-blood-test-for-yeast-t2candida-gets-fda-nod-93962/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
My newest video in the how to blood smear series. I also show you my microscope on the 2nd half of the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFQom3ssd38&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Great video lymedin! More people should know about this.
You have almost the same microscope as i have. But i dont have the trinocular option, so i have to use one of my binocular tubes for the camera.
Great tip about the led light too! My bulb is old and gives a yellowish color. I think the white led produces a fuller white spectrum right?

I have also seen the dumbbell shapes you speak of.
Could be a spirochete i suppose?

In the my series of timelapses, i have captured a string of pearls emerging from a cyst:
http://youtu.be/ObT6IHXHVFw
Watch in HD to see the details.
Im not sure, but could the process be triggered by the touch of the RBC???
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thank you sir!


You can easily replace with a trinocular head & it would make life much easier for you. Buy used & then when you resell, you will get back most of your money.


Before that I used a soft white CFL, only because that is what I had in the house, but it resulted in yellowish light. I expected to get a white/daylight CFL & fortunately bumped into the Cree LED's. It is cheap enough for you to give them a try in darkfield & it should suite you well.


Oh man, I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE that video! That is exactly what I had wanted to do. So this is all manual time lapse? Do you find yourself having to refocus every few minutes, like I do? I won't have the stamina for 13 hr sessions & hence my lack of microscopy video production.


I wonder if it is really coming from a cyst or a RBC? It certainly is the right size & shape to be a cyst & I think more likely so. Also notice, that as the string of pearl emerges from the cyst, it absorbs the cyst, so that the cyst gets smaller & smaller over time.

Precious work, please keep it up!!!!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I KNEW they had to bleb out, but could never provide microscopy proof. I knew when I first looked at fresh blood I can only see a few spiros if any & then as time passed more & more spiros emerge. A few hours later I see a boatload & then MYSTERIOUSLY a few hours after that all of a sudden they disappeared from the plasma & there are far fewer left. So instead of many spiros, they become fewer, but there is a ton of dancing debris in the plasma. As if the blood conditions change further & don't allow for the prospering of larger spiros, only the formation of cysts & blebs.

For me it is hard to prove that the dancing dots are cysts or blebs, but with a video like yours people are more willing to listen. They would be more inclined to take a second look, if not anything else. Try to take it even further next time. Let the blebs break up & scatter in the blood plasma. I bet when you do, you will get something like this video I took a few months ago. Your video will show the missing link between the spiros blebbing & them scattering with TONS of blebs/cysts in the plasma over time.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mDvyOCfENs&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


As far as the dumbbells, just think about it logically. They break up into cysts & an adult spirochete has to come from somewhere. Even when you look at the smallest spirochete, it had to develop from something smaller.

When I string together the quantities of all that I see collectively it only makes sense that the sequence is bleb-> tailed bleb -> dumbbell spirochete -> spirochete w/slight undulation -> longer spirochete with more undulation -> very long spirochete & a break up into blebs. Of course there are so many variations in between any of stages as well.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
I have not seen the strings break up and scatter yet. I will try to do a longer timelapse to see what happens with the strings over time.

I dont do manual timelapses any more, no that is too time consuming. I have automated the process. Ive made a simple program on my laptop that forces the image-capturing software to take a picture every few minutes. It also turns the light of the microscope on a few seconds before the picture is taken, and turns it off a few seconds afterwards. This way the bulb of the microscope doesnt burn out so fast, and the blood sample is not heated up by the light. And it prevents the image from going out of focus.
I think it would be even better with a LED light, since they dont mind being switched on/off all the time.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So Peter was correct then, the heat DOES force the scope to go out of focus? My discussions with other microscopists lead me to believe that it was the top weight that affected out of focus issues & that the camera + mounting contributed to this effect?


So you see a difference when turning off the light? Prior to keeping the light off when not needed, you had focus issues? And now that you are doing just that, you have managed to resolve focus issues? Also, how old is the blood smear from the first minute you begin the time lapse video recording?


When I press down slightly from the very top of my scope (from the camera), it gets out of focus.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Yes Peter was right! Its not the static weight of the camera, its the heat that slowly builds up in the frame of the microscope causing it to warp.

And yes i had the same focus issues when i kept the light on. It has completely resolved with switching the bulb off in between pictures.

My microscope also goes out of focus when i press down on the top, but it needs s fair amount of weight to do it. Like 1 lbs of force doesnt make it go out of focus yet, but 4-5 lbs does.

Im not sure, but i think my blood smear was about 10 hours old before i started the time lapse.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
S13, your last video is one of the most impressive videos that I have seen to date. I have distributed your video in various sites & shared it with key people.


I would also like to use your video in my future video with commentary & I will give you & your youtube channel credit.


I will do a lamp/focus test today & hopefully that will inspire me to do something about it. The out of focus issue is such a huge issue when doing time lapse & it is super awesome to know the real source of the issue.


Also, check out these DIC (Differential interference contrast microscopy) blood videos. Really expensive equipment, but I wonder if anyone has done any DIC Lyme microscopy? It really gives it that 3D edge in viewing/recording.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGeomKDPmcA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TKTSHrw5QI
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I found some DIC Lyme pics & it looks like Dr. Eva Sapi has been on it. It would be awesome to see some video though.


A few months ago Dr. Sapi received funds to purchase the Atomic Force Microscope & I wonder how that is going?


The article:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048277


The pics:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0048277
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
S13, your last video is one of the most impressive videos that I have seen to date. I have distributed your video in various sites & shared it with key people.


I would also like to use your video in my future video with commentary & I will give you & your youtube channel credit.

Thank you!
Please share it, i think more people need to be aware of this.

Those DIC images look very nice. You really get a sense of the 3D geometry. Expensive equipment probably [Wink]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
"...i think more people need to be aware of this."


Haha, that is exactly why I created this thread. I went from having just a few symptoms & checking my blood for days & hours. I could not find anything & I thought they were right, that the infection was imbedded deep in the tissue.


I checked days & weeks after & slowly started to see things. As I got sicker, I saw more & more of these things in the blood. At that early time, I knew whatever it was, it was responsible for making me & keeping me sick.


It is coming soon, check your blood at 1000X & you can see borrelia in your blood & this will make it available to EVERYONE & no need for scopes. Tie in time lapse apps on the gadgets & bingo!!!

They are using this to check for Anthrax too.

3D Printed Microscope for Mobile Devices that Costs Pennies

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIh9dnwnt7Y
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Borrelia cyst forming, more string of pearls and an infected RBC showing some kind of bleb-growth.

http://youtu.be/FopUPJ86MLI

The forming of the cyst happened at the edge of the screen which is a bit out of focus (problem of my microscope).
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another beautiful capture. At the end you can lineup all your captures & a full story emerges.


After a few days of the smear being out, I find surprisingly less spirochetes coming out & more blebs/cysts. And it works out this way a majority of the time.

Are you finding the same thing? Also, are you waiting 20 min between each shot?


For anyone looking, there is a cheap microscope for sale on Ebay, the power supply is not included. The lamp/LED bulb technique I use in my video will more likely be a better substitute for nice clear & bright white light than the darn halogen on the scope.

It has a trinocular port & you can always add the attachment & cam in the future.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281435516766?_trksid=p2060778.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

[ 10-05-2014, 02:06 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Yeah im finding the same thing. I think its because the environment in the smear is deteriorating and thus most spiros will have converted to cyst. I think the string of pearls is also some kind of passive cystic form, because they seem to persist for long periods of time.

Im waiting 2 mins between each shot. So my previous movie was created from almost 800 separate images.

Having a darkfield condenser on your microscope makes it easier to detect the spirochetes. So anyone who is looking to buy a microscope, try to get one with a darkfield condenser. Most of these microscopes will only do 400x mag with darkfield, but that is enough, and it is what i use in my videos. Somehow 1000x oil darkfield requires a different (probably more expensive) condenser.
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
I have not read all of the posts, but have checked out a few of the photos and one time-lapse video. Very impressive. I have considered getting a microscope, but still have not made a purchase. I'm hoping to get a bit more strength, both mentally and physically before I mess with the microscope.

Would it be possible to use a time-lapse ap. from an iPhone ? I have not even seen what it does, just curious if the time-lapse feature could be used on the iPhone.

I am using an oxygen chamber. I thought it would be interesting to take before and after photos. The oxygen does seem to be helping quite a bit, fingers crossed.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, you can, but any slight movement will easily disrupt the video. So if you have patience, then you can do it...I found out that I don't for long term hunting.


Here is an Apple TV app:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/lapse-it-time-lapse-stop-motion/id539108382?mt=8


Here is video taken with a Samsung Galaxy S3 older phone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9va0KPrVExs


It is best you DIY a quick setup like this.
http://www.aurelm.com/2014/03/09/diy-smartphone-adapter-for-microscope-photography/


There are pre-made phone adapters, like this SkyLight, but I bought one & did not have any patience with the sensitivity from any movement & the plastic holder warped over time, so that it does not hold the phone properly anymore. Easy fix with some clamps, but for an expensive piece it should not lead to this & that is why I say just build your own.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6WBeB0kvUM


So it is good if you just want to see it in your blood & make a quick capture. If you are serious & want to do long term hunting & proof, then just do a USB cam or video cam connected with an adapter.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
New video showing a spirochete go into cyst mode. Look at utube description for detail on what to look for.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsJ5Zit6q0U&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


I've had a new & very exciting video for some time. It is taking me forever to finish up the commentary & I just got a new mic which should help. New video will show:

-Medusa spirochetes

-Many change form into the String Of Pearls (SoP)

-Break up of spirochetes into multiple infinite forms

-Formation of 2 cysts

ALL IN ONE VIDEO!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Check out the newest video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hbin5ZT6A5s&list=UUt9FccFyhKI-fRGh0YKWDXg


As I mentioned above, the video will show:

-The reason why Lyme blood looks so horrific

-Medusa spirochetes

-Many change form into the String Of Pearls (SoP)

-Break up of spirochetes into multiple infinite forms

-Formation of 2 cysts

ALL IN ONE VIDEO!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey Lymedin2010,

I just watched the new video.

I saw the prominent kete, but didn't see it convert. I did notice it changing a little at the very end, but I will have to look at it again.

I did see the funny looking red blood cells. I think you have referred to them before as "crenated" red blood cells, but in the HD format, they sure looked (to me) like bartonella bacteria on the cells.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hi TNT.

There is a lot going on in that video & the damn spiros don't stay still, bouncing around all the time.


Notice one of them break off & I show you with an arrow & then use the caption "A SoP spirochete broke off from the medusa."


I slowed down the video & showed you frame by frame & you can see it shrink at first for cysting & then break into 2 pieces that remain in the smaller cyst attempted configuration.


When I watch other spiro videos, I often find myself going back & forth to see things a few times in order to more clearly satisfy myself.


The most important take home lesson is this. Look at the plasma surrounding the medusa before & after the time lapse. Do you see all the dancing pieces of broken up spirochetes?


This is what we see when we see the wretched debri infested blood smears of those who are chronically sick with Lyme.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Just realized I didn't see the video you just mentioned up above at 7:20 pm. I saw a different one that I was notified through Youtube that you had recently posted.

So, I will go back and look at these two again sometime soon.

You're doing incredibly awesome work! Keep it up. I am inspired to get myself a good trinocular once I am more able to.

Right now my family either laughs at me or gets grossed out about the things I look at under my 30x lighted magnifying glass.

I was eating organic spinach from Walmart one day and kept noticing this funny taste and then noticed these tiny creepy crawlies.

So, I got out my magnifier and looked at some of these things and had my wife and children look at these "neat" little bugs I had been eating.

No sooner had my wife stuck her eye into the lens that she shrieked, "YOU ARE EATING LITTLE STINKBUGS!!!" All my children were equally grossed out, and now remind me of the time this summer that daddy ate baby stink bugs.

I think they were some kind of aphid. But I'm no insect biologist.

So, I would love to get a good trinocular to look at things and take videos of things with. Particularly of blood. Hopefully in time.

Keep making strides and giving out inspiration!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks TNT.

That is exactly why I steam or lightly boil my veggies. If you need help choosing a microscope, I can send you links on ones I would buy from time to time. I always buy used, which can be a gamble, but you get most of your money back when you resell it. So it is an investment & place holder for your money until you sell.


Below is my response to phone cameras on microscopy in another thread, in case anyone needs this in the future:


The short answer, Yes & you will get better images/video than I have.


The longer answer is dependent on you. The "magnification" will be dependent on the objective lens & eyepiece of the microscope & not the phone really. The phone will act & see the same thing your eye does when it looks into the eyepiece of the microscope. So in this respect it will be dependent on your microscope & any good lab micro will be good for this.


I know the Galaxy S4 & S5 & the iPhone 5c were reported to have a narrow Field Of View (FOV) & focus to infinity & hence better at maximizing the video capture. How much better or worst they are compared to each other is dependent on a phone by phone basis, but most phones should be able to capture video.


*****TRICKY part #1:*****
This will depend on you. All dependent on the attachment method (Skylight vs DIY setup) the phone may be susceptible to movement, shakiness & displacement, which may force you to constantly readjust.


For instance I tried the Skylight & each time I go to hit the record on the phone the whole setup gets displaced by the slightest movement, forcing me to readjust. The DIY setup should hold it in place better, but it is still up to you to create a solid DIY. I always wanted to make one, but have not as of yet.


*****TRICKY part #2:*****
When you hold the phone up to the eyepiece manually, you don't just hold the phone up to the eyepiece. You have to hold it up & move it up & down until you get the optimal spot. Too high & you get video of the black tube in the peripheral & you lose sight of subject. Too low & you lose more video of your blood cells, so for example you capture 100 cells instead of the normal 200 cells with optimal distance.


The DIY tube will rely on your precision at optimal distance & that is DEPENDENT ON YOU & how well you can do this. The Skylight too, which has clamps for up & down (Z direction) & sliders that EASILY move in X & Y direction (don't forget it can easily get bumped & moved).


If you make a DIY setup, you have to find a PVC or plastic tube that is the right size to fit the eyepiece & just the right size/distance from the eyepiece (precise length cut).


If you build the DIY perfectly to your specs, as based on your test from manually holding the phone, then it will be a more solid choice...less movement.


*****TRICKY part #3:*****
Which is LIGHTING & is true for just viewing with a microscope, as well as with any type of camera attached. You can do a DIY LED light setup or use the bulb setup I showed you in one of my videos. BE WARNED that LED lights are powerful & can burn your retina, especially the small DIY ones. The Cree bulb I show in my video & use has frosting on the bulb & it does not bother my eye, although still use caution.


The same is true for any camera you have (Point & shoot cameras (PNS) or DSLR's), in that you should be able to hold it up with your hands to the eyepiece & record video. There are devices that you can purchase to hold it in place though.


Now compare all this to the other method, which is what I use a Amscope USB cam that just slides in the eyepiece or the trinocular port. Advantage is that it is cut to specifications & all I have to do is just slide it in. Disadvantage is that I cannot capture as beautiful images with crappier resolution & price for better resolving ones.


So all this depends on you!
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Dear All,

My latest sets of pictures (and some oldies) are now on flickr. I've been using an FITC antibody stain for b.b. which has worked on some extracellular agents and on white blood cells; the latter being of particular interest to me. There is some text with the 'Albums' explaining what the photos are about:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157648320849440/
If anyone has experience/skill at identifying WBCs, I have included a brightfield/geimsa or Diff Quik stained photo with some sets. I would love to know exactly what some of these cells are.
Best Wishes,
Peter
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
From what I can tell for these 2:

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/[email protected]/15340558708/in/set-72157648320849440/

https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/[email protected]/15340317899/in/set-72157648320849440/

They almost look like monocytes or basophils, but mono & baso are typically 12-15 microns & yours is smaller.
Basophils would look a lot busier & have large granules, but if the green stain is foreign (borrelia) then yours is not a baso & yours has a lot of CLEAR cytoplasm (aside from borrelia green stain). Green cytoplasmic contents are cysts & blebs, correct?
Monocytes would have a kidney shaped nucleus or developing one & yours does not look like it does.

So they are Lyphocytes. 7-8 microns for the smaller ones & is a good fit compared to adjacent RBC size comparison. Lymphocytes have agranular clear cytoplasm, but based upon staining yours have what look like spirochetal blebs & cysts? They also account for 30% of WBC’s, while Neutrophils (60+%) & together they make up 90+% of WBC’s in body. So the rest of the WBC’s are rarer.
Also the lymphocytes have fairly rounded nuclei in your pictures & typically have very little cytoplasm. Every now & then we will find one in the blood with more cytoplasm & an irregular nucleus. Yours has slightly more cytoplasmic content, but perhaps it is expanded due to borrelia.
_______________________________________________

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15340560408/in/set-72157648320849440/
Either a bi-lobed Eosinophil that has lost some content spilling into the plasma, evidenced by the RBC below it degrading from the enzymes. As a result it appears smaller than what an Eosinophil should.

OR

Another Lymphocyte where the nucleus is misformed because of the rupture.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Are you adding anything to the blood to induce the RBC's to inflate? It does not look like it?

I wonder if BB WBC infection makes the WBC's typically smaller in size than usual & disrupts the nucleus at times, making it more difficult to ID?

The orange stains are acridine orange, correct? Isn't it one of the better indicators of b.b. presence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15528967402/in/set-72157648320849440/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6602602
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Hi Lymedin, thanks for your observations, I think you are right about the lymphocytes. I frequently see normal-looking lympho's that are smaller than RBCs; though the RBCs in the sample tend towards the large side, often around 8 microns or even more. I also see segmented neutrophils that are perfectly formed examples but no bigger than an RBC.

Some of the cells look like neutrophils with nuclei that are starting to segment, but maybe their progress has been halted by the bb infection. I find your thought about the nucleus being disrupted interesting. It could be that these are all lymphocytes, perhaps at different stages of activation, but that the nucleus is damaged by the cell being 'taken over' by bb.

If bb does take-over the cell, it could explain why the first set of photos from a chocolate-agar culture had intact, infected lympho's but that other WBCs were mostly destroyed as expected. So they would not really be lymphocytes, but the remnants of lymphocytes which have become mini-bb colonies.

Other than the choc-agar culture set, all the others are from thin-film smears of peripheral blood so they should be quite normal looking. The FITC antibody was not buffered and in distilled water (no saline). I guess this could slightly distort the appearance of some cells given the length of time that staining was done.

Thanks again for your ideas.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Just to add, in the photos are included some 'smudge' cells with fluorescence in the cytoplasm. The smudge cells generally look like large lymphocytes and some like segmented neutrophils. The main point being that there are rather a lot of them which suggests to me that there is a problem causing their destruction.
 
Posted by PeterKemp (Member # 35585) on :
 
Just to add, in the photos are included some 'smudge' cells with fluorescence in the cytoplasm. The smudge cells generally look like large lymphocytes and some like segmented neutrophils. The main point being that there are rather a lot of them which suggests to me that there is a problem causing their destruction.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey Lymedin2010,

I'm just trying to get an idea of what's out there and what is a good deal concerning trinocular microscopes....(ie DREAMING).

Is Omax a good name?

These both look like a good deal:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OMAX-40X-2000X-Trinocular-LED-Compound-Siedentopf-Microscope-with-Digital-Camera-/400794338851?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d51344623

http://www.amazon.com/OMAX-40X-2000X-Biological-Microscope-Mechanical/dp/B00AEJ9FJ4/ref=pd_sbs_indust_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=0ZW9N3NH1TJ1P9P0RRJY

What do you think? Is the one with the German-sounding optics a better deal than the one with the built-in camera? Any pros and cons?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter, so you are finding infected WBC's often. Personally, I don't see them in other peoples blood who have been bit & who only have a few symptoms. I only find them in mine & they are rare.


I found them in abundance one hour after I take a hot bath & this gives credence to what others have reported of them being imbedded in the skin for protection. Perhaps the heat forces them to leave the skin (& maybe even other areas) & migrate to the blood plasma.


There they are picked up by the WBC's & that is when I see them in abundance. I would really like to know what happens to them long term & whether they are indeed killed off by the WBC long term or whether they truly disrupt the WBC & rupture out.


Microscopy observation might not be the best indicator of the true in vivo nature of the result.


TNT, sure I can help you. I have never heard of Omax, but they seem similar to the Amscope, which are grade "B" type microscope. I did a quick check on Ebay & sometimes great deals can be had, but nothing at the moment.


That 3MP camera is really poor, mine is 9MP & I am still not satisfied with it. Let me check for a better one for you.


In the mean time you can check this how to use a microscope & oil immersion video, but use my oil immersion tutorial.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7KlFSgdUGU
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Awesome job on your latest video Lymedin2010!
The medusa heads, SOP, blebs, its all identical to what i see here under my own microscope.

I think for me the borrelia infection is pretty much all in cyst form in my blood. The temperature change from drawing the blood (and perhaps other chemical changes) probably activates the cysts to spawn the medusa heads, SOP and blebs. Perhaps these morphological forms are better capable of spreading the infection via the tick?

Anyway, ive posted another time lapse on youtube. This time not of borrelia, but growing candida between human skin cells:
http://youtu.be/l4t7UKi4ma8
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
When looking for a microscope, having a darkfield option really comes in handy when it comes to seeing spirochetes in the blood. Darkfield microscopes should not be more expensive than non-darkfield. The only part that is different is the condenser, which has a (often removable) disc that blocks some of the light rays. Its a very simple technique, but immensely useful.
Most affordable darkfield microscopes only do up to 400x with darkfield. With 1000x the objective is simply too close to the sample for the darkfield technique to work, so they can only do 1000x in brightfield.
But no problem, 400x darkfield shows spirochetes just fine!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I called Amscope & DRILLED them for what model would work best & I was able to get out of them that the lower models would produce less superior images & the images/view would look blurrier. So stay away from the ones that you linked, because he confessed that for that price point there is a tradeoff on optics & microscope parts (metal vs non metal).


At the end their biggest bang for the buck would be model series B660. If you want darkfield you can always get the darkfield condensor. As was mentioned, you can always interchange condensors & have the best of both worlds. Click on a microscope from the B660 list & then click on a microscope slide image and notice how much clearer the image is than the lower end models from below.
http://www.amscope.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=b660


So that you & others understand, here is a lower/cheaper end model: T490-DK. Click on the darkfield RBC photo & see how BLURRY the image is. So don't get this crap!!!!!!!
http://www.amscope.com/40x-1000x-trinocular-compound-darkfield-microscope.html


The next model up (from the T490-DK) is the T580B-DK. Click on the cell photos & see it is still a bit blurry (So don't get this crap either). You can see spirochetes with this, but it is advantageous to have better optics.
http://www.amscope.com/40x-2000x-professional-darkfield-research-biological-compound-microscope.html


If you want a brand new microscope you can buy the B660 Amscope series, but personally I think better used microscopes can be had for cheaper. I would wait & I can start linking you to some. I just scored my new scope that is typically $1,000-$1,200 for 1/3 the cost, but because I had patience.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks S13.

It is crazy that I captured all that from one video (the last medusa colony) & I don't know of any other such revealing all-in-one video like it. This is what I was expecting/waiting to see from others all along. If you know of any such video, please link us...I would LOVE to see it.

When I look at my 40x via eye, it is very hard to spot a spirochetes & the majority of them are missed. If the spirochete is larger then I can see it if I strain my eyes. BUT when I have my camera on, then I can see it. The cameras optics allows for more than 400x magnification & at this point it can be seen. Each camera is a bit different in how it resolves & magnifies the image, but most cameras will magnify what is seen via eye.

The beauty of your 40x + camera setup is that you have a more wide field of view & the video is not as blurry. You are not struggling to focus constantly, as I am with 100x.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This is the type of external blood treatment that I was referring to much earlier when I started this thread. I believe the future of Lyme treatment will involve direct blood impact of some sort & then successive filtration to rid of pathogen particles & toxins that the external blood impact will release.


Patient cured of Ebola in Germany treated with biofiltration device
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/11/14/patient-cured-ebola-in-germany-treated-with-bio-filtration-device/


Artificial Spleen ‘Cleans’ Blood of Pathogens:
http://singularityhub.com/2014/10/11/artificial-spleen-cleans-blood-of-pathogens/?utm_source=Singularity+University+Lists&utm_campaign=6714861c1b-Newsletter_October2014&utm_medium= email&utm_term=0_9c706260a1-6714861c1b-57375953


This is what I said months ago on page 2 of this thread, "I also think that the future of Lyme will be in blood treatment. So one can use an IV line & let the blood be stored in an external container, HEATED & treated (with things such as ozone), dialysis type filtration & then transfused back into the blood stream in a continuous loop."


This may not be a direct cure, but it may be just enough to get your blood clean, White Blood Cells fighting again & enough to get you over the hump into healing land. The rest of the infection can then be cleaned up by ABX and/or herbals.


For others it will be life-long continuous treatment.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Cool video of WBC's attacking a parasite.
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152126525726937&fref=nf
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
That last video is pretty cool lymed2010.

I've always thought that parasites may be the most difficult to eradicate because they are so large that the immune system can not knock them down . Obviously that is not the case here, it appears the immune system CAN attack those suckers!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks Haley.


Normally parasites are handled or managed well by our functioning immune system, but our Lyme inflicted bodies are immunosuppressed & may not be able to handle parasites as efficiently (or at all) the way this video shows.


Check out this new bulb I use for observations now:

-Produces less heat than the previous bulb.
-It is flat & can fit on many more & most of microscopes.
-It is dimmable.
-It has a frosty coating around the bulb, so you won't burn your retina out.

(Philips SlimStyle 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb (E*) Model # 433235)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-SlimStyle-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-A19-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-E-433235/205128422


Check out another good live microscopy video, where they find spirochetes in someones blood that is taking multiple antibiotics.


The dancing strings with the bulbous tips are the spirochetes & the free floating "dots" can be platelets, lipids, WBC lysosomes, blebs, & cysts. It is hard to tell what is what from the video, but based upon the sheer quantity (when compared to normal blood) many may indeed be blebs & cysts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN_W9K5Wt_0
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good study.

"Experimental studies in dogs, mice, and non-human primates have found persistence of B. burgdorferi DNA following treatment with a variety of antibiotics, but persisting spirochetes are non-cultivable."


Meaning that despite their presence, that they could not culture them. When they allowed a tick to bite an infected animal (in xenodiagnosis), the tick picked up borrelia & provided evidence of ongoing & chronic infection.


"Despite the continued non-cultivable state, RNA transcription of multiple B. burgdorferi genes was detected in host tissues, flaB DNA was acquired by xenodiagnostic ticks, and spirochetal forms could be visualized within ticks and mouse tissues by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively."


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24466286
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
I am in the process of buying a microscope. Just bringing this back up so I can go through the majority of these posts. I seem to have some energy to research this now (finally).

Do any of these posts have skin samples? I am wondering if there may be help for us in skin biopsies as opposed to blood. I know that parasites can be seen in the skin, I just have to learn how to identify them.

Is there is a book that shows tropical diseases or the like under a microscope? Any recommendation for a textbook that identifies strange pathogens?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
No posts on here on skin biopsies. You can look up histopathology or histopathology of the skin books. Some are very expensive, so best you buy a used one such as this.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Atlas-and-Synopsis-of-Levers-Histopathology-of-the-Skin-Miller-III-MD-O-Fred-/361164780636?pt=US_Nonfiction_Book&hash=item541719345c


_____________________________________
This one is a very good microscope. Don't forget that you will get back more than half of your money when reselling the microscope.

REICHERT A/O MICROSTAR IV TRINOCULAR
http://www.ebay.com/itm/REICHERT-A-O-MICROSTAR-IV-TRINOCULAR-/181627616964?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a49d97ec4


_____________________________________
Also, don't forget this LED bulb, as I highly recommend it for microcopy & it will produce much better visualizations, images, & video.

(Philips SlimStyle 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb (E*) Model # 433235)
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-SlimStyle-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-A19-Dimmable-LED-Light-Bulb-E-433235/205128422
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
"spirochetes were observed in cultures of genital secretions from 11 of 13 subjects diagnosed with Lyme disease, and motile spirochetes were detected in genital culture concentrates from 12 of 13 Lyme disease patients using light and darkfield microscopy."


Culture and identification of Borrelia spirochetes in human vaginal and seminal secretions
http://f1000research.com/articles/3-309/v1#reflist
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
Thank you Lymedin2010. I bought the book and am watching the scope, haven't bid on it yet. I will get the bulb also.

[ 01-06-2015, 12:09 AM: Message edited by: Haley ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thank you Peter Kemp!


"These video clips are from an experiment in which 11 friends provided a tiny amount of fingertip blood on a microscope slide. All donors were met through patient support groups and have chronic illness.


8 of 11 have been ill for 20 years or longer.
9 have been diagnosed with M.E. or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome


10 of 11 had negative NHS tests for Lyme borreliosis - one was not tested.
9 had private tests that were positive.


These eleven donors represent a total of 235 years of illness and 170 years of lost productivity."


http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/MeetingMicroscopy.html
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Surface protein staining of bb.

 -
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36371/title/Image-of-the-Day--Lyme-Disease-Bacteria/


DNA imaging probes for Borrelia.

https://cloud.gonitro.com/p/iaaxzXsfbUBRef55xbwmcM
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
If gamers can learn to identify pictures of malaria-infected red blood cells, why can't we?

http://www.malaria.com/news/malaria-diagnosis-game

Play an Online Game to Help Diagnose Malaria
JUNE 23, 2014 BY MALARIA.COM

Online crowd-sourcing — in which a task is presented to the public, who respond, for free, with various solutions and suggestions — has been used to evaluate potential consumer products, develop software algorithms and solve vexing research-and-development challenges. But diagnosing infectious diseases?

Working on the assumption that large groups of public non-experts can be trained to recognize infectious diseases with the accuracy of trained pathologists, researchers from the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have created a crowd-sourced online gaming system in which players distinguish malaria-infected red blood cells from healthy ones by viewing digital images obtained from microscopes.

The UCLA team found that a small group of non-experts playing the game (mostly undergraduate student volunteers) was collectively able to diagnosis malaria-infected red blood cells with an accuracy that was within 1.25 percent of the diagnostic decisions made by a trained medical professional.

The game, which can be accessed on cell phones and personal computers, can be played by anyone around the world, including children.

“The idea is, if you carefully combine the decisions of people — even non-experts — they become very competitive,” said Aydogan Ozcan, an associate professor of electrical engineering and bioengineering and the corresponding author of the crowd-sourcing research. “Also, if you just look at one person’s response, it may be OK, but that one person will inevitably make some mistakes. But if you combine 10 to 20, maybe 50 non-expert gamers together, you improve your accuracy greatly in terms of analysis.”

Crowd-sourcing, the UCLA researchers say, could potentially help overcome limitations in the diagnosis of malaria, which affects some 210 million people annually worldwide and accounts for 20 percent of all childhood deaths in sub-Saharan Africa and almost 40 percent of all hospitalizations throughout that continent.

The current gold standard for malaria diagnosis involves a trained pathologist using a conventional light microscope to view images of cells and count the number of malaria-causing parasites. The process is very time-consuming, and given the large number of cases in resource-poor countries, the sheer volume presents a big challenge. In addition, a significant portion of cases reported in sub-Sahara Africa are actually false positives, leading to unnecessary and costly treatments and hospitalizations.

By training hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of members of the public to identify malaria through UCLA’s crowd-sourced game, a much greater number of diagnoses could be made more quickly — at no cost and with a high degree of collective accuracy.

“The idea is to use crowds to get collectively better in pathologic analysis of microscopic images, which could be applicable to various telemedicine problems,” said Sam Mavandadi, a postdoctoral scholar in Ozcan’s research group and the study’s first author.

Ozcan and Mavandadi emphasized that the same platform could be applied to combine the decisions of minimally trained health care workers to significantly boost the accuracy of diagnosis, which is especially promising for telepathology, among other telemedicine fields.
 
Posted by joey2020 (Member # 45201) on :
 
Have you ever heard about a lizard in CA that cures lyme in ticks? I wonder if you you get bit by one of the ticks that have bit the lizard and there for is caring the anti-bodies to kill lyme. What if that tick that is now caring anti bodies bites you will he inject you with anti-bodies and there fore letting your immune system pick up the anti-bodie and become cure?

the reason I ask is, I have hunting buddies that get bit by tens of ticks for the last 20 years and they seem to be find no symptoms of any sort?

I wonder if they got bit by one of the ticks carrying anti-bodies?

I would like to get some ticks with lyme, draw some blood from them see if they have lyme, then let it bite one of the lizards and see if it really does become cure of lyme?


http://lymedisease.org/news/hardscienceonlyme/657.html
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Bringing this thread back up. I'm hoping the veterans have something to share.

Also, I have a question.

Have been viewing my blood and family members' for over two months now. No problem seeing ketes, candida, probable parasites and protozoa (dots and holes inside RBCs and formations like "Maltese Crosses"), probable BLO on outside of RBCs, and biofilms.

I had initially only been viewing with a friend's older lab-grade scope that only had light-field view. Now, I got myself an older lab-grade dark field/light field scope (good deal on Ebay), and have been viewing between the two scopes.

My question is this:

What are those shiny twirling, flipping, rotating triangular objects that appear to perhaps have a lobe on each corner. Every one of these objects are identical, no matter how many I see. Sometimes there are few of these things, sometimes very many.

They are not what I have seen referred to as "lysozomes" (granules from the WBC). They are about 3-5x bigger than the "lysozomes," but still very small. The lysozomes violently bounce around (when no longer part of the WBC), whereas these things twirl around as they travel (and they are never still).

They seem to me to be native to the blood, and I'm hoping they are not pathogenic.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The little flipping white things at 2:01 on this video. This man claims they are bacteria.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40mvty0EM2o

Here is a fuzzy close-up of what I am referring to. Notice and follow the flipping object at the top middle of his screen at 4:50 to 5:12.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRzPrnkaw4k
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Haley,

Did you get a scope?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, I will call you and we can discuss some of your questions.
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
http://www.wildcondor.com/dr-horowitz-on-babesiosis.html

Dr. H says this about babesia testing:

"And then for Babesia, you use a panel approach, a Giemsa stain, a Babesia immune-fluorescent assay, IFA for Babesia Microti, an IFA for Babesia Duncani, WA1, a PCR looking for the DNA, polymerase chain reaction, a FISH testing. There’s five Babesia tests."

Has anyone done any of these? I assume that special and expensive equipment would be needed for some.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I'm afraid what I'm seeing in my blood IS pathogenic and not native.

The flipping, twirling merozoites in these videos look like the exact things I'm seeing in my plasma.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MYmNaufItU&safe=active

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3DSB1xXuec

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKEGZCZqZ_w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSH_rua1hh8
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I wanted to make a correction about what kind of microscope I have. I am so new to this that I originally thought that mine was darkfield/lightfield. I have come to realize that what I have is actually a phase contrast/lightfield scope. I have really fallen in love with this thing. I think phase contrast gives more detail than a darkfield, although I realize I have never used a darkfield [bonk] but can only compare what I'm seeing to the pictures/video from darkfield scopes.

I'm also seeing what is referred to as yeast. S13, are you seeing any stuff like this? I'm referring to the white circles, not what the arrow is pointing to.

 -

Another candida pic:
 -

I think some of the pictures they refer to bacteria and mold are actually platelets/clumps of platelets.

http://www.morgellonsdiseaseawareness.com/live_blood_microscopy

The pictures of this blood (the "black & white" pics) appear to be with a phase contrast scope. These are very much like what I see under my scope, although I think I can focus better than some of these. [Cool]
 
Posted by Haley (Member # 22008) on :
 
Yes I would agree, that is yeast.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
im actually not sure about that. It may be yeast or a byproduct from it, i dont know. I have seen more people claim that it is yeast, so there may be some truth to it.

Perhaps you could culture these objects and see if they start to grow in to fungal forms? Then perhaps we know more.

Like ive posted in the parasite warriors topic, these objects float in my blood:

 -

Its a time lapse done manually (that was before i got my new usb camera), but it does show some interesting growth.
Its the "true" hyphae form (as opposed to a "pseudo" hyphae form) of candida. Identical to what is shown here:

 -
Source: http://www.nature.com/nrg/journal/v3/n12/box/nrg948_BX1.html

So this is obviously candida in the blood.

It seems like these hyphae forms start to develop from objects about the same size as a RBC (~7um) or a bit smaller. These roundish objects look a lot more faint than normal RBCs. That seems to be in accordance with your observations of the yeast in your phase contrast pictures.
So yes, we are maybe looking at the same thing! However, in your case the candida would still be in its less harmful yeast state.

Btw, nice that you have a phase contrast microscope! Those things do give more contrast than a darkfield. What type of microscope did you say you were using?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Thanks, S13. If you are seeing the pseudohyphae in your blood, does it gently wave around like seaweed in water? The stuff I'm seeing gently waves around.

If so, does it have that delineating cross-section line at the base of the hyphae like what is shown in your pictures above? I'm not seeing any delineation.

I see neutrophils gobbling the balls of "candida" up (if the candida is not too big).

I'm also seeing something very similar to the stuff that is waving around, but it is different. This other stuff very much appears to be thick, faint, spirochetes anchored in what appears to be cysts. The "cysts" are about 1-2 um in diameter and are not necessarily uniform in roundness. The "spirochetes" spin and move just like real spirochetes. I am suspecting these could be l-form borrelia, especially since they appear to be anchored in a cyst. These "ketes" appear to be approx. 3-6 um in lenth (about the same length of many spirochetes).

My scope is an American Optical. I definitely like the phase contrast! I would like to get a usb camera eventually, too. Then I could do time lapse.

Hey, has anyone seen or heard from Lymedin2010? I'm a bit concerned about him. I tried to contact him a few times and have not heard back. Hope he is alright!
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Tbh it has been a couple of months a go that i took those hyphae pictures, so i dont remember if they where waving or not.

This video i made earlier from the pseudohyphae shows the fungi is pretty solid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlAYKAR9X2Q

But then i also have this video of what i thought was borrelia string of pearls:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObT6IHXHVFw
But maybe this is also a fungal candida form? Now that i look at it, it sure does have a lot of similarities with fungal organisms. And these chains are waving a lot as you can see.

The green line that is shown in the candida example is a fluorescent marker of a protein. Im not sure if you can see that under dark field. And besides, the pictures i took are not clear enough to distinguish them. I will try to look for more of these hyphal cells and see if i can find the seperation line.

Nice that your neutrophils are eating the yeast! That at least proves it something that doesnt belong in the blood.

I havent seen Lymedin2010 in a while.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Those are awesome videos!

No, I think you are right about the string of pearls. That looks like a kete for sure. It looks very much like what I'm seeing come out of "cysts." It's just that SOME of the emerging "ketes" I'm seeing don't look completely like some of the other typical spirochetes free floating in the serum. But, most do.

And your fungi video looks pretty straightforward, too.

I have thought that there is a small possibility that the "candida" balls I'm seeing are lipids. But, lipids would probably be shinier like the tiny droplets of immersion oil that get dispersed at the edge of the field when using oil.

I might eventually post some of my findings. I'm just a bit leary of posting personal info in a way that the whole world can see. It was a stretch for me to post on a public forum at the beginning.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hi guys, sorry I have not been here for a while & I will resume microscopy real soon. Mold forced me out of my house & it has been months worth of migrating & running.


Months ago I too captured what appear to be yeast. At first I thought they were the shrunken & ghosted RBC's that I spoke about in my video. Some are RBC's, while some are non human and expand & give rise to daughter cells. It is hard to tell them apart most times.


My next venture will be culturing borrelia directly from our blood via a cheap & readily available method. Once I get it down packed, I will share with you & you should be able to culture the classical burrowing spirochetes via this method.


Directly from Alan MacDonald about microscopy & DNA Probe Hybridization:

"Dear Ruth,
I send to you a personal note to thanks for your very kind donation to support my research.
It is clear to me , as it is to you and to many others that
blood Testing is not a reliable method for the diagnosis of recent or or Remote Lyme borrelia Infection. DNA Probe testing of body tissuesin biopsy,or of blood smears under the microscope or of
spinal fluid under the microscope with Accurate DNa probes is the method of choice in the 21st century.
My Molecular Beacon Dna Probes have proven that
patients with disease, chronic type, and Borrelia induced by infection, is best handled with the Use of DNa probe hybridization testing ( my FISH method).
Such Testing gives extremely valuable information, which can be obtained in no other way,and assists the physician in making a diagnosis , either for aor against Borrelia infection in patients who seek diagnosis and care.
I will use your gift to expand the number of DNA Probes for strains of Borrelia which are curently producing Real Disease in patients, but inwhich today's blood tests return NEGATIVE Antibody test results.
Always bear in Mind, that :
NEGATIVE Lab testing results are
MEANINGLESS. Only positive and reliable Tests Really help patients.
Gratefully ,
Alan"
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey Lymedin2010,

It's good to have you back!! I'm glad you are ok, but sorry about your mold/house issue. I hope you can get that remedied somehow so that you can live in your own house.

This thread has not been as active without you. I'm considering posting some of my findings, but wish there was a way other than youtube (since they are mostly videos).

I got an awesome capture of a bart-like bacteria attacking a SOP kete... boy, was that bacteria MAD! I don't know what the kete did, but as I watched, I was glad I wasn't the kete. He would not let him get away! The kete was getting pummeled! I wish I knew what kind of bacteria it was that was attacking.

I don't think strep, staph, or brucella are motile, so it must have been a bart-type organism. It appeared to be slightly dumb-bell shaped and approx. 1 um in length.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks TNT.


Great to hear you have made progress with your own discoveries & it sounds that you are content with your decision to dive into borrelia hunting via microscopy?


It shows us how distasteful & macabre medicine has become and how easily doctors are willing to take our monies & co-payments whilst pushing us through the revolving door of Hotel Chronic Infection.


I cannot wait for you to post some of your work so that we can all enjoy, marvel, & learn from. If you like you can send me your finished product & I can post for you?


I too see additional organisms, but it is difficult to know what they are exactly.


I wonder if this great video is from Peter Kemp? It looks like he is incorporating staining for proof & those stains are not cheap.

https://plus.google.com/u/0/105345895299559481000/posts/1BpgpCk686X?cfem=1
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
BTW, yes that is Peter Kemp's work & here is the original posted video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgSo8tSV1uY
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Thanks, Lymedin2010. I can't wait to share some of my finds. I'm about as anxious as a schoolboy waiting to show his buddies his pet frog! Though, I'm afraid my videos will be quite humbling compared to some others' on here.

That fluorescent stain video is awesome! The clarity is SUPERB! Peter Kemp is definitely in the big leagues.

Since most of you post on youtube, is that the easiest and safest place to make personal videos public? Is there a size limit?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
There are 2 viable options between Vimeo & Youtube, the latter of which has a heck of a lot more monthly viewers.

http://www.amsterdamprinting.com/blog/2015/03/17/vimeo-vs-youtube-what-you-need-to-know/


TNT, you have superpowers & you don't even know it! Besides seeing the world in slow motion because of the chronic exhaustion and stymied pace & being able to sniff out mold & chemicals through chemical sensitivity, you should now realize that you can touch someone with the right force & transfer them what is in your blood.


I don't think anyone, seeing what is in our blood, would want to make direct contact with us. But all kidding aside, if the big guns have not touched the many professionals who are attempting to turn the tides of Lyme, then I think they could care less about you & I.


Make a Youtube account & do not reveal your true name & connect it to a new email account that you should create in conjunction with the youtube account. Then post & feel free with your superpowers [Smile]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
“Our latest findings indicate that the bacteria can literally outrun our immune cells within the host,” Wooten said. “We figured they would get in the skin and go hide from our immune response. Actually, we are finding that they don’t hide. They continue to move for months or years, and our immune system isn’t clearing them. Why is that? That is what we hope to unravel.”

http://utnews.utoledo.edu/index.php/07_17_2015/ut-microbiologist-seeks-better-treatments-for-lyme-disease-with-immune-response-research
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
That's an interesting article Lymedin. I find the same thing in my blood. The neutrophils readily gather up the candida and other "artifacts," but completely ignore and go right past a kete. It's very depressing if I dwell on it.

So, it's encouraging to see this microbiologist has a found a way to study this phenomenon. Of course, it has to be mentioned in relation to a vaccine!!! [Roll Eyes]

When will the profiteering stop with this disease!!! [Mad]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I know you all are going to start getting miffed at me for not sharing these videos (I'm working towards that), but I couldn't wait tell about this find!

Much to my horror and delight, I finally got video of a bacteria with flagella-3 bacteria in fact! You can CLEARLY see the multiple flagella on the bacteria and see it motoring with them. Two of the bacteria are kind of intertwined but their flagella are distinct. The 3rd one was by itself and very clear to see its whipping "tails" as it moved through the plasma!

INCREDIBLE!!!

What I found interesting is that lysozomes (the little immune particles from the WBCs) were attacking the flagella of the one bacteria.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
This picture is similar to what the flagella looked like except my bacteria were round, not rod-shaped. And, of course, I don't have near the magnification and resolution as this. Nevertheless, it is unmistakable!

This photo is from the bartonella.org website.


 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Like I said, I am anxious to share my videos, and am working on getting them available. I am also working towards getting equipped with 1000x or more (even 1500x) with my dark phase contrast. I just bought a 100x dark phase objective, and am working on obtaining the other necessities for this.

So, hopefully before too long I (and you all) will benefit from images and videos that will be closer (only closer, sigh) to the pic of that bartonella posted above.

Man, it would have been awesome to have gotten that flagella footage of mine with 1500x dark phase instead of just 400x!

I feel like Galileo wishing for a bigger telescope, lol.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, I too have seen WBC's go right past candida & borrelia. At times though I see WBC's with candida & partly degrades candida vesicles within them, indicating that they must have the surface proteins/antibodies to be able to sweep them up.


We have heard that borrelia suppresses the immune system & perhaps that is why most of the WBC's go past the spiros. Its more clever approach is its retreat into our cells, where our WBC's can't get into.


"The bacteria that cause Lyme disease are able to trick the immune system into not launching a full-blown immune response or developing lasting immunity to the disease, a new study with mice shows."
http://www.futurity.org/lyme-disease-ticks-immune-systems-954232/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great find on the bart & can't wait to see your videos!!!


I have never seen a flagella whipping organism in my blood as of yet. I have seen what may be babesia, but it is difficult to say for sure with live RBC's & without staining.


I have seen what lymephotos are calling Horseshoe mites in my blood, at least 6-8 of them when I first started microscopy, but that was early on in my treatment & I have not seen any since.


 -


More pics here.... http://lymephotos.com/mites/index.html


I have also seen something that resembles an amoeba, but it may have been an underdeveloped phagocyte.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is a rare time when one of my WBC's picked up a spirochete.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GCUFjYY3zs
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Lymedin2010, I think you get really good quality brightfield view. Must be the Zeiss optics and the brighter light.

The only thing that salvages my scope is the phase contrast. As the name implies, the technique gives very good visual contrast, and things like ketes really stand out in phase.

The WBC in that video must be a lymphocyte. It's too small and regular shaped to be a neutrophil, although I think I see one come into the field and leave again on the left side.

This answers a question I have had for a while. Apparently some of you find that your lymphocytes are traveling around and "eating" pathogens. I have not seen that yet, only with neutrophils.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, yes it is the objective Zeiss optics that shine on my scope. BUT with the built-in halogen bulbs the image is not as sharp & well lit as it should be. The LED lighting takes it to the next level, just watch out not to burn your eyes out. My USB video camera comes in handy in this respect.


The blebs are the most difficult to spot out of all the morphologies, then comes the cysts & then the full grown spiros.


If you look at the video from my last post, on the WBC that picks up the spiro, there you can see that the WBC is filled with these dark/black & filled dots, but I cannot tell those dark dots from the lysosomes or sometimes lipid droplets & that is why it is hard to know for sure.


One can never really know when it comes to blebs, as you can with the longer & full bodied spiros. One can only gain more suspicion where you see many cut up pieces of borrelia (part of borrelia body + blebs along the body AND many other what may look like blebs or spores in the plasma). Then you can say to yourself, this is MORE LIKELY to be a bleb or spore.


Alternatively, if you really want to prove that it is indeed a bleb. Then you should collect it & grow it in culture media & do some time lapse to see it develop into a full spiro. This is on my list & is what is available from our limited resources. If you had more money & resources, then you could do PCR, DNA probing. or immuno staining, which is always better than a visual to nail down the EXACT type of spirochete we are dealing with.


As I pointed out early when I started this thread I think the growth goes from bleb, to tailed-bleb, to dumbbell shaped, long dummbells & then really long ones. Not all of them get to be long & really long spirochetes, since the internal conditions might force them to become cysts or undergo String of Pearl formation & break apart.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Alternatively, if you really want to prove that it is indeed a bleb. Then you should collect it & grow it in culture media & do some time lapse to see it develop into a full spiro.

I'm afraid I can't.... I don't have tweezers that small. [dizzy] [Wink] [Big Grin] [lol]

Sorry, I couldn't resist!

Seriously, though, that seems like it would be quite the undertaking.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
No need to get those tweezers dirty with borrelia filth. They make affordable micro-pipettes. [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Fluorescent dyes of bb exiting mouse capillary wall.


I wonder if bb is more aggressive & spiraling when first introduced into humans & becomes less aggressive & spiraling over time? Perhaps it is some component in the blood that inhibits its aggression, which in turn makes it more difficult to treat in humans?


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2408724/bin/ppat.1000090.s007.swf
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I have been looking around to find out possibly what bacteria those cocci were, and I'm reading that most cocci DO NOT have flagella.

So, does anyone know which cocci bacteria have flagella?
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Are you sure its not just a protozoa?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Questions:
1) What magnification are you using to view them ?

2) What size do you think the organism is (.5-1 microns)?

3) Do you see the organism right away after live blood prep, or does it come out sometime after?

4) Does it grow, morph, change shape or form in any way over time?


At times at lower magnification even bacilli can look like coccoids, some bacilli start off looking more like cocci early during the life cycle too & then grow more rod like, just take a look at this Vibrio cholerae video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TWRFF79YsM


This one is a comma-shaped rod & is a predatorial bacteria, Bdellovibrio.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kLQslIAfxs
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Without higher magnification we can mistake a rod for a cocci. If one has leaky gut & lowered immune system it can really be any number of organisms. In my experience no professional that I have asked has been able to identify any cocci. Not when I have asked, nor when others who have identified COCCI organisms in their blood & have asked other professionals.


I would buy more clues & perhaps do some time lapse to get closer to the truth. Cocci are the hardest to identify without knowing more.

You mentioned "triangular" shaped in your previous posts. The only thing that I have seen in my blood that is oddly shaped, so not a cocci, rod, spiral, but "imperfectly" round are the following possibilities:

1)Shrunken & ghosted RBC's
2)Borrelia cyst


Some of the borrelia cysts appear more roundish & hollow, while some look more solid & have edges that stick out & can appear triangular for lack of a better term.


Here is a borrelia cyst that is more hollow, does it look like this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOrbEnFeT1k
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Your rod shaped with multi-flagella might be Helicobacter Pylori (if magnification is low). This is a common tertiary infection with Lymies & usually in the gut & lives at lowered ph.


With leaky gut & lowered immune it might have traveled from gut into blood stream. How often do you find these in your blood?


It would be really interesting if it was bartonella & you would be the first I have heard of this from live blood microscopy. I have never seen them live in anyones blood, nor those who have made their own videos.


 -

 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This is how they can look more cocci rather than bacilli under lower magnification.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9nB4O74X5Uw


Here is bartonella hensleae, does it look like this?
 -

[ 07-28-2015, 10:38 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by S13:
Are you sure its not just a protozoa?

Could easily be, except with phase contrast, I can usually see nuclei pretty well, and this (these) had no nucleus.

In relation to some of Lymedin's questions, I was viewing under 400x, but zoomed in with my camera to about 4000x. My camera is only a 6mp, so when completely zoomed in, the image quality is not extremely clear. But, when zoomed out or only part way in, the image is fairly crisp, but not very close.

Interestingly, the flagellum are clearer when zoomed out (I guess because of image distortion).

As for size of the organism, let me look again.

I would say .5-1.0um. Definitely no larger than 1um, and almost perfectly round.

The plasma had very slight current at that spot, and the organisms had the flagellum pointed mostly "downstream." In other words, the flagellum were pointed in the direction they were moving.

The shape and amount of flagellum were consistent with this pic. Though, my "cocci" were very bright.

 -

The organisms did not look like these:

 -


The top pic is a cocci bacteria, and the bottom pic (with nuclei) are trichomonas.

I really need to get my videos posted. I will try to work on that.
 
Posted by Eight Legs Bad (Member # 13680) on :
 
Have not had time to read all the posts here, but for those of you interested in microscopy, Dr Alan MacDonald has recently found TWO different Borrelia in the autopsy brain tissue of Alzheimer's Disease victims.

He found both Bb and B. miyamotoi. The Borrelia were labelled with Molecular Beacon DNA Probes specific for each species - the most accurate technology known for identifying bacteria.

These are stunning findings, so important. Dr M is now launching a crowdfunding campaign so that he can test the body fluids and biopsy tissues of LIVING people. Please see my other post here for more info:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=132256;p=0

I hope you all will support Dr M's fundraiser and circulate the message far and wide - his work could potentially bring hope to millions.
Elena
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I'm sorry this is not very good quality published. I lost some video quality in the upload. Did you guys have trouble with your published videos having less resolution than your actual videos? Is there something I'm doing wrong? My videos look much better on my computer before publishing (Of course, actual viewing is even clearer).

Anyways, here is one of the bacteria with the flagellum. Notice also the very long kete.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEQnmNKVt6w


And, here is a bacteria from the same sample that appears to be bart-like. But, it has no flagellum that I could see.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOftWSU92fY
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, I was looking again at some of your videos and am curious how you got that one with candida growing on dead skin cells.

I think that one would have been a difficult one to catch. And how/why were you looking at dead skin cells in the first place?

Maybe I don't want to know, lol....but I'm very curious.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Eight Legs Bad, thanks for the info. His postings have been floating around on Facebook & I have done my part [Smile]


Thanks for the info & others should help out as well. Dr. Alan MacDonald is one of my new idols post Lyme! His perseverance
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, great video & it looks as you said it would & that pic serves as a good example. As I said before anything coccoid would be more difficult for anyone to confirm, as I have asked near & far in the past.


But yours has flagella, as you said it does, & it should be easier. I have never seen or heard of such an organisms & most of the babs & bart organisms I have seen are from STAINED RBC slides & never any live ones.


I will do some research on it in the oncoming days & hopefully we can ID this one.


How often do you find this in your blood & about how many can you find on ONE slide? Are they all pretty much the same size or do they come in slightly smaller or larger diameter?


All my past Youtube videos I did not have any conversion & display issues with, except for my last one. I will have to upload another video just to determine if Youtube might have changed any specifications. Perhaps they have moved on & they are expecting most videos nowadays to be in the WIDE screen format (HD) & are no longer 3x4 format friendly?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
How often do you find this in your blood & about how many can you find on ONE slide? Are they all pretty much the same size or do they come in slightly smaller or larger diameter?

This is the first time I have seen cocci with flagellum. There may have been one or two cocci in previous samples, but it was very rare and never before with flagellum.

The bart-like bacteria I HAVE seen before... maybe 3 other times/samples (one organism per sample those other times). The one that was pummeling the kete was identical to this one. Actually, all the previous bart-like ones were identical to this one.

Would anyone be interested in the video where the bart-like bacteria was attacking the kete? It may have resolution issues, too, since I zoom in most of the time, and, since I may lose some clarity in the upload.(I will be more careful with the zoom from now on-at least until I get a better camera).

Thanks for your help Lymedin!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Was the bart like organism a rod shape in any form, or strictly round?


How large is original video, as it may not pass the max file size requirement?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The bart-like organism that attacks the kete is identical to the one in the second video I posted. It is rod-shaped. The bart-like organisms I refer to are all rod-shaped.

The kete-attacker video is a few minutes long, depending on which one I select.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The bart-like organism (rod-shaped one) I am learning could easily be E. coli bacteria. According to Wiki, cells are typically rod-shaped, and are about 2.0 micrometers (μm) long and 0.25–1.0 μm in diameter, with a cell volume of 0.6–0.7 μm. That would fit the bill for the "bart-like" (rod-shaped) organisms.

Here are some pics of E. coli from Dennis Kunkel Microscopy Inc.:


 -

 -


Here is an interesting one in which it looks like there could be a cocci form, but I think it is just on end:


 -


Some E. coli strains do possess flagella, but my rods did not. Only the cocci looking organisms had flagella.

So, this only gives me a possible answer for the rods, but not for the round flagellate organisms. And a quick search did not reveal a "cocci" morphology for E. coli. So, I don't think the round flagellates were E. coli.

So, I'm still looking for suggestions on what the round flagellates could be.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is a great video of E. Coli & it shows both rod & rounded shaped forms, I would imagine it being dependent on where in its growth cycle it is at. Also, the rounded ones appear to have flagella & is more noticeable when one pauses the video & reviews it frame by frame.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ea1GRCW4pFM


Another one of my colleagues suggest that it might be a platelet (aka thrombocyte), which are 2-3µm in diameter. As you make more microscopic observations see if any appear without flagella. Or do they ALL appear with flagella all the time?
This is a Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smear.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/51/Platelets2.JPG/1280px-Platelets2.JPG

[ 08-01-2015, 08:15 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey, thanks for the video of the E. coli! I, too, think it appears as though the round ones have flagella. The rod shaped ones, too. Though, I wish the video was of a higher magnification to tell for certain.

I don't think those round flagellate organisms in my blood are platelets.... I can see platelets very well, and are fairly numerous. The round and rod-shaped "bacteria" are very rare, and are quite different from the platelets. To name just one major difference, platelets look dark in my dark phase view. When I upload more videos, I can try to get ones with some platelets in the field.

I would tend to think my organisms are E. coli, especially if there is round-form stages with flagella. It seems to me that it would be very easy for a predominant organism (E. coli bacteria) of the GI tract to get into the blood stream in few numbers, especially if the mucosal membrane is not completely healthy and there is an imbalance of gut flora.

The scary thought is that the gut could seed other parts of the body via the bloodstream in a situation as that...or just as scary, lead to sepsis.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
One thing that I have learned, especially from watching the Animal Planet "Monsters Inside Me" series, is that we are susceptible to many different varieties of tertiary infections with the immuno suppression of Lyme.


If you watch the series you will become all too familiar with the wording "most people can fight off the infection, however the young, elderly, or immuno compromised individuals are at risk."
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
I would tend to think my organisms are E. coli, especially if there is round-form stages with flagella. It seems to me that it would be very easy for a predominant organism (E. coli bacteria) of the GI tract to get into the blood stream in few numbers, especially if the mucosal membrane is not completely healthy and there is an imbalance of gut flora.

The scary thought is that the gut could seed other parts of the body via the bloodstream in a situation as that...or just as scary, lead to sepsis.

I think you are very right here! The wild life i have encountered when watching growth in the blood is staggering and the diversity just doesnt seem to match with a single borrelia infection, or even one with a couple of known co infections.

So the idea that gut flora is constantly seeding the body with a wide variety of bacteria is a very good possibility. The growing candida hyphal forms in my blood sort of proves its possible. And the mechanism is leaky gut.

One of the clear observations i have made is that this wild life growth under the microscope is much more abundant when you press the slide with a small object, basically rupturing some of the RBC's and WBC's. So i suspect most of this wildlife is contained in the WBC's. At least an indication that the WBC's are mopping up this gut overflow.

And even without rupturing the WBC's i have pictures showing this wild life just growing from inside whole (but probably dead) WBC's :
 -

Its a bit fuzzy, but it shows 2 WBCs with unknown bacteria and or fungi growing out of them.

So gut flora overspill is probably a very important factor for some of the lyme patients. Continuous overstimulation of the Th1 branch of the immunesystem causes chronic inflammation. Lyme itself with its LPS also adds to this problem of course. Continuous chronic inflammation of the gut causes more bacteria to leak out and possibly causes more SIBO by damaging the ileocecal valve for example.
So its a vicious cycle.


quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
One thing that I have learned, especially from watching the Animal Planet "Monsters Inside Me" series, is that we are susceptible to many different varieties of tertiary infections with the immuno suppression of Lyme.

So are we immune compromised? Or is it just continuous overstimulation of the immune system that is causing trouble?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have seen a few "normal" & "healthy" blood samples & THEY ALL HAVE FOREIGN ORGANISMS!!!!


The difference is that our Lyme blood is overloaded & overstimulated from many different angles & sources and hence our blood shows the very large loads.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Did you guys see Peter Kemp's new centrifuge work with Lyme blood? I almost bought a centrifuge during the first year I bought my scope, since I thought I could sequester & concentrate the spirochetes in a blood layer & have visible masses of spirochetes for time lapse. After my disease spread the spirochetes became more plentiful & I lost the need for a centrifuge.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYnTBi7blck

 -

So in a nutshell this is basically how Advanced Labs & Dr. Burrascano would do a Borreliosis blood culture to prove Lyme Disease in our blood. It is not the exact recipe & but the gist is here. Add a culture medium, add your blood & store in a temp controlled environment for a few days & then check via microscopy.


The only difference here is that Peter was interested in determining which blood fractionation layer would host mot of the spirochetes. I always suspected that the blebs or cysts would be very buoyant & would "float" to the top plasma layer.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
OMG! I watched Peter Kemps video. I thought the buffy coat layer was bad! But, when the video got to the lower RBC layer, I about fell out of my chair! That's BAD! Those RBCs are basically colonies of spirochetes! I do wonder sometimes how we are still alive.

I viewed the blood of a very healthy friend of mine a couple months ago. I was very surprised, yet not surprised, by what I saw. He had one definite spirochete, perhaps 7-8 um long, and two probable shorter ones.

I am certain he has been exposed to lyme one way or another, and probably has been tick-bitten before. So, it was not a complete surprise to me that he did harbor a very small presence of the germ. But, he is as healthy and strong as an ox.

Though, if something would severely stress his immune system, I am sure there is a chance he could "come down" with Lyme disease.... the same way many people "come down" with it (not necessarily right after exposure, but after a STRESSOR on the immune system).

Oh, Lymedin. Do you think there is anyway you could shorten the URL address of that picture of the giemsa stained blood smear to get this page back to normal size?

[ 08-01-2015, 09:10 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, the blood sample was CULTURED to get that many spirochetes.


.3ml blood from various layers after the centrifuge + 1ml BSK medium, which was then incubated at 35C for 4 days.


So the few spirochetes in your blood became many by the time he looked at them on the 4th day.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Phew! That's a relief! I didn't see that it was cultured. NOW that I read the video description, I see that it SAYS it was cultured. Thanks, Lymedin.

If there would have been a snake in that description I could have been bitten. [bonk] [Frown]


Thanks also for fixing the page. It's so much easier on my eyes.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, I know a lady who has Lyme so bad & so much circulation issues that she cannot go to bed with her arms & legs crossed , because it hurts/burns so much from the Lyme.


I am willing to bet anything that her blood will look close to that.


There must be some limiting factors that prevent our blood from totally building up with spirochetes though & it must be the utilization of an essential growth component of bb, maybe something like availability of manganese or something along these lines.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
More info on blood culture advanced test.

http://www.medsci.org/v10p0362.htm


"In this report we present a method to cultivate Borrelia spirochetes from human serum samples with high efficiency. This method incorporates improved sample collection, optimization of culture media and use of matrix protein. The method was first optimized utilizing Borrelia laboratory strains, and later by demonstrating growth of Borrelia from sera from fifty seropositive Lyme disease patients followed by another cohort of 72 Lyme disease patients, all of whom satisfied the strict CDC surveillance case definition for Lyme disease.


The procedure resulted in positive cultures in 47% at 6 days and 94% at week 16. Negative controls included 48 cases. The positive identification of Borrelia was performed by immunostaining, PCR, and direct DNA sequencing."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Just as they mentioned in Under Our Skin 2: Emergence, that they closed down the microscopy work of Prof. Morten Lanne because of what was revealed.


Microscopy visualization of Borreliosis in Chronic Lyme is HUGE.


"Prof. Morten Laane held the presentation: "Easy Detection of Bacteria and Parasites in Infected Human Blood by Microscopy. Some Simple, Low-cost Methods" at the NorVect conference 2014.

Because his and Prof Mysterud's study on Lyme patients were stopped and all results were destroyed by the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision, Prof Laane was not allowed to talk about this particular study. He showed some of his work using two films. One is seen here in this excerpt. His presentation can be watched in full length at http://www.norvect.no


This is not the video of the full lecture.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alB_VvzMF5Q

The Norvect Conference is huge & all the key Lyme players lecture there.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3zx5pQ9_szEkWdAdXoyTw/videos
 
Posted by dbpei (Member # 33574) on :
 
I recently came across this thread and saw some pictures that resembled what I have been seeing with my eye floaters for the past few years.

Photos posted by Lymedin2010 7/28/15 at 9:55 a.m. - both pictures look very similar to what I see daily! I could not tell if these photos posted were from H Pylori or Bartonella.

I also have some small cyst shaped floaters, but the ones I see the most, I describe as looking like earwigs with a bunch of long, thin hairs on one end. Do any of you see these same floaters? After seeing these photos, I wonder if it could be bartonella or H Pylori that is keeping me sick.

Lab testing shows that I am making lots of antibodies for brucellosis. Is there a place I could find out what that bacteria looks like under microscope?

I don't own a microscope but am seeing my eye doc this morning. I wonder what she will say when I tell her what my floaters look like. I hope she won't add me to her nutty patient list.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Many Lymies have strings as floaters, as I have had for years & continue to have as well, which I suspect are the Borrelia spirochetes.


The pics I posted on that day are of H. Pylori, but your floaters could be Brucella because of your antibodies clue. If you describe them as you do, "like earwigs with a bunch of long, thin hairs on one end," then they could just as easily be H. Pylori escaping from your gut, bart, or another organisms we have not thought of yet.


Brucella:
 -

http://www.healthiana.com/2012/07/brucellosis.html


Above is what it looks like zoomed in & beyond the power of the standard microscopes & in the link below is a pic thru a microscope.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brucellosis


H. Pylori:
 -
 
Posted by dbpei (Member # 33574) on :
 
Thanks so much! It definitely resembles H Pylori missing the bands I see at the end near the hairs, but actually looks more like an earwig than the rod I see here. I saw my eye doc today for my annual exam and told her about them.

She examined my eyes really well and found one of the floaters I described. She told me they are vitrious detachments and not to worry. I hope she is right.

I really appreciate the help in identifying these critters! I will have to follow this thread. It is very interesting.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Eye floaters are really hard to prove in either direction, but it is interesting how many Lymies report them.


If anyone is interested in a break down of which cameras are best for pics, video & time lapse, here is a breakdown with focus specifically on microscopy.


http://www.lmscope.com/produkt22/Camera_Ranking_en.shtml?currentpage=1
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here you go... a Bart-like organism attacking a spirochete!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F331jqs3qaE

Thankfully, it turns out that I did not lose much resolution in the upload.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, the big one sure looks like borrelia!!!!
Awesome video & thanks for sharing!

It has the bulbous tips on both ends & it spirals/undulates in that very distinctive way with a bit more aggression than just a stagnant string or anything that may be of human origin & an actual artifact.


BUT, the one you are calling Bart like I also think is Borrelia, just a pre-mature one. It looks like a dumbbell, right?


From the beginning of my thread:
"The progression might be DOT--> DOT WITH TAIL-->STUBBY DUMBBELL-->MEDIUM DUMBBELL-->LONG DUMBBELL (STRING)."


At that time I thought it was spirochaeta gallinarum, because it was the only spirochete that I could find where someone discusses the blebs or spore formations. Now I know it is borrelia for sure & the blebs (dots) grow to be tailed blebs at first & then look like very small dumbbells, which are basically growing borrelia organisms.


One of my future wishes is to catch the blebs grow into tailed blebs & then the small spirochetes (small dumbbells).
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Yes, the longer one is definitely borrelia.

Why is the shorter one acting the way it is? It sure appears to me to be attacking the longer one. And the longer one appears to be losing energy.

The shorter one could possibly be borrelia, but I'm not sure. I don't have enough information to go on. I will pay attention to your videos with dumbbell organisms that size.

If you find any dumbbell footage from Sapi or MacDonald, please let me know.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I will be putting out a morphology video soon & it will cover the progression.


The Brownian motion you see often is from surface charges & they end up just bouncing around sporadically. The lighter an object is the more it may be affected by these charges & more they can bounce around.


The blebs & smaller dumbbells bounce around the most from what I see.


I think the phenomena you saw in your video is from surface charge & not really from an attack & it just happens that the two independent spiros had an attraction toward each other or were moving in the path of least resistance in unison. Two spiros attacting each other usually does not happen & is dependent on local concentrations & charges in the plasma.


This is Peter Kemp's video, take a look 13 seconds into the video at the top & center. You will see the small baby spiro or what I called the dumbbell. There is also another one on the lower left side.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7K5jHthVscI


9s into this very same video on the lower left, you will see a slightly longer dumbbell that has already gone through "String of Pearl" (SoP) formation & you can be satisfied that these are indeed spiros!!!!

That last spiro has 3 dots or blebs along the entire body, the two that you typically see on either end & it has developed a bleb in the center.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I am still a little hesitant to say every dumbbell-shaped organism is a juvenile kete. I am definitely open to the strong possibility that some are. But, take a look at this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_mXDvZQ6dU


I found this next video fascinating because of the resolution, magnification, and for the sheer awesomeness of phagocytosis! Is this with a DIC microscope?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvGVoxdy-yM
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yea, I have seen this exact Staphylococcus Aureus as one of my first videos when I first started with microscopy.


Proving via time lapse that the blebs turn to tailed blebs & then the dumbbells & then to larger spiros is high on my priority list. But yea it is always possible to confuse them with rods.


Take a look at what Staphylococcus Aureus looks like, since it is spherical, but the bodies can stick to one another & DO NOT HAVE a rod between them!!!! More times over more than one stick together & one would see many, not just two together. All of the dumbbells I see are 2 bulbous tips plus the center body = borrelia I think.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staphylococcus_aureus


Yes that is a DIC & an awesome way to see details.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
A really great videon on bb & biofilms, one of the best I've seen so far!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbWWTslbLM&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Look someone made a bb playlist, click on green arrow to go to next set of pages as there are a few.

http://datab.us/Search/Popular%2BLyme%2Bdisease%2Band%2BBorrelia%2Bburgdorferi%2Bvideos%2BPlayListIDPL53Pb2ML9854YXQ-LN8Qa7MNOAvKcg68v
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Thanks, S13. If you are seeing the pseudohyphae in your blood, does it gently wave around like seaweed in water? The stuff I'm seeing gently waves around.

If so, does it have that delineating cross-section line at the base of the hyphae like what is shown in your pictures above? I'm not seeing any delineation.

I see neutrophils gobbling the balls of "candida" up (if the candida is not too big).

I'm also seeing something very similar to the stuff that is waving around, but it is different. This other stuff very much appears to be thick, faint, spirochetes anchored in what appears to be cysts. The "cysts" are about 1-2 um in diameter and are not necessarily uniform in roundness. The "spirochetes" spin and move just like real spirochetes. I am suspecting these could be l-form borrelia, especially since they appear to be anchored in a cyst. These "ketes" appear to be approx. 3-6 um in lenth (about the same length of many spirochetes).

I have been studying up on L-form (cell-wall deficient) bacteria all morning and am coming to the conclusion that these waving, thick, faint "spirochetes" ARE VERY POSSIBLY a form of cell-wall deficient bacteria.

Here is exactly what I am seeing in my blood and exactly what I am referring to:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jb43_x8nODc&safe=active


I am also seeing "terrain" very much like this (that could look like what has been referred to as candida):

 -

(The above picture is a Phase contrast image of L-form cells from Bacillus subtilis)


Penicillin antibiotics CAUSE cell-wall deficient bacteria!!!!!

I'll probably post my own videos on what is probable CWD bacteria before too long.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here's an interesting page about L-form (CWD) bacteria:

http://mpkb.org/home/pathogenesis/microbiota/lforms
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hmmmmm, interesting how they say the coccoids can coalesce into what "appear" as string of pearls. Many different particles can come together to make a pseudo SOP from what I see, but they are never lengthy & do not appear properly aligned to come from a spirochete.


The organisms we did time lapse on don't coalesce into the SOP's, the bodies actually form the SOP as CLEARLY seen in our time lapse videos.


Also, it is stated that they do not easily grow externally to the body & in media. I already know a few people who are culturing the spirochetes externally & when I give you the recipe you will be able to as well. This will also allow you ample time to do time lapse on many of them at once.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
I haven't been back here in a long time (I took a break from the Lyme world after being harassed by some nefarious characters a few years ago)-- but I just wanted to thank all of you who contribute to this incredibly important and upbeat thread!!

It is so gratifying to see the explosion of microscopy videos online, showing the spirochete's behavior and habits. At some point, TPTB will no longer be able to suppress the information, and they will be widely viewed by the scientific community as the illegitimate, unscientific liars that they are..

Microscopy is TRUTH---- and the truth will prevail---- thanks to all of you.

Back in 2007/8 there were no videos on Youtube showing Lyme spirochetes, and we were all told the Big Lie--- that spirochetes were impossible to find in blood!!!

I remember stumbling upon a British Lyme guy online who was so pissed off at getting the "Lyme Runaround" from his British doctor that he bought an old microscope. He filmed hungry active spirochetes in the evening, and then loaded several short and poor quality videos of clearly visible live spirochetes in his blood directly onto his webpage. I was amazed that a layman could do this-- and I was so impressed by him. I guess he didn't think to put the videos on youtube, because youtube was fairly new at that time.

I then took the liberty of uploading those amazing, but poor quality videos to youtube-- and his videos-- the first spirochete videos on youtube--- received 10,000 views on my youtube page--- in a short time!!! I was so harassed later that I shut down my youtube page and dropped out of the Lyme world for a while-- because I didn't even know what an ad hominem attack was...and the evil out there directed against vulnerable, chronically ill people was so shocking to me....

This is why I am now so gratified that so many people are now doing microscopy and uploading their amazing videos!!!!

I'm now excited to get my own microscope and camera.

I want to see if promising herbals have any visual effect on diminishing spirochetes in blood over time. I know that only intravenous Rocephin seems to clear the blood completely-- based on one of your findings on this thread... but perhaps we could discover something miraculous working together!!

It sure would be great if there were a "Microscopy Herbal Club"--- we could all agree to take 3 months of a promising herb or herbal cocktail--- while filming befores and afters. (I say 3 months because that is the rough lifespan of a red blood cell-- and microscopy has proven that the spirochetes are intracellular-- i.e., they get safe harbor inside red blood cells) Anyway--- its just a thought.

I would love to see if any of the following herbals have an impact on diminishing spirochetes in blood over a three month period: Olive Leaf Extract; Enzymes like Serrapeptase; Teasle, Monolaurin; Barley Grass; Japanese Knotweed; Smilax; Boron; GSE;Baking Soda; Enula/Houttuynia; Banderol/Samento.... etc, etc.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Welcome back, WakeUp!

Yes, you need to get a microscope and start experimenting!

I think you will find it impossible to get a collaborative study with microscopists who are chronically ill who are looking at their blood who would be able to stop their own protocol to commence one with only herbals. There are just not that many of us.

I am sure you have heard of Sapi's in-vitro studies with Samento and Banderol? This is probably the closest thing you are going to find to your idea. It's a good idea, though, for sure!

Actually, there was one sample I took about 30 minutes after taking approx. 20 drops of Samento that showed MANY ketes. That would have been meaningless except that the previous samples were showing very few ketes. I just assumed that the Samento got intracellular and forced the ketes out into the plasma. But, who knows?

I thought it was interesting because in Sapi's studies the Samento alone caused more round bodies. I don't know if her medium was with whole blood though.

I just chalked it up to a fluke, because the next time I took Samento and then looked at my blood, I found very few ketes again.

My thinking as of late is that the so-called persister bugs are keeping us sick. I think the persister cells are the cell-wall deficient form. But, not just with borrelia, but other bacteria in our blood, too. Cell-wall deficient bacteria are extremely difficult to eradicate. Cysts and spirochetes are easy compared to these.

Perhaps you could do another youtube account and post some of those videos again?? I'd be very interested in seeing them!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, welcome back & welcome HOME!


We can share our experiences with where our abx & herbal protocols take us within our actual course of treatment. Personally I have already done this for some time & I have found that it is lengthy for someone to be on a protocol for 3-4 months in order to fully realize the realities.


But if LLMD's were to implement this by a patient basis, the collective observations & data gathered would be invaluable & would propel the community forward.


It would also be very interesting to see what rife frequencies these spirochetes respond to, since some of us develop additional symptoms to RF, Cellular, & electronic radiation.


I have partly written up my observations based upon abx & herbs and provided theories & insight and I will make that information available soon. My Lyme brain & exhaustion prevents me from systematically gathering all my dozens of ideas into a coherent collection, but as soon as I am done I will post here.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Welcome back, WakeUp!

Yes, you need to get a microscope and start experimenting!

I think you will find it impossible to get a collaborative study with microscopists who are chronically ill who are looking at their blood who would be able to stop their own protocol to commence one with only herbals. There are just not that many of us.

I am sure you have heard of Sapi's in-vitro studies with Samento and Banderol? This is probably the closest thing you are going to find to your idea. It's a good idea, though, for sure!

Actually, there was one sample I took about 30 minutes after taking approx. 20 drops of Samento that showed MANY ketes. That would have been meaningless except that the previous samples were showing very few ketes. I just assumed that the Samento got intracellular and forced the ketes out into the plasma. But, who knows?

I thought it was interesting because in Sapi's studies the Samento alone caused more round bodies. I don't know if her medium was with whole blood though.

I just chalked it up to a fluke, because the next time I took Samento and then looked at my blood, I found very few ketes again.

My thinking as of late is that the so-called persister bugs are keeping us sick. I think the persister cells are the cell-wall deficient form. But, not just with borrelia, but other bacteria in our blood, too. Cell-wall deficient bacteria are extremely difficult to eradicate. Cysts and spirochetes are easy compared to these.

Perhaps you could do another youtube account and post some of those videos again?? I'd be very interested in seeing them!

Hi.. thanks for the welcome back--- sorry but I'm done with youtube because of google's intrusiveness. I do happen to have one of the original videos (wmf file) from 2007-- its only of historical interest, though-- since what people are making today are just so much better.. I could email it to you if you like, though it might not go thru email.
With respect, I don't like to use the word "impossible" as its quite discouraging, and won't help us as a group to find a cure. Of course no one would have to change their own protocol in a Lyme Microscopy collaboration, and I would never in a million years suggest this...

What I am talking about is simply having a list of protocols-- both herbal and antibiotic--- to select on an "online Lyme microscopy club" page, --- kind of like a signup sheet for a potluck dinner, and when and if someone wants to start a new protocol, he or she signs up to grab the slot for that protocol, i.e. "Buhner Protocol" or just "Teasle" alone, or Samento/Banderol. (Or we could have ten slots per protocol) He or she would then just document spirochete behavior in vivo ---and numbers of spirochetes and round bodies observed, say-- once every other week--- for a couple of months, according to a simple, but standardized procedure on the web page. Any side effects could also be documented. All results would be published on an ongoing basis for club members to view and disseminate. I would make it a "Research Microscopy CLUB"---- so that the FDA or other Fed big pharma shills could not claim that it was anything else!!! It might not be hard to do at all... and might provide some valuable anecdotal evidence on treatments.
Im just getting tired of spending endless funds on herbs, know-nothing, unproven Doctors, and antibiotics that may not work at all.
Your finding on samento (in live blood vivo) is very interesting, combined with Sapi's in vitro finding that Samento, like Doxy increased round bodies!! Perhaps the motile form is stressed by the presence of samento, and flees out of the red blood cells as it senses samento-- and that is what you were observing!! (See this 1912 study on how spirochetes went crazy, shaking like dogs, fleeing in the presence of Salvarsan under the microscope: http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/55039)
Wow-- some of us need to follow your anecdotal observation up further!! If you are right, then a combo of samento, banderol and Rocephin might do the trick of clearing both the blood and the red cells.
I can't do samento anymore, because I now get a heart palpitation while taking 30 drops a day. I did get an improvement in arthritis recently, while on Olive Leaf Extract with Monolaurin, Boron drops and a daily Green powder drink. My physical fatigue and foot pain, though is still crippling, which I have come to realize is probably Bartonella..(I test negative for everything...so gave up on tests..lol) so Im now making Houttuynia tea (3 grams of leaves and twigs per day) with Enula drops every day-- Sapi's study showed that the Houttuynia/Enula combo is one of the most effective for killing round bodies and biofilm in vitro. Plus, Dr. Schaller believes that Houttuynia kills bartonella.
Just think positively and never say "impossible"--- we WILL find a cure or effective treatment, and it won't necessarily be from big pharma.

No one else in government or the AMA cares about us... WE are the ones who must be the cutting edge. A cure or successful treatment will be far more likely if we can create a collaboration with hundreds of Lyme microscopists working together to document this devil's behavior in live blood.. Anecdotes are very valuable things.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Sorry--- I think Balfour's Microscopy paper on Salvorsan was from 1911, not 1912, and I don't know whether he had checked the liver juices BEFORE he gave the chicks the Salvorsan--- but the Salvorsan did completely clear the blood of spirochetes!! :

"If a well-infected chick be given a dose of salvarsan, the peripheral blood is soon cleared, or nearly cleared of spirochaetes.

If then a drop of liver juice be examined by the dark-field method, it will be found swarming with spirochaetes and with highly refractile granules. The source of the latter is soon apparent, for attention will be directed to spirochaetes which are not moving in the usual way, but are in a state of violent contortion, or are, so to speak, shaking themselves to and fro.

Indeed, I cannot give a more apt comparison than by likening their movements to those of dogs which have been in water and are shaking themselves vigorously to dry their coats. The object of the spirochaetes, however, is to rid themselves of the bright spherical granules which can be seen within them and which may or may not be aggregations of the so-called chromatin core.

They are forced along the periplastic sheath and suddenly discharged , so that they become free in the medium and dance hither and thither as tiny, solid, spherical, brilliant white particles.

In process of time the spirochaete loses its activity, becomes difficult to see, and eventually all that is left of it is the limp and lifeless sheath drifting aimlessly in the fluid and liable to be caught up and swept away by some still vigorous parasite. Such a sheath may still retain one or two of the granules which it has been unable to discharge. As may be imagined, the process is most fascinating to watch, and my observations have been confirmed by Captain Fry and Mr. Buchanan, of these laboratories and Captain
O'Farrell, R.A.M.C. I may also say that the first-named had previously seen a shedding off of granules by trypanosomes in the peripheral blood of experimental animals, a phenomenon which he is now studying.

>b>It is these spirochaete granules in the liver, spleen and lung, and possibly also in other internal organs, which I believe, invade the red cells.

I think I have seen the penetration occur, but require to make futher observations in order to be certain as to the mode of entry.

Such a chain of events fully explains all the puzzling features which this intracorpuscular infection has hitherto presented, and moreover, brings it into line with the infective granules found in the ticks, for these very closely resemble those seen in liver-juice films both when examined by dark-field method and when stained by the Levaditi process."

Since Salvorsan is an arsenic compound, it is no longer used.
the links is http://www.lymeinfo.net/medical/LDCysts.pdf
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Yes, welcome back & welcome HOME!


We can share our experiences with where our abx & herbal protocols take us within our actual course of treatment. Personally I have already done this for some time & I have found that it is lengthy for someone to be on a protocol for 3-4 months in order to fully realize the realities.


But if LLMD's were to implement this by a patient basis, the collective observations & data gathered would be invaluable & would propel the community forward.


It would also be very interesting to see what rife frequencies these spirochetes respond to, since some of us develop additional symptoms to RF, Cellular, & electronic radiation.


I have partly written up my observations based upon abx & herbs and provided theories & insight and I will make that information available soon. My Lyme brain & exhaustion prevents me from systematically gathering all my dozens of ideas into a coherent collection, but as soon as I am done I will post here.

You are absolutely right.... if LLMDs had a simple web page they could access in order to track live blood observations while their patients are on various therapies--- this would be amazing. I, too am a believer in the possibility of a RIFE treatment. I think Professor Holland was working on RIFE frequencies for Lyme-- he actually "exploded" several blephera organisms live on camera--using only frequency. If we could find a frequency that only worked for Lyme cysts--- that would be a huge advance for all of us!!! It might not be too difficult to do this with an army of microscopists. We can only do all these things with an army of amateur and dedicated microscopists who can spend the time needed to run rife frequencies and or take different herbs, and record the results on film.
As for the brain fog you are experiencing-- my sympathies--- I have it too -- it comes and goes. Have you thought to use your iPhone to record all your thoughts and observations so that this community does not lose your precious work?
Lastly, you do not have a Lyme brain--- you have your own brilliant brain which is being attacked by a very evil microbe. Never take ownership of this disease----- and never give in to it. I look forward to your results, and wish you strength.
We will find a cure.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am sure many will be willing to pay for Live blood viewing in a LLMD's office & the MD does not need to waste their time doing it either. Once you nail down the technique the work is very robotic & boring in fact, and they can pay minimum wage workers to simply record any significant findings. One simply hits record when something irregular comes up & the LLMD can then quickly review the video recordings & make an assessment. I am sure they will find a correlation between symptoms & the amount of blood pathogens.


I am sure that many other findings will come along the way & especially if we share & learn from one another.


I have not done any audio recordings on my phone, since then I have to listen to myself for hours & I would rather just read my short-hand note taking.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
An electron photomicrograph of a white blood cell attacking Borrelia.


Review of evidence for immune evasion and persistent infection in Lyme disease
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3636972/


 -

 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Electron Cryotomography of Borrelia b.

Yet another clever defense mechanism in the fact that bb keeps its flagellum hidden between the Outer Membrane (OM) & Protoplasmic Cylinder (PC). I was night dreaming of the possibility of putting an end to this organism from the motility standpoint, but this would be a difficult task for bb. Most other organisms have the flagella extending out to the open, where it is more vulnerable, but not bb.


 -

"Figure 1 of Charon et al. Bar, 50 nm.
PFs, periplasmic flagella; PS, periplasmic space; PM, plasma (or cytoplasmic) membrane; OM, outer membrane."


 -

http://www.sarcoidosis-sarcoid.com/2013/01/spirochetes-unwound-viewing-arrangement.html
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Guys, this is a very valuable tool to have for microscopy for under $20. Basically it is a mount that you attach either to the trinocular or 1 of the binocular ports & it allows one to attach your Point & Shoot camera (as long as the lens does not stick out too far) to it via the tripod adapter.


Furthermore, if you attach it to the trinocular, you can rest your mobile phone on there & take pics & video, as well as do time lapse video via an app called "Lapse It" or "Lapse It Pro."


http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=Universal+Digital+Camera+Adapter%2Fmount%2Fstand+For+Scopes%2Fspotting+Telescope&_sacat=0


This is the exact one that I bought some time ago.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Digital-Camera-Adapter-mount-stand-For-Scopes-spotting-Telescope-/191246956510?hash=item2c8734f7de

 -


If these links should ever expire, then you can search for "Universal Digital Camera Adapter/mount/stand For Scopes/spotting Telescope" on Ebay.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Someone got an awesome view with Zeiss 100x phase contrast lens of borrelia in at least 3 morphological forms- spirochete, cyst (ketes anchored in cysts), and what I feel is probably l-form (cell-wall-deficient). Oh, yes, I also see "string of pearls."

Notice that this is blood from a "healthy" person.

Notice the frames near the end where it appears like there are many l-form ketes. The "ketes" are ghosted, thicker, and without a distinct outline (cell wall), but definitely resemble ketes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N30PjQTF1Eo
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
I think we need to be more careful about claiming whats what under the microscope.

It is an interesting video, absolutely. Apparently this healthy person has a small amount of bacteria in the blood which are mopped up by WBC's quite efficiently. Is that suggestive of borrelia? Im not sure. In fact, borrelia seems to be pretty good at evading WBC's and hides in RBC's instead.

The long wires shown in the video are probably not borrelia imo. They are way longer than whats normal for a spirochete. And they dont seem to be motile, they just wave in the blood stream from brownian motion.

The speed at which this wild grow appears (after just 24 hours) is also strange for borrelia. Borrelia is a slow grower, so the wild grow is imo more suggestive of a different faster growing bacteria or fungal form.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So you guys are discrediting Dr. Alan MacDonald, when he says that no other life forms in the blood should present itself as the "String of Pearls?"


Time = 41:00
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ojq_2-HlNg&feature=youtu.be&t=2463


You are discrediting a PATHOLOGIST who has graduated Columbia University in 1974 & has made countless blood observations in the lab with actual real life diagnosis?


An individual who has devoted his entire life to Borrelia & who has THE MOST influential connections of people who actually study & care to study this organism. You can bet that when he puts something out to the public that he has done a thorough investigation & thought process & has the support of his colleagues.


A person who has access to some of the best & most current testing & who follows & gets advice from those with cutting-edge contemporary testing (PCR, Culture Tests, DNA Probing/Hybridization, & Immuno staining microscopy) & some incorporating multiple test forms.


Do you think that the scientific Lyme community will allow this video clip in Under Our Skin to be shown without raising questions or doubts? The Lyme community has been VERY conservative even to say that Borreliosis is sexually transmitted & or passed to unborn child & have only hinted at such anecdotes.


Time = 1:16
https://youtu.be/edA3l2MlMtA?t=76


Please wait for my full report, which surmises everything that I have learned from microscopy & Lyme thus far.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Im not discrediting anyone. Im just saying we often dont know for sure what we are seeing. Understand that this is all ongoing research. Dr. Alan MacDonald doesnt have all the answers yet, nobody does.

I assume string of pearls is real, yes. If you look at the same video of him where it emerges from a cyst:
https://youtu.be/1ojq_2-HlNg?t=39m50s

But the scale is smaller than what we often see in the blood under our microscope. So how do we know what we see is the same thing that Macdonald describes?

To say no other organism can make a string of pearls in blood is a daring statement, since we dont know and havent classified all pathogens yet.
What about streptococci?
They are exactly what we think of as string of pearls. And they are found in massive numbers in the gut, so some of them could very easily wind up in the blood.

So again, im not saying MacDonald is wrong. No, in fact i think he is doing a great job and his research is fascinating and very valuable! But we need to realize there are still more pieces of the puzzle to uncover. And while MacDonald primarily focuses on the borellia bacteria, there are often other infections involved with lyme and other chronic illness.

Remember, good science is to questing everything, not follow the herd. Thats exactly what MacDonald did, and its what we should do to.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
So you guys are discrediting Dr. Alan MacDonald...?"

I think his comments were directed towards me, Lymedin... and his caution is well received. We do need to be very careful that we have pretty good evidence to specify what we are seeing under the microscopes.

I feel that since almost no doctors are looking into what we are seeing in our blood (because of the suppressive medical, insurance, and pharmaceutical industries that wants the real nature of disease and cures hidden) that the burden of proof ultimately rests on the ill.

What we are seeing under the scope is REAL. I don't believe in "artifacts." Everything we see is in our blood for a reason. If it is not native, then it is probably pathogenic. Even if we cannot say exactly what things are, I feel we have the liberty to discuss and learn...from valid authoritative sources, and from each other.

When we have laboratory proof of specific infection, we can feel pretty confident that these are the things we are most likely going to see in our blood. But, we need to reference accurate information so that we can correctly identify that we are seeing what we think we are seeing.

I realize that correctly identifying these organisms is not always possible without techniques such as culturing, PCR, or staining. But, hey, even certified labs (think Advanced Labs in PA, and IGENEX in Calif.) are discredited even with verifiable proof.

This has been a very scientific thread, and we need to be careful to keep it that way without making it too narrow that we cannot draw upon our own observations (and each others), and the credible microbiology resources available to us (textbooks, scientific journals and pictures, and our own labwork, etc.), to come to some educated conclusions...

But, sometimes I need reminded that I am not a pathologist....(I missed my life's calling, sigh). I will try to be more careful to use the terms "possible" or "probable" when discussing the organisms I'm not certain about (those that don't have a reasonable level of proof).

Thank you, S13!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
It is always a good idea to question, but I just wanted to show you the body that you were up against. I too questioned in the beginning, but the summation of all things that I know about bb now & what I hear & have seen from others is suggestive that it is bb. I WISH that I could say that it is not, but I simply cannot. At least for now you guys accept that they are not "artifacts," which is a huge leap forward for everyone.


At the beginning there were notable biologist that I was sending this information to & they were happy with the "artifact" explanation. When I finally captured the spirochete undergoing cyst formation, spiraling into themselves, undergoing SoP formation & dispersing in the blood, then all felt silent & the matter was taken seriously.


Perhaps for me it hits home, because right after IV Rocephin I could not find a single one of these organisms in my blood. I looked for hours & hours, and days & days, into weeks. Then at one point after my oil immersion technique I started to see them, albeit scarcely. From month to month I saw more & more and eventually an explosive amount in my blood, which followed my increased symptoms DESPITE aggressive combos of oral abs & herbs.


Some of these other guys doing work have cultured their blood, stained them & they have done immuno staining & fluorescent microscopy. They are all confirmed & suggestive of bb. in our blood samples, the very same "STRINGS" that we see in our blood. These guys are far more advanced than I am & when they too tell me that these are definitely bb, I take it seriously & simply pile the evidence on top of everything else.


What I am learning is that INFECTION does not mean DISEASE. Even with my discussions in the veterinary world, where they see a good chunk of dogs with positive borrelia tests, yet they have no symptoms & they do not treat. Carrying the pathogen with no disease is not new, we see it in Malaria infections, Syphilis, TB, herpes...etc. We even see this in HIV+ vs AIDS & I try to see Borreliosis in the light of other known infections where there is a constant battle between immune system & infection. My wife has the same spirochetes that I do, yet she is relatively asymptomatic. I could not find these organisms in the few healthy people that I have checked no matter how hard I looked. Now if you guys are finding this in everyone around you, or in most people then that would be a new finding.


Even from the standpoint of a tick biting a mammal or reptile & picking up the infection is corroborated by this model of spread via the blood. Even the migratory symptoms, shortness of breath, & circulatory issues fits in perfectly in this model. Even the detox issues & sensitivities fall into this, where the body is being overwhelmed by constantly having to filter & contend with toxins (i.e. the massive amounts of bb & toxins in the blood stream).


Do you guys realize the struggle to make blebs & cysts known as part of the borrelia cycle? This despite their known existence in other spirochetal entities. Do you realize the struggle to gain acceptance of the L-forms, the non-aggressive spiraling forms? Reportedly they loose their full spiraling ability & become as we see in our microscopes, as gyrating and worm-like entities.


At 13:42 Dr. Alan MacDonald discusses the non-spiraling form & perhaps why it is non-spiraling. Here I can debate about the REASONS it is non-spiral vs spiral, but I cannot on the existence of a non-aggressive spiraling forms.
https://youtu.be/pqKaM_J7KDI?t=822


Even in this video that I made, there is proof that the spirochete still has spiraling abilities, where a very long spirochete forms a hairpin & then spirals into itself. It forms a much thicker double stranded spiral at the point of contact & continues to do so along the length of where it spirals onto itself.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAmEMz-t1dA


When I take a step back & look at all the information collectively, I simply cannot dismiss it & I cannot say this is not bb. There are new & promising tests coming up & it will hopefully allow us all to see the realities.


In my videos I have shown:
1) Cyst formation
2) Spiral activity remains in spiraling onto itself
3) SoP formation of blebs & subsequent release.


The best way to confirm syphilis is still via microscopy. What would be good visual evidence, where we can be more confident in considering this to be bb? For me it is to see an L-form, such as we see in our blood & have that unit give rise to spiraling form within an in vitro culturing environment. Once we have this video, we can go on with more confidence that this is bb.


I am working on it.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Im not questioning the fact that we in fact have lyme disease. I think that is pretty obvious. And yes, those artifacts are not supposed to be in the blood stream. Ive seen that myself countless times on giemsa blood stains. They are bacterial and dont belong in the bloodsteam.

But from a good scientific point of view i want to warn not to contribute everything to borrelia we see in the blood.

For example the neurotoxins by borrelia you mention have never been scientifically shown to be a problem or even exist. So with that im not saying neurotoxins dont exist, we just dont know yet. A lot of other bacteria have been shown to produce potent neurotoxins, so why couldnt they be the source of toxicity for a lot of patients?
The idea of neurotoxins fitting in the disease model you have created, doesnt prove the model to be correct. Its a theory that must either be proven right or wrong. And again, dont get me wrong here, its great that you take this approach. Formulating a model of what could happen (the hypothesis) is always the first step in medical research imo. But dont forget to take it to the next level. Find proof that your hypothesis is either right or wrong.

What you mention here is something that puzzles me:
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:

At 13:42 Dr. Alan MacDonald discusses the non-spiraling form & perhaps why it is non-spiraling. Here I can debate about the REASONS it is non-spiral vs spiral, but I cannot on the existence of a non-aggressive spiraling forms.
https://youtu.be/pqKaM_J7KDI?t=822

MacDonald clearly states in that part of the video that Borrelia becomes elongated and can lose its spiral shape in tissue. Whereas in liquid medium it remains spiral shaped.
So why are we seeing the exact opposite in the blood? Ive never seen a true spiral shaped borrelia in my blood. They are all elongated irregular shapes. So again, im not saying those shapes are not borrelia (bacause i actually think they are), but are we truly seeing the same things as MacDonald under our microscopes? MacDonald can back up what he is seeing by using fluorescent molecular DNA probes. We just cannot. For now at least...

So thats why it would be great to get our hands on those dna probes and we can finally start producing some real proof.

There are still lots of shapes and forms of bacteria that i see in my blood and others that i seriously question to be borrelia.
For example the medusa heads. Ive never seen fluorescent stained proof from Macdonald or anyone else that those forms are indeed borrelia.
For example, stuff like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJeVah57y3E

What if these strange shapes are in fact not borrelia? What kind of new co-infection are we perhaps dealing with? Could this be another missing piece of the puzzle why some of the chronic lyme patients just dont get better with standard treatment?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, you have mentioned in the past that some of what you are seeing may be fungal forms of some kind.

I have wondered that as well at times. Especially if the little white round globs the neutrophils are picking up are some kind of fungal form such as candida. That would make it likely that the "l-forms" we are seeing coming out of the WBC are a hyphal form of fungus....like in the video I posted above.

( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N30PjQTF1Eo )

And, with the dark-field video you just posted above, I can see why one could think that:

( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJeVah57y3E )

The trouble I see with this possibility is that there is no obvious branching of the "hyphae," as in your CLASSIC skin fungal time lapse. And, the "hyphae" do not seem to be as rigid as would be expected. Unless... these pseudo-hyphae are a fungal l-form.

If these "l-forms" are fungal hyphae, I wonder if the hyphal structures that would "grow" out of these "fungal tubes" would be "as" microscopic as what we are seeing in our blood on the WBC. Approximately what size were those branches in your skin fungal time lapse?

And, lastly, I see the same "l-forms" coming out of RBCs in my blood, and that would be more consistent with an intracellular bacterium. I am not aware that candida can be intracellular in RBCs.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
You are right, its not candida. Candida branches are way bigger from what ive seen.

You can compare this by looking at the size of the red bloodcells:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJeVah57y3E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlAYKAR9X2Q

Candida branches are about 6um in diameter. The medusa stuff is more in the range of ~0.7um diameter. And more important, candida just keeps on growing and growing lengthwise. At least, thats true for the hyphal form. The medusa head never grows that long. So its not candida, but that doesnt rule out all fungal forms of course. Psuedohyphea also dont grow very long either.

What you mention is a good observation. If it also grows out of RBCs then it is probably not a fungal form, but an intracellular bacteria.

If it grows out of WBCs it can be anything, since WBCs will devour anything pathogenic.

Perhaps we need a fungal stain to rule out fungal forms in the blood. I dont think its much more difficult then giemsa stains. However i dont have any specific chemicals for it now. Perhaps some kind of silver stain like GMS:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grocott%27s_methenamine_silver_stain
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Very good, S13, how could I have forgotten that video of yours of the fungal growth in the blood?! Thanks for the clarification-that's very helpful.

Yes, we need to get a fungal stain. You are the man!

For general interest, I just published a couple of my earliest videos of ketes in brightfield (1000x). You can tell I was new at it because of all the zooming in and out, and the jerkiness.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1TORYgrY6o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXkxcFPhLNs


I want to publish a couple videos with the "l-forms" we have been talking about, but I just need to browse through my list and find some good ones.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, I hope you feel it's alright for me to be posting these videos as "possible" organisms. If you think of a better way I could publish these, please let me know.

I don't exactly know (and can't prove) what some of these organisms are in my blood. But after searching and reading and learning for hours on end (not to mention all I have learned and read over the years besides what has been direct result of microscopy), I feel it is very possible that these organisms could be what I/we refer to them as.

Also, I have strong lab evidence for some of the organisms I refer to.

So, hopefully I am still in line with keeping this thread as scientific as possible. Since we can't absolutely prove some of this stuff as of yet, we are still in the hypothesis stage. But, the correlations we are seeing under our scopes are striking!!! And, I don't believe in "artifacts!"

Ok, that was my disclaimer, lol.

Here are newly published videos. They are not in chronological order. I should eventually go back and post the recording dates.

Here is a couple videos of the possible l-form spirochetes "coming out" of the RBCs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0f_PdjmFpE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WONelrewI48


The next two videos are of possible merozoites in the plasma. (They don't look very alive anymore). I took the one video with my old Canon A540 camera, and the other with my "new" Canon SX160is camera that records in HD. I am comparing the quality of recording between the two, in case you are wondering. My first impression is that the A540 will do just as good of a job and be more presentable because of the 160's "tunnel vision" with it's wide-field lens. What do you all think?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eAGs5FzA2Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7M-h0LnE1M


A close-up of a possible merozoite in the plasma:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcVMe35q7XE


And, a scary one of many possible merozoites on RBCs and in the plasma. These are the triangular-shaped organisms I have referred to before. They definitely resemble apicomplexan merozoites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUZaE-NFlKw


I may have posted this link before, but here is a good high resolution video of the invasion of RBCs by merozoites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKEGZCZqZ_w

A couple more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPgqAQkE-M0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3DSB1xXuec

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQgFMWRedxw


Here are a couple awesome fluorescent stain videos of merozoites! This is what we need to do!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVQw4voFDEg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=383jDplBeT0


Let me know what you guys think.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hi guys, sorry I have not contributed & responded back earlier. My Lyme symptoms are more crippling at times & brain fog is really high & I am just exhausted with my current treatment & herxing and I did not have the energies to answer concerns to the degree with which it deserves.


No, not all that you see in your blood is due to Lyme & since this is an immunosuppressive disease, as we all now know, you will see additional organisms. The best way for you to determine what is what & to get a better feel for things is to observe "normal" blood as much as you can. With normal blood I also see the rouleaux formation & the spiky protrusions on the rbc's due to crenation. I also see various, although very sparingly, coccoids. Some of which are more rounded, whilst others more oval or cigar shaped.


As I have mentioned in my previous videos that they can be confused with WBC lysosomes, platelets, fat droplets..etc. So because of this I do not report much on smaller entities, since I find it impossible to confirm. I also see what I can more clearly identify as platelets & lipid droplets in normal blood, since they are all rather uniformed in size & there is no presence of other spirochetal morphologies that I mention below.


By now I can pretty much tell when a debri field in the plasma is due to the spirochetes, since there will be many .5-2µm cysts & blebs in the debri field, as I show in My Horrific Lyme blood video when the medusa colony disseminates. The bigger smoking gun &when I can be more confident is when I witness the partially detached or cut up pieces of Borrelia from the terminal stage of SoP formation & extrusion. So you may see the body of borrelia with 3-4 pieces of blebs, all attached in one piece, & free floating in the plasma & along with an unusually high load of what look like blebs & cysts in the surrounding plasma. As stated in my video, this can be replicated in Lyme blood if the blood is left out for at least 24-36 hours. This is when I am more confident that I am looking at spirochetal morphologies & for which I have never seen duplicated in normal blood.

I have also been able to see a single filarial worm & what Lymephotos calls horseshoe mites. The mites I only saw in the very beginning & treatment must have eliminated them, since I have not seen them since. I have never seen the mites in others "normal" blood.

I also see & recorded what might look like candida & even biofilms, but I have not shown this in the past since I cannot confirm what they really are. I was more suspicious of the candida being ghosted & shrunken rbc's. I have since done time lapse & some of candida looking clumps actually grow & bud off, while some are behaving like rbc with no further growth. I have not shown this video either, because I wonder about the possibility of contamination.

I have seen dead & lifeless looking objects that have bends & spiral & that look like spirochetes in my blood, but did I come out to show a video that I found active typical spirochetes? NO! I have found no further evidence to suggest that they are even alive & to this date I have found no TYPICAL AND ALIVE spirochetes in my blood (with deep & aggressive spiraling waves). Just because I have not found them does not mean they do not exist though & perhaps those typical ones are more deeply embedded? Now others that have cultured their blood have observed TYPICAL & text book spiraling ketes IN THE NEW CULTURE, but for some reason this does not happen as often as we expect it to.


Trying to think ahead, the best thing to do is to feed "sterile" ticks with our blood & allow it to fester & grow, where we eventually confirm bb presence via microscopy of xenodiagnosis.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
THERE ARE objects in the blood that look like spirochetes & that is why I wrote this in the past...

"As far as I am concerned, if one sees the bulbous tips, the undulating motion, and sheer abundance of such objects, then that is a dead giveaway. I think it is hard to logically dismiss that as random artifacts & should force the general scientific/medical community to AT LEAST be interested in further investigation."


So this is where the confusion resides, in that such objects can exist from what I am told, although I have never been able to see them in ANY normal blood slide as of yet. I was able to see one form in normal blood (small dumbbells), which may be another organism & I will discuss this in a bit.


When observing I give higher credibility to when I find the following:

1) BULBOUS OR ROUND TIPS ON BOTH ENDS & MEDIUM LENGTH SPIROCHETES. There are spirochetes that do not have bulbous ends & I have seen video of large quantities of these spirochetes PROPOGATED from the people who have chosen to culture them. So they can exist & I have tons of video on those as well, but I chose to dismiss them. There are also many VERY thin ones which lack the rounded tips, which I also have tons & tons of video but I choose to dismiss.

AND

2) SPIRAL OR UNDULATE WITH SOME AGGRESSION. I prefer to see a bit of life in their mobility. Even Dr. Alan MacDonald makes reference to these relatively docile forms that appear rather lifeless.

AND

3) LARGE QUANTITIES OF ITEM 1 & 2. Large quantities of the 2 items above eliminate the possibility of the chance encounter of any aggregates conforming to this configuration.

If you look at the videos of professionals who release their videos, they fulfill 2-3 out of the aforementioned for a high impact reception.


Furthermore, the morphological transformations of cysts & blebbing is a huge advantage for even more positive identification.


Now go back & watch some of Dr. A. MacDonald's videos & see where this all fits in the big picture. They did not show strings or what may "look like" ketes, they showed actual atypical spirochetes.

http://alzheimerborreliosis.net/videos/


Go back & read Morten Laane's paper again... " Figure3. Borrelia from another patient (“EN”) with chronic borreliosis diagnosis (confirmed with both DNA and immune techniques). "
http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/MysterudAndLaane.pdf


Now on to the small dumbbells. I have seen these types in normal blood & I am not sure what they are exactly & I don't think they are Staphylococcus aureus as the poster suggests.
S. aureus are coccoid & clump together (and usually in multiple quantities & not just two), while these clearly have a body (rod) between the two rounded ends. To this date this remains the bane of my observations until I can show video of a bleb or tailed blow giving rise to an atypical spiro, or with some luck even a typical one.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnlULOjUhSQ

[ 08-28-2015, 12:16 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have contributed at a snail's pace because of my symptoms & disease, but imagine how much more can be done to benefit all of us if we all contributed.


I have made my videos available publically to contribute & help us all. I show that they are not artifacts but have morphology & life. They fit the definition of a spirochete & in my videos I show:

1) They burrow out of RBC (as bb is known to do).

2) Form cysts (as bb is known to do).

3) Bleb & SoP formation (as bb is known to do).

4) Disperse blebs effectively throughout the blood during certain conditions(which I don't think has ever been shown before, aside from the bulbous tip blebbing...unless I have just not encountered it?)

5) The appearance of undulating movement is actually spiraling movement, as I show in one of my video.


AGAIN, it fits the mold of a bloodborne disease, whereby it needs to get picked up to propagate infection & it fits into the notion of CHRONIC symptoms & infection. Chronic & continuous migration of spirochetes to & from the blood stream, as they migrate & hit nerve fibers causing pain (migratory symptoms) & setup colonies to cause further damage & pain.


It fits the model of fibromyalgia, shortness of breath occurrences whereby at any given time there may be a greater concentration of spirochetes in a given area (via RBC's partly) such as the lungs, heart, or brain, producing temporary shortness of breath that then resolves as the concentration disperses & evens more out via circulation. As the numbers grow in the blood, this then leads to exercise intolerance & gasping of breath from slight exercise or movement. All this has occurred in me as the load of these organisms has exploded in my blood & I am sure in most of my organs, joints & other tissues.


Peter Kemp has released his fluorescent microscopy videos, which suggest that we are dealing with a LIVE organism & NOT an artifact.


At the end our observations are just that, but take this next reality as an example of what we are doing...we can't prove these are bb with 100% certainty until we do PCR or DNA Probing, but then again neither can the CDC on this next exhibit.


Directly from the CDC on Treponema pallidum (the Syphilis spirochete, which is the cousin to the Lyme Disease spirochete...Borrelia burgdorferi) microscopy. So it is wise to perform microscopy on T. pallidum when antibodies are not present, but because some fail to acknowledge that atypical, cysts & blebs exist, we then forlorn the importance of microscopy observations on Lyme Disease?


A person with Syphilis like symptoms comes in for a blood microscopy sample & they find spirochetes in the samples. Do you want to fight the CDC & medicine on this one & say that their observations are invalid? Any spirochetes visualized might be that of bb, B. Miyamoto, or any of the other 300 spirochetes that they may not know of as disease causing yet.


"A clinical diagnosis of syphilis is confirmed by using DARKFIELD MICROSCOPY to demonstrate Treponema pallidum in material from suspected lesions or regional lymph nodes. A positive darkfield result is an ALMOST CERTAIN diagnosis of primary, secondary, or early congenital syphilis.For patients with early primary syphilis or for patients with syphilitic lesions and advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the darkfield examination may identify the etiologic agent of syphilis and help diagnose the disease EVEN WHEN ANTIBODIES TO T. pallidum CANNOT BE DETECTED."

http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/manual-1998/CHAPT5.pdf
_______________________________________________________


On microscopy usage & ATYPICAL forms.
Atypical- Are the non-aggressive forms are what we see in our blood.
Cystic - Are the coiled up & protected B. borrelia forms.
Blebs- Smallest unit of bb.

"We characterized these abnormal forms by histochemical, immunohistochemical, DARK FIELD and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods."
"The detection and recognition of ATYPICAL, cystic and granular forms in infected tissues is ESSENTIAL for the diagnosis and the treatment as they can occur in the absence of the typical spiral Borrelia form."
http://www.jneuroinflammation.com/content/5/1/40#IDA5STJJ

[ 08-28-2015, 12:20 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, you can do a Giemsa stain to prove merozoites are babs.


Video 1 of 3, search the other 2.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVBbq4MftpU


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qphokxSd4CM
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Lymedin, thanks for all your hard work in contributing to this thread.

Yes, I could do a Giemsa stain to help verify. The reasons I have not are a lack of energy and brain clarity to learn and do it, and because of the added expense on top of an already horrible financial situation.

I would like to pursue staining as soon as I can, though.

The trouble with our microscopy is that as we get well enough to do more involved microscopy, there are fewer organisms in our blood to view, ha ha. I have even noticed this with the spirochetes from when I first started viewing.

Thanks for the links. Those tutorials are as clear as I have seen about staining.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I've added these items in the post above:


"Furthermore, the morphological transformations of cysts & blebbing is a huge advantage for even more positive identification."


and


"5) The appearance of undulating movement is actually spiraling movement, as I show in one of my video."


The issues with babs identification, is that it is reported that most times <1% of rbc's are infected, unless it is an acute infection. Now I don't know what is actually going on in my blood with babs either, since I have not done any staining as of yet. It is another one of my future endeavors.


Staining can get expensive & PCR even more expensive. Here is a good virtual pc lab link, just click on "begin" to start your education on PCR techniques to understand how it works at least.

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/labs/pcr/
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Giemsa staining is not that expensive tbh. You can buy some 100% methanol for fixation for cheap. I paid like $10 for a quart of the stuff.
Also Giemsa solution undiluted 500ml set me back about $30.

You can make a lot of giemsa stains with this, probably several thousands.

Other stains are probably more expensive because of less commonly used chemicals, and they are more complex too (involves more steps). Giemsa is just a matter of smearing, fixating, coloring and youre done.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT is really pressed for monies & understandably so with what we all know Lyme does, both financially & health wise. I have reached that point too.


The microscope was a stretched purchase, but like I said don't worry since you can resell your used microscope & reclaim a large portion of your monies.

S13, can you send us the link where you purchased from?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Guys, Morten Laane has embarked on new research that will prove this once & for all.

http://vof.no/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Borrelioseintervjuer-engelsk-Laane-oppslag.pdf


http://vof.no/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Borrelioseintervjuer-engelsk-Mysterud-oppslag.pdf


Read both for a status update.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Since im from the Netherlands, i know only where to get the chemicals here. I use a webshop dedicated for laboratory stuff:
http://www.labstuff.nl/contents/nl/d103.html
You can find the Giemsa solution in that list, along with a bunch of other staining chemicals.
They also sell the methanol, though i originally bought it from a different webshop that sells wood finish restoration products (specifically French polishing).

I would think in the US there would be a similar kind of webshop that sells laboratory equipment?
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
TNT, your mailbox is full.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Sorry, I cleared some messages out. You should be able to send a message now. Thanks.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
The microscope was a stretched purchase, but like I said don't worry since you can resell your used microscope & reclaim a large portion of your monies.

There's NO WAY I'm getting rid of my microscope, unless I get a better one!!! [Wink]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I feel the same way about mine [Smile]


"A common side effect of long-term oral antibiotics is proliferation of yeast, mainly Candida albicans, which is normally a minor fraction of the gut flora but becomes a major part as bacteria - both harmful and beneficial - are killed. The symptoms of candidiasis are usually intestinal bloating, cramps, poor digestion, constipation and/or diarrhea. In advanced cases the normally round yeast can metamorphose into a mycelial form that shoots out filaments that penetrate into the intestinal walls, thus allowing undigested food, yeast and bacteria that normally stay in the gut to pass through into the bloodstream. This is called leaky gut syndrome. "

Candida albicans in normal form
 -


Candida albicans in mycelial form
 -


Candida albicans burrowing into living tissue
 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I put up a video such as this one & you guess whether it is from "normal" blood or LD blood. First one in the series.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maAR-QtUv8w


Ghosting of a rbc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFl_Fq0CsYE
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This guy crushes ticks & checks it under a microscope. What he sees is the exact same thing we see in our blood.


Click on his name & videos to see some of his other videos.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKXCXo2wB8
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hot off the press & from Dr. Alan MacDonald's latest research on Alzheimer's Amyloid brain plaques. It appears that the plaques are actually biofilm. See how the blebs, cysts & atypical forms fits into the model he describes in Alzheimer's Disease.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_drEJgxQp7M


Wish we had some DNA probing!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Babesia bovis aggressive & sharp movement when compared to the relative stagnant movement of Brownian motion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVQw4voFDEg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seyLyRwlTtg

It is very interesting that the egress in this instance did not produce ghosting of rbc.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
The ghosting is probably the rupturing of an RBC with resulting deflation.

Intracellular bacteria need to keep the cells alive or they dont have a place to hide and feed. So they use specific proteins to carefully open the cell, gain entrance, and seal it back up. So the cell remains alive. That is why you probably wont see ghosting when babesia (or bartonella) enters an RBC.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
What I meant was that only 1 rbc ghosted out of the few that we see babs go through. There is an outline still of the rbc & it does not look like it ruptured.


This is interesting in the way malaria works, in that it is known to rupture the rbc's. It is also interesting in that every time I have seen a medusa colony out of a rbc, the rbc is ruptured, damaged & ghosted.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This is from Fry Labs & looks a lot like what TNT has shown us. I have not found that in anyone's blood yet, or perhaps it does not occur on a large enough scale for me to notice.


They are in essence very short rods that can be mistaken for cocci, hence coccobacilli.


 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This could be it!

B. henselae
 -


More bart.
 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
 -

It says that arrows are pointing to the coccobacilli. The Fry photos I have seen do show actual arrows, but this photo has none, only boxes with numbers with a line attached to the organism (except on #3). I know I'm being technical, but Fry normally has a couple pictures, one of which does normally have actual "arrows."

Could there have been another pic with these results that could be posted that would give us more info? Is the description actually referring to THIS pic? I know I'm being technical....since it does look like coccobacilli.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Actually, to the left of the square box surrounding the number IS a pointer (arrow) & it is very faint. I guess they consider that the "arrow" or pointer to the bacteria.


All of the arrows seem to be properly aligned to the dots (bart coccobacilli) on the peripheral of the rbc extracelluarly, except for #3 which I think is just not aligned properly.


You can right click the image & save as, then zoom in to see it better.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I made my first Giemsa stain! The bottle of stain came from a local supplier thru Amazon, so it came much quicker than I expected it to.

I know I should know this, but, do Bart-like organisms stain with Giemsa? Or, is it only parasites with a nucleus?

My brain is not working well enough right now to try find the answer myself.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Warthin-Starry staining is used to identify it histologicaly or another type of SILVER stain.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, what do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, what I meant was what stain do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms.

Has anyone seen these new videos yet? They are pretty good for what appears to be a home setup. The proposed cyst video has over 60 views already!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyElJm2qFUA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIcK6Nd7v50
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
For bacteria you can use the giemsa stain yes. Though if you want more differentiation you would need a Gram stain (so you know if its gram negative or gram positive bacteria).

For BLO i dont know. Nobody knows, since we dont know what BLO is. Is it a bacteria? Does it even exists? Perhaps its just a collection of other known bacteria?

Anyway, take a look at some of the posts over in this blog:
http://lymemd.blogspot.nl/
He has posted several examples of giemsa smears showing babs and what he thinks is bart or BLO. Though even he regards some of the bacteria just as "mystery bugs".
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The last video sure looks like Borrelia & fits the 3 criteria I mentioned previously.


I don't think Giemsa is reliable for many Bartonella species, as most DO NOT stain well. That is why when you see many of these studies they use Warthin-Starry staining, Steiner silver stain, or other type of SILVER stains, which are BEST used for Bartonella.


I think I read somewhere that Fry Labs has used a MODIFIED Giemsa stain with success, but they did not mention any details as to the exact modification process.


One could also culture Bart on chocolate blood agar or soy agar, but it takes DAYS (9-40) for cultures to appear.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Dr. Willy Burgdorfer crushed ticks & viewed them under a microscope.
 -


As posted before, this guy has done the same thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKXCXo2wB8


Are you guys willing to try this? Now I can't wait to find the next tick.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I hate the nasty, filthy creatures! Who knows what each one may be carrying. There's no way I am going to be tampering with a tick. They go down the toilet unless they have been attached. Though, I have been known to burn and torture them.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Ok, I tried posting a picture from my Google account (then deleted it) and now I know it will work.

To those on the forum that are more computer savvy than me, will this be a potential security hazard for my Google account or my identity?

I love sharing about my microscopy, but I can't afford to invite a breach into my personal info.

The main thing I'm concerned about is the URL address of the picture being visible to the whole world, but it didn't appear like any personal info was in the URL, and even if it did link my profile, I don't really have any personal info visible on the profile (just in the account).

So, I feel pretty safe, but would like some input.

Thanks
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
You can email it to me & I can place it on photobucket, or you can make your own photobucket account.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Lymedin, why do you use photobucket instead of your google account?

Are you saying there is a security threat with posting from one's google account?

The fewer accounts that I open the better!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I would not give out my main email account to the public no matter what I was doing.


Also, you can keep your hobbies & interests private from your friends & families if that is what you desire also.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
At 25:38 Dr. Alan MacDonald presents pictures of Alzheimer's Diseased dead brain tissue that he was able to culture aggressive adult spirochetes from.


Notice how in the brain tissue they appear squiggly & worm like, just like we see in our blood. Whilst the cultured versions appear more aggressive & textbook style types.


https://youtu.be/8TQj2137PGk?t=1538


BEAUTIFUL!!!
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
S13, what I meant was what stain do you use for bacteria or bart-like organisms.

Has anyone seen these new videos yet? They are pretty good for what appears to be a home setup. The proposed cyst video has over 60 views already!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyElJm2qFUA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIcK6Nd7v50

Wow-- these are amazing videos. Luckily for her, her live blood doesn't look too bad in terms of spirochete infestation-- but classic spirochetes are clearly visible and actively trying to suck the life out of her red blood cells! I wish I still had my youtube channel so that I could comment and give her a thumbs up and heap praise on her for her videography work.. If anyone here has a youtube channel, please give her our congratulations and praise. Thanks for sharing these. All people out there doing Lyme videography deserve academy awards.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Dr. Willy Burgdorfer crushed ticks & viewed them under a microscope.
 -


As posted before, this guy has done the same thing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBKXCXo2wB8


Are you guys willing to try this? Now I can't wait to find the next tick.

This is a great vid, too lymed2010... In this specific video of the crushed tick's blood, it looks like there are more borrelia cysts than actual live spirochetes( I only saw a couple of live spirochetes) which is a useful piece of scientific info. I was hoping to see filaria also, but I don't know exactly what they look like. I also think that youtube may be suppressing the view count on these types of videos--- if you watch that video 5 times, the view count stays static... LOL...
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hi Wakeup, filtered water was added to the crushed ticks & I think water forces them into cysts & blebs as they prepare for adverse conditions. I think more are inclined to the relative quick cyst conversion, as opposed to the time consuming SoP formation & hence more cysts are seen.


The water level concentrations are not the same for every point of the mixture & at one point it balances out as tick cells lyse & change the overall balance, so a few spiros might never encounter high enough water concentrations to induce morphological change & as a result appear atypical.


What is surprising is that they are atypical in a tick as well, just like we see in our blood & not the text-book style aggressors (for at least this case).
 
Posted by Aneg (Member # 46674) on :
 
Hello. I wanted to post that I will start doing some research on my own too and do what I can to contribute.

I have a Nikon laboratory microscope. I work as a chemist but this microscope is MINE. I am ordering some slides and I am also going to order some gram staining kits and other kits too.

I am missing my oil immersion lens [Frown] .

However I will need to get one of those.

I find some of these videos fascinating. I work with two microbiologist but one of the guys I work with is very intelligent.

He worked in Cali producing Botulinum Toxin from C. Botulinum. I have worked in microbiology for two years prior to becoming a chemist however there is still a great deal to learn.

My background: I spent two years working in food and pharmaceutical microbiology and going on 3 years as a chemist with 1 year in food chemistry and 2 years in pharmaceuticals. Was completing biochemistry degree but all this hit me and I was too ill to finish.

I am still making an attempt but to be honest, almost everything you need to know is available online and can be self learned.

I hope I can be of some help as I was just diagnosed yesterday and having this for ~4 years.

Talk soon, ANeg
 
Posted by Aneg (Member # 46674) on :
 
Hello. I am more of a chemist than anything and my knowledge set is not strongest in microscopy however I noticed something strange with my blood stains when they dry.

Now I noticed when this was fresh last night there were what looked like thousands of tiny proteins that I could see and some still seem to be moving among the smear.

There is an artifact in the photos that looks long and rod shaped, that is from the camera and I was unable to get that off. Not sure what it is.

However I have no idea what the network looking strings are. I was thinking they could be potentially the plasma crystallising while drying. What are your thoughts.

This is at 1000X. Sorry for poor lighting, the camera was not the best.

 -

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Whoa, ANeg, you got an oil lens pretty quickly!

Those "network-looking strings" may be fibrin spicules.

Do you think the "proteins" you are seeing could be lysozomes (they would be the same tiny particles you see flowing around in the WBCs, but can also be seen bouncing around in the plasma from brownian motion)? What I notice is that they are the most abundant in the plasma when first viewing the slide, but diminish as the sample deteriorates.

Thanks for your contribution! I don't know if you have any other hobbies, but, be forewarned, microscopy may become hobby #1 for you now, LOL!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
 -

[ 10-09-2015, 11:02 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by Aneg (Member # 46674) on :
 
They could be. I borrowed the lens from the microlab at work. I am going to order a Nikon brand as for this one was Olympus. not really a big deal but my microscope is a Nikon. Old school alphaphot YS but it works well and I can see things that I could not ever be able to using college microscope.

I do enjoy it, I cannot look too long under the scope or I will get dizzy. I was looking at getting a camera but I have yet to find anything good. Any ideas?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The pic I posted above is from my first Giemsa-stained slide. It shows a Basophil among erythrocytes.

I plan on posting various pics of my Giemsa stain.

Aneg, a Nikon is a nice scope to have. As for a good camera, I use an old Canon A540 and that works pretty well just shooting through the eyepiece. But, you cannot do time-lapse with that; I hope to get an eyepiece camera sometime for that purpose. I'll probably get an Amscope eyepiece camera unless I find a better one for a better deal.

The problem I'm hearing with time-lapse is that between shots the scope can get out of focus. S13 has overcome that problem, and I wish I knew more about how he did it.

If you get a chance S13, do share the details of how you accomplished that (like what program you used and how you integrated it practically). Hopefully it's not too challenging for those like me to understand.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Yes the camera will get out of focus with timelapse recording. I still think it has to do with the heating from the light bulb that slowly warps the frame of the microscope. So the solution i use is to switch off the bulb between pictures. This works really well.

I do use a complicated solution, but thats just because i used to be an electronics engineer before lyme and i had some old projects laying
around that i could use.

Basically i use a standard microscope camera with PC software. Ive written a small software program that commands the camera PC software to take a picture with a programmable interval. It also communicates with an FPGA board via USB. By toggling a relay on the FPGA board it can enable and disable the microscope light bulb.

So every 2 minutes or so, the program will enable the light, wait a couple of seconds, command the camera software to take a picture, wait another couple of seconds, and disable the light.

So you end up with hundreds of pictures that can be converted to a video by a video editing tool (i use powerdirector). And then you get something like this for example:
https://youtu.be/l4t7UKi4ma8
(24h candida growing time lapse)

Time lapses can be very fun to see things grow [Smile]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Can someone take a look at this and tell me what I am seeing?
I followed it for over an hour.
It appears to be an RBC (portion of) with a spirochete or some other mechanism providing motility, as the cell matter traveled around to some degree.
It's not easy to see in the video, but when viewing through the microscope, you could see the thin portion protruding from the cell matter moving and whipping around.
HERE IS THE VIDEO (filmed on my cell phone)
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=7wOwSebreVc
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey dude,

Welcome to the forum, and to this thread!

It looks like your link is a dud. It appears as though you didn't "publish" your video when you were done uploading it.

Try again, and we may be able to give you some possibilities of what you may be seeing.

Care to share some of your story??
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
It says it is published and public.

Can you still not see it?

I've actually been diagnosed with MS, but was also reactive on a few bands on western blot IgM and IgG.
So I've been using my microscope to do some of my own stuff, out of curiosity. I have some formal training in this kind of stuff, but it's been so long, and I am not a professional.

The video is from my cell phone, as it was the only way to capture it at the time.

This video is also roughly two hours after I started viewing it, so the motility is much lower, likely due to the blood drying.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
You need to provide us the youtube "share" link, not the "edit" link.

Anyway, this should fix it: https://youtu.be/7wOwSebreVc

tbh i cant make much of this video. Perhaps use a steady digital camera with some optical zoom?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
There it is! Thanks S13. Before my last post I even searched youtube for the last 10-15 characters of the link dude gave us, and still couldn't find it.

Yeah, I couldn't make anything out of the video either. I would 2nd S13's suggestions.

A smaller digital camera works great if you hold it up to the eyepiece. A smaller camera works better than a larger one. My Canon A540 works great, whereas my Canon SX160is is very unsuitable even though it is a newer and better version (the diameter of the lens is too wide to practically hold against the eyepiece since the 160 has a wide angle lens).
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, unfortunately this was 2 hours after I had started viewing it. It's the hemolyzed RBC right below the arrow. The only one that is not a full RBC.

It's hard to see, but I did follow it and had others look and confirm that I wasn't just seeing things.

The small portion extending out of the RBC on the right side was moving, and providing motility. I'll see if I have any other videos.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://youtu.be/PWpnqzIYuXQ

I uploaded another video I had pointing at what I was looking at.

Unfortunately, you have to look closely to see it moving. The portion extending out of it WAS moving, and providing motility. I had numerous other people also view it to tell me what they saw.

It moved through a small portion of the slide before the blood had started to dry, which is why it is not moving around like it was. However, the RBC was being moved, as you could see that small portion wiggling/flicking.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I'm sorry, dude, but I couldn't see any more than with the first video. They make cradles that you can attach your phone to a microscope with if you don't have access to a point and shoot camera. It will keep your phone still and "may" help your phone get a better capture.

But, even with a point and shoot camera, you may still have similar trouble keeping it steady. Then again, there are adapters for that, too.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here are some adapters:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=phone+microscope+adapters

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FIW4CTK?keywords=universal%20microscope%20camera%20adapters&qid=1444146229&ref_=sr_1_8&sr=8-8
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Will post more in future, for now just a quick answer to a question.

I have found that running a ceiling fan & keeping room temp constant AFTER bulb has been on a while, to help drastically with focus creep issue. I would imagine that a dedicated fan properly placed should diffuse the heat. The whole trick is to keep a constant temp, no matter what that temp is. Expansion & contraction due from the heat is what causes the focus creep.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
 -

 -

Best photos I could get for the moment. I have a video uploading currently if anyone wants to look.
It appeared to be a spirochete to me, linking to RBC's. The free RBC that is crenated was actually pulled closer, across the open plain of plasma, so it is about twice as close as it started.

What do you guys think? Best photo I can get currently. I enlarged the area in the first photo to get a closer look.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjs5cltElOI&feature=youtu.be

4:30 is a good point to see what I am talking about. Focusing on it and getting it to be clear in the video is hard right now.

[ 10-10-2015, 02:44 PM: Message edited by: thatdudefromkansas ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
It is really hard to tell what that is. Since there are string like objects in human blood, I would disregard anything that does not fit the criteria I mention in the past (with bulbs on both tips...etc).


There will be spiros without bulbous tips, but in order to avoid false identification it is best to disregard anything without those criteria. You have actually posted a beautiful video from another Youtuber that met the criteria.


To make instant improvements to your video & image, I would use any DAYLIGHT 5000K CFL bulb, such as the Philips CFL with TuffGuard Protection that I showed you video of.

Here is another example of a CFL that you can use:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-60W-Equivalent-Daylight-5000K-T2-Spiral-CFL-Light-Bulb-E-6-Pack-414045/205390612

Basically, place the bulb in a standard lamp & then directly under your condenser & shift the bulb with your hand until you witness best lighting & shading via the binocular port. Keep in mind the heat will cause more focus creep though & the LED daylight bulbs will produce less heat but can be damaging to your eyes. So if you use an LED bulb, then it is best to only use your camera to view the images & not damage your eyes with prolonged LED exposure.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Will do. Unfortunately, the other one I did see would more closely match that criteria.
Another one protruding out of an RBC, with a bulbous end and very clearly moving.

I need to get a shorter lens on my camera. It'll clear it up more.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here are some pics from my first Giemsa stain:


1. Two possible Bart-like organisms that took up the stain:

 -

2. A zoomed in pic of the same organisms:

 -

3. Another possible Bart-like organism:

 -

4. A zoomed in pic of the same organism:

 -

5. 3 WBCs and a possible kete:

 -

6. A possible kete among RBCs and a few platelets:

 -

7. A zoomed in pic of the same organism:

 -


If the above organism is a kete, it's noteworthy that it did not take up the Giemsa stain.

[ 10-11-2015, 03:37 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Have I ever told you guys how HAPPY microscopy makes me?

This HAPPY:


 -


It's too bad a smiley-faced-shaped WBC is not the sign of a happy immune system!!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Hey that last pic looks like me.


I feel the same way about microscopy. Rather than being in the dark, it gives us power.


"6. A possible kete among RBCs and a few platelets:"
That one looks like it could be a spiro & undergoing blebbing.


TNT, I am surprised you are not seeing as many in your blood as I am in mine, which might be a good thing actually. I find mine everywhere & the only thing that has been able to reduce them was Cowden Protocol so far, but it has wore off.


As I said before the only other thing that MUST have cleared my blood of spiros, but sent them to all my joints, organs & nerves, was IV Rocephin. Since I could not find any spiros in my blood at the tail end of that drug.


FYI, check my other post out about Dr. Eva Sapi's work on Stevia & Bee Venom, which both showed anti-Borrelia activity. CBD oil was also shown to be effective on ALL FORMS of bb.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
TNT, I am surprised you are not seeing as many in your blood as I am in mine, which might be a good thing actually.

That may be a good thing, unless they are in L-form, as I am suspecting. The last wet mount that I did about a week ago showed a higher load of what I have been suspecting are L-forms (the forms I pointed out in a couple of my videos).


(As for that last pic resembling you), I imagined you with bigger ears, lol!

Ha Ha, I'm just kidding!


I have recently been giving Bee Venom treatment a little more consideration. It has done wonderful things for some people.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
As I said before the only other thing that MUST have cleared my blood of spiros, but sent them to all my joints, organs & nerves, was IV Rocephin. Since I could not find any spiros in my blood at the tail end of that drug.

As I pointed out in a previous post, Penicillins and Cephalosporins CAUSE cell-wall deficient bacterial forms!!!!!

This could be why you saw no ketes in your blood. It could be the ketes sought safe haven in your joints and nerves, OR, it could be that the Rocephin caused them to convert to L-forms and the L-forms caused the damage at these places. Cell-wall deficient forms cause the most damage, and are the hardest to eradicate! Thus, when you discontinued the Rocephin, you eventually got much worse than you previously were. Because, not only did the ketes come out to play once you discontinued the Rocephin, you now had l-form ketes to deal with.

I personally feel that LLMDs should not treat with Cephalosporins or Penicillins UNLESS concurrent treatment with a macrolide or tetracycline is given!

[ 10-13-2015, 01:39 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I feel the same way & I thought to myself what type of backward thinking is this.


It is useless to treat mid to late stage without a cyst buster, simply moronic & I have had that stance since the first month of starting treatment.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I feel the same way & I thought to myself what type of backward thinking is this.


It is useless to treat mid to late stage without a cyst buster, simply moronic & I have had that stance since the first month of starting treatment.

Even if one does treatment with a penicillin or cephalosporin AND a cyst-buster, you will STILL CAUSE CONVERSION TO L-FORMS and perhaps be worse off.

That is why it is important to hit all three forms at the same time for effective treatment.

Though, I am afraid of cyst-busters because I have had horrible reactions with them. Did they cause conversion to L-forms? Is that one reason (among others) for why I had bad experiences with them? Quite possibly.

I find it interesting that there is so much hype about the overuse of antibiotics causing antibiotic-resistant super-bugs and so little research into the fact that most bugs are pleo-morphic.

This really could be a huge component of why the drugs aren't working as well anymore. I mean, when someone has strep throat and the normal course of Amoxicillin doesn't clear it up, the patient is then given Azithromycin. That clears it up.

ABX-resistance?

That's what they say (and it probably is).

Pleomorphism?

Very possibly, too, in many cases.


It's interesting that the drug of choice for eliminating persister cells is Daptomycin. If you look Daptomycin up you'll find that it is one of the most effective drugs against L-form bacteria. It ruptures the cell MEMBRANE of cell-wall-deficient bacteria.

So, are the real persister cells (and the reason many don't get well with ABX treatment even with anti-cyst drugs) L-form and not cysts?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://youtu.be/Nq92hfXHlgI


I have a view more vids.

This is dark field, but filmed with my DSLR instead of microscope cam.
Where the indicator is pointing.
Watch in 1080 HD, full screen.
It's on 400x in this video.

Easier to see now?

I have more videos I can upload as I go.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vIEiGqy554&feature=youtu.be

Another video.

Watch in HD. Where the indicator is pointing.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Very good, dude! Now that's what we are after! It appears like that RBC on the second video may be a "colony" as I see multiple ketes swinging out of it.

That's a nice crisp view of things! Your DSLR does a great capture!

What kind of scope do you have? Did it come with a darkfield condenser when you bought it, or did you just get the darkfield?

Isn't microscopy SO exciting!? I'm glad you joined the thread! We need more recruits.

Is it possible to do darkfield at 1000x? I think I remember S13 mentioning that it's not possible at 1000x. That's too bad if not, because you could have REALLY been able to see that cell at 1000x if it would be possible.

How long after drawing you blood did you make the videos? It appears like you are not heavily infected, thankfully.

Some of the other members are doing time lapse. Can you do time lapse? I sure would like to but I need to get an eyepiece camera.

What bands showed on your Western Blot if I may ask? Some bands can cross react with other infections.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I have a microscope camera I am gonna try as well.

I bought an Amscope T490-DK. Was only about 375 dollars, including dark field, useful up to the 40x.

It is possible to do dark field on 1000x. However, you need a dry or dark field lense with the aperture large enough. I could be wrong, and it might only be oil immersion, but you can buy condensers for this purpose.

I draw blood into vacationers. Generally, I have been viewing samples anywhere between 1 and 3 days after drawing the sample, and anywhere between 1 and 6 hours after applying to a slide.

Time lapse on my microscope camera won't seem to work, but I'll keep trying.

My history: I have been diagnosed with MS.
IgG: 31, 41
IgM: 39, 41
That's it.
I am also testing the blood of a co-worker, also diagnosed with MS. I find the same in his blood.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Keep up the good work. We would definitely be interested in seeing your time-lapse if you get that working.

quote:
and it might only be oil immersion, but you can buy condensers for this purpose.
Now that you mention it, I think I have seen info on oil condensers for darkfield.

quote:
I draw blood into vacationers.
I assume you mean you draw blood into vacuum containers, and not vacationers? Wow, a phlebotomist and a microscopist! Do you refrigerate the blood until you view it? Why do you draw the blood that far in advance?

Lymedin2010 has a blood slide making tutorial in which he shows how to seal off the coverslip with immersion oil to "preserve" the blood for longer viewing. That would help with getting a good time-lapse capture.

My brain isn't working very well today, so I can't go into much detail, but you definitely are positive for borreliosis: Band 39 is specific for Lyme, and your microscopy confirms it.

Bands 31 and 41 are not always specific for lyme and can cross-react with other infections. Those bands are also specific for Brucella, so they could possibly indicate a concurrent undiagnosed infection with that. (Very) possibly (I feel).

In fact, I found a description page about a test for Brucella that actually suggests that the Multiple Sclerosis epidemic could be connected to Brucellosis. So, it's not just because of Lyme. Read this description about Brucellosis:

Notice the last sentence in the first paragraph:

"...it is possible that there is a link between an infection with Brucella and the outbreak of multiple sclerosis."

http://www.ibl-international.com/en_us/brucella-igg?gclid=CJDJw5mpi8gCFYNFaQodrosMkA


And, here are PubMed articles showing the specificity of Osp (outer surface proteins) or Omp (outer membrane proteins) -- (referred to as "Bands" on the Western Blot) -- 31 and 41 for Brucella bacteria!!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14715555

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16817909


I personally feel this is an unseen epidemic even in the U.S. But, I won't take the time to go into that.

So, if you ever want to broaden your microscopy techniques, we have plenty of opportunity to delve into things like staining, fluorescence, DNA probing, culturing, etc.

Some of which we can possibly do ourselves with a little learning and practice (AND money).

These advanced techniques have the ability to help us better understand what each of us is dealing with!

Of course, simple microscopy, time-lapse, and staining is well within each of our abilities and means. We just need to keep at it and bring in more recruits!! [Smile]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Sorry, auto-correct.

Yes, Vacutainers. It changed this to vacationers for some reason.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I don't refrigerate it. I keep it at room temperature.

The blood I view over this longer period is blood I have drawn from others. It's just easier this way then saying hey, Come over to my house so I can draw blood real quick.

On top of that, I am trying to compare what I see in these longer samples than a straight draw.

I'd imagine the change in environment has an effect (98.6 degrees in body versus 70 degrees room temp), stuff like that.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vIEiGqy554&feature=youtu.be

Another video.

Watch in HD. Where the indicator is pointing.

Wow-- kansas dude----amazingly excellent video!! I can clearly see at least two spirochetes hanging off that red blood cell-- trying to suck the life out of you.

What microscope , magnification and stain did you use? I really like the resolution on your microscope. ( I want to buy a microscope but have been gun shy because I want to get a good one for spirochetes with dark field--- without having to spend $1,000s of dollars.
Anyway-- amazing work -- you deserve a "Spiro" award....(It looks like the oscar but is squiggly) LOL..
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Wakeup:

I have the T490B-DK.
400x. (40x objective and 10x eyepiece).

I believe it was 375 dollars, off amazon.
Dark field useful up to 400x, which is what those videos are.
I filmed with my DSLR, however, through the eyepiece. I am waiting for an attachment to see if I can get better images with the DSLR in the trinocular port.
You can get excellent microscopes with dark field for cheap. This is obviously not lab/research quality, but things are still quite visible.

No stains, just dark field. I have to use and LED headlamp, as the bulb in the scope is not strong enough. 214 lumen headlamp for 10 dollars. (I only look in the microscope until i find something, then record. LED is bad for the retina, can be damaging).

This is a good breakdown:
T490B-DK (375 on amazon)
400x
Dark field
Slide and slip covers (cheap, like 12 dollars for 75 or so, and you just clean them with alcohol to reuse them all)
Samples tested up to 7 days after drawing (vacutainers), stored at room temp.
Some samples tested on blood slide over the course of 12 hours or more, as long as sample has not dried (start seeing the most around 2-4 hours after placing on slide)
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I am looking for info on a research quality scope if anyone has advice?

I have a very specific reason that I need something good enough to capture pristine, sharp, clear images up to 1000X or higher.
I am looking at around 1500 dollars to 2000 dollars.

This microscope is adequate for finding, viewing, and recording, but I need something much greater in quality.
Not sure if just updating the 40x and 100x objectives with a higher quality objective lens would do the trick or not.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
It's kind of hard to know what to advise without knowing exactly what you need it for.

But unless you want something special like an inverted scope (which are actually some of the cheaper research grade scopes from what I have seen), I would recommend an Olympus BH series. The BH series have a little age, but are definitely research grade.

Olympus microscopes are excellent! I don't think they make a cheap line like even Nikon has. Of course, I don't speak from actual experience, just from looking and watching them sell.

They can run well over $1000.00 (used). But, I saw a nice BH series with a case sell thru Ebay from a thrift store go for a little over $200.00. So, if you look and wait, you can sometimes get a really good deal.

Whatever brand you decide on, you can get a VERY nice (used) scope for the amount of money you have available.

I personally have fallen in love with (dark) phase contrast. They tend to be considerably more money, but you should still be able to get a pretty nice dark phase Olympus with that kind of money. A dark phase Olympus with a turret in excellent shape runs $1500.00-$2500.00.

Your idea about just swapping lens is an idea to consider if you would rather stash that cash away for something else (depending on how many lens you buy). The Objectives and oculars are really the main components on a scope, so if you would buy some high-end lens, you would in effect have the same grade of scope for some less. Buying lens individually can get expensive, though.

I think all objective lens nowadays (especially high-end ones) are infinity-corrected, so it wouldn't matter what scope you installed them on. Regardless of lens brand, I wouldn't consider any that are not "Plan Achromat."
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxJyT8BxYnA&feature=youtu.be

Best one at ~1:45 in the video. Quite long, too.

Obviously, watch in 1080P, full screen.

I have a few more videos, but it has been hard to get videos of them actual motile, moving freely in the serum and not attached to/coming out of RBC's.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0exzLApZBkE&feature=youtu.be

Another.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0exzLApZBkE&feature=youtu.be

Another.

Hi dudefrom kansas--

Thanks for the info on the scopes-- I will be buying one soon and am anxious to see whats in my own blood. I want to take vis of before and after herbal regimens.

I saw the spirochetes in the video of your blood above-- very good film!

I hope your red blood cells in the video above were old and drying-- because if not, the sharp spiky points on all your red blood cells might indicate that you have toxicity in your body, including heavy metals (aluminum or mercury) and/or pesticide exposure. How long does it take before round rbc's begin to look spiky like that?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, the crenation is from the blood simply drying/being exposed to the environment outside of the tubes/body.

It varies on when I start seeing more crenated RBC's.
I havne't paid much attention to that.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here are a couple pics of biofilm in my blood:


An earlier pic with brightfield:

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A recent pic with dark phase contrast:

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Closer (notice a couple red blood cells at the top, and some platelets at the bottom, partially entrapped in the film):

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Really close. You can easily see the partially entrapped RBCs at the top. I don't know what the object in the middle is...perhaps a uric acid crystal or a piece of contaminant on the slide:

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
A Fry smear showing biofilm

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Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
That's interesting.

Can you see any of that on live blood smears? Or is it only visible with staining?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
All 4 pics of my blood (the brightfield and the dark phase) are live blood samples. There is no stain. The above (Fry) smear...originating from Fry Labratories, is stained.

It appears like the Fry smear might be a (modified?) Giemsa stain.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WDmCzJNnUo&feature=youtu.be

Any idea what this is?
I've seen reference to a Medusa's head?

They also appear segmented, similar to the string of pearls that I have seen photos of. My microscope video is better and seeing the segmentation, but that's on another computer.

Any ideas?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WDmCzJNnUo&feature=youtu.be

Any idea what this is?
I've seen reference to a Medusa's head?

I'm sorry dude, I'm not sure. Lymedin2010 or S13 will have to weigh in on that one. It looks similar to what I think could be l-forms in my own blood. If you could get a little more magnification on it, it may help narrow down the possibilities.


I just published the video of that biofilm in my blood. The video shows slightly more detail and proves it is live blood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpdL3d_Gojo
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Wow-- I just viewed this person's blood (channel name jasmine) on youtube-- this has got to be a very sick person, or perhaps its cotton tissue left on the slide--- the blood is riddled with long tendrils. Do you guys think that some of these are spirochetes?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKNd9s6P6N8
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Wow-- I just viewed this person's blood (channel name jasmine) on youtube-- this has got to be a very sick person, or perhaps its cotton tissue left on the slide--- the blood is riddled with long tendrils. Do you guys think that some of these are spirochetes?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKNd9s6P6N8

Some of the blood looks pretty good. The blood has plenty of immune components bouncing around (lysosomes), so it appears like their immune system is not too suppressed. I think they were viewing at the edge of the sample where the condition is often worse. The junk usually accumulates there.

That being said, I have never seen any parts of my samples look like that. I can't say what those "strings" are, but my OPINION is that they COULD be l-form (cell-wall-deficient) spirochetes, though they don't look like what I normally refer to as l-form ketes (the thicker, fainter-looking ketes with darker/brighter ends). I see lots of round forms among those strings that could POSSIBLY be round form (cyst) spirochetes. These are just guesses.

Without seeing active undulating (thinner, shorter) spirochetes with bulbous tips in this person's blood, I would be a bit hesitant to say they are definitely infected with borrelia.

We need more research about some of these "artifacts."
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
The most informative live blood spirochete microscopy video I have seen to date--- I think the narrator is a microbiologist.

She covers identification of the many morphologies of spirochetes(including IDs of cell wall deficient forms versus cysts and blebs, string of pearls, etc), as well as IDing different types of lyme biofilms. One astounding piece of information she divulged is that cysts undergo reproduction inside the cyst wall, and when they burst open they contain 8-12 living spirochetes!!

This does not bode well for doxycycline treatment alone, which creates a large increase in cysts, while killing the living spirochetes. I got a screen shot of the chart of the morphologies for future reference..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_QO3QEr5W4
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
All 4 pics of my blood (the brightfield and the dark phase) are live blood samples. There is no stain. The above (Fry) smear...originating from Fry Labratories, is stained.

It appears like the Fry smear might be a (modified?) Giemsa stain.

Hi TNT-

Your live blood biofilm pics are excellent-- I think I can detect what Dr. MacDonald referred to as "water channels" inside your very own personal biofilm sludge! It would be very interesting to count biofilm blobs in an average 1/2 hour live blood session, and then begin to start a diet high in biofilm busting substances such as pomegranate, rosemary, cloves, mango, cinnamon, sarsaparilla, curry, etc..... or just take Eva Sapi's Samento/Banderol combination--- and then see if the count of biofilm blobs progressively goes down over time.

I think that liveblood microbiollogist (in the video I posted above) had stated that by the time she sees less than 5 live spirochetes in a 1 hour live blood session, the subject is usually symptom free. Of course our goal is ZERO spirochetes/cysts/lforms/blebs. LOL....
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Excellent photograph of a borrelia cyst, by the amazing Brorsons research team in Norway --- revealing multiple spirochetes inside--
 -
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Recognizing the stages of borrelia biofilm (Sapi 2012)-- Dr. MacDonald's famous "water channels" seem to be clearly visible in the older biofilm colony on the right of the image-- also the older biofilm has no spirochetes hanging off the edges-- Im assuming they are all sheltered inside "the structure." Does anybody know if the structure is composed of alginate or dead organisms-- or metals?

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Your live blood biofilm pics are excellent

Thanks WakeUp! And, thanks for your great contribution here on the microscopy thread, and the Spirocheticidal & Antibiofilm Compounds Thread!

As for breaking up the biofilm, my experience has been that I get more debilitated if I address biofilms and my antimicrobials are not strong enough to address what's being released out of the colonies' protective niche.

If you have sufficient firepower there when the bugs are flushed out (anti-biofilm agents are used), you will improve your health. If not, you will make yourself MUCH sicker. That was confirmed by my LLMD who is big into biofilm treatment.

I, too, think the number of organisms in the blood is a good indication of how well you are. Just don't forget we can't always easily see (or identify) the different morphologies. So, just because there are few ketes, doesn't mean there are few cysts or l-forms.

Also, there are unseen colonies in various body tissues that can seed the blood and rest of the body. So, NO ketes seen over an extended time period with multiple viewings is a safer gauge.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Excellent photograph of a borrelia cyst, by the amazing Brorsons research team in Norway --- revealing multiple spirochetes inside--
 -

Whoa, the cyst in that picture is HUGE!

I didn't realize they got that big. 5 microns? I wonder what the average size would be? Perhaps some of "candida-like" stuff I have seen could be cysts. They are as big as that many times.

Usually the "candida-like" objects are more uniform in roundness without the slightly ragged edge seen in this pic.

I'll try to look more carefully the next times.

Does anyone know the average size of cysts?
 
Posted by Cold Feet (Member # 9882) on :
 
Hey everyone, I've not posted in a while...

You may recall my video interviews with Dr. Alan MacDonald.

In case you have not seen my last video, which shows my live blood analysis, see:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQWggZSS5t4

I filmed this at International Biocare Hospital in Tijuana. All my other films (mostly biofilm-related) are on the youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/ADRSupport/videos

You will clearly see Bartonella AND gut bacteria in my blood.

I am working on other videos, but I'll post in the appropriate topic areas later. [Wink]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Thanks for joining the thread, Cold Feet!

Your video from Tijuana is intriguing. I am fairly new to this "hobby" so I hate to question what Dr. Francisco says, but what he points out as Bartonella at 5:00 (the first video) looks to me to be the end of the spike of a crenated RBC.

He claims that the Bartonella will hide around the side of the cell when it feels like it is identified. (???) I don't think it knows it's being viewed, nor can it go to the back side of a cell and escape the immune system (only inside the cell to escape) because the immune system is all around the cells.

I would agree that the black dot on the bottom of that RBC (6 o'clock position) resembles Bartonella, but not the one he points to at the 2 o'clock position on the same RBC (when he says they will go around the side of the cells to hide). As I said, I think that one looks like the end of the spike and only looks like a dot because of how the microscope is focused.

I could very well be wrong.

Please don't take my comments personally. This is the first I have viewed that video and this was just one thing that I couldn't quite see eye to eye with him.

But, I have watched some of your other videos before, and am very glad you have this wonderful library on your channel. I particularly like the ones with Dr. Alan McDonald and the one in Sapi's lab. EXTREMELY helpful!

Thank You!

Do you personally have a scope and look at your own blood?
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Cold Feet:
Hey everyone, I've not posted in a while...

You may recall my video interviews with Dr. Alan MacDonald.

In case you have not seen my last video, which shows my live blood analysis, see:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQWggZSS5t4

I filmed this at International Biocare Hospital in Tijuana. All my other films (mostly biofilm-related) are on the youtube channel:

https://www.youtube.com/user/ADRSupport/videos

You will clearly see Bartonella AND gut bacteria in my blood.

I am working on other videos, but I'll post in the appropriate topic areas later. [Wink]

Hi Coldfeet-- Wow-- International Biocare's microscope setup is amazing-- interesting that he could immediately spot the intracellular Bartonella. Thanks for sharing this valuable information and video. Next time I go to California, I might make a trip down to Tijuana to have them analyze my blood too. In the last half of the video was he analyzing dried blood that had been centrifuged? I was confused. Also what did he recommend for the Bartonella?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I too love the MacDonald videos & I am very grateful for them. However, the video from IBH, there are a few holes we can punch in & they appended an extra zero on the magnification reporting as well.


Interesting read on Alan's continuing work & microscopy.

https://spirodementia.wordpress.com/featured-new-discovery-blood-borne-borrelia-biofilms-coated-with-beta-amyloid-7-oct-2105/

"“…A hunch led me to stain peripheral blood from a heavily infected Chronic Lyme patient with dementia with Congo red Stain for Amyloid.;;

The biofilms in blood were completely covered with Amyloid, and the Amyloid stain demonstrated the textbook partly red/partly green color – [ i.e.; Birefringence under white polarized light illumination]

Water channel spaces are clearly seen inside of the Congo Red stained amyloid covered Biofilms.

Summary point: Borrelia biofilms in Alzheimer’s brain exist and are always wedded to amyloid plaques which completely cover the Borrelia biofilm.

Biofilms of Borrelia in circulating blood exist in some dementia patients and are …wedded to Amyloid covering the biofilms in blood …”

Please click on the link below for details and microscopic images of amyloid-coated Borrelia biofilm in the blood of a victim of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Amyloid-coated Borrelia Biofilms in Blood of Alzheimer’s Patient"
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
In some of my videos I have shown possible merozoites. The organisms could very possibly be bartonella (or BLO). Their shape suggest apicomplexans, but their size would suggest BLO.

What I am about to post resemble released apicomplexans from apparent ruptured red blood cells. In these pictures, the shape AND size both resemble merozoites, not to mention the proximity and position of the ruptured RBCs. The only anomaly is that these objects did not take up the Giemsa stain.

It is impossible to determine what these objects are. The only clues I have are my positive lab tests and my correlating symptoms.

That all said, these objects could be platelets beside ruptured or maybe even lopsided RBCs. But the scenario and placement (and shape/size of the objects) would suggest my earlier-stated possibility as well.

So, basically two possibilities.

I'll let you be the judge.

These pictures were taken from my Giemsa slide. I simply toggled the neutral density filter below my condenser to get more contrast on the specimen.


1.
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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
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6.
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7.
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Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Typical platelets:

*The larger objects (in clumps) are what I'm referring to. They are approximately 2-4 microns in diameter. (Red blood cells are 6-8 microns in diameter). I don't think the smaller objects (in clumps) are platelets. But, they could be.


 -


 -


 -


 -

[ 10-22-2015, 06:04 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YyuUO43N6g
watch in HD

1:40 is a good one.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HbXThingA4
Watch in HD

Quite a few here if you watch through it.
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Hey TNT, nice to see you are trying stuff with giemsa staining.

However you need to change your staining technique a bit. Your stains lack a lot of color and that makes it difficult to recognize bacteria from platelets, inclusions, stippling etc.

Take a look at some of the giemsas ive made:

 -

 -

 -

Perhaps your solution is too diluted, or you are not allowing sufficient time for staining. Also the yellow bulb in your microscope is not allowing you to see the blue spectrum of the light very well, and blue is a very important part of the giemsa stain.

I suspect a lot of the humps you posted in your last post are in fact platelets. In my stains the platelets are clearly visible as pink, not blue.

Also perhaps you need to try different types of water you use to make the giemsa solution. Different types of water with different pH values. The pH of the solution has a significant impact on the coloring of the sample.


I hope this message gets through (im using a proxy server now to post here since my internet provider gave me another IP address, one which has been banned apparently from lymenet flash).
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13, I love your lymphocyte! What are the round white objects in the cytoplasm? Also, the bacteria on your one RBC is pretty cool, too (NOT)!! That RBC is very parasitized! Oh my!

One thing I notice about your platelets is that they are pretty uniform in roundness. That is a difference I see in the objects I pointed out (which are more pointed). But, I admit, it is hard to see this in my pics. In your last pic, the platelets have more similarities to the smaller (pointed) objects I pointed out in my sample, so you are probably right about my smaller objects being atypical platelets. What do you think about how they appear to be bursting from ruptured red blood cells?

I appreciate your suggestions. I definitely need more practice. I'm so glad I have you and Lymedin2010 to help me out!

The Giemsa solution I purchased is "ready to use" and no mixing needed. I suspect the main issue is the fixative I'm using. A friend of mine had methanol available, but it is dyed (very light blue). Since it was free, I tried it anyhow and thought it wasn't much of a problem since the white blood cells and some bacteria stained fine. Though, I did notice that my lymphocytes didn't stain with both hues and my color overall was not typical.

I let it stain at least 30 minutes, and it probably was closer to an hour.

Also, I don't know if it matters, but I'm using Reverse Osmosis water to rinse the stain off the sample.

I guess my next step is to get methanol without any dye in it.

I might have to try Lymedin's suggestion on the light to see if I can get better views.

Thanks for sharing those pics.

How have you been doing, lately? Are you still doing mHBOT? Is your diet still helping? Keep us posted (when you can get through). It sure is good to have you check in from time to time, especially here on this thread.

Also, I don't think I'm missing any steps in my staining technique, but it might help me to have a more experienced microscopist post step by step instructions from start to finish. If you get time, I think we all would benefit. Even if it is just a link to the instructions that perhaps helped you get it under your belt.

(The videos that Lymedin linked me to earlier were great, but I still think it would be helpful to have steps written out here on the thread).
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
The white objects are some kind of inclusions, not sure what. It may have something to do with ehrlichia, thats why i took a picture of it.

The blue bacteria on the RBC are not necessarily inside the RBC. You can see the focus plane of the microscope is not on the RBCs (they appear a bit out of focus) but a little bit above. So my guessing is the bacteria are just sticking on top of the RBCs.

Im not sure about your bursting RBCs. I know they burst all the time, thats just from the smearing procedure. So the guts can just spill out, and that may be what you see on your photos. I think if you get the staining a bit optimized you will be able to tell if it is inner RBC guts, platelets or some kind of bacteria.

If your methanol is not 100% pure you can always try without and see if that improves color. Its only used for fixation anyway. If you are careful when applying the giemsa solution and the rinsing procedure afterwards you probably can get good results without fixation. For rinsing you can use any type of water, so reverse osmosis is fine.

I think the giemsa solution you have is a bit too diluted. I usually do 45 minutes and that already overstains some of the objects (especially wbcs). Perhaps you need to try 2-3hours, and gently move the sample around a bit a couple of times so the solution gets redistributed during the proces.

I used this pdf for staining information that also talks about the pH value:
www.tropeduweb.ch/parasitology_methods_pdf/2_blood_giemsa.pdf
But i dont use chemicals to create a certain pH value, i just use different kinds of spring water. They all seem to have slightly different pH values which is ideal to create the solution with. I guess since you have a prediluted giemsa solution, you cannot easily change the pH value without diluting it even further. So lets hope your pH is not too bad.
Making the smear is not difficult at all. Just remember to let the sample dry sufficient between each step and dont forget to use oil when viewing under the microscope (at 1000x), that seems to work best.


Im still doing the mhbot yes. And the GAPS diet is still really helpful. But im stuck on the introduction diet. Somehow my dysbiosis will not resolve, and its causing a lot of symptoms. So im still looking for solutions to solve that. Im probably gonna do some more experiments with candida herbs or sibo herbs.

For example the candida coursing through my blood:
 -
Here shown in its yeast form (budding), but i also have dark field time lapse showing true hyphal forms growing in my blood.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
S13,

I see that ethanol works as good as methanol for fixing. Only, it takes longer.

Denatured alcohol is supposedly the same thing as ethanol and can be obtained from my home improvement store locally. My question is then, can I use denatured alcohol as my fixative?

You reminded me to use oil when viewing at 1000x. That is a given. But do you place oil directly on the sample, or do you use a cover-slip and place the oil as usual? So far, I have not been able to see anything by using oil directly on the sample. I have had to use a coverslip.

That's scary to see candida budding in your blood. You said you will have to try more candida and SIBO herbs. Have you tried Thorne's product "SF722?" It is undecylenic acid and supposedly potent for killing candida. I have been using it along with Nystatin and it seems to be effective. According to Thorne, it is 6x more potent than caprylic acid.

https://www.thorne.com/products/dp/formula-sf722-reg
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I just don't understand what I'm doing wrong!

So, I did a thick smear and let it dry. I used no fixative. Then I put it in the "ready to use" Giemsa for 2.5 hours. I rinsed it very carefully (very little of the blood rinsed off). Then, I let it dry for another 2 hours.

I can see no RBCs and the WBCs are not clear. There is more color this time, but I can distinguish very little.

WHAT?

According to the seller's description of this Giemsa, it is suited for seeing malaria parasites.

This is what I bought:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K337WG4?keywords=giemsa%20thick&qid=1445721971&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1#descriptionAndDetails
 
Posted by S13 (Member # 42830) on :
 
Very weird. Its supposed to be diluted (1:50) stock giemsa solution.

Normal giemsa solutions are diluted to about 1:20 or 1:15, so they are a bit stronger. But still yours should still color the sample, though it would take a bit longer.
So if you dont get coloration after 2 hours, something is wrong. Perhaps the pH is completely off? I suppose you wouldnt be able to measure it?

Perhaps you should have gotten the 26154-03 instead of the 26154-01 solution:
https://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/technical/datasheet/26154.aspx
I think that is the "pure" stock giemsa solution (undiluted). Then by diluting you can play with the pH level yourself. Ive noticed huge differences with RBC colors and the pH value of the solution.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I don't know what happened. I see on the distributer's data sheet (the link you posted) that the instructions are to allow the sample to air dry 18-24 hours BEFORE staining. Maybe that's what the issue was.

The first stains I did I used the dyed methanol and fixed them. This time I did not fix, but I did not allow it to "set up" for longer than it took the blood to look totally dry.

I will keep trying. Practice makes perfect.

Thanks for posting your own Giemsa pics. It's very helpful to compare the finished "product" since I am so new to staining.

If my next couple tries do not turn out, I may have to buy the undiluted Giemsa. I'd rather not have to do that because mixing the solution looks complicated to my Lyme brain.

Thanks again for your help.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey thatdudefromkansas,

Here is a nice Olympus scope with phase contrast. All it needs is a 100x Olympus phase objective.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Olympus-CH-Phase-Contrast-Microscope-/381451163057?hash=item58d042d5b1:g:~P4AAOSwwbdWMQz4
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
This one is even better. Phase contrast (with a turret) as well, and looks like it may be the 100x objective that is phase. A trinocular at that, but needs 220V current. Nevertheless, a dandy!

http://tinyurl.com/pzahcym
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
1. What's nice about the CH scope (the first link) is that it has phase objectives for 20x and 40x already. You would only need the 100x. AND, the turret is equipped with all the annuli!

You can use phase objectives as regular lens if you only want to do regular brightfield viewing. So, you don't need other lenses with this scope (besides the missing 100x phase objective).

This is a nice scope!


2. The second scope is an extremely NICE trinocular. The BH series is a better grade (and a newer line I think) than the CH series. A dandy scope!

You would have to message the seller to find out which annuli the turret is equipped with. I would assume it has the 100x annulus since the 100x objective appears to be the phase lens, but you never know for sure without asking.

This scope may be more suited for your needs if you need a trinocular port.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Cool, thanks for the info!

I've got so many more videos as well.

I'll post one soon once it is uploaded to youtube.


I may look into getting a new microscope soon. The only downside to the one I currently have is poor resolution at anything over 400x. The 100x oil immersion lens on my current scope just isn't that good. As well, I don't have a dark field lens that can be used with the 100x anyways.
I have 20x eye pieces, but the resolution still lacks a bit.
If I could find a better way to film, I would. The resolution at 400x is crystal clear, but the limited ability to film is what hurts it in the videos.

It's good enough now for my current purposes.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs2Q6NsPE-I&feature=youtu.be

At 2:30, 2:45, 3:30, and 6:30 are some good ones.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
You definitely are loaded, dude! Are you on any antimicrobials?

I just put my 100x dark phase lens in service. I thought lyme blood was scary at 450x! It is absolutely incredibly bad-looking at 1000x!!!

There are ketes that aren't even visible at 450x that I can see at 1000x. Quite a few of them, actually. I was looking at an area with my 45x and it looked pretty clean. Then I flipped to the 100x and couldn't believe my eyes. Many tiny baby ones. Hard to believe, I know, but true.

Dude, I hope that if you have that much money for a scope that you don't settle for just a high-quality brightfield, but get one that is equipped with a phase contrast turret and the corresponding phase lens. With that, you are able to use it as brightfield. Even if said scope is not equipped with darkfield, you can add a darkfield condenser pretty cheaply very easily. Then, viola, you have a wonderful high-grade scope you can do phase contrast, brightfield, and darkfield.

But, don't settle for the cheap package deals for phase (like Omax or Amscope) seen all over Ebay. Get something good like an Olympus. Like the ones I showed you.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, I'll go with a quality one.

I know there are some that make scopes with both Phase Contrast and Darkfield (and obviously brightfield).

For my intents and purposes, bright field would be useless, other than for any stains I may do.

I am not on antibiotics of any sort currently.
I am currently, recently diagnosed with MS.
None of the docs will listen, but I am trying to get them to look into Neuroborreliosis. To no avail, at this point.

Also, for anyone curious, my approach right now is fairly simple.

I store blood samples in EDTA Lavender top tubes, and I store them in an incubator (Egg incubator off of amazon) at roughly 98.6F. I am gonna do various samples incubated at different temps out of curiosity.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
If you are not on any antibiotics, you are the perfect candidate for WakeUp's "trials." (See page 4 on the microscopy thread... WakeUp's post on 8-11-15).

There are many different natural substances that are potent antimicrobials. You could try some of them and see if they make a difference (you might herx first, though).

I prefer Stephen Buhner's protocols, as his choices seem to be pretty effective for many people. I don't care for Cowden. Way overpriced and many people find his products ineffective.

WakeUp has an active thread right now about these type of substances. It's a pretty good list. You can be his first guinea pig on the microscopy thread. [Big Grin]

That's an awesome idea about the incubator for culturing!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I'd potentially be interested.

However, with the potential for this to be a neurological infection, it's not something I may have the time to mess around with.

I'll take a look at that, though.

I needed an incubator, but normal lab incubators are expensive. I just bought a cheap, still air incubator and it does what it needs to do.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Honestly, if there was only one thing I could take, and nothing else, it would be CBD oil. It has the most promise to be a cure than any other compound. Check out WakeUp's post on 10-17-15 on the Spirocheticidal & Antibiofilm Compounds Thread.

It's worth a try, at least for the time-being, if you cannot get a doc on board to issue antibiotics.

Hemp CBD oil is legal in every state. And, it's exactly the same thing as CBD from Marijuana.

If you look into it, CBD oil is quoted as illegal except in Medical Marijuana legal states. But, that's not true.

The confusion surrounds CBD oil derived from Marijuana (the "Charlotte's Web" strain of CBD oil). THAT IS ILLEGAL in non-legal states. But CBD oil from hemp is not.

That's my understanding of it.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/132608
 
Posted by May (Member # 10319) on :
 
Hi! I have had a few problems getting started with microscopy, and am hoping for some help...

First the 20w bulb doesn't seem to be able to illuminate very well at 40x regaurdless of how I adjust the condenser. I put my 320lumen led flashlight under the condenser and get a much better view - any ideas why this is?

I hooked my point and shoot up to my third viewing port, but it doesn't get a very good image - I have to zoom quite a bit to see anything, and still have some trouble. It also doesn't do well through the eyepiece, but my ipad does.


I took this video with my ipad held up to thee yepiece and an LED flashlight held below the condenser. It is about 8 hours after making the slide:

https://youtu.be/vYhiI4EqMrU

What do you think? Do these things look like spirochetes? Any suggestions about how to use the camera better?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hi May, welcome to the thread, and thanks for joining!

What kind of scope do you have? Improvising with the flashlight is a good idea, but you might want to look into Lymedin2010's suggestion about the LED (?) bulb from Home Depot. It seems that most microscope lights are less than adequate. Generally, the more light, the better the view.

It sounds like you may need a relay lens for your third port viewing. That would explain why you have to zoom to get an image. I'm not sure why your camera is not getting a good view through the eyepiece lens, though. That's what I do, and it works very well for me.

Those objects do resemble ketes, but I can't say they are for sure since they are not undulating like true spirochetes. Nor do I see the bulbous tips. Yours look more rigid; like the ones I refer to as L-form, or cell-wall-deficient ketes.

What power objective are you using for that video? I would guess it to be 100x (1000x total magnification).

You could purchase a camera adapter that mounts to your eyepiece and see if that helps your camera get a better capture through your eyepiece lens. I gave links for some adapters further up in the thread. That would help to keep your camera steady which might help it focus better.

I hope those suggestions help.

You're doing a great job. That video was nice and clear, and overall very good.

My next step is to get a true eyepiece camera and start doing time-lapse. Also, I need to perfect my staining abilities. I found out that I bought and have been using the wrong stain. So, hopefully once I get the correct one(s) I will have more to share.
 
Posted by May (Member # 10319) on :
 
Thanks for the information!

I wonder what else those things could be? I could only find 2 before the blood sat for a while - then there were many.

I'm using an amscope 490t dark field with oil condenser. I could modify my system to use an Mr16 led, but it isn't drop in compatible. What seems strange is that others seem to be doing fine with the stock 20w halogen.

I'll look into a relay lens.

I'm using 40x objective and 20x eyepiece. The 100x shows nothing. I was thinking about getting a 60x or a 100x oil with iris - I wonder if anyone has any experience with the 100x oil/iris?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Hey thatdudefromkansas,

Here is a nice Olympus scope with phase contrast. All it needs is a 100x Olympus phase objective.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Olympus-CH-Phase-Contrast-Microscope-/381451163057?hash=item58d042d5b1:g:~P4AAOSwwbdWMQz4

I found a 100x Olympus plan phase objective for this scope if anyone is interested in it. And a really good price at that:

This would make a great scope for someone wanting an Olympus phase contrast microscope but not able to spend thousands of $$.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OLYMPUS-HI-PL100-1-30-100X-Microscope-Phase-Contrast-Objective-BH-PC-FHT-EH-/111818536414?hash=item1a08e775de:g:dt0AAOSwLVZV4cGl


For those wanting to buy a scope, please be informed about your item before purchasing (especially a used scope). I am still a novice, and I take no responsibility for your purchases, but I think I know a good deal when I see it.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
"Woman who has live PARASITES 'wiggling around everywhere' in her blood flies to Germany to undergo controversial treatment for Lyme disease

Tahlia Smith, 21, was diagnosed with Lyme disease in January this year

She has travelled to Germany to undergo controversial treatment

A test showed Tahlia's blood contained live Spirochetes bacteria

The treatment involves blood filtering and heating her body to 42 degrees"


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3316410/Lyme-disease-sufferer-Tahlia-Smith-live-parasites-blood.html#ixzz3rNcVi5U7
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Hi guys--

I was looking at this $499 "inverted" microscope on craigslist:

http://hartford.craigslist.org/pho/5274075253.html

Do you think this would have enough power to see borrelia, cysts and biofilm well?

I don't really know what inverted means. Anyone have an opinion?
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Heres one more-- a used $300 olympus:

http://newyork.craigslist.org/lgi/tls/5270061443.html

Any ideas whether this is a good deal and would allow me to see spiroochetes?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey WakeUp, both of those scopes are good deals. But, I don't know if either one is phase contrast.

I don't have time to answer thoroughly right now, but as I mentioned earlier, phase contrast is wonderful for seeing organisms in live blood.

The upright Olympus CH for $300 looks like it may have a darkfield condenser, but I'm not sure.

The inverted looks like a really good scope. If the whole scope is Olympus like its eyepiece lens, then it is a great deal. It does not appear to be phase contrast. And, inverted scopes take up a lot of space and are not as easily moved.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Thanks TNT -- I will look only for phase contrast.

This cytoviva attachment with patented tech produces stunning videos of spirochetes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWR7AFcgKSc
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
WakeUp, that Olympus CH phase contrast scope I linked to above (on Ebay) is almost exactly like the CH you linked to on CL except the Ebay one is almost fully equipped for phase contrast (it's missing the 100x phase objective, but I linked to one for that as well).

The Ebay scope is not currently equipped for darkfield, but if I'm not mistaken, all you would need to do would be to get a darkfield annulus to put in the turret condenser.

This scope has a "Make an offer" option, so they may let it go for considerably less. You never know.

With Plan phase objectives, and all the annuli in the turret, this scope is a lot of scope for several hundred dollars.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Olympus-CH-Phase-Contrast-Microscope-/381451163057?hash=item58d042d5b1:g:~P4AAOSwwbdWMQz4

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OLYMPUS-HI-PL100-1-30-100X-Microscope-Phase-Contrast-Objective-BH-PC-FHT-EH-/111818536414?hash=item1a08e775de:g:dt0AAOSwLVZV4cGl
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here is another brand name phase turret scope, but I hesitate to recommend this one because there is no description and I'm not sure what kind of shape it's in.

There are just too many questions about this scope to recommend it, but it is a nice scope for the price. It's a trinocular that appears to have plan objectives (I can discern the word "Plan" on one of the objectives at least). It does NOT appear that they are phase objectives. Nor can one tell which (if any) annuli are installed. Also, the turret looks a little off-center.

Here it is for what it's worth:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/321913787081?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

It has "Make an offer" option.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Thanks TNT...
Phase contrast really makes a MASSIVE difference in the images. Its worth saving up for the Phase contrast-- even though they are much more expensive (new they are over $1,000):
Heres an image that shows the astounding difference between a regular microscope and phase contrast:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_contrast_microscopy#/media/File:Brightfield_phase_contrast_cell_image.jpg

Thanks again--- scopes are a new world for me... As a child I read the book the Microbe Hunters--- and I have always been intrigued since then.

Wish I had been able to film my blood before I went on a new herbal regime that has IMPROVED my arthritis in just a few days (Neem(spiros), Grapefruit Seed Extract(spiros and cysts), Burdock root(biofilms), Sarsaparilla(spiros and biofilm), Mangosteen juice(spiros), Pomegranate Juice(biofilm) and NAC(biofilm), Boluoke(biofilm)...Mango juice(biofilm), Cilantro and Chlorella (detox of heavy metals) and Monolaurin (spiros).

Yes--- I am actually walking up and down the stairs, and I was able to string christmas lights without massive pain...! Wish I could see if my blood looks different!!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
WakeUp, that's great that you are more mobile!

Yeah, you need to get a scope soon! You don't really want to totally rely on others to do your trials for you, do you? ha ha

I think that it can appear that the blood looks worse with effective treatment...at least until the load is actually lowered. There are times when my treatment is doing something and I'm feeling slightly better that my blood actually looks more infected. I can think of a couple times that happened at least. Though, overall, it seems to be fairly random.

One thing that has really improved under the scope for me is the prevalence of what many live blood microscopists refer to as candida, or perhaps it's byproduct gas bubbles.

I think there is a possibility it could be something different, but I'm not sure what. But whatever it is, I have almost none of it anymore. Whereas before, I was loaded very heavily with it. My gut is getting better, so perhaps it is candida.

Microscopy was a "new world" for me, too. I am so glad I got into it. And, I am so glad I got a phase contrast scope.

I just got more stain, and my slides are much better now. I'm using another ready-to-use solution that is easier to use. It's a Wright-Giemsa stain, and the differentiation is more like what I had originally expected (the first stain I got was plain Giemsa with less differentiation). The company I got it from actually gives out free samples, so I didn't even have to pay for it!
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
Hey guys, a little late to the party but I'm glad I found this thread. Over the past few months I've been using a new scope I have purchased to help try and unravel my families health mysteries.

Hopefully I can get some pics and video up soon 😃
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
https://youtu.be/BObdg5Ah0FA

Live blood on Phase from the other night. Not sure if its a spirochete or what. thoughts
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hi Gerald12,

Welcome to Lymenet and welcome to this thread! It's great you have joined! That's a great view, and a nice capture.

That's an interesting bright phase view. Do you have a color filter? My bright phase lens doesn't give me that amount of color. What kind of scope are you using?

That "string" organism could easily be a spirochete but without obvious bulbous tips it's kind of hard to verify that it is. If it is, you will definitely see more typical-looking ketes eventually.

The other organism is of more interest to me. I can't quite discern from the video, but did it appear to have flagella? It almost appears like there could be flagella at the 5 & 6 o'clock positions (on the organism).

Check out my flagellate organism:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEQnmNKVt6w


I really like the detail your scope gives the white blood cells.

Keep us updated. We will give you as much help and advice that we can.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
There are objects that resemble spirochetes in our blood & the two can thus be confused.

With Oblique Illumination I have been able to see them in normal blood as well. So to differentiate between spiros & those objects, which might be fibrin, we look for the following criteria from my previous post:

"When observing I give higher credibility to when I find the following:

1) BULBOUS OR ROUND TIPS ON BOTH ENDS & MEDIUM LENGTH SPIROCHETES. There are spirochetes that do not have bulbous ends & I have seen video of large quantities of these spirochetes PROPOGATED from the people who have chosen to culture them. So they can exist & I have tons of video on those as well, but I chose to dismiss them. There are also many VERY thin ones which lack the rounded tips, which I also have tons & tons of video but I choose to dismiss.

AND

2) SPIRAL OR UNDULATE WITH SOME AGGRESSION. I prefer to see a bit of life in their mobility. Even Dr. Alan MacDonald makes reference to these relatively docile forms that appear rather lifeless.

AND

3) LARGE QUANTITIES OF ITEM 1 & 2. Large quantities of the 2 items above eliminate the possibility of the chance encounter of any aggregates conforming to this configuration.

If you look at the videos of professionals who release their videos, they fulfill 2-3 out of the aforementioned for a high impact reception.


Furthermore, the morphological transformations of cysts & blebbing is a huge advantage for even more positive identification."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
A new DNA test that takes blood & various other samples (such as knee fluid).

"The test offers a highly sensitive and reliable molecular diagnosis independent of clinical manifestations and serology test results. Before performing PCR amplification, the borrelial bacteria are concentrated by differential centrifugation from the blood and body fluids for DNA extraction to further increase the sensitivity of the detection method. "

http://dnalymetest.com/home.html

http://dnalymetest.com/lymediseasediagnostics.html
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Borrelia in gonads from Dr. MacDonald.

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5998


Don't forget they found spiros in semen & vaginal secretions. Has anyone checked their sperm yet (if male)? I did quickly once, but was too symptomatic to do a thorough check.

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=5998
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Guys really ANY LABORATORY GRADE MICROSCOPE will allow one to see the spirochetes. The difference will be in how well designed & polished the lenses are and that will translate to the clarity, sharpness, & focus of the image.


It is difficult to know with certainty which one is better than another. An analogy would be the countless lenses for photography cameras & photographers purchasing them only to have mixed reviews on public forums. Some will be satisfied with the image, others will hunt for a sharper lens that may cost more.


Remember what Morten Laane said in his interview in OUS2...one can see the spiros with a 100 year old microscope, but he does not mention anything about how clearly or sharply one can see them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTlcgCql2k0

I would stick with the top guns such as Olympus, Zeiss, Nikon, Reichert...etc. Zeiss is known for its sharp lenses & even on Sony PNS cameras I notice how well they perform. My Zeiss scope lenses have not disappointed as well.


You should go back & check out all the videos that are made of Borrelia & keep in mind the make/model of the scopes & the type of light you want (light, dark, phase, obligue, or DIC)
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gerald12:
https://youtu.be/BObdg5Ah0FA

Live blood on Phase from the other night. Not sure if its a spirochete or what. thoughts

I can see (I could be wrong) what look like at least two spirochetes hanging off your red blood cells--- one is very long with a bulbous end, and the other is short... They seem to be able to hook onto red blood cells very tightly.

Good show!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Gerald12, that is such a great video & it has enough aggression/movement to be borrelia. You should check out "normal" blood as well to make comparisons. I was not able to see any of these things in normal blood until I used a new oblique illumination microscope, which then brought to light a mesh of fibrin scattered everywhere between the plasma in all people with "normal" & non-LD'd blood.


Some of the fibrin I observed were detached from all the surround fibers & they move & gyrate similarly to spirochetes, albeit with less force/aggression.


I have also now noticed that these fibrin strands sometimes become sticky with WBC's & they drag them along the tail end as footings. For this reason I use the 3 items that I came up with above to increase the chances of a positive ID, which is about all we can do now without DNA/RNA testing. To this date I have never seen in normal blood the 3 items I listed above & have never even seen a medium size one with bulbous tip. I have never seen any bulbous tip ones in normal blood ever, but I have spent considerably more time on blood of those who were bit by ticks & in some of these blood the bulbous tip spirochetes are abundant & easy to identify. I have also seen in normal blood what looks like small dumbbells & I am yet to accept an identification that I am comfortable with.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hbin5ZT6A5s

You can see the bulbous tips on the medusa colony of the My Horrific Blood video. Do you see any bulbous tips spiros in your blood? As I said before, not all spiros will have bulbous tips either & the best way to next come closer to an ID is via time lapse to observe either cysting or blebbing. To me the surrounding activity in your blood, aside from the longer strand, is an added clue to Lyme blood, but it is not definitive.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Now take a look at this blood sample that was cultured in medium & allowed to grow for a few days. This person did not see this many spiros in their blood, yet with the right medium the spiros multiplied. Observe how many have bulbous tips & how many do not & how many are in different morphological forms. Even the most steadfast inquisitor will have to succumb to the notion that we are dealing with a living entity AT THE VERY LEAST.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_nAqavEAe0


This observation accompanied with your observation of normal blood will provide you with clues as to what you can more safely dismiss vs accept as Borrelia. My series of normal blood vs lyme blood videos is not complete, but should help everyone out. I will also in time give you the recipe how to culture the spiros yourself.
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
Thank you for all the kind words and compliments. I have ordered a few staining kits so I can hopefully get a little more info on these organisms.

The scope I use actually was less than a 1000.00. But I have spent a lot of time fine tuning my staining techniques .

I have many fascinating images that I have collected since I got my scope a few months ago.

Heres another very interesting organism that has been very hard to identify .

https://youtu.be/Mti3pHZuXrI
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
Saliva Image:

Similar to a WBC , but lacking the nucleus formations. Mold, Or L-form bacteria???

Cool imagery either way

https://youtu.be/D1_gb37hNIc
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
By the way, spirochetes love the Saliva. Now, are they the dental form which are "Wink Wink" non pathogenic [Wink] , or monsters like Lyme?

I will play with the images and try and get them into a better resolution and share them here.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
All very clear video.

https://youtu.be/Mti3pHZuXrI

Seems to be a deformed RBC to me & not a parasite. I see many odd shapes of RBC's in my blood throughout my observations.


https://youtu.be/D1_gb37hNIc

Maybe a basphil or eosinophil that has expanded due to added hydration in the saliva perhaps? Have you tried scraping from under your gums (gingival sulcus)? Just make sure it has some saliva on there. You can check out this guys video, click on his Youtube name & then "videos" to see more.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iyhlz11pOyY

I have also tried checking tears & sperm & vaginal secretions besides saliva. I have only done this once each & did not find anything, but I did not have enough stamina to thoroughly check as I should have.


Looking forward to more videos.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Lyme is hell & I don't always have the stamina or will power for all things Lyme related. I will go back to some of the previous posts & comment, since I missed so much good stuff...sorry.


thatdudefromkansas, you are not getting enough zoom with your recording equipment, can you zoom in more? Despite this it looks like clear & cut spirochetes in this blood sample that fulfill all 3 requirements on the list....awesome work!!!!

This I do not see in normal blood!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs2Q6NsPE-I
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
https://youtu.be/Mti3pHZuXrI

Seems to be a deformed RBC to me & not a parasite. I see many odd shapes of RBC's in my blood throughout my observations.


https://youtu.be/D1_gb37hNIc

Maybe a basphil or eosinophil that has expanded due to added hydration in the saliva perhaps?

Gerald12,

I would also agree that that odd shape is not a parasite but a red blood cell fragment. I honestly feel it could be a RESULT of a parasite (ie babesia-like, or even bart-like organisms) that has ruptured the RBC, leaving a misshapen fragment in it's wake. I have watched RBCs "die" from "normal" circumstances and they either pop and vanish, or burst and ooze out. I think a fragment with a cell wall mostly intact could possibly suggest parasitization.

In the saliva sample the two objects appear to be WBCs. I can see the nuclei (and granules) in both objects.

Those are some great views! Keep up the good work. I would really be interested in seeing some of your stains.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I don't think they are parasitized either, as I also see them in normal blood. You hit yourself & bang yourself & apply pressure in various parts of your body. Extruding blood from the fingers is another form of trauma & in particular smearing across a glass slide. This will deform a few RBC's.


TNT, your ruptured RBC's are a different thing & I think ARE due to a parasite. I was going to get to a response when going through it. I do not see that type of ruptured cells in mine or in normal blood & malaria is known to rupture RBC's. So I wonder if it is babesia? Look for ruptured RBC in malaria & you see a similar bursting of RBC's, almost identical to your images.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Malaria caused RBC rupture.

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Look for ruptured RBC in malaria & you see a similar bursting of RBC's, almost identical to your images.

Thanks. That's why I shared those photos.

The shape, position, and proximity of the ruptured RBCs and the shape, size, and proximity of the other objects seriously suggest apicomplexans bursting forth from RBCs.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Have you seen any cruciforms (X or cross forms) or the ring forms?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
quote:
Have you seen any cruciforms (X or cross forms) or the ring forms?
Not sure. Earlier on I thought I had, but if I remember correctly, it was the red blood cells that had funny folds and creases-and even holes-and not objects inside of them. I'll have to find the folders that have those pics and videos of that.

[ 11-19-2015, 05:35 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I read somewhere that typically only <.01 of RBC's would be affected by babs & for Bart something on the order of <.001. It is nice to see you guys expanding into uncharted territory & against such odds.


Cheap scopes, gotta find out the objectives on this one.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/leitz-wetzlar-trinocular-polarization-orthoplan-microscope-/361430601499?hash=item5426f14f1b:g:NckAAOSwLVZV6ezV


http://www.ebay.com/itm/LEITZ-WEZLAR-OTHOPLAN-TRINOCULAR-MICROSCOPE-/151888286069?hash=item235d3f5175:g:Mu0AAOSwvt1WRVvQ


thatdudefromkansas has almost as many spiros as I had & it is interesting how he was diagnosed with MS (as well as his friend). What are your total MS symptoms & do the symptoms overlap into LD symptoms partly?


Just an FYI, out of all the countless stuff I have taken only Cowden Protocol along with pulsed ABX has managed to decrease the amount of spiros directly in my blood. I had Doxy dependency & nothing was able to take it away other than just Cowden alone.


At one point Doxy started to relieve many of my symptoms & prevented what appeared like a sure stroke for me & it was a great drug when I needed it. But over time it has done nothing more than continue my LD progression & I deeply regret staying on it. I knew about Dr. Eva Sapi's study on doxy producing 300% more cysts, but I thought it might have been affecting myco & the reason it was helping me so much initially.


After the Cowden/abx pulse, I now have trouble finding spiros in my blood, albeit it does not change the severity & my multitude of symptoms.


Also it is interesting how I observed spiros in my wife's blood in 2011 & predicted she would show signs of LD. I hear her joints crack & snap, every night, yet her symptoms remain minimal. I think besides all that we know about LD (co-infections, supplements, probiotics...etc) the ability for your body to clear toxins is a major factor in producing pain symptoms. When I get exposed to various substances that I was normally fine with before chronic LD, now I develop additional LD symptoms.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter Kemp's latest Borrelia video & it looks like a pretty damn long one there. He may just hold the record?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzt4sMpPk30
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Peter Kemp's latest Borrelia video & it looks like a pretty damn long one there. He may just hold the record?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzt4sMpPk30

That video is interesting because those are some of the laziest ketes I have seen. There's not much undulation.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
In this video Peter Kemp mentions the presence of l-form spirochetes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0bcIgNssJo

I wonder what he is referring to. Is it what's pictured from 2:02-2:06 (the bright round objects hanging on the outside of the bright RBC)?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have seen lazier & they appear to be actual ketes with sharp bends at various points & not fibrin. I saw the most of these very stagnant & lifeless ones when I took a combo of doxy & Penicillin VK together.


I had asked this question as well earlier on as I always though that it referred to the fission of a spirochete in the middle, which then forms into what sometimes looks like an L or greater or lesser than sign. But it turns out he is referring to all of the strings, which are atypical (non-textbook spiraling) & L forms. So every string we see in that video that is not a cyst or bleb/spore.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Just what we need, more complications with EBV in the mix...over 60 varieties of EBV.

http://goop.com/the-medical-medium-and-whats-potentially-at-the-root-of-medical-mysteries/
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
... it turns out he is referring to all of the strings, which are atypical (non-textbook spiraling) & L forms. So every string we see in that video that is not a cyst or bleb/spore.

I'm still not sure what you mean or are referring to. L-forms are a different morphology; a non-spiraling spirochete would be just that-a dead kete. That would not be a different morphology. Have you been able to ask Peter what he is referring to?

I guess I could post a question under his video.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have asked the question to friends of his in the same circle in the past & they say that they refer to all the strings that we see in our blood. I too was taken back by the response, as I thought they were the ones with bends within the bodies.

He won't answer the Youtube video. Instead go to FaceBook & search for "Peter Kemp" check his page & he usually likes to post about LD & UK politics and ask him there.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Check out his other video, with clues as to the "motile coccoid" stuck in the middle of the L-form spirochete (the same strings we see in our blood).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LOCDpOlzs4
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Stevia kills LD.

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
L-form, or cell-wall-deficient bacteria are just that, bacteria without a distinct cell wall -but, rather, an outer membrane. So, theoretically, L-form could be any possible shape. But I think they would probably tend to resemble the shape of the cell-wall form.

That's why I am inclined to think that the faint, thicker, spirochete-looking objects that appear to undulate (or at least wave around) are l-form ketes. Especially the ones that have darker tips.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Check out his other video, with clues as to the "motile coccoid" stuck in the middle of the L-form spirochete (the same strings we see in our blood).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LOCDpOlzs4

I am not sure I agree with the description about the objects or what is happening in the video.

The "coccoid" appears to be a lyzosome attacking a typical spirochete. It appears to move up and down ON the OUTSIDE of the kete.

I cannot see anything that differentiates that "l-form kete" from a typical spirochete. There is not enough magnification or resolution to discern between a cell wall and a cell membrane.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here are some examples of what I earlier thought was babesia-like organisms, and maltese crosses:

 -


 -


 -


 -


There were a number of stock pictures I could choose from, but here is just one example I thought my pictures resembled:


 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The coccoid he is referring to is a bleb (aka spore, aka granular form). It is the dots in the string of pearls, which break up at the end & give just the coccoid.


It is a way that Borrelia breaks up into the smallest unit containing just DNA/RNA in one vesicle & designed to spread effectively. So one borrelia undergoes SoP formation & forms 10-20+ coccoids, which can then EACH develop into new spiros & repeat the cycle.

Peter knows this now, since after my video he has done time lapse & see long strings at the beginning & then hours later only COCCOIDS, which is the same name for blebs or spores or granular forms.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Those are unstained pics I believe. I see those types in normal blood too & are halos & have to do with the way the RBC is biconcave & bends lights between the sloped points at the center.


The 1st pic is more convincing on your behalf & could be though.

You should however look at normal blood at some point & it will explain a lot.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Lymedin,

I guess if he is trying to show that that coccoid is a bleb, then time-lapse would be best. I guess this is the kind of thing we are up against with proving it. Because, honestly, it looks to me like one of the many lyzosomes are attacking the kete.

I think it was S13 that showed time-lapse of SOP to bleb formation?? I remember your one video showed that too.

The thing I find hard to believe is that he is referring to the kete as an "l-form spirochaete." I don't think he can prove that by the video.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here's an early video (just uploaded in response to our conversation on the last page) of my blood showing parasitized RBCs, possible "maltese cross," and ketes with brightfield at 1000x:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjOT4XtSgDA
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The other thing that makes me speculate that these cells are parasitized by apicomplexans is that babesia and malaria tend to infect the reticulocytes (immature RBCs).

The affected cells appear to be reticulocytes.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
You captured some very clear spirochetes in that video, great work. Do you see them all over & scattered in your blood, or are they hard to find?


It could very well be, but the best way to capture them is via staining. This is no easy feat as you may have to do a whole lot of staining to increase your chances of capture.


I have seen normal blood & the RBC's look as if it can be loaded with parasites because of the effect I described previously. I thought they were parasites in my blood too when I first got into microscopy, but after some time with normal blood, I have to easily dismiss them.


Just look at this vid of normal blood & focus on the RBC, which might one mistake as parasitized? And by no means is this the best video of this illusion & I have recorded better in the past.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maAR-QtUv8w


The other way to capture them is via darkfield & I have seen some very convincing video of parasitized RBC's under darkfield.


For sure you have parasites in your RBC's, as your ruptured RBC's & the pictures you took of the occlusions exiting rbc suggest & that was beautiful work which I have not seen from any other LD person doing microscopy. Congrats!


Consider the possibility of culturing them in chocolate agar, as I had mentioned in a previous post. This will allow you to place a larger amount of blood & again increase chance of seeding the medium.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I don't know if I did a good enough job on the My Horrific blood video? One of the major points was to show SoP formation & how it breaks up & scatters in the blood.


So if you wait a few hours you will see the spiros come out more & more into the blood plasma. But if you wait even more hours the plentiful collection of spiros in the plasma just vanish & what is left is a lot of debri & many coccoids/blebs/spores/granular forms (all those words are interchangeable for the same Borrelia structure....the dot).


P. Kemp has done maybe about 4 months ago a before & after video of the same thing that I have. First he shows the spiros in plasma & then a few hours later all one sees is the blebs scattered in the plasma. I suppose he used coccoid as a more general term to be safe & can apply to any object. I know from watching his videos that his culturing produces A LOT of blebs/coccoids in the plasma.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
It looks like slowly the world is learning...this is recently & directly from Dr. Alan MacDonald...


" Macro Particulate forms of Amyloid (coating living Borrelia bio-films) exist in Circulating Blood from
dementia patient.
Link:
https://www.facebook.com/whyamistillsick

Amyloid ""Globs" up to 100 or more microns in size
were captured in photographs by me after I completed a Congo Red stain [ for amyloid }
on a peripheral blood smear from a 62 year old woman with dementia, and with previously documented circulating large size Borrelia bio-films in her blood smear.
No one, on planet earth ,has ever stained a
blood smear with Congo Red Stain to search for
amyloid.


No one on earth has ever performed FISH method
DNA hybridization for borrelia Miyamotoi DNA.
No one on earth has ever photo documented the
existence of living Borrelia biofilm communities
in the circulating blood.


These discoveries occurred on October 7,2015.
One of the Images of a huge Borrelia biofilm
Coated with Amyloid is below. Other images are posted through the link above.


This is a Major new insight into the biology of Infectious Alzheimer's Disease.

Respectfully,
Alan B. MacDonald MD, FCAP
October 9,2015"


https://www.dropbox.com/s/wza01fpuqovy90h/Oct%207%202015%20Update%20-%20Amyloid%20Coated%20Circulating%20biofilms%20in%20blood.pdf?dl=0#
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
You captured some very clear spirochetes in that video, great work. Do you see them all over & scattered in your blood, or are they hard to find?

That last video was from the second slide I ever did, so it was very early on. At that point I was seeing COLONIES of spirochetes, as I pointed out in previous videos. It goes without saying that this was not cultured blood....so yeah, MANY, MANY ketes! Now I do not see that many (most of the time).

Here is another early video of the same area that shows some of these same elements, but gives a better idea of just how many ketes there were:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSfkIH7Wqp0

I apologize for the shaking and the loud noise in the background. Someone was vacuuming as I shot the video. Plus, the slide/coverslip was under the influence of some type of tension that kept pushing the blood around every time I tried to focus. I think I had too much blood for the surface area of the coverslip that allowed it to "float."
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Alan is doing AWESOME work! I hope it continues. Does anyone know if it is true about his microscope being taken from him? Can someone provide written proof about it?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I have seen normal blood & the RBC's look as if it can be loaded with parasites because of the effect I described previously. I thought they were parasites in my blood too when I first got into microscopy, but after some time with normal blood, I have to easily dismiss them.


Just look at this vid of normal blood & focus on the RBC, which might one mistake as parasitized? And by no means is this the best video of this illusion & I have recorded better in the past.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maAR-QtUv8w

I could be mistaken, but the RBCs in your video don't quite look like what I pointed out. But, please don't go searching in your archives for a better resemblance because I realize that what I am showing in my video may completely be an illusion.

I was simply illustrating what COULD look like "maltese crosses," and pointing out a couple things that could lead a person to consider the possibility of apicomplexan parasites. I don't plan to "go to the bank" with it, because it's not hard evidence.

The other thing I consider is how much Zithromax and Artemisinin has helped me in the past number of months.

So, I am just trying to get the big picture on things, and TOTALLY appreciate all of your help & input (Lymedin, and each one of you).
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Here's an early video (just uploaded in response to our conversation on the last page) of my blood showing parasitized RBCs, possible "maltese cross," and ketes with brightfield at 1000x:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjOT4XtSgDA

SIGH---- TNT-- OMG your red blood cells look like crap. I'm sooooo sorry for us all because "our life is in the blood.." and these parasites are literally sucking the life out of us.

It takes red blood cells 3 months to die-- so treatment must be a minimum of 3 months.. just to eradicate an infection in red blood cells, not to mention other cells.

SIGH-----

Those "S" like spirochetes inside your cells are SSSatan's personal taunt...LOL
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Alan is doing AWESOME work! I hope it continues. Does anyone know if it is true about his microscope being taken from him? Can someone provide written proof about it?

Elena mentioned that the LDA had withdrawn their loan of the cytoviva Microscope, but I will see if I can verify it-- and the reasons for it. They probably came under "pressure" to take the scope away.

The last thing we patients need is MORE tick studies and tick surveys. Tick studies are great---- BUT--- they distract precious resources from research for a CURE, and I, for one do not want to finance more tick studies and surveys when almost no work or money is going into finding a CURE..

I want to finance researchers who want to CURE--- to eradicate Borrelia biofilm Borrelia spirochetes and Borrelia cysts from our bodies. Denialists harm us because they divert attention from these lines of research onto research that will never find us a cure....

If the microscope loan was called in, then a group of concerned Lyme patients need to buy the Cytoviva to rent to MacDonald for $1 a year. This way, actual patients who want a cure will have control over the equipment-- and not an organization like the LDA which is subject to pressure and compromise because of its funding requirements.

Our only hope rests with grass roots funding of dedicated scientists like Sapi, Miklossy, MacDonald and that pathologist is Norway... (forgot his name-- brain freeze)

One key to which scientists are dedicated is: they always get persecuted when they come close to the truth!!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Elena mentioned that the LDA had withdrawn their loan of the cytoviva Microscope, but I will see if I can verify it-- and the reasons for it...


....If the microscope loan was called in, then a group of concerned Lyme patients need to buy the Cytoviva to rent to MacDonald for $1 a year. This way, actual patients who want a cure will have control over the equipment-- and not an organization like the LDA which is subject to pressure and compromise because of its funding requirements.

Thanks WakeUp, I appreciate you verifying that for us.

If this is true, perhaps someone should put a bug in John Caudwell's ear that MacDonald could use another microscope. The best scope made would cost pocket change to him.

It's too bad MacDonald couldn't get his hands on one of the 2 surviving original Rife microscopes. Then again, there might be a learning curve to using one. They were the most powerful microscopes in the world at that time, and maybe still are.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I don't know if I did a good enough job on the My Horrific blood video? One of the major points was to show SoP formation & how it breaks up & scatters in the blood.


So if you wait a few hours you will see the spiros come out more & more into the blood plasma. But if you wait even more hours the plentiful collection of spiros in the plasma just vanish & what is left is a lot of debri & many coccoids/blebs/spores/granular forms (all those words are interchangeable for the same Borrelia structure....the dot).

I thought you did a great job with that video. I only wish it could have been filmed at 1000x instead of 400x.

I don't have an eyepiece camera yet, but I recently watched a sample over a week's time. At first there were numerous ketes. But as the week progressed, fewer and fewer ketes were visible until there were NONE. The inverse was true concerning cysts. I saw more and MORE and MORE irregularly-rounded, granular type objects approximately .5-2.5 um in diameter. I had seen a few of these objects in blood before, but was not sure what they were until this sample.

Now I know.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Interesting that your last video is not that sharp & very shaky, yet it is very easy to identify as spirochetes, great job on that one.


You guys know that I was thanked by many for my video & that we have influenced other researches into looking at the blood & spirochetes more seriously now. Hopefully the momentum will keep on going & we will all learn new things as time progresses. What we really need to do is to get the LLMD's involved.


1000x produces a VERY narrow field of view & when focusing on only 1 spiro it becomes difficult to keep focus since it easily moves & looses focus. I am doing more 40x with cam zoom now. Good to see that both you & P. Kemp have noticed a very similar pattern to what I have noticed. I think this info is BIG news & insight for all of us. We have shown the researches what actually happens in our blood & how 1x borrelia can easily lead to 20x or 30x Borrelia entities.


TNT, I again asked for verification on L-form of borrelia & this is what was said:

"...our definition of L form is: typically a long thin string like body with a length between 10 and 20 microns and diameter about 0.3 to 0.5 microns.

That’s typical, however we also frequently see and include. Very long forms that can be 100 microns or more, and very short forms that can be 3-10 microns in length. Frequently the short ones have definite round bodies on the ends and look like dumbells. Some of these can be seen in the video you include."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Also I have thought about this many nights, are the CDC really this stupid? Could they really not understand that different morphologies exist. Is it too difficult of a concept to accept that in a BLOOD BORNE DISEASE that the pathogen can be in very large quantities in the blood?


In the beginning I thought I had discovered a species of Borrelia that may not be known as pathogenic to humans or maybe a new one all together. I was able to figure out spores, dotted spirochetes & their breakup all within 4-5 months. I knew nothing of Borrelia burgdorferi as it pertained to what I was seeing. The only sure guarantee that I witnessed was that these things were not in my blood during early infection, when I only had a few symptoms & I was guessing I had Lyme. Then as I developed more & more symptoms these things coincided in abundance.


Could they really be this moronic or do they know this already? Perhaps they are already aware & realize that if we cannot kill it with abx early on, then no matter how much antibiotics or combos of abx we administer subsequently the organism will persists.


If people go on life thinking they have fibro or ME/CFS, then why not leave it at that & not scare the public. I bet when they went out testing, they discovered that many people have the infection, yet they show no symptoms or very little symptoms. Collectively the cost of handling this would be astronomical. So if the infection exists & it does not necessarily translate to disease, then how does one prove that they have full blown LD? This becomes a public fiasco.


Big pharma is making money off us Lymies, but the insurance companies are loosing a tremendous amount. Do you think that the gov will favor Big Pharma over insurance companies? Or are they trying to reach a happy middle ground where the gov does not loose much, big Pharma gets its share by way of drugs for labeled diseases, & insurance companies loose minimally.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
TNT, I again asked for verification on L-form of borrelia & this is what was said:

"...our definition of L form is: typically a long thin string like body with a length between 10 and 20 microns and diameter about 0.3 to 0.5 microns.

That’s typical, however we also frequently see and include. Very long forms that can be 100 microns or more, and very short forms that can be 3-10 microns in length. Frequently the short ones have definite round bodies on the ends and look like dumbells. Some of these can be seen in the video you include."

So, they are saying the very long strings we have in our blood and which you can see in many of our videos (like in my flagellate video) are the L-form (cell-wall-deficient) spirochetes?

I wish they would tell us how they know that. What are they seeing about those long ketes that define them as cell-wall-deficient? Because they appear no different than the shorter ones. They do not appear to have the qualities consistent with cell-wall-deficient forms from what I can see.

I also wish I could get hold of a copy of Dr. Lida Mattman's book on cell wall deficient forms! If only it wasn't so expensive.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Small dumbbells, medium, long, & extra long ones are all L-form. In fact everything that we see that is not granular (dot) or cyst is L-form in our blood thus far. I don't know of anyone who has captured a typical spirochete in their blood yet. They are also called atypical & they do not conform to the text-book definition of a Borrelia spirochete. I know someone who has cultured them & had a few typical ones in full spiraling Borrelia form. Some L-forms can never revert back, while some can.


Perhaps because it is cell wall-deficient it does not spiral with aggression. Other organisms also have L-forms such as Bacillus subtilis & mycoplasma.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here is a good slide show in the public domain that explains l-forms well:

http://www.slideshare.net/amjadkhanafridi4all/l-forms-protoplast-and-spheroplasts?related=1

Here are a couple highlights:

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 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here is a better picture and description of the first pic (on last post):

Phase contrast image of L-form cells from Bacillus subtilis showing a range of sizes. Scale bar is 5 micrometers:

 -


A couple more pics:


Transmission electron micrograph of L-form Bacillus subtilis, showing a range of sizes. Scale bar is 10 micrometers:

 -


Transmission electron micrograph of L-form Bacillus subtilis. The cells lack the electron-dense cell wall of normal bacteria. Scale bar is 500 nanometers:

 -


Does any of this information give us an idea of what L-form spirochetes look like under the scope? I'm not sure. I will continue to search it out.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good links, but I am sure there is more to learn from Borrelia L-forms.


I think it forms when exposed to harsh conditions, such as the abx we take & it does so easily with Penicillin exposure as well. I cannot really prove they are CWD, as we would need an electron microscope. BUT, it looks like we have them in abundance & the abx we take are not very good at killing them, which is a clue in itself as to CWD. Also their motility is impeded by the loss or degradation of the flagella. So the clues are there, but I have to go by what the say since I do not have the insight to prove it any further.


Take a look at this great article from 1996 on L-forms. http://www.lymepa.org/07%20Cysts%20and%20spherical%20forms%20of%20Borrelia%20burgdorferi.pdf
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great progress by Dr. Alan MacDonald & future DNA probing education.

https://www.gofundme.com/7tbbf5zw

"Antibody status is immaterial in DNA detection [BANR] procedures . Borrelia spirochetes which bind to Species specific DNA probes, directly visualize under the microscope, the borrelia spirochetes in the body of the
[BANR] patient."

"The equipment needed for each physician performing such testing after graduation from the tutorial is inexpensive and straightforward. It consists of a microscope. "

"Point of Care Methologies are now routinely available in many physician offices, and this campaign will expand the capabilities of individual physicians to, with a microscope in their private offices , to evaluate their own patients for DNA evidence of borrelia infections. This harkens back to the early 20th century, when every physician was trained in and equipped with a microscope and with the necessary reagents for staining bacteria ( Gram Staining) , to assist in diagnosis of infections their own patients."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
It looks like they did confiscate the Cytoviva loaner microscope from Dr. Alan MacDonald.


http://www.elenacook.org/open.html


"I realise now I was mistaken. It turns out that LDA has never given any funding to Dr. Alan Macdonald.

The Cytoviva microscope was effectively a loan, not a gift. You recalled it in a great hurry from Dr. MacDonald just as he began to make important strides in detecting Borrelia biofilms with it.Biofilms are, by definition, proof of persistent infection.

Mrs. Smith, who pressured you to demand that Dr. MacDonald return that microscope so hastily? And why did you concede to that pressure?

These matters, and all of the issues raised in my letter, are relevant to the Lyme community throughout the world, and deserve an answer."
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Good links, but I am sure there is more to learn from Borrelia L-forms.


I think it forms when exposed to harsh conditions, such as the abx we take & it does so easily with Penicillin exposure as well. I cannot really prove they are CWD, as we would need an electron microscope. BUT, it looks like we have them in abundance & the abx we take are not very good at killing them, which is a clue in itself as to CWD. Also their motility is impeded by the loss or degradation of the flagella. So the clues are there, but I have to go by what the say since I do not have the insight to prove it any further.


Take a look at this great article from 1996 on L-forms. http://www.lymepa.org/07%20Cysts%20and%20spherical%20forms%20of%20Borrelia%20burgdorferi.pdf

That IS a great PDF! Thanks.

I find it interesting that they describe the change from CWD form to active spirochete in these terms: "the cytomorphic change from atypical nonmotile, "rigid" form to motile helical form..." - So, the l-form is "nonmotile" and "rigid."

In reference to the four biological variations of their Bb cultures they said (concerning #3), "the colonies may grow to resemble mycoplasma;" (I think they refer to the "fried-egg" look of the colonies in the agar dish).

They also mention "membrane blebs."

Also, "[previous] studies showed the presence of large bubbles (1.0-1.6 micrometers) and encysted forms of leptospirae and borreliae."

And, the mention of "elongated forms."

I really don't think that an electron microscope would be needed to see CWD borrelia.
I reference the pics I posted of the CWD Bacillus as an illustration. The usual form of Bacillus is roughly the same size as it's CWD form. I imagine the same is true for spirochetes. Greater magnification would therefore not be needed.

In response to some of the great material in that PDF, it might be helpful for me to post the slides defining & showing the two basic forms of CWD bacteria, protoplasts and spheroplasts:


 -


 -


 -


 -


 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Pictures of Spheroplasts:


 -


 -


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Bacteria that attempt to divide in the presence of penicillin fail to do so and end up shedding their cell walls in the process.


 -


 -
NASA / Univ. of Alabama
A fluorescent stain renders adds a green tinge to the corkscrew-shaped Spirochaeta americana from California’s Mono Lake. Green spots are spheroplasts. Reddish areas are dead cells.
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
here are some more spirochete images

https://youtu.be/Bnxx7eJ9LXw
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
more ...................

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3w4bPijwyc
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gerald12:
more ...................

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3w4bPijwyc

That is definitely a spirochete.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Gerald12:
here are some more spirochete images

https://youtu.be/Bnxx7eJ9LXw

But these appear to be good examples of what we have just been discussing... Cell-wall-deficient forms.

Those little round translucent "bubbles" appear to be spheroplasts of some type of organism. Could be from gram-negative bacteria of some type, because gram-negative bacteria (as well as other things) produce spheroplasts.

Borrelia spheroplasts? Who knows? Could be! But, they could be some other type of bacteria just as easily.

Great job with both videos! I like them.
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
spirochete hanging half way out of a RBC while it destroys it !!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFGudL4oZ7w&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lODLLqLHNs#action=share

interesting video .

As far as the L-form . Im working with a local college in a infectious disease study of these monsters . It is amazing what they can do and how fast they can change. You throw vancomycin or any other cell wall attacking antibiotic at them on the slide, they imediatly drop their cell wall and hop into the nearest RBC to protect themselves .

its nuts !!!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Since the L-form lose the cell wall & flagella it then becomes rigid & what they call nonmotile, although they sure as heck still have motility although it is very passive. I believe they need this motility in order to make it in & out of our cells (RBC's....etc). Imagine how awkward it would be for them to burrow in & out of the RBC's lengthwise if they were "NONMOTILE."


Since the information has been fed to us & we know what to look for in the string/spiral form of the spirochete, then no we don't need an electron microscope. But if we really wanted to prove that there is actually no cell wall or flagella, then yes we do need it. What if there was still a cell wall & flagella but that they were only perforated & damaged & thus producing this non-motility.

In fact your spheroplast picture is an electron micro pic & such a pic as I had posted in a previous time would provide very clear detailing....

Electron Cryotomography of Borrelia b.

 -

"Figure 1 of Charon et al. Bar, 50 nm.
PFs, periplasmic flagella; PS, periplasmic space; PM, plasma (or cytoplasmic) membrane; OM, outer membrane."


 -


http://www.sarcoidosis-sarcoid.com/2013/01/spirochetes-unwound-viewing-arrangement.html


I cannot tell whether the blebs are CWD or not & whether they are sphero or proto. They do come in an assortment of shapes & sizes & at times they hold on to part of the Borrelia body.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Gerald, such impeccable timing on subject matter for this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3w4bPijwyc

I really love this video since it shows the physical spirals of a spirochete & this may be the in between a typical & atypical spiro, whereby it is losing the cell wall & flagella. It also has what is reminiscent of the text-book spiral movement, albeit still not as aggressive as the dogmatic naysayers would like to see it in.


Beautiful!!!!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, I am very well aware of how RESPONSIVE these things are. Within minutes of taking a particular herb or abx I can feel mass migrations, tremors, vibrations, pins & needles as they scatter & hit nerves, muscle twitches & movement as they form cysts.


When you keep in mind a systemic infection that involves the total blood volume & its incredible rapid response to environmental factors, then one can explain many Lyme symptoms via this model of infection & occupancy.


I liken the spirochetes in the blood as a person being dragged in a river or rapids. The person has some movement, but not total control. Both Borrelia & the person moves intentionally & passively with sticky bolbous tips or sticky hands & feet that grab onto or stick to what is need (rocks vs cell walls).


Also it would be huge for researches to apply a microscope to our capillaries to follow the spiros as abx are administered. I also see a synthetic capillary with a semi-permeable membrane directly to our blood supply via IV & monitored by a microscope. Since our blood can live outside of our bodies for hours & days these blood experiments can be conducted in vitro as well & will be the hallmark of future studies. They will provide insight as to what is actually going on in real time & with each abx application.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Lida Mattman on Cell-Wall-Deficient forms:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WozrCFW0mRM

Very interesting!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
That lecture is GREAT! She knew this stuff like the back of her hand.

At 41:15 she says that in many of these (chronic, neurodegenerative) diseases the organisms react with Borrelia burgdorferi antibody fluorescent stain, but their respective cysts show that the organisms are fundamentally different from one another; (same genus, different species). The slide (pic of blood culture from ALS patient) shows pleomorphic spirochetes in fluorescent borrelia antibody stain.

Very revealing and interesting! It's not much of a surprise to us of course.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yea, I watched those a long time ago & loved her lectures. I love when she mentions the guy they used to make fun of who used to clean his hands after touching the door knob. Once he had the knowledge of possible contact transmission, who could blame him after all.


There was some other giant secret that Dr. Burgdorferi had left dangling in the wind & I think it may have been to deal with contact transmission as well. He left off in his video professing that he did not tell us everything!


On another note, have you guys checked the blood of a normal person? Do you see any spirochetes in normal blood with the same criteria used for a more positive identification? I personally have not been able to see a single one yet with bulbous tips.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I have wondered about the strong possibility of contact transmission many times. There is no doubt people have contracted Lyme through body fluids. It's possible it could be with far more casual contact than we would like to believe!

Even Burgdorfer himself contracted it from the urine of an infected rabbit that he was dissecting in the lab. The urine squirted him in the eye and he came down with the tell-tale symptoms. The lab physicians diagnosed him with Borreliosis and immediately put him on ABX. His symptoms resolved.

Later, under pressure, the lab physicians retracted his diagnosis saying it couldn't have been Lyme!!! The politics went against un-refutable evidence with the very discoverer of Lyme disease. Even Willy himself said (with an incredulous chuckle) "What else could it have been?"
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
From my microscopy studies I can see how some people can harbor the bacteria, yet not show any/many symptoms, but I just don't know why exactly. I will go on a limb & say there are more people who don't know they have Lyme than there are those who have it, as I was one of them too & certain people on my block continued with life after the bite & treatment, but forever changed.


Even I was an exception & I was loaded with spirochetes until it came to a boiling point & then it all changed in severity in an instant. It is that type of change that we see in HIV+ to AIDS, very similar in immunosuppressive nature.


http://www.naturalhealth365.com/Lyme-disease-Western-medicine-1525.html

“Dr. Lida Mattman, Ph.D., who died back in 2008, taught microbiology, virology, pathology at major universities. She identified the Lyme disease spirochete in semen, saliva, mosquitoes, biting flies and spiders – in addition to the well-known deer tick. This means (of course) that we’re all exposed to these conditions and since she found them in things like tears, semen and saliva – that, in addition, it’s contagious.”
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The mortar and pestle tick grinder that Dr. Burgdorferi used at Rocky Mountain Labs to crush ticks & check for Borrelia.


 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
On another note, have you guys checked the blood of a normal person? Do you see any spirochetes in normal blood with the same criteria used for a more positive identification? I personally have not been able to see a single one yet with bulbous tips.

I did.

The friend I've referred to before, who is as healthy and strong as an ox, had 3 ketes in the sample. One of those was irrefutably a lyme spirochete. It was one of the thick spirochetes (not a thin string) with bulbous tips on both ends and approx. 6-8 microns in length. It was a textbook borrelia spirochete.

I didn't know how to explain it to him, so I never told him (and didn't show it to him). Regretfully, I didn't document it with pics or video. I've kicked myself ever since.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Take a look at this beaut coming out of the RBC with some aggression. Probably on the way to becoming a L-form.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wDV4TliIHg
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, if you can take video next time that would be awesome. I have checked quite a few people so far & I don't see what I see in my blood & my wife's blood & a few other people with Lyme.


Like I said before I see small dumbbells & fibrin strings, but nothing that meets the criteria so far. I did find loads of stringy objects (fibrin???) in my father-in-law's blood who has Parkinson's & was bitten by many ticks when he was younger. But I just don't have any proof that they are spirochetes or alive for that matter. I will post that video up eventually.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Classic microscopy reveals borrelia bacteria


http://phys.org/news/2013-06-classic-microscopy-reveals-borrelia-bacteria.html


"A simple method has been found that tells people who have become seriously ill after a tick bite once and for all whether they have bacteria in their blood.

Over the past year, two experienced biologists at Oslo University have seen something that very few scientists experience. They have been sought out by a persistent stream of people from all over Norway who are asking for help."
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Take a look at this beaut coming out of the RBC with some aggression. Probably on the way to becoming a L-form.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wDV4TliIHg

Definitely an aggressive one! I've seen quite a few of these short aggressive ketes in my blood already. Interesting, because many of those I've seen have been "coming out" of RBCs, too (but not all of them).

The bright, granular, jiggling small object to the immediate left of the infected RBC appears to be a borrelia cyst. That's exactly what the objects in my blood looked like in my week-old sample.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, I think it is a cyst too with some granular forms floating around as well, but it is easy to misinterpret them as well & as we already know.


Take a look at the stacked RBC's on the top right with the Maltese Cross, as that could be a sign of babs, but it can also be the illusion I talked about in the past & better to see those when the smear has been stained.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The future of cell microscopy?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieO57KjFf5k
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Happy Thanksgiving.

http://www.thenaturalrecoveryplan.com/articles/Does-Lyme-Disease-Originate-in-the-Mouth.html

" Research into syphilis in the early 1900’s showed that the causative agent, Treponema, has a unique life cycle which, when under attack from antibiotics or the immune system causes the spirochaete to change into a spore form. Recent research has shown that the Lyme disease spirochaete has a similar life cycle producing spore and cyst forms when under threat - which may account for the persistence and chronic nature of the infection.


In fact, much recent research confirms what homeopaths have long maintained which is that many of the diseases which plagued our forefathers were never completely eradicated, but suppressed to be expressed in various forms later in the individual's life or in future generations. "
 
Posted by Gerald12 (Member # 47028) on :
 
2010, that new software for that scope is amazing!! im going to research more and see exactly what it can do and what the magnification levels are.

That could be HUGE for folks being run through the medical ringer
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
That scope may help us to reveal spirals in Borrelia, where the spirals have regressed to the benefit of the spirochete & infection.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I have not done much with my "new" stains since I got them a few weeks ago. Actually I made three slides right afterwards, and stained two of them immediately. I looked at them under 400x for a while and thought "Neat!" but didn't see anything significant, so I didn't mess with 1000x.

The two new stains I got provide results similar to Wright-Giemsa, and the other, similar to plain Wright stain. I did one slide in the "blue" and the other in the "red." ---Those where the ones I previously looked at under 400x but saw nothing outstanding.

Yesterday, after comparing the two types of stains, I decided to stain the 3rd slide (finally) with the "red" (Wright stain).

For this slide I finally pulled around the 100x objective. I looked for hours and took probably 100+ pics. The final product with these stains are pretty typical (finally) and are really neat. But, after looking at hundreds of WBCs and glancing at thousands of RBCs I didn't see much that was remarkable (except one possible kete and a few inclusions...and my platelets stain purpleish-green...which is a little strange perhaps?).

Nothing very remarkable. UNTIL THIS! (I am feeling dramatic)!

I was ready to hang it up until I spotted two distinct, (mostly) crescent-shaped objects that are stained YELLOW! (I know, S13, you're gonna really love me)They are about 1.5 microns in length and about half that in width.

My obvious question is, what type of organism stains YELLOW???!!! A protozoan? Toxo? But, they're supposed to stain blue or purple I think.

Any ideas?


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 -

[ 12-03-2015, 10:34 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I know my lighting is still not the greatest. I need to get an LED and try that. Here's some that are not as bright but highlight a little different (better??) pattern of coloring (my platelets and WBCs are more typically-colored for a Wright stain):


 -


 -


 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I will say, some of this is my camera. I can get better, more typical coloring with my newer camera on the stains. But, I cannot get proper field depth with that one since it has wide-angle lens, so almost all my captures are done with my older A540. Which leaves much to be desired unless I'm doing dark phase with live blood. (The A540 does pretty good with that).
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
My obvious question is, what type of organism stains YELLOW???!!! A protozoan? Toxo? But, they're supposed to stain blue or purple I think.

Any ideas?

Anyone???
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Personally I don't have a whole lot of staining experience, but I would have just paid more for the real Wright-Giemsa stain if this is what you indeed wanted to do & not a stain that is "like" WG, which would introduce new variables & uncertainties.


It is very hard to say what that is exactly, as it has the consistency of the rest of the surrounding material. It could very well be fragments of RBC"s...just not sure? I think identification of babs, bart, & BLO's requires a trained eye from one who has seen the bacteria in action & has spent some time with it, which I think none of us here have this experience. It has been very difficult for me to get a professional opinion on any one of those organisms in the past. This coupled with the knowledge that babs typically infects <.01% of RBC's & bart infects <.001 of RBC's means getting a positive stain is like hitting the lottery.


I would be more confident in ID'ing if a purple stain was present showing one of the known morphologies (such as the Maltese Cross), which would also increase the chances of a negative ID.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I agree. If I would be seeing the typical ring form or maltese cross in the RBCs I could be 100% sure of what I was seeing. So far, I have not seen that in my stains. I seriously doubt they are RBC fragments. They aren't shaped as such, and they are not stained pink.

As for the quality and consistency of my stains, I don't think that is variable or uncertain anymore. I am using a good standard stain. This is what I used:

http://www.astraldiagnostics.com/hematology/quick-i

Even though the identification of these two objects is uncertain, I still feel they are significant. But more personal investigation is needed to discern what they could be.

According to my Fry protozoan multiplex test, I had a very high load of a type of protozoan that was in the babesia/toxo class. Could these be related to that somehow? I don't know. Probably not if all protozoans stain purple with Wright-Giemsa.

So, at this point, my objects are perhaps "mystery bugs." That's why I posted about it. Just maybe someone will have a clue. In the meantime, I will keep learning, and keep treating.

By the way, I did find another flagellate, but in a family member's blood. They are sick, too. I might publish that video sometime.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Probably not if all protozoans stain purple with Wright-Giemsa.

Correction- that smear was stained with the equivalent of a Wright stain, not Wright-Giemsa.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
How many stains in total have you done? The more you do the more likely you are to get a hit.


Funny when I saw all these things grow in my blood as I got sicker & as I saw them grow in my wife's blood, I knew there must be sexual & contact transmission as well. When I mentioned it on this website there was a backlash from some members, who indicated that it was not possible since their partners were not getting sick. But they were forgetting that many people were bitten by ticks & did not experience any discernable symptoms for years. Many people, including myself can carry the bacteria for years without ever knowing. Many people receive treatment & get "cured" only to experience relapses.


My wife is finally getting fatigue, migrating joint pain & migrating body pains on a small scale to the point where she is finally giving into the notion that she is a carrier as well.


It is no wonder that the billionaire John Caudwell has 9 infected family members. His 3x kids, ex wife, 5 close family members & himself all have LD.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/1790102/?i=5&from=%2F12653136%2Frelated

"Dairy cattle and other food animals can be infected with B. burgdorferi and hence some raw foods of animal origin might be contaminated with the pathogen. Recent findings indicate that the pathogen may be transmitted orally to laboratory animals, without an arthropod vector. Thus, the possibility exists that Lyme disease can be a food infection."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, are you vacuum sealing the slide when you do 40x for spirochete viewing? I have been using Vaseline with a Q-Tip to apply it to the slip cover edges ever so gently with success & it is working beautifully.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
How many stains in total have you done? The more you do the more likely you are to get a hit.

About 4 slides now, not including the ones that flopped. Yes, I plan to keep doing them. If I get well again, I plan to work during the day, and moonlight as a pathologist/microbiologist, LOL! [Big Grin]

quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Funny when I saw all these things grow in my blood as I got sicker & as I saw them grow in my wife's blood, I knew there must be sexual & contact transmission as well. When I mentioned it on this website there was a backlash from some members, who indicated that it was not possible since their partners were not getting sick. But they were forgetting that many people were bitten by ticks & did not experience any discernable symptoms for years. Many people, including myself can carry the bacteria for years without ever knowing. Many people receive treatment & get "cured" only to experience relapses.

My wife is finally getting fatigue, migrating joint pain & migrating body pains on a small scale to the point where she is finally giving into the notion that she is a carrier as well.

It is no wonder that the billionaire John Caudwell has 9 infected family members. His 3x kids, ex wife, 5 close family members & himself all have LD.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/1790102/?i=5&from=%2F12653136%2Frelated

"Dairy cattle and other food animals can be infected with B. burgdorferi and hence some raw foods of animal origin might be contaminated with the pathogen. Recent findings indicate that the pathogen may be transmitted orally to laboratory animals, without an arthropod vector. Thus, the possibility exists that Lyme disease can be a food infection."

I completely agree! Definitely, there is sexual transmission! And, I feel there is casual contact transmission to a certain degree as well. Specifically how that is, is a good question. I have my own ideas. As for it being passed orally between animals (and humans), I don't doubt that at all.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
TNT, are you vacuum sealing the slide when you do 40x for spirochete viewing? I have been using Vaseline with a Q-Tip to apply it to the slip cover edges ever so gently with success & it is working beautifully.

I seal my wet mount samples only about half the time. When I do, I use the immersion oil method.

What is the advantage of using vaseline? I wonder how even that minute amount of manipulation of the coverslip will affect the sample environment.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
When I do oil at 100x then I use the oil immersion method, but when I do 40x I use the Vaseline method since the oil is not needed & I don't have to waste it unnecessarily.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I wonder if it is possible to exploit this feature to at least clear the spirochetes from the joints of the arms & legs with limited blood flow restriction & exposure to temperatures higher than 106 to the appendages? Continued high temperature exposure in this region might also clear them from the blood. External blood collection & high temperature treatment might work wonders for us & relieve many circulatory symptoms/issues?


http://www.jci.org/articles/view/12484


"In vitro cultivation of B. burgdorferi at various temperatures demonstrates that the spirochete replicates most quickly at 37°C." (98.6F normal human body temp)

" An increase in temperature to 39°C retards growth significantly, while a 24 hour exposure at 41°C (105.8F) kills all spirochetes in the culture. " It is dangerous to push the body to 106 & not all areas (brain, heart, & organs) may reach this temp because the body protects them through vaso-dilation/restriction throughout).

"Therefore, the optimal growth temperature of B. burgdorferi is only 4°C below the upper lethal limit. The low tolerance of spirochetes for high temperatures is well known and may explain in part the restricted distribution of B. burgdorferi to temperate latitudes and its absence in the tropics, where infected ticks may be exposed to high temperatures detrimental to spirochete survival. Interestingly, the thermal sensitivity of T. pallidum was exploited in the early 1900s prior to the discovery of penicillin by using fever therapy with malaria or relapsing fever infection to treat patients with general paresis (31)."


"During the natural transmission cycle, OspA is produced by the spirochete only in ticks and not in mammals (11, 24, 25), suggesting that growth at higher temperatures downregulates production of this protein. Supporting this concept are observations that the amount of OspA expressed by the bacteria declines when the spirochetes are cocultivated at mammalian host temperatures with tick cells (26), or when they are present in attached, infected ticks feeding on mice (undergoing warming to near 37°C) (24, 25). "
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877959X15300327


Big news in the LD arena as they found a new spirochete (B. bissettii) that causes LD & Bb in people who do not necessarily show classical LD symptoms.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter Kemp is sick like us with LD & has done his own microscopy & went further out to culture & stain his the spirochetes.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157662470495951


He too is finding spirochetes in the blood as well as the White Blood Cells.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
http://danielcameronmd.com/culture-evidence-of-lyme-disease-in-antibiotic-treated-patients-living-in-the-southeast/


"The researchers successfully cultivated Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia bissettii-like spirochete from these individuals. This is the “first recovery of live Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto from residents of southeastern United States,” writes Rudenko. “And, the first successful cultivation of live Borrelia bissettii-like strain from a resident of North America.”


A modified Kelly-Pettenkofer medium was used to culture the specimens, rather than a Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly-H (BSK-H) medium. The positive cultures were further characterized by DNA purification, PCR amplification, sequencing, sequence analysis and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) followed by transmission electron microscopy."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So which microscope do you need to see the Borrelia spirochetes in your Lyme Disease infected blood?


Any "Lab Grade" microscope can be used & even a 100 year old microscope as Morten Laane has said publically in Under Our Skin 2: Emergence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTlcgCql2k0

Below are some links to microscopes being used by some of the investigators who dare to look & to help you in your selection. Darkfield gives the best contrast between the background blood plasma & the spirochetes, but you can use lightfield, phase contrast or DIC just as well & easily see the spirochetes as demonstrated by some of the video links below.

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: Lymedin2010 on lymenet.org

Microscope used :
Zeiss Microscope "Standard 14" Laboratory Trinocular Microscope (Light & Phase Contrast) (Ebay @$100) &
Reichert Diastar Trinocular Microscope (Oblique Illumination) (Ebay @$350)

Camera/Recording equipment:
Amscope MU900 9MP & Amscope MU1403 CK 14MP

Youtube videos for Zeiss Microscope (all videos before Aug 2015) & Amscope MU900 9MP cam:
https://www.youtube.com/user/BorreliaStudent/videos

Youtube videos for Reichert Diastar Trinocular Microscope (all videos after Aug 2015) & Amscope MU1403 CK 14MP:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8-JiuhGSd8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maAR-QtUv8w
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFl_Fq0CsYE

Thread link:
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/120458

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: TNT on lymenet.org

Microscope used:
AO 1031 trinocular phase contrast

Camera/Recording equipment:
Canon Powershot A540 via eyepiece

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC68bRnvm6bErXS-ykip0nGg/videos

Thread link:
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/1/120458

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: S13 on lymenet.org

Microscope used:
Olympus E Series binocular with darkfield condenser

Camera/Recording equipment:
Canon Ixus 80IS & Euromex CMEX 5 MP USB camera.

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/user/KillerBSup/videos

Thread link:
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/1/120458/2?

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: thatdudefromkansas on Healingwell.com & Lymenet.org

Microscope used: Amscope T490-DK
http://www.amazon.com/AmScope-T490B-DK-Magnification-Illumination-High-Resolution/dp/B004TP7KDM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1445193107&sr=8-2&keywords=amscope+t490

Camera/Recording equipment:
Canon 70D DSLR camera + DSLR adapter to insert into trinocular port.

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxJyT8BxYnA&feature=youtu.be

More Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/user/tylerks279/videos

Thread link:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=30&m=3517941
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=120458;p=6

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: Aurel Manea on YouTube.com

Microscope used: Microscop biologic BIM-136B
http://magazin.telescop-expert.ro/microscop-biologic-bim-136b.html

Camera/Recording equipment:
Samsung Galaxy S2 & S3 on a DIY microscope eyepiece rig.
http://aurelm.com/2014/03/09/diy-smartphone-adapter-for-microscope-photography/

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9va0KPrVExs

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: MrRomzor1 on YouTube.com

Microscope used :
Amscope B490A with a darkfield oil condenser.

Camera/Recording equipment:
logitech C525 webcam

Thread link:
https://www.youtube.com/user/MrRomzor1/videos
_____________________________________________________________
User: Peter Kemp

Microscope used :
Vickers Instruments M14/2 with darkfield modification
100x objective + 15x eyepiece and camera zoom which gives around 3000x

Lighting: LED Luxeon M 5700k

Camera/Recording equipment:
Fujifilm F10 which has 3x

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/user/pkemp123/videos

Thread Link:
http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/borreliamicroscopynavigation.html

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: CytoViva Videos on Youtube.com

Microscope used:
Olympus BX 51 microscope at 100x

Youtube videos:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnsuiSKGDRs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWR7AFcgKSc

_____________________________________________________________
User/group: Elizabeth Caudill on YouTube.com
This person was diagnosed with MS as well.

Microscope used :
Amscope B340B-DK-LED.
http://www.amscope.com/special-microscopes/darkfield-microscopes/40x-2000x-3w-led-siedentopf-binocular-darkfield-compound-microscope.html

Camera/Recording equipment:
3MP USB2.0 Microscope Digital Camera + Software (SKU: MU300)
http://www.amscope.com/accessories/camera/3mp-usb2-0-microscope-digital-camera-software.html

Thread link:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdM_KscKSw87nnHV60r0cMA/videos?shelf_id=0&view=0&sort=dd

_____________________________________________________________


Other microscopes used in Borrelia & pathogenic microscopy:

-Nikon Optiphot 2

-Wild M20 & Canadian Lumenera Infinity 3 Monochrome

- Nikon Ti Eclipse

- LW Scientific Mi5 Infinity LabScope

Many others that do not share equipment or findings/videos.

_____________________________________________________________


##################################################
RECORDING EQUIPMENT:

1) The Amscope type cameras are very useful when it comes to time lapse & I adore them for their software & time lapse feature.The newer USB 3.0 are better for on demand viewing on the screen, as lag time has been drastically reduced between the time you change focus on a slide to the time it is actually displayed on the screen & it is practically real time. The older USB 2.0 cams are a pain for real-time viewing, but still powerful for recording & time lapse.

The settings on the Amscope software are a PITA to set & one thing I do not like about the whole Amscope/software setup, but at least they give you presets to save the settings & recall them if needed on the left bottom parameter pane. PNS & phone cameras are so much easier, you just point the camera & mostly everything can be set to auto unless you wish to tinker with some manual settings but not necessary.

To counter this pain nothing beats direct USB connection & the ability to record directly on a PC while viewing on a monitor & quickly doing time lapse & reviewing video on demand. You also avoid having to hit record on the PNS or phone & destabilize the image, as opposed to hitting record on a PC.


2) Option two is to use any PNS camera (or DSLR or video camcorder) that has a video output & add a video card to your PC. Then you download a free software called VirtualDub & I am sure there might be others out there.

Keep in mind that the screens will be small & you may not see what you want to record necessarily & you may have to find it with the binocular first & then switch over to record. Some cameras have a video output & you can connect a TV or monitor & see the live image in real-time.


3) Option 3 is to use your phones with one of the adapters I have linked & download an app like LapseIt Pro.

Some phones also have the ability to attach a mini-HDMI cable & you can see the video in real time on your TV screen.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/171843472900?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

This is the exact one that I bought some time ago.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Digital-Camera-Adapter-mount-stand-For-Scopes-spotting-Telescope-/191246956510?hash=item2c8734f7de


##################################################
1000x OIL VS 400x, WHICH TO USE?:

Human blood spirochetes by 400x & the naked eye are difficult to see, but not impossible. Thicker spiros will be visible. The smaller ones, thinner ones, and details can easily be missed & therefore it is beneficial to use a camera (to a TV monitor or USB PC) to see them with the compounding magnification of the camera zoom.


A successful culture of spiros in BSK, because of the many available spiros to view, is easier to see than a direct blood smear with the naked eye @400x, but can still drastically benefit by camera zoom & thus a camera is highly recommended.


Personally, I now prefer to view them under 400x + cam zoom, since this provides a deeper depth of field & more details can be viewed & recorded in one instant. This is in direct contrast to the 1000x Oil view, which intrinsically provides a much narrower field of view & forces one to constantly refocus the fine adjustment to keep up with the motility of the spirochete. So there is a trade-off for the 1000x between greater magnification and detail VS depth of field & the annoyance of constantly have to refocus to catch the details of the ever moving spirochete. The latter will also be affected on the position of the spirochete to the surrounding and its orientation, thickness of the spirochete & its relative speed of motility and can be different for each spirochete on the same slide.


Here is the trade-off summary to help better understand:

400x + cam zoom: Greater depth of field, but loss of magnification & detail. But one spends less time constantly refocusing.


1000x: Greater magnification & detail, but at a loss of depth of field (i.e. the field of view is VERY narrow & as a result one is forced to constantly refocus (depending on spiro size & movement).


What good is having all that extra mag & detail if ones is doing time lapse & your spiro moves out of the narrow field of view & what you record is just blurry detail with really nothing to show for. This is why I prefer 400x when doing time lapse & overall. When I want detail & mag, but I am willing to put in the energies to refocus many times over again, then I use 1000x.

##################################################
LIGHTING FILTERS:

Turn a lightfield scope into a darkfield:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taKfysZ-LNY&spfreload=1


##################################################
BORROW/USE A MICROSCOPE IF YOU DON'T OWN ONE:


If you do not own a microscope you can always do the following:


1) Check to borrow or use friends & families.


2) Ask to use one in a local high school or college. You can prepare a 1 day old & 2 day old slide before ever walking into the facility & simultaneously make a fresh smear right before going on site. You can then swiftly make observations of multiple time framed slides, allowing spirochetes ample time (before hand) to burrow out of the rbc's.


3) Seek out a local Microscopy Blood Analysis & they typically charge $100-$150, the monies of which could have been used toward the purchase of your own microscope.


Always keep in mind that if you buy a used microscope, that it will retain an intrinsic value & you can resell your used microscope at a similar price for which you bought it for. Be wise & selective in your purchase & monitor prices. Know that prices for microscope start to go way up around Oct-Dec for the holiday season & then gradually spike back down again into spring & summer time, when most people are in vacation mode & microscope sales are sluggish.

[ 02-09-2017, 03:20 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Facebook microscopy thread started for those that wish to contribute.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1644398389176489/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
What???


One of the biggest new optical microscopy technology companies has put out videos stating that these dancing strings are spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) in human blood, but the stupid, moronic, idiots at the CDC can't?


" This video illustrates spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) associated with Lyme Disease in a live red blood cell culture. This video was captured using a research grade optical microscope equipped with CytoViva's patented enhanced darkfield optical illumination system."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWR7AFcgKSc

Check out CytoViva's page to learn about them.
http://www.cytoviva.com/about/

Another video from CytoViva:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnsuiSKGDRs

Check out all of their technologically amazing videos on Youtube here.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYCOUUCicJBa6SSHIGem9SA
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
For the novice & those that are new....just because one sees strings in their blood, it does not necessarily mean they are spirochetes.


1) For instance one can confuse the glass slide or slip cover glass streaks from the glass cutting process as spirochetes, but they will be very straight, sharp, rigid & non-moving.


2) Then there are artifacts from the RBC, either from the proteins on the RBC's surface or from phospholipid layers of the RBC wall than can break off into a string & move similarly to spirochetes, but with much less aggression. These will not have bulbous tips or bulbous tips in BOTH ends. Sometimes a cocci can stick to one end & give a false illusion.


3) Then there are stand-alone fibrin particles that do not attach or become connected to other fibrin particles & as a result can gyrate similarly to spirochetes, but again they will move with less force & intent and again no bulbous tips.


Because of the above realities I have come up with the below criteria (which I have posted elsewhere before) that will place you into the hump where you can say that you are more confident that these are spirochetes & not artifacts & say to yourself it would be great to ultimately prove this via PCR or DNA Probing.


"When observing I give higher credibility to when I find the following:

1) BULBOUS OR ROUND TIPS ON BOTH ENDS & MEDIUM LENGTH SPIROCHETES. There are spirochetes that do not have bulbous ends & I have seen video of large quantities of these spirochetes PROPOGATED from the people who have chosen to culture them. So they can exist & I have tons of video on those as well, but I chose to dismiss them. There are also many VERY thin ones which lack the rounded tips, which I also have tons & tons of video but I choose to dismiss.

AND

2) SPIRAL OR UNDULATE WITH SOME AGGRESSION. I prefer to see a bit of life in their mobility. Even Dr. Alan MacDonald makes reference to these relatively docile forms that appear rather lifeless.

AND

3) LARGE QUANTITIES OF ITEM 1 & 2. Large quantities of the 2 items above eliminate the possibility of the chance encounter of any aggregates conforming to this configuration.

If you look at the videos of professionals who release their videos, they fulfill 2-3 out of the aforementioned for a high impact reception.

Furthermore, the morphological transformations of cysts & blebbing is a huge advantage for even more positive identification."

################################################
Here are two great resources for many experts in the microscopy field. Furthermore, if anyone has any questions you can always give a shout to microscope dealers locally or online, as they are always willing to help & make a sale.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Amateur_Microscopy/info

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Microscope/info
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter Kemp's wonderful work & some Q's & A's to help the novelists & those joining late.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157662470495951/with/23761275012/

Peter your work is amazing & just to clarify for the new comers & for those that may not necessarily understand, your culturing work on these spirochetes means the following?

1) You find a smaller amount of these spirochetes in human blood (some peoples blood shows more than others), but when you culture them you are able to see even larger quantities?. Which then means they are living organisms & not mere human cellular debris or artifacts? With this information we can pretty much dispel anyone who says these things are just artifacts?


2) Borrelia produces proteins or antigens on their surfaces & can release them in the surrounding environment. Humans can produce antibodies that are specific to these Borrelia proteins & is the basis for current Lyme Disease testing. The FITC antibodies fluorescence you use are specific for Borrelia antigens & act like a lock and key. Once the key (the FITC fluorescent antibodies) attach to the lock (Borrelia antigens) then they give off a fluorescence. So this not only allows us to say they are living things from item #1 above, but now we can say they truly come from Borrelia & that FITC antibodies fluorescence is commonly used in peer reviewed research papers where there is a need to identify specific organism?

_________________________________________________

Peter's response:

"...that is essentially correct. There is a problem that many of the spirochaetes like the ones that people see on these pages do not bind borrelia antibodies and therefore do not fluoresce with FITC staining. My guess is that this is because most of these are L-forms with unusual or hidden surface proteins. What does stain, is some infected white blood cells, biofilms, some very tiny coccoid forms."
 
Posted by baldone (Member # 43172) on :
 
Need a more experienced eye to look at these and let me know what they see.

https://youtu.be/7Ymd6iH1gdk

https://youtu.be/-c0LjoWaqUg
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
All of those objects can be found in normal human blood & it is hard to say for sure. I don't see any clear signs of Borrelia.


Perhaps keep on searching.


I am curious what make/model of microscope you are using, since the video is rather blurry & not very sharp and detailed? It is a sign of the objective lenses not being well made & relatively cheap. Yet this should not stop you from seeing spirochetes if there was spiros in the blood.
 
Posted by baldone (Member # 43172) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
All of those objects can be found in normal human blood & it is hard to say for sure. I don't see any clear signs of Borrelia.


Perhaps keep on searching.


I am curious what make/model of microscope you are using, since the video is rather blurry & not very sharp and detailed? It is a sign of the objective lenses not being well made & relatively cheap. Yet this should not stop you from seeing spirochetes if there was spiros in the blood.

It is a very cheap setup. I am looking to get a better video camera.

Thanks for looking.

I was Elisa and Western Blot positive 5 years ago and have been on the antibiotic roller coaster ever since.

Feel like crap....go on Doxy for a month...start to feel better.

A few weeks later the cycle starts again.

Finding a Doc willing to put me on something for 6 months or a year has been almost impossible.

Due to HMO restrictions I have not been to a LLMD yet but I think I am going to have to open the wallet and do it on my own.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
If Doxy worked for you then the Cowden Protocol was a surprise to me that it was able to take away my doxy dependency. It is expensive though & just like the abx can wear off.


Buhner's protocol has helped others & is much cheaper & I would try that. Maybe with some GSE, garlic extract, & CBD oil.


Sorry, crazy stuff we are dealing with & can feel like the twilight zone.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Lida Mattman knows that our blood & RBC's can contain spirochetes, so why doesn't the CDC???


At time 24:28 Lida Mattman shows RBC's parasitized with Borrelia infection. Then she states that "lots & lots of intracellular growth. So you understand how they get hemolyzed cells & are going to feel miserable."


At time 24:28.
https://youtu.be/WozrCFW0mRM?t=1468


Yea, no kidding!!! Feels like torturous unimaginable hell on earth & as I said before this can explain some of the LD symptoms (circulatory issues, exercise intolerance, feeling of burning & O2 depravation and shortness of breath and heart palps). The RBC's flow randomly throughout the body & at times one gets a mass of heavily concentrated group of highly infected RBC's to parts of the brain or heart & all of a sudden more heavier shortness of breath or the heart starts to palpitate to compensate for the lack of O2 to that organ/area. Then as more randomness comes into play & the higher localized concentration disperses and evens out & balances and the deep shortness of breath & heart palps go away for that moment (or day) only to come back again when it happens again. All this will depend on how heavily infected the blood is AND the infection of the organ/area in question. The hemolytic activity of many RBC's simultaneously can also produce these two latter symptoms.


Lida Mattman goes on to say....
"This is merely blood that was shipped so it had a chance to grow in the shipping temperature & we often find shipped blood will give us a good picture without anymore incubation."


She shows a few more slides & goes on to say that ear pricked blood is a place of stagnation & good for Borrelia detection.


This is basically what I observed & made widely known in my "Horrific Lyme Blood" video, in that spirochetes detect the changes in blood parameters & start burrowing out into the plasma. Over 6-24 hours more & more will come out to the plasma. Exiting will depend on infection load, plasma environment & external temp. Shipping will provide the added benefit of mixing the blood & perhaps favoring some Borrelia growth because of this?


In an ironic twist of fate the simplest of organisms works so efficiently with co-infections and tertiary infections, yet they have gone against the human race & against innocent women & children.

[ 12-30-2015, 04:11 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Who is Lida Mattman you ask?


"Lida Holmes Mattman Ph.D. (1912–2008) Graduated with a M.S. in Virology from the University of Kansas and a Ph.D. in Immunology from Yale University.

Mattman has taught Immunology, Microbiology, Bacteriology, Virology and Pathology. She worked for 35 years in these fields at various schools and institutions including Harvard University, Howard Hughes Institute, Oakland University and Wayne State University.

She was a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biological Sciences at Wayne State University in Detroit where she was engaged in research and lecturing.

She has served as President of the Michigan Branch of the American Society for Microbiology, as Chairman of the Medical Division of the Michigan Academy of Sciences, and held various offices in the local chapter of Sigma Xi."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lida_Holmes_Mattman

(breaking up the post for easier reading for many here)

[ 01-02-2016, 03:36 AM: Message edited by: Robin123 ]
 
Posted by baldone (Member # 43172) on :
 
Do any of these look like Bartonella?

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Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Are they stained or just a result of camera settings or pc color editing?


They look similar to what I have seen with babs & bart, but can be fibrin too & so it is difficult to say. It is even better if you can catch these things moving in a video, as I have seen a video of very similar but larger (~1 micron) organisms. We were debating whether they were babs or bart & we thought for sure babs. An expert resolved our question by telling us it was bart.


Locomotion is important in identification when staining is not used. Overall it is more difficult to ID babs & bart without stain & recordings of movement, especially with minimal exposure to such organisms in fresh smears (as is the case for myself & most on here).


Borrelia is so much more easier to identify.
 
Posted by baldone (Member # 43172) on :
 
These were stained with a vet equivalent of Giemsa Stain.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vet-Supply-J0322A1-JORGY-DIP-QUICK-FIXATIVE-CLEAR-500ML-Labs-Testing-Slides-Vet-/351455467440?hash=item51d460d7b0

http://www.jorvet.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/DipQuickStain_J322.pdf

I was PCR tested for Bart, Babs, and Erlichia two years ago and all were negative.

Have never had a FISH test.

My current GP is fairly open minded and if I show him these slide he will probably have a ID look at them and maybe order another round of tests.

I am not overly symptomatic right now but after 5 years of riding the roller coaster I am ready to get off.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The platelet stains are usually 1 micron in diameter & typically stain the same color as your blood, which is usually pink, light purple, or red (depending on quality of stain).


The bartonella video that I have seen are very dark without stain, but they too were around 1 micron.


Yours look smaller than 1 micron & it is possible it is babesia microti, but I cannot tell for certain. It would have been nice to capture ring or maltese cross forms in your RBC's & then be more confident.


b. microti pic:
 -
 
Posted by baldone (Member # 43172) on :
 
I have looked pretty hard for clear signs of Babs but have not found any.

My symptoms do seem to line up pretty well with Bart including frontal headaches and eye issues(crusty). Also have had a funky rash on my chest since the lymes started and gets a bit better at times but has stuck around since 2011.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Great pic above, Lymedin!

These last couple posts are a good lead up to what I have to share.

As an introduction:

http://www.emedmd.com/content/babesiosis

This is a good article, but I beg to differ that Babesiosis is mainly an animal disease. Also, because of this belief, they seem to believe that there have only been approx. 1000 human cases of B. microti in the U.S. since 1988... not to mention the number of cases of B. duncani they quote...


Below: Infection with Babesia. Giemsa stained thin smears. Note the tetrad on the left side of the image, a dividing form pathognomonic for Babesia.

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Below: Babesia sp. in a thin blood smear stained with Giemsa. Note the clumped extracellular forms indicative of Babesia.

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Below: Babesia life cycle. I would like to note that even though ticks are specified as the vectors, I believe it's quite obvious that mosquitoes transmit this as well (just like with Malaria).

 -


Notice the pics of the fatal case from Finland near the bottom of the page of the aforementioned link. Notice the rashes on his arms and legs. Of course, this was a very complicated case that involved lyme and Aspergillosis as well. Dare we suspect Bartonellosis as well? Or, is it possible Babesiosis can cause "Bart" streaks as well? It's very possible he was co-infected with bartonella without it even being considered.


More on this topic later!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great work TNT & you will probably be the local expert here on babs & bart [Smile]


I would love one of you guys to get a stain with a ring or cross, would be great to see & share.


From the MY MICROSCOPE FB page:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1101242879894314&set=gm.1647799642169697&type=3&theater


http://www.cdc.gov/relapsing-fever/clinicians/index.html


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"Tick-borne relapsing fever

Tick-borne relapsing fever is found primarily in Africa, Spain, Saudi Arabia, Asia, and certain areas of Canada and the western United States. Other relapsing infections are acquired from other Borrelia species, which can be spread from rodents, and serve as a reservoir for the infection, by a tick vector.

Borrelia crocidurae – occurs in Egypt, Mali, Senegal, Tunisia; vectors – Ornithodoros erraticus, Ornithodoros sonrai; animal host – shrew (Crocidura stampflii)
Borrelia duttoni, transmitted by the soft-bodied African tick Ornithodoros moubata, is responsible for the relapsing fever found in central, eastern, and southern Africa.
Borrelia hermsii
Borrelia hispanica
Borrelia miyamotoi [6]
Borrelia parkeri
Borrelia turicatae

B. hermsii and B. recurrentis cause very similar diseases. However, one or two relapses are common with the disease associated with B. hermsii, which is also the most common cause of relapsing disease in the United States. (Three or four relapses are common with the disease caused by B. recurrentis, which has longer febrile and afebrile intervals and a longer incubation period than B. hermsii.)"

[ 01-02-2016, 02:28 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Wow, Lymedin, I NEVER would have thought that the CDC would have endorsed microscopy for the definitive diagnosis of borrelia!!!!!

They don't mention burgdorferi in the list.... something seems pretty suspicious about that. Because that is a pretty big disconnect! So, it definitely seems intended.

BUT, the fact they say this about borrelia in general is something that EVERY Lyme patient can "go to the bank" with. That's exactly what Morten Laane has been saying, and exactly what "they" have been discrediting him about!!

quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I would love one of you guys to get a stain with a ring or cross, would be great to see & share.

Well, HERE YOU GO!!!! Some of these with my newly-improvised LED makeshift lighting....(the way Lymedin has encouraged us to do). I'm glad I tried this, and should have done it sooner! The colors in my stains are so much truer!


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Notice the "signet," or "ring-form" in this neutrophil. Notice also the color difference between the "ring" and the platelets just above the neutrophil-

 -


And, the diagnostic "maltese cross"-

 -


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Notice also the exo-erythrocytic ring-form on the left-

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Since most of my babesia pics right now are with my stock lighting, I will post more "halogen" babesia pics in the next post since I ran out of space in this post (Lymenet gives room for a maximum of 8 pics per entry).
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here's perhaps a better version of my last pic. Sometimes zooming in makes it more "tiresome" to look at.

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I'm not sure what form this is, but it is either an exo-erythrocytic maltese cross, or a couple clumped exo-erythrocytic merozoites-

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A form of the tetrad/maltese cross?-

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An early stage of the tetrad?-

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Some more interesting forms-

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Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
This is almost identical to the stock photo I posted a couple entries ago of the exo-erythrocytic clump of merozoites-

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Some more forms-

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A "mass" I suspect is/are a form/forms of babesia-

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And, a halogen lighting version of the ring in the neutrophil-

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Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
A laboratory reference from the CDC:

http://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/resources/pdf/benchAids/Babesia_benchaid.pdf


A link from Stanford:

http://web.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2009/NaikhobaManobi_Babesia/NaikhobaManobi_Babesia.htm

Babesia morphology:

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"Babesia enters erythrocytes at the sporozoite stage. Within the red blood cell, the protozoa become cyclical and develop into a trophozoite ring seen in the second cell [of the above picture].

The trophozoites morph into merozoites, which have a tetrad structure coined a Maltese-cross form.

The tetrad morphology, which can be seen with Geimsa staining of a thin blood smear, is unique to Babesia and serves as a distinguishing feature from Plasmodium falciparum, a protozoan of similar morphology that causes Malaria.

Trophozoite and merozoite growth ruptures the host erythrocyte leading to the release of vermicules, the infectious parasitic bodies, which rapidly spread the protozoa throughout the blood."

(breaking up the paragraph for easier reading for many here)

[ 01-02-2016, 03:38 AM: Message edited by: Robin123 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I think you finally got it, congrats & they look beautiful!!!


I think you are the first to find them via stain!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here is an interesting page with some info pertaining to the recent posts:


http://www.ccjm.org/index.php?id=107937&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=360849&cHash=37944e80c4bbca603fc99ffa6ff9c4e3


BELOW: Babesia microti forming intra-erythrocytic rings (short arrow), exoery-throcytic rings (long arrow) and a "Maltese cross" (red arrow) (Giemsa stain, original magnification x100).

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And, here is a wonderful hematology and clinical microscopy glossary PDF that I downloaded:

http://www.cap.org/apps/docs/proficiency_testing/2012_hematology_glossary.pdf
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Perhaps someone can help.

I picked up an oil immersion dark field condenser to use on my microscope.

However, I cannot achieve dark field with it at 100x
I have oil on both the condenser and the objective.
I only get dark field on 40x and below.

The condenser is 1.36-1.25
The objective is 100x/1.25.

Is there a way to adjust the condenser? It should work since it is 1.36-1.25.
Is there some way to adjust between 1.36 and .125 on the condenser that I just don't understand?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I think you will need to use a 100x objective that is less than 1.25. According to this video you can get a drop in plug for your objective that restricts the light value to make it possible to do 100x oil darkfield. It's a very good tutorial that explains darkfield apparatus very well.

He addresses 100x darkfield starting at 7:20.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6jsnLIsNwI
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
As far as I know placing oil on the condenser & on the slide should do it, although I have never done darkfield personally.


Good microscopy guide & it shows you how to do oil immersion & oil on condenser.

http://www.frankshospitalworkshop.com/equipment/documents/microscopes/background/Olympus%20-%20How%20to%20Improve%20Photography%20Through%20the%20Microscope.pdf


Here is video of Borrelia in a tick.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnFR4Ca5MVo


Malaria microscopy can be used toward babs & in part bart.

http://www.frankshospitalworkshop.com/equipment/documents/microscopes/background/Microscopy%20for%20the%20Detection%20of%20Malaria%20Parasites%20-%20WHO.pdf


Here is a good babs collection from the CDC.
http://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/babesiosis/gallery.html

[ 01-12-2016, 06:28 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Well, I figured out the issue.
I'm formally trained in microscopy, so it shouldn't have been such a simple issue.
I am not formally trained in any nature in Darkfield, but who really is these days?

The dark field condenser has an aperture of 1.36-1.25.
The 100X oil objective has an aperture of 1.25.
I know that the condenser must have a higher aperture then the objective lens to attain dark field.
I thought the 1.36-1.25 was equivalent to a higher aperture, but it wasn't.

The only fix was purchasing a 100X oil objective with a variable aperture, so I can adjust it so that it is smaller than 1.25.

So, for anyone else curious, if you have a 100X objective with a 1.25 aperture, it is too large of an aperture to achieve dark field with a 1.36-1.25 condenser.

I will report back with, potentially, some new video at 1000X, once I get the new lens in.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Also, I may very well have a report, as scientific as i can make, available for anyone to read, including video, and perhaps powerpoint, in a few months.

I am seeking more patients locally (I am one myself).

MS patients.
That is my diagnosis.
I have another coworker with an MS diagnosis.
We both have a demonstrable spirochaetosis (I don't have the equipment, supplies, training to do PCR's or DNA type staining), but it is interesting that any controls I have done (individuals with no illness/disease) do not have the same findings. So I am trying to increase my sample size, gather and organize any and all lab findings/diagnostics used for the diagnosis of MS.

I am currently working to have a diagnosis for a co-worker changed, potentially.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am finding the same, as I see the spirochetes in my blood & the family members that have LD, but not in healthy blood.


Where exactly is here locally?


You can post to the FaceBook page on MS & ask.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/msfocus/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good doc on Babesia in live microscopy by Morten Laane & Mysterud.

https://www.facebook.com/download/610508185724901/babesia.pdf


Here is the paper on Borrelia.

https://www.facebook.com/download/1485671288380504/borrelia%20laane.pdf


FL1953 Protomyxzoa Rheumatica: An Introduction
http://www.personalconsult.com/posts/FL1953.html
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVMawODCXjc&feature=youtu.be


That's from today.

It was simply the largest one I had seen today, so thought I would share.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Very good! You can't deny that one, can you? I think I see at least 5 other (smaller) ketes in the frame near the beginning.

It looks like you got your 1000x darkfield to work! That's cool!

How long did it take to upload a video of ten minutes? [dizzy]

I found it humorous when the kitty talked to the man in the background. [Smile]
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Has any one done rife through microscopy to verify frequency kills or has anyone done before after of killer agents?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Haha, that was me.

I was teasing my neighbors cat outside while I was recording, haha.
She would meow and I would respond.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by bluelyme:
Has any one done rife through microscopy to verify frequency kills or has anyone done before after of killer agents?

bluelyme,

I tried watching under the scope while I used a Beam Ray rife machine early last year, but I couldn't see much response with the frequencies I used. That machine never did a whole lot for my borrelia that I could tell. It seemed to help with other infections and symptom relief when it helped.

Then again, I didn't have the energy to pursue it more than a few times. I honestly would have liked to have subjected my slides to a different machine such as a BCX. You need a "broadcast" machine to even try this experiment. A contact machine will not work. But, a Doug Coil would. It would be interesting to try it with a Doug Coil, actually. I don't know of anyone who has one, though.

I KNOW rife works! I just don't have the equipment to do more experiments at this point. I am using a borrowed contact device at the moment.

Have you seen Anthony Holland's youtube videos on shattering cancer with frequencies? He uses a plasma tube. I hear that he has also done successful experiments with borrelia, but has done that work "underground." He claims it takes a machine that can run at least two frequencies simultaneously, with the 2nd frequency being the 11th harmonic of the base frequency.

Here's Anthony Holland on rife for cancer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w0_kazbb_U

As for herbal agent microscopy experiments, "Wakeup" proposed that back in August of last year on this thread. It's page 4 (8-11-2015). See my response in the very next post.

Maybe you could put a bug in Wakeup's ear for her to get a microscope and to get started doing her own experiments. I would like to contribute, but mostly it is just too labor-intensive for me to do controlled "studies." Besides, I am on ABX and can't discontinue them at this point.

[ 01-30-2016, 09:20 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Does anyone have any good references for/describing artifact visible in dark field?

As well as any examples/references for normal structures found in the blood that would possibly resembler spirochetes?

I am just trying to make sure that the structures I am seeing are indeed spirochetes, and not normal, benign structures like fibrin strands, etc.

I can't find any decent examples, or references to look at. It seems that very little exists for dark field microscopy, in this realm.

For example, what would be found within erythrocytes, that are long strands, that could possibly anchor them to a slide?
See below image, above the yellow dots.

 -

What can't be seen in the photo is the fact that these structures are anchoring the RBC's in place.
They don't appear to be different in nature to the other spirochetal structures in my samples, when not anchored to the slide.
The RBC is still freely moving within the serum, but this structure anchors it.

It is debatable whether or not borrelia can be intracellular, especially in RBC's. But I so often see these structures either coming out of RBC's, anchoring them to the slide, etc.
What normal component would do this, and have this appearance?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I don't know of any dark-field references off hand.

But, I really think that those connecting strings are fibrin. They are not undulating are they? Take your last video for instance. It was not attached to anything and it was undulating...and moving freely in the plasma.

But, I know what you mean. Even though we feel certain about what we are seeing, we want verification from a reputable reference.

Morten Laane's work may give you a clue. Other than that, ...???

Great job, by the way! Your 1000x darkfield is working out wonderfully!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JJBSGFbl-8&feature=youtu.be

Sample:
3.0mL Whole Blood, 7.0mL EDTA Vacutainer
72 Hours Incubation
94.4 Degrees Fahrenheit

Relevant Data:
IFA: Positive
IgM 39/41
IgG 31/41
Patient Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.
Current treatments: Tinidazole 500mg bid, Minocycline 100mg bid

Anecdote: Significant increase in spirochete/spirochete like structures compared to fresh/non-incubated sample viewed immediately after blood draw. Purely subjective estimation of 4-5 fold increase in visible spirochetes.

Samples are drawn into syringe. One slide is immediately prepped with a sample for viewing prior to injection into Vacutainer for storage/incubation.
New samples produced daily for viewing.
Best time frame I've noted for viewing samples is 72 hours after draw/incubation.
~94 degrees fahrenheit for incubation is based off both personal, subjective experience as well as referenced from other studies conducted stating that temperature range is optimal for long term culture. (Caveat: Those studies used culture medium. I do not. Those studies were long term, months long cultures. I "culture" for up to 5 days before discarding samples).
I call these spirochetal/spirochete like structures because I am not a trained pathologist, nor do I have any capability to definitively determine that these structures are indeed bacteria.

Take a look!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
http://vdi.sagepub.com/content/3/4/350.full.pdf

Here, this article talks about the issue of pseudo-spirochetes, particularly when conducting live blood analysis/dark field microscopy.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYTLWXWSmrA&feature=youtu.be

Sample:
3.0ml Whole Blood, 7.0 mL EDTA Vacutainer
Sample prepped immediately after draw (from vacutainer, didn't plan on doing initial slide sample tonight, but decided to and immediately drew from the vacutainer, so the sample is not fresh in the sense that it has been reconstituted with EDTA from the container)
Video is 4 hrs after slide prep

Relevant info:
Control sample
Patient has no known illness/disease/infection

Anecdote:
Control samples, for my purposes, are simply samples drawn from individuals with no known, diagnosed, or suspected illness/disease/infection.
Samples are treated in the same way as "infected" samples. Draw of the sample, slide preparation and viewing, storage of the sample in EDTA, and incubation times for further slide preparations are the exact same.
Note lack of structures/organisms that are spirochetal in nature.
Continuation of slide viewing at 12 hours, in the morning, along with further slide preparations at varying stages from the incubated sample will also provide more pictures/video.


I've got lots of video, and need to create an organized video presentation of them.


Also, to note, my equipment used.
Amscope T490B-DK
Equipped with 100X OIL objective with adjustable iris
Canon 70D DSLR (with DSLR adapter for view through the trinocular port on top of the microscope)

The 70D provides great video and photo, as it is 18.4? megapixels, but even with software update, I don't think it is capable of doing time lapse photography in a single file (it will do time lapse, but each new image is a separate file, which I don't want to deal with combining).
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I am curious how others feel about a few things regarding this work.

Many resources I look at reference the length of time it takes to culture Borrelia, and specialized culture mediums.
I have read a few references, including the Mattman resources linked here and elsewhere, the discuss the intracellular nature of Borrelia.

So, a few things to consider:
1) The increase in these organisms/structures with simple incubation of samples:
Are these truly spirochetes growing in this environment?
Is it artifact? An phenomenon produced from the break down of components of the blood sample (strands of protein, etc).
Is it a combination?

2) Comparison to known and suspected samples.
The "spirochetes" visible in these samples look like the non-motile (or whatever your preferred term is) form of the spirochete from examples of uncultured Borrelia. Are they the same?
Examples of artifact? I am still looking for definitive examples of any debris that could possibly mimic the shape, etc.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4JJBSGFbl-8&feature=youtu.be


Current treatments: Tinidazole 500mg bid, Minocycline 100mg bid

Anecdote: Significant increase in spirochete/spirochete like structures compared to fresh/non-incubated sample viewed immediately after blood draw. Purely subjective estimation of 4-5 fold increase in visible spirochetes.

Samples are drawn into syringe. One slide is immediately prepped with a sample for viewing prior to injection into Vacutainer for storage/incubation.

So, it appears that this video was made with a sample that was fresh, that was NOT subjected to the Vacutainer beforehand, and viewed immediately. Blood was from chronically ill person (you) who was concurrently on treatment (of special note is the Tinidazole-a known cyst-killing ABX).

Contrary to your next video in which sample was immediately made using fresh blood- FROM Vacutainer-, but not viewed until 4 hours later. Blood was from an otherwise healthy person who was not on ABX.

I personally feel that those "spirochetes" in the video of YOUR blood are INDEED true spirochetes!

What I notice in the second sample (from healthy individual) are what appear to me to be cysts. Particularly, I notice them at :30, :35, and :40. -- (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYTLWXWSmrA&feature=youtu.be)


My thoughts on the "healthy" person's blood:

Could there have been conversion in the "healthy" blood because of the EDTA in the Vacutainer? Or, was the immune system strong enough to keep the ketes dormant in the cystic form regardless of the EDTA?

It would be interesting to see a sample from the same "healthy" individual not subjected to EDTA (Vacutainer) and viewed immediately.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, I should have viewed the blood right away.
I injected the blood into the EDTA vacutainer, then decided to do a slide anyways. So the sample was fresh, as it just drawn, but had already been exposed to the EDTA.

However, I didn't notice anything in the control sample.
I should note, also, that I did view it immediately. The "4 hours later" is actually when the video was taken. No change between the immediate view and when the video was taken.

Most of what you see is normal artifact, cellular debris and normal components of blood. There is also expected artifact from the use of EDTA.
With future slide preparations, I will consider the sample to be a clean, negative control in the absence of spirochetal structures.

I am also trying to get my hands on some BSK.
Anyone know where to get any?
(Sigma Aldrich only sells to registered research laboratories).

As an interesting side project, I am very likely to make my own.
The components, and amounts used to create it, are available online. And even though I can't purchase the medium, it is possible to purchase each individual component.
I'm about to set up my own high school science experiment.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is one video showing strings in blood that can be fibrin or phospholipid rbc wall components.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FlpCs0MiS8


This video describes other anomalies that can confuse us for Borrelia cysts & blebs in the blood. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFQom3ssd38


Dr. Bela Bozsik shows us video of Borrelia spirochetes in human blood at the NorVect conferences in 2014. This is the same exact thing that most of us see in our Lyme Diseased blood!!!!!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyCVB5kG5PQ&feature=youtu.be


The NorVect conferences are the most reputable of gatherings that everyone in the whose who of Lyme Disease research & treatment goes to. The information shared by top doctors & researches (Dr. Alan MacDonald, Dr. Richard Horowitz, Dr. Eva Sapi,...etc) these presentations are considered very valuable.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
One of the biggest new optical microscopy technology companies has put out videos stating that these dancing strings are spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) in human blood, but the CDC can't?


From the video:
" This video illustrates spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) associated with Lyme Disease in a live red blood cell culture. This video was captured using a research grade optical microscope equipped with CytoViva's patented enhanced darkfield optical illumination system."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWR7AFcgKSc


Check out CytoViva's page to learn about them.
http://www.cytoviva.com/about/


Then I contacted CytoViva & asked about how those videos were obtained & their confidence that it was Borrelia b. & this is what they had to say.


"Thank you for your interest in CytoViva technology and the ability to observe Borrelia and related organisms. Our patented enhanced darkfield microscopy enables the capture very high signal-to-noise images of these types of pathogens in-situ in tissue, blood cells and other environments.


By adding hyperspectral imaging to the microscope, you can spectrally characterize these pathogens in these different environments.


The video you referenced was captured by microbiology researchers at Auburn University who were studying Borrelia. These bacteria were specifically cultured by this microbiology group.


CytoViva provides fully equipped optical microscopes for this type of imaging and can also provide integrated hyperspectral imaging as required.


Please let us know how we can support you with more insight regarding this technology. "
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
Most of what you see is normal artifact, cellular debris and normal components of blood. There is also expected artifact from the use of EDTA.
With future slide preparations, I will consider the sample to be a clean, negative control in the absence of spirochetal structures.

Have you looked at any of your (own blood) samples over the long-term? Most of us are finding granules (in the absence of spirochetes) in the samples of older blood in which initially there were numerous spirochetes. In my experience, week-old blood has many granules and no spirochetes.

I think that until you can positively identify what the artifacts are you cannot prove that what you are seeing are not Borrelia morphologies.

What I am saying is that it is impossible to know that a sample does NOT contain Borrelia without the use of DNA typing/staining in the absence of typical Borrelia spirochetal structures.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
"What I am saying is that it is impossible to know that a sample does NOT contain Borrelia without the use of DNA typing/staining in the absence of typical Borrelia spirochetal structures. "


True, I always dismiss everything bleb or cyst like, unless I see many bulbous tip spirochetes or SOP in the area.


Look at this wbc time lapse as when it lyses it can produce cyst & bleb like objects, which is the same thing I have witnessed & tried to describe in my video. At times though the wbc's do carry borrelia cysts & they can uncoil to show the spirochetes atypical structure. I see the cysts burst out when I do hot baths & check my blood after 1 hr as I mentioned before.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0UGnI5N8lg
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
I am curious how others feel about a few things regarding this work.

thatdudefromkansas,

I hope you don't regard my comments in the above posts as negative criticism, because I think you are doing awesome work, and approaching this very scientifically. Keep up the good work, and good luck in making your own BSK medium. We would be very interested in the details. I might try it myself if not too expensive.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
No, not at all.

However, criticism is always a good thing if the purpose is constructive.
If something is wrong, point it out.

Science cannot progress with criticism.

I think it is always best to approach this problem with two mindsets. The current one that you are correct, and these are spirochetes. The other being critical, that these are not, and actively pursuing any reason why these would not be spirochetes.

So I am also actively pursuing references or resources to the contrary of my beliefs. To cover both sides.

What was interesting, if you read that document I presented about "pseudo-spirochetes" is that they noted the difference between the true spirochetes and the pseudo-spirochetes thusly:
Transmission electron micrograph of a pseudospiro- chete, showing dark homogeneous protoplasm, as is typical of eryth- rocytes, and lack of both an outer envelope and endoflagella. Pseu- dospirochetes appear in and out of the plane of focus because of their irregularly curved morphology
Reference: http://vdi.sagepub.com/content/3/4/350.full.pdf

But there are both naturally occurring as well as laboratory modified mutants of borrelia that lack flagella, and as a consequence, also have altered morphology.

Altered motility and morphology of mutant SC-E1.Analysis of targeted mutations in the major flagellin gene, flaB, indicated that loss of PFs in B. burgdorferi influences both cell morphology and motility (46, 59). Because the hook is essential for flagellum assembly in other bacteria, we determined if the cell morphology and motility of SC-E1 were also altered. Dark-field microscopy revealed that whereas wild-type spirochetes had a flat-wave morphology, SC-E1 cells were rod shaped and often grew in chains (Fig. 1a and b). Moreover, electron microscopic examination of thin sections of SC-E1 revealed that the cells completely lacked PFs (Fig. 1c and d). These observations further support the conclusions, drawn from analysis of the flaB mutant, that the PFs influence the shape of cells and have a pronounced skeletal function (46). We also tested whether the motility of SC-E1 was altered. Dark-field microscopy examination of SC-E1 indicated that the cells were completely nonmotile. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type cells, SC-E1 cells did not swarm on swarm agar plates (Fig. 1e and f). These results indicate that SC-E1 resembles the previously characterized flaB mutant (46, 59); both strains were deficient in filament synthesis, were rod shaped, and were nonmotile.
Reference: http://jb.asm.org/content/190/6/1912.full
Photomicrographs of mutants described in this work
 -

So it is possible, as well, that the identification of a spirochete like structure as a "pseudo-spirochete" based on the lack of endoflagella/periplasmic flagella (PF) or a variation in the protoplasmic cylinder is potentially flawed as well.
I will look up more resources tonight regarding protoplasm of Borrelia. What variations can occur naturally, in mutants or normal Borrelia? Would that cause the appearance to be like described above, in the pseudo-spirochete?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
The Dr. Bozsik presentation was interesting, as well.

I hadn't seen that yet, so thanks for sharing the link Lymedin.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Dude from ks,
Are you currently treating with mino and tinidazole? ,very clear video, thank you
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, I am.

100 mg twice daily Mino.
500 mg twice daily Tinidazole.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Also, if anyone is interested, I might be willing to part with a Darkfield Condenser.

.7-.9 NA Dry.
I have the OIL one I use exclusively now, so the condenser that came with my T490 is not being used.

Good for 40x magnification.
Some of the images I have shared have been 40x, but with a 20X eyepiece.

As long as you have a standard microscope, it should fit perfectly fine.

So, with the purchase of a set of 20x eyepieces, you could get relatively decent magnification/resolution at 800x.

If anyone is curious or interested, let me know.
It doesn't mean anyone that borrows it will get to keep it for the long run, but I am willing to loan it out for any period of time.

I'm wlling to share =)
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
thatdudefromkansas and others thank you for all your links and info.
I often find thicker free floating strings only in areas with lots of RBCs anchored by thin strings, which suggests, that the thicker free floating strings were created from broken anchoring strings. Lots of times I find several stretched lemon shaped RBCs anchored in circular pattern around shrinking bubble or single WBC like in picture below. All free floating strings I find are dead. They are just punched around by Brownian motion. At certain point they disintegrate in to tiny pieces. I have seen one floating string disintegrate in just few minutes. I don’t think that the free floating strings are spirochetes.
 -

Yet another source of strings coming out of certain blood cells appears to be apoptosis (process of programmed cell death).
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150615/ncomms8439/fig_tab/ncomms8439_F3.html

I think figuring out how to incubate borrelia from blood sample might be the only chance to somehow see it and verify that it still exists in some type of form.
I found some instructions on how to do it here:
http://www.medsci.org/v10p0362.htm
Culture media can be possibly purchased here?
http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/sigma/b8291?lang=en®ion=US
I noticed that in 15th minute of video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WozrCFW0mRM
Lida Mattman points out that they just grow borrelia directly on slides inside of coplin staining jar. How? I don’t know. It’s possibly tricky. I estimate that coplin staining jar could be partially submerged in bucket of water with cheap self regulating aquarium heater and hold same temperature as expensive incubator. If somebody figures it out please let us know. I will start trying when I’m off of abx.

[ 02-06-2016, 04:13 PM: Message edited by: Sobre ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Sobre, welcome to Lymenet, and to this thread!

That's an interesting picture. I have personally never seen those "strings" that you and dude have shown. Nor have I seen the lemon-shaped RBCs. It's kind of odd because I've looked at a lot of blood. I'm not sure what the difference may be that you guys are seeing this and I'm not.

Do you have video footage of that same spot the picture was taken? I would be interested in seeing how those components were moving.

Please tell us about your lyme journey and fill us in on your microscope equipment!

Thanks for joining!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Excellent sources, Sobre.

Just the thing I was looking for.

The strings anchoring the RBC's in place didn't appear to be fibrin, as fibrin is often readily visible on my slides as well, and there is a stark difference in the way fibrin appears.
I figured it was some mechanism I didn't fully grasp that was causing that kind of cellular debris that might mimic an atypical spirochete.
Also explains the limited presence of these structures in the blood of non-infected individuals.

A good question beyond this is, how long do these structures last? And what is a distinguishable difference between those and an atypical spirochete that would have a similar shape.

Also, it is quite hard to differentiate between anything living and dead to the brownian motion, as you have stated.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Also, for the culture medium, Sobre.


Sigma Aldrich will only sell that medium to registered research laboratories.

No purchase possible there unless you have that affiliation.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
For culturing:

I have an styrofoam egg incubator that I store my samples in.
The kind used to hatch eggs.

You can manually adjust your desired temperature, and it works quite well.
http://www.amazon.com/Miller-Manufacturing-Company-9300-Incubator/dp/B00KKRDQAE/ref=sr_1_1?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1454821047&sr=1-1&keywords=Miller+Manufacturing+Company+9300+Wh ite+Digital+Still+Air+Incubator
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
http://www.mms-seminar.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/2001-norway-brorson-ms-is-lyme.pdf

Interesting research to read, for anyone interested.
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
TNT the video is here
http://vid411.photobucket.com/albums/pp198/sobre3/1_zpsqgrsky7p.mp4
It’s not really good one. I only have 400x dark field and hand held camera. I use AmScope T690C. It uses infinity objectives and AmScope doesn’t sell 100x infinity objective with adjustable iris to match their dark field condenser. I think I will try AmScope 60x infinity objective or try to get lucky on Ebay with some other brand 100x objective. Can somebody recommend time-lapse camera setup?

The video shows 24 hour old sample left at room temperature. I’ve been doing this only for few weeks and haven’t witnessed how WBCs manage to get tangled in RBC strings while creating small clearing in carpet of RBCs. That slide had about 5 similar spots on it while other slides may not have anything or just couple of spots. Possibly preparation of slide might have something to do with it. The slide with 5 spots was from drop of blood so small that it didn’t need to be smeared and edges of drop started to coagulate little bit before I covered it.
On some slides I have seen RBCs getting stretched by strings around air bubble and once also next to channel of flowing RBCs when blood kept flowing on slide for extended period of time. Since yesterday I goggled it and only found few live blood analysis pictures with lemon shaped RBCs pointing to protein linkage, which has something to do with digestion of proteins and only sounds like theory.

My Lyme has been rash half year ago, then month and half of trying to figure out what it is, after that standard doxy, after that other classic Lyme symptoms and now mixtures of abx for few months.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Thanks Sobre! That video was helpful.

The only real way to definitively determine if those strings are ketes (besides culturing) is to do the borrelia stain with fluorescence like Dr. Alan MacDonald and Peter Kemp are doing. Though, I would be hesitant to conclude that those "detached strings" are not spirochetes. They may just be devitalized, or more dormant than wild-type. Take a look back at some of the criteria that we (particularly Lymedin2010) have given for spirochetes.

I definitely appreciate your work and contribution! That nature.com article was interesting and very helpful. I had never heard of apoptosis creating beads-on-a-string before. It's possible that, at least some of what we are seeing, is apoptosis. As dude has reminded us, we need to maintain an open mind and approach this objectively.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Sobre, are you seeing things that you could confidently call spirochetes?

Also, could you view a sample over a week's time, and then report what you find (you will have to seal off your coverslip to keep the sample from drying out)? I know I have found spirochetes at first, then fewer and fewer until no spirochetes, but more and more granules til the end of the week.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
PeterKemp, if you are still active here.....

I'm looking to expand my experimentation with microscopy and culturing, as well as any tests I could competently perform.

You seem to have some personal experience in doing this yourself.

Any ability to point me in the right direction or help me out with the processes you have used to conduct your own research?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter does not come here anymore, but he listed all his materials & methods on his website. He got the idea of using sodium citrate from Morten Laane & his paper.


Months into his experiment the atypical & flat strands grew into more typical spiraling spirochetes.

http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/bskculture2.html


http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/intracellularspirochetes.html


QUOTE:
"Materials and methods
The medium to hold blood cells stable on a microscope slide mini-culture was prepared as:
Deionised water with:-
Sodium Chloride 9 gms/litre
Sodium Citrate 3 gms/litre
Dextrose 5 gms/litre
Triton X-405 0.5 mls/litre
Gelatine granules were dissolved in the liquid as per the manufacturer's instructions (Dr Oetker Gelatine - www.oetker.co.uk) to create a soft jelly.
The slide was prepared as a normal blood drop thin-film smear on a Polysine TM (Thermo Scientific) cell adhesion microscope slide. No drying time was allowed. A drop of the prepared medium was immediately placed on the smear and a 50mm coverslip placed. After blotting, the periphery of the coverslip was sealed with microscope immersion oil."
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
You can use this to grow spirochete, as it also contains a bit of sugar as well.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/221563170819?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


-0.65g per 100ml of RODI or Distilled water
-Add 1 drop of solution above to 1 drop of your blood directly on the slide.
-Try this with a completely sealed slide (use Vaseline if doing 40x) & try with all sides sealed except leave one side open.
This is because Bb will be depending on proper O2 vs CO2 to encourage to grow.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Interesting, might have to look into something like that.


As a side note:

In the absence of any manufactured culture medium, I've been thinking of other culture methods.
Then it dawned on me-----
Why not do a skin biopsy, and use that tissue for a substitute medium. Biopsy a sample, divide it, and then culture a number of ways: One culture in whole blood, one culture in plasma, one culture in whole blood diluted with something like glycerol, etc etc.
However, essentially crush/grind the skin sample so that, in the culture, it can be stirred prior to drawing for creating a slide.

My thinking was that the next best medium might be host tissue. A skin biopsy is a simple thing if I can get a kit.

I'm also looking into creating, or getting as near to creating, my own BSK medium. That's not to say that it will have all the ingredients. If the best I can do is a medium lacking an ingredient, I'll take that.....better than nothing, and still might yield results greater than simply incubating whole blood.

What do y'all think?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
I'm also looking into creating, or getting as near to creating, my own BSK medium. That's not to say that it will have all the ingredients. If the best I can do is a medium lacking an ingredient, I'll take that.....better than nothing, and still might yield results greater than simply incubating whole blood.

What do y'all think?

Sounds like a plan! I would also give Lymedin2010's suggestions a try. They sound simple enough.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Do you have Lyme Disease think skin & red rashes? I know I do & culturing from there is on my list. I predict that if we are carrying as many spirochetes, blebs & cysts as we carry in our blood, then we are shedding some in our skin in general & should be able to culture them from skin shavings/slothing.


They used microscopy & culturing way before any PCR or the new DNA sequencing was available. Willy Burgdorferi was able to find spirochetes in blood, CSF & skin well before 1984 using microscopy, yet somehow this concept eludes the CDC. All of a sudden in the 21st century where technological advances inundates us we become moronic to such concepts.

"This suggestion was strongly supported by the subsequent isolation of seemingly identical spirochetes from the blood (3, 12), cerebrospinal fluid (12),
and skin (12) of patients acutely ill with Lyme disease and the further demonstration of immunological reactivity of patient sera with the spirochetes (12). "

" The cells are gram negative and stain well with Giemsa and Warthin-Starry stains. Unstained cells are not visible by bright-field microscopy but are visible by dark-field or phase-contrast microscopy. "

"A review of reports on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of strains of the spirochete which causes Lyme disease revealed that these organisms are representative of a new species of Borrelia. We propose the name Borrelia burgdorferi for this species. The type strain of B. burgdorferi is strain B31 ( ATCC 35210). "

http://ijs.sgmjournals.org/content/34/4/496.full.pdf+html
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, simple indeed.
Seemingly quick as well.

Lymedin, where have you seen the use of the dioralyte as a culture medium?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
The reason for culturing with skin biopsy is also to use it as a medium for growth.

The intent would be the introduction of the biopsied tissue into a sample of some component of infected blood.
That would be cultured.

A control would be a second biopsy, or simply dividing the single biopsy tissue into multiple parts, and culturing that in the same conditions, but in the absence of infected blood.

It would simply provide a haven, with nutrients, that might yield better results than just blood.

It's just an idea I was thinking about, and am looking into other sources to see what has already been done with this method, and seeing what results were reported.

The BSK medium is rich in nutrients that borrelia needs which is why it yields such good results. But, host skin tissue also has nutrients ideal for borrelia.
So it might be a culture medium of compromise, in lieu of being able to get my hands on BSK.
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
TNT Everything on my slides seems to start degrading after 24 hours. (I have been sealing all 4 sides so far.) For example the area where I took posted picture had only couple of tight strings left following day and eventually they all disappeared. I have seen floating string disintegrate in to granules, but I would not be able to distinguish the granules from all other debris. I see more and more debris with time but that’s everywhere and it appears to come mostly from decomposing white cells. There are only few strings in just few areas of slice so they can’t create too much debris.

[ 02-09-2016, 03:56 AM: Message edited by: Sobre ]
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
Thank you guys, you are wealth of information.
I’m trying to come up with some logic on how to use microscope as tool to monitor results of treatment but I’m not sure I understand everything correctly. It appears that there are following ways to detect borrelia body parts which can still multiply or reproduce:

1) Grow corkscrewing spirochetes
Advantage is that it’s 100% accurate (if successful)
Disadvantages are 5 month delay and complexity of process.
It’s also not very useful if you know you are infected and only want to compare counts of bacteria to some other sample.

2) Use antibody stain to detect stained strings
I think this one should be also 100% accurate as any strings in blood samples appear to disintegrate in matter of days. If fresh string managed to assemble itself from components which get stained by borrelia antibody I would bet that same components can also multiply or assemble something than can further multiply.

3) Use antibody stain to detect stained anything (blobs, etc.)
Possibly not 100% accurate as even components which can no longer multiply might get stained.

4) Use other stains than antibody stain.
I don’t know much about this one, but I think this type of stain might also stain other stuff. If stained strings show up, that might be interesting.

5) Look for any string in blood.
Advantage is that it’s very simple and almost instant but not 100% accurate. However if string can be found with same characteristics and behavior as string found by antibody stain that could significantly increase accuracy. I guess it all depends on antibody staining technique. If there is antibody staining technique which doesn’t damage RBCs and even keeps strings attached to RBCs that would be great.

If you can please let me know if you see any errors in this or if you have additional ideas on it.
Thank you

[ 02-09-2016, 04:11 AM: Message edited by: Sobre ]
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
Dude
I noticed in link from Lymed on this page
http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/bskculture.html
line:
“various quantities of BSK 2 (with 6% rabbit serum) have been used from 2 to 10mls (it has been suggested by an expert that bovine serum might be better)”
Bovine serum appears to be sold by more places than BSK so I was thinking that it might be easier to buy.
Also around 37th minute of video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WozrCFW0mRM
MPM media is mentioned.
Instructions on how to make it appears to be here.
http://lymerick.net/MPM-2001-medium-Bb.html
It however looks like ingredients for it may also not be easy to get plus it’s tricky to use.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Thanks, Sobre.

The quote about bovine serum being better is as a preparation material for the BSK.
So, not Bovine serum alone, but with BSK and bovine serum as opposed to BSK with rabbit serum.

MPM media might be interesting to experiment with, but I read another study stating that the MPM media doesn't actually work.
Wouldn't stop me from trying it, though.
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
OK, it looks like there is a problem with my theory on antibody stain: Fluorescent microscope for couple thousand $ is needed.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, fluorescent microscopy can have a very high startup cost.

Cheap filter system, maybe 1500 dollars, plus stains.....
So, if you really, really like doing this, and you can afford to sell your left nut, then got for it, haha.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
If you guys can test cultures and their suceptability to antimicrobials and find one that works in vivo i will volunteer an appendage or two...
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Peter Kemp has suggested dioralyte & says it alone can grow spiros, but still a bit tricky as some have still not been able to grow it even with BSKII added yet.


I think mine has grown & sometimes hard to tell from the many spiros exiting rbc's & have to do controls. I messed up the first rounds with too much Vaseline on the cover slip & it mucked up the slides.


Rabbit serum + dioralyte is another method & really you can use any serum. You can even get human serum & put it in a container with a hole & boil it. You can have this on the cheap & do this before you spend any money. Even going to a farm butchering shop & asking for rabbit or any animal blood for real cheap, boil + dioralyte, and then adding 1 drop of this to 1 drop of your blood on the slide.


Try with part of slide unsealed, as you need ratio of O2 to CO2 to be just right & try with sealed too.
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
OK my theory form post above on using fluorescent antibody stain to verify if floating strings are borrelia L-forms has another problem: Borrelia L-forms in form of string apparently can not be stained by FITC antibody stain. Message at 1 minute 45 seconds in this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbWWTslbLM
points it out. Plus there are no picture of stained strings before they turn to spirals anywhere.
 
Posted by Sobre (Member # 47458) on :
 
Lymed,
I ordered it. Do you think that if successful the dioralyte might generate visibly increased number of floating strings in a matter of days and that would indicate possibility of being on right track to grow spinning spiral forms in few months?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes. You may have to leave 1 side open at least & seal the rest. I would try seal all & another slide leave one side.


I think Niall Cronely might be Peter Kemp, it sure looks like his work. Maybe what we are seeing in our blood are very stagnant & slow growing Bb & as a result they do not produce large quantities of antibodies on their surfaces & as a result do not stain well. Or perhaps what little proteins they generated were shed.


Persister cells are also known to grow very slow & have a very low metabolic rate. This is still part of the mystery that we have to figure out.


Alternatively they could be another body spirochete (oral or gut) that explodes because of immunosuppression of LD>


Here is a BEAUTIFUL spiro in a LD patient blood, the same type we see in our blood, & it is caught undergoing a perfect cyst. This video is so precious & shows that this thing is a spirochete!


https://www.facebook.com/groups/MyMicroscope/permalink/1661566817459646/
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another cyst formation, but this one is incomplete. A "Tennis Racket" form that then completes cyst formation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUsVAd4n_1c
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
BOOM!!!!

Dr. Alan MacDonald, THE GOD OF BORRELIA, strikes again & this time showing that Borrelia can be seen in the blood of someone who is long-term ill with Lyme Disease & where serology testing may be negative or inconclusive. Please, please, please donate if you have not already (I have [Smile] )


THANK YOU Dr. MacDonald!!!


http://f1000research.com/posters/1097535


https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtf1/t31.0-8/12710891_1705941026352742_2198305036781083369_o.jpg

QUOTE:

"Borrelia Spirochetes In Human blood Fluorescence In Situ DNA Hybridization Method -FISH"


"Borrelia in Patient Blood by FISH Method is a Reliable Diagnostic Method"


"•Borrelia in Spiral form ( Rare)

•Borrelia in cylindrical undulating form,

•Form, Borrelia in Granular form

•Borrelia in Biofilm

•Borrelia in Cystic Communities,

•Borrelia in L Form ( Cell Wall Deficient form)

•All of These Diverse Profiles Contain DNA of Borrelia

•All are detectable by FISH method with

Molecular Beacon DNA "
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Does anybody have footage of l form..?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
We think that the one we see in our blood is an L-form (CWD, cell wall deficient forms), but you cannot really tell them apart from the regular spiros, that is not until you look at them with an electron microscope & to observe the lack of the cell wall.


There has been a recent study showing us that the forms are not CWD, but I think that it may be incomplete since other past studies have shown otherwise. It might be a matter of achieving proper conditions to produce an L-form. The forms that we see in our blood are ATYPICAL, as they do not look like the regular strong spiraling wave forms.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18F1xKvGeH8

Above is another beautiful video of the atypical spirochete that we see in our blood & after some time it forms cysts. There are two of them in fact.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another video where a few spiros turn into cyst. Sometimes the body turns into cyst, but the tip remains either bleb or independent cyst...hard to tell for sure. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HVwFqGpTnY&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another great cysting video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HUtKungjvE


And another.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVf39rSop48&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I might have some interesting information to report in the next two months that you guys might be excited about.

Not gonna say now, as I am awaiting more information, but we will see.

Also, BSK-H culture is going to happen! Awaiting rabbit serum, coming in next month, and I will begin my work.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I am always excited on new info/news/knowledge on this thing & hopefully we can all push things forward & eventually be cured!


Two VERY important videos here. This one is a beautiful cyst formation in Lyme Disease blood:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nK9VuG-ZnU


I cannot believe we missed this one, as it shows atypical spirochete to -->"Tennis Racket" (TR) --> to Discoid Gemma (DG) transformation. This one is so precious since it clearly demonstrates to us that the tennis racket form is simply a transitional form from one morphology to another & not a stationary morphology onto itself. It also shows that the DG is simply another form of a cyst & that the end form is likely dependent on the adult atypical spirochete shape & size.

Tennis racket forms have been reported in WILD TYPE Borrelia burgdorferi directly from ticks & cultures, so if/when we make the connection of this transition & especially when TR is involved, then this makes the visual connection in human blood HUGE & SUBSTANTIAL and will add to the mounting evidence that we are looking at a spirochete & not a mere artifact in our blood!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg_Id74a_4I
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Wow. That change in morphology change in that video was amazing!

The first video posted in the previous post.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Hey, all!

If you could message me your current locations, that would be awesome.

I might be interest in culture samples in the future. Only if it is feasible based on location initially, but we may be able to work out something more long term!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://youtu.be/fJBBHZSCdb8

Video I edited together.
Watch in 1080p.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Dude ,Very cool video ...have you identified any coinfections?...if you need some sw samples let me know...also have you done any expermentation with other killing modalities other than abx?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Only what I was diagnose with.

Babesiosis and a borderline, though negative, Chlamydia pn.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great video, thanks for posting.


With a MS diagnosis, how many other symptoms are present that scream Lyme Disease?


Have you checked "normal" blood as a control to see if you can observe the same spirochetes? I have not been able to find any in normal blood, but I have heard at least 2 other people say that they have been able to. I wonder if then it is true that many people have these spirochetes, but no symptoms?


I also have a report that someone working in a lab with Borrelia had the entire lab workers tested for PCR/DNA Bb & 75% of them tested positive.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
For symptoms, it is hard to say.

I mean, I'd venture to say that any "MS" symptom I would have, would also be a symptom of a neurological infection.
Hence the need to rule out this infection before the MS diagnosis is made.

So it is hard to say.

Current symptoms, really, are only fatigue, chronic pain in arm and leg, tinnitus, and in rare instances, paresthesia.
On top of that, any physical activity also results in a buzzing sensation in my arm and leg that often accompanies the pain.

Similar symptoms to a plexus neuritis or mononeuritis multiplex.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
My early symptoms too were only constant headaches that grew progressively worst over the years & chronic tiredness.


After a few years, then came the stomach burning.


I think Bb can lodge itself in certain areas & become slow growing cysts & longer spiros, in a sort of stale mate with the body. It patiently waits for immune system opportunities to further take over & can lead to an AIDS-like scenario where it overwhelms & takes over the entire body.


I think if it is in the circulatory system, then most people can handle the detox & it does not cause as many symptoms. When it can infest tissues, then that becomes a whole other problem. Since then it can grow into biofilm, cause localized damage & act as a point-source-infection as a pumping house to overwhelm the rest of the body.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Lymed i think youre right ..so if it is in our blood then are we fubar?...have you tested other killersbeside abx ..like antiparasites or venom
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
bluelyme,

What do you mean by "fubar?"


Here is a horrible video by Mildred Arbaux that demonstrates how bad the blood can look even after ABX. Notice innumerable ketes, thick ketes, and innumerable round bodies. It's the worst I've ever seen, though my blood has come close:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzcQgLRm3jI


Now, here is her blood only two days later about a day after taking Bactrim, Flagyl, and Plaquenil. It has very many motile granules and still a moderate number of ketes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EtmGRRA-Gg

In the first video, it appears as though the two intracellular ABX (Zith and a tetracycline) were making the RBCs an unfriendly environment (that's perhaps why you see SO MANY hanging onto the outside of the RBCs and in the plasma). But there is not enough spirocheticidal agents in the blood to eliminate or even lower the spirochetal load. Perhaps if she had added IV Rocephin it would have lowered the number of ketes??? Maybe.

Once she stopped the Zith and tetracycline and added Bactrim and Plaquenil I see very few round bodies in her blood.

She is doing great documentation, but her resolution could be a little better. I have a little trouble seeing exactly what those "motile granules" look like. Some of it certainly is the difficulty focusing on specimens at 1000x. That's why I'm more and more seeing the advantage of using 450x with a high resolution camera with zoom.

I now have rudimentary apparatus to do time-lapse. Hopefully I will be able to post some before too long. The last specimen of my own blood saw the conversion from ketes to round bodies over a number of days (to a week). But, it was not until after this that I got my time-lapse software installed, so I was not able to capture the conversion of that particular sample.

I also have footage of healthy blood with spirochetes. I'm more and more convinced it's the presence of coinfections and the strength of the immune system that determines if one becomes ill with Borrelia.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
Here is a horrible video by Mildred Arbaux that demonstrates how bad the blood can look even after ABX.

I didn't mean that the video was horrible. I meant that the blood condition was horrible.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Thanks, fubar is old 90s colloquialism for messed up beyond recognition , great post tnt, just got some plaqunil so you got me thinking. ..its a bummer she only could do a day of the quad therapy...
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
TNT, that person's YouTube post is part of another group & she adds a concoction of things to the blood sample, including acridine orange.


Did you see my experiments on PH buffers? You can add vinegar to water at a certain ration & you will see tons & tons & tons of SoP coming out of RBC's over 36+ hours & days on end. The idea is to make it more acidic & to speed up the acidity & dying of the blood, just like an animal dies in real life. The spiros break up to blebs for maximum dispersion.


-Make 4ml of RODI or Distilled water + .2 - .4 ml of white vinegar (PH = ~2-2.5).
-Add a drop of above solution to the slide.
-Touch that drop with a drop of blood from the fingers.
-Smear the combination on the slide as normal (see my video) & then seal the edges of the cover slip with Vaseline for 40x objective viewing or w/immersion oil for 100x oil.
-Wait 24-36 hrs to see the mass migration. They come out for days on end.


TNT, have you posted the healthy blood with spirochetes & how healthy are they? With absolutely NO symptoms?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
TNT, have you posted the healthy blood with spirochetes & how healthy are they? With absolutely NO symptoms?

I have not published any of those videos yet.

The person has absolutely NO SYMPTOMS. Hardly ever gets sick either.

Thanks for the info about the buffers. I really have not needed to use any buffers as I see many spirochetes in my own blood without any problem.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://labtestsonline.org/news/160310lyme/

B. Mayonii.

Second species of bacteria now attributed to Lyme in the United States.

Interesting.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I have seen that & it is actually now the 3rd & counting, along with divergent forms of burgdorferi and just like there is a strain B31 & wild type Bb forms.


So now it is miyamotoi, bissettii, & mayonii.

http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=21454
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, sorry.
Meant the number of "accepted" species infectious in the US "specific to Lyme".
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I should be able to begin BSK cultures shortly.

I am divided between doing two separate sets, or just one.
(Two incubators, two separate temperature ranges).
As the goal is not to determine optimal growth conditions or anything like that, I don't know if I want to spend the extra time or money doing that.

However, it would have the potential of increasing the efficacy of my study, as it would allow for a greater likelihood of culture success.

And, as of right now, I'll only be culturing blood samples. Trying to work out getting CSF samples, as that would be a more telling finding if anything actually grows in the medium.
 
Posted by katrinab (Member # 30330) on :
 
I have been reading this thread for awhile and it peaked my interest because I am currently taking human anatomy and physiology at college and have learned to use a microscope. I am not sure if the microscopes available at my school are ideal. I am not sure the magnification available but when I find out what type of microscopes are available I will post here and let you know. I am guessing what they have wont have dark field or phase contrast but I could be wrong. I have a few questions.

What is the purpose of using chocolate agar? Can someone explain how to use it?

I was reading how to use the Giemsa stain and read that you need to purchase two separate ingredients to create a buffering solution, then mix it with the Giemsa to create a ph balanced solution for staining babesia. I couldn't find the ingredients on eBay so was wondering if I could make a 1:10 dilution of Giemsa first myself then add an acid or base to the solution to adjust the ph. I'm not sure what I would buy but I think there are ph adjusters on eBay for use with plants.

It was mentioned about Eva sapis research on Lyme with stevia. I was wondering if we are able to find spirochetes in our blood, are we then able to add things to the slides that we think may kill the spirochetes and see how they react? Like add a drop of stevia, or turn on our rife machine at a set frequency near the slide and see if the spirochetes explode. Or does it not work like that? It would be very cool if it did. At the very least I think this is a helpful tool in monitoring how our treatments are helping us right? For example, if we are planning on starting a new treatment we could look at our blood before starting the treatment making note of how many spirochetes we find and then doing the same while on the treatment.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The choc or soy agar was for Bartonella growth, which would take days to cultivate.


Absolute or pure ETHANOL is what is used as a fixative agent. Instructions here.
http://www.med-chem.com/pages/lab_procedures/pdf/giemsa_blood_stain.pdf


I have tried stevia in a ph lowered solution to erupt some rbc's & I will be making a video of it eventually.


That video looks interesting. Seems like a rbc w/ruptured wbc & even some string of pearls. There was a new study that showed that it is possible to get string of pearls from wbc's as a normal occurrence (paper was linked here before) & it is hard to know what to believe. It has become to believe research nowadays & I would have to know the researchers and their intent It is something to keep in mind.


I have not seen any independent spiros w/ bulbous tips on both end in your video & I would hunt for those in case the wbc producing SoP objects are possible & true.
 
Posted by katrinab (Member # 30330) on :
 
So can anyone answer my question about how to make a ph buffered solution for babesia with the Giemsa stain? I can purchase Giemsa but I was wondering if I can use ph adjusters to adjust ph
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
There is something that I've noticed that I want to share to see if anyone else has noticed it.

What I've noticed in the week-long samples is that when on ABX the ketes eventually turn to "round-bodies." These are almost perfectly round objects varying between 1-3 microns in diameter. These round objects have almost no perceptible movement.

An example of these is Mildred Arbaux's video after a year of ABX:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzcQgLRm3jI

Maybe it's just the sample environment (amount of fluid etc.), but, unlike some of Mildred's, I have not seen my round bodies move or jiggle.

But, I am noticing that when off ABX, the ketes eventually turn to "granules." The granules are typically ever so slightly bigger than the round bodies and have an appearance somewhat resembling salt crystals. The best I can describe them is that they look like tiny "gob-stoppers" from the movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. And they very noticeably vibrate (which could simply be from Brownian Motion since these granules are more angular and would tend to "catch" free atoms fairly easily).

So, what I'm noticing is that ABX cause the conversion of ketes to round bodies.

But, without the presence of ABX in the blood, the ketes convert to granules.

Anyone else happen to notice this phenomena?

Hopefully I can get some personal videos and time-lapse posted to illustrate this.

In addition to the granule vs. round body phenomena, I have also noticed that when on ABX (particularly intra-cellular ABX), there are many ketes visible in the blood. But, when off ABX, I typically see very few ketes. This makes me believe that intracellular ABX in particular tend to do their job of getting the ketes out of the cells fairly well. Or, perhaps, as in the case with Azithromycin which has extremely good tissue penetration, we are pushing them out of their tissue niches and into the blood.

Either way, if this is the case, the objective therefore should be to have on board a very potent spirochetal-cidal agent....whatever that is. It seems like Rocephin would do the job in this case, but results with Rocephin have been contradictory in the cases I've heard about. Perhaps that was because of the conversion to l-forms without enough CWD ABX on board....

Sorry for the rambling here at the end.

[ 03-24-2016, 09:53 AM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
The best I can describe them is that they look like tiny "gob-stoppers" from the movie Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.

I think they were called "Ever-lasting Gob-Stoppers." [lol]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by apsara:
This is from finger pricked blood of someone on doxy for two months. No "traditional" forms seen.

https://youtu.be/0xl8GJPyu8c

Any thoughts about what this is showing?

apsara, I gave my remarks just a little bit ago in the thread you started called "spirochetes?"

I just wanted to bring this up here on the microscopy thread about your other video that appears to show a great example of rod bacteria in the blood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgLbrXTFOtg

As I mentioned in your thread, this infection needs to be addressed. Without knowing more about the health of the person whose blood this is, I would say this is the real reason they are sick. I have never seen this (the chains of rods) in any blood I have looked at (only the fairly rare isolated individual rod) and I think this could be showing sepsis. It really needs addressed!

Great capture. Great example. I just hope this person gets adequately treated!

Please share more about this person's health and history... anonymously of course... because this looks serious.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
apsara....?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hi apsara, thanks for the replies!

Yeah, I fully understand it's not legit in the eyes of the establishment if it doesn't come from a certified lab.

That's good to know that the bacteria are not showing up in repeated specimens. It IS hard to know sometimes. I still think that the presence of those bacteria is extremely noteworthy, especially since it was a wet-mount specimen. There are not many avenues of contamination with a wet-mount preparation as long as the slide/coverslip and fingertips are clean.

Are you new to microscopy? What kind of equipment are you using?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Hey, thanks a lot for replying. Leica is a great scope! Do you use a DSLR camera for capture?

That's too bad there is no WBC activity in their sample. I hope they can find the right treatment to get well. A protozoan infection can really drive the killer cell count down. In fact, taking Malarone for Babesia can drive down those counts, too. Those symptoms you mentioned definitely sound like protozoan symptoms.

That's interesting you have some experience with Wright-Giemsa stains. I'm pretty new with them. But, they can be very informative, even diagnostic. Did you see my pics of the Babesia ringforms? That cannot be contamination!

I have some recent pics of an unknown fungal form from my last Wright-Giemsa. I have not been able to positively identify it. Perhaps you can help with it? Any thoughts?


 -

 -


Keep up the great work, apsara, and please stick around. Your input is valuable.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
I have some recent pics of an unknown fungal form from my last Wright-Giemsa. I have not been able to positively identify it. Perhaps you can help with it? Any thoughts?


 -

 -



It does resemble Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites, too. Perhaps that is what (they) are. I didn't think it was that because (they) are not crescent-shaped. But, could easily be.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Have you ever been to Southwest? ...coccidioidomycosis?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by bluelyme:
Have you ever been to Southwest? ...coccidioidomycosis?

Hey bluelyme!

Yes, I have been in the SW, but I don't think it's that. For one, I don't have any cutaneous manifestations of this.

I hope you don't have it.

Thanks for the suggestion. I hope you are making some progress out there....keep fighting!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by apsara:
TNT - I have seen something similar to that but at the moment it escapes me. If I can remember I will let you know.

Much appreciated!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I would be glad for any feedback regarding my last pics if anyone comes across any ideas.

---------------

We know that asymptomatic Babesiosis is becoming a major issue in the U.S., and I thought these old cases represent this all too well:

Babesiosis by transfusion was well established over 15 years ago:

http://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/monthlyCaseStudies/1998/case01.html

http://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/monthlyCaseStudies/1999/case26.html

And, here is a good example of why Babesiosis by blood transfusion is a problem....(when seemingly healthy people donate blood):

http://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/monthlyCaseStudies/2001/case51.html

It says, "Her father was not ill at the time and had not been for several months." It does not say he had previously been diagnosed with Babesia. This could infer that he had had a passing febrile episode that was mistaken for a case of the "flu." This kind of thing happens all the time in my opinion in which a person has a round of what they think is the flu bug, but eventually- even years down the line they begin to have health issues and present with a "disease."

A case like this could easily set a person up to become ill with chronic Borreliosis.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Protoazoa rhumatica ? Fryguy 1953.....just guessing as i have never seen pics
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Will post videos shortly.

BSK-H culture almost a week in.
Nothing significant yet, but again, only about a week in at this point.

It will be more telling if any of the cultures produce motile, spiral form spirochetes.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://youtu.be/LIpNWnbYCR0

See above video.

BSK-H Culture, 5 days after inoculating the medium.
Two separate conditions: 94.0F and 100.0 F.

I'll continue to update and create videos of the cultures as things progress.

Also, I included some 400X video in the beginning, though most of it is, and should be, in 1000x.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
See next video
https://youtu.be/aFa6S8fB2Tk
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
[IMG]  - [/IMG]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
[IMG]  - [/IMG]
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
[IMG]  - [/IMG]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
EXCELLENT!!! The pics are AWESOME and the videos are too! I think the pics' definition capture the kete's bonafide essence and distinction wonderfully, and are superior to the videos (in my opinion).

Those ketes are textbook....classic. Wow.

Keep up the good work.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great work!!! When will the PCR testing take place?


A few of us have now been able to grow them too, me included & the spirochetes display deeper spiral forms with ALL OF US who have cultured them.


Good news & more evidence that they are not artifacts & they are spirochetes.
 
Posted by katrinab (Member # 30330) on :
 
So do you think it's possible to use a microscope to see if certain rife frequencies will kill the spirochete? Or would this be difficult to observe under a dark field microscope?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by katrinab:
So do you think it's possible to use a microscope to see if certain rife frequencies will kill the spirochete? Or would this be difficult to observe under a dark field microscope?

Absolutely possible!! In fact, that is exactly how Doug MacLean tested the first Doug Device rife machine. He got some borrelia from the CDC and watched under his microscope while he tried different frequencies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQAJjb_DO_g
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Dude from ks, holy smokes that is some great video ..those ketes are just dancing...silly question are the blebs bouncing baby ketes? Why do some labs take 3 weeks to do culture test ..yours are ferocious after a week
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Blue:

The unfortunate nature of the bacteria creates a few problems when culturing.
They are micro-aerophilic, so you have to do as much as possible to control for oxygen levels in the samples.
The time it takes for growth for the cultures can be quite long. This is due to both the environment the bacteria are growing in, as well as the bacteria themselves.
A goal in my current cultures is to cultivate the classic helical shaped spirochetes. This may take a very long time. Could be 1 month if the sample is prepared properly, could be 6 months. At this point I can't say.

The current culture is setup with BSK-H mixed in cell grade culture water, an antibiotic mixture to prevent Staph Aureus or E Coli or similar bacteria from contaminating the cultures, incubated in vacationers, trying to maintain completely full tubes to eliminate as much O2 as possible from the samples.

I have samples set up with whole blood in BSK.
Erythrocyte layer in BSK.
Plasma in BSK.
Some of them in 100F incubator.
Some of them in 94.0F incubator.

Some I am not touching until a predetermined date to start preparing slides.
Some I use to draw samples from on a weekly basis, to monitor any progress.
Some I simply let sit in the incubator.
Some I invert every couple of days to mix everything up.

I am trying to capture as wide a range of culture methods as possible.

The end goal, for now, is traditional spirochete shape, captured on video.
Beyond that, I have other plans. But I must take these one step at a time.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
***Cyst forming videos directly in our Lyme Diseased human blood:


***Atypical spiro to "Tennis Racket" form & then to Cyst (Discoid Gemma type) directly in HUMAN BLOOD. Tennis racket forms are widely known & seen in Borrelia obtained from ticks & wild grown in culture.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg_Id74a_4I


Another precious cyst formation capture that stops mid way at the "Tennis Racket" form.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH3fGVndMYo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HUtKungjvE


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nK9VuG-ZnU


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gcuqfk97TA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVf39rSop48


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HVwFqGpTnY


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsJ5Zit6q0U


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18F1xKvGeH8


Partial cyst forming video, from "Tennis Racket" to cyst morphology:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUsVAd4n_1c

[ 04-23-2016, 04:47 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Dental Spirochetes and Biofilm---KILLED with laser therapy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GboQ3Y7h0eQ

Nice video work. The baking soda brushing had caused motile spirochetes to disappear short term---but they came back after she discontinued the baking soda.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
2 weeks post laser op--- only one sluggish spirochete seen, when before treatment, there were dozens:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1s35YlTxFDU

It does seem as though biofilm plays a major role in harboring dental spirochetes-- once the laser treatment had eradicated the biofilm in her gums(alongside the teeth), her mouth was almost perfectly clear of dental spirochetes two weeks later.

Of course this is much more difficult for Lyme patients-- since spirochetes are inside our red blood cells.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is what is in my mouth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eeRsUR-TWD0
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlns0JgaEb0

Time Lapse 15s intervals for 14hrs of fresh smear & then sped up 10x.
-400x w/Vaseline slip cover seal + cam zoom. Microwave (13s high), UV light (20 min) & heat exposed sample (20s) to speed up degradation.

Caution must be observed when trying to identify spirochetes in the blood, as other objects can easily be mistaken as spirochetes.

Red Blood Cells (RBC's) are biconcave in shape & when viewed on their side, they can be mistaken as small, stubby, string-like, & with bulbous tips. Some even appear as tennis rackets when stretched on one side.

Picture a coin standing on its side or a thicker rubber band folded onto itself. The rubber band will produce bulbous tips as the two opposite ends meet flatter in the center & naturally bulge out at the ends. Similar shapes can be seen when the bi-lipid layer of a rbc folds onto itself further to produce a narrow center & bulbed tips on it standing up.

These false spirochetes are:
-Usually stubby & thicker than a real spirochete.
-Usually very stiff & moves uniformly with no wave motion.


You can follow this video from scratch many times over & pick a new focal point to see what ultimately happens to the object in question. You might make a new discovery that I have not noticed with my bad Lyme eyes.

So now we have 3x objects in the blood that can be mistaken as spirochetes.

1) RBC's that are positioned on their ends standing up toward the observer (this video).

2) Footings & protrusions formed from moving White Blood Cells.

3) Fibrin strands that are stand-alone & that have not attached to other fibrin strands or blood components.

Examples of item #2 & #3 can be seen in this next video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FlpCs0MiS8


Now for the contrast of the ideal spirochete in my blood in this next video.
-It has bulbous tips.
-It moves, spirals, or produces waves with some aggression.
-I see many of these to avoid mistaking any chance occurrences.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCfItVSReeM
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Here is what is in my mouth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eeRsUR-TWD0

Wow-- nice video!

Lots of weird rod thingies in your mouth that don't look like oral or borrelia spirochetes. Did you scrape at the gumline to get the biofilm colonies at the gumline?
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Oh sorry--- I see that you did scrape the sulcus (in the video info box.) I wonder what the rods are?

I really need to get a microscope soon-- I want to see if 2 grams a day of NEEM has any effect on my blood. I also want to to look at the effect of Manuka honey, plus foods with high saponin content. I'm just afraid Ill spend a lot and get a crappy scope since I dont know much about them..
 
Posted by packypacky (Member # 41758) on :
 
This thread is very interesting. I have not read all the posts yet, just a few quick questions first:
1. Are those photos and claims on Lymephotos.com true or false?
2. How long does it take for the bacteria to change from one form to another? (time frame to rotate abx??)
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I purposely slacked on brushing to be able to take that sample. Before I slacked off & brushed with baking soda, I could not find a single organism. I don't know what these are exactly, and when I asked an experienced dentist who does microscopy what these are, he just called them plaques with rods. There are so many oral flora we don't know about.


It takes seconds for them to go from spiro to cyst. It can take hours to go to SOP form & all depends the solution they are in.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
The interesting thing about that video, though, is that I wouldn't consider those to be bacilli.

They look much too large for that. I mean their length in respect to width. What resolution was that?

I'd be interested to look at that under dark field.

I might take a swab myself to throw on the microscope.
Might even though a sample or two in BSK. Just something for fun.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://youtu.be/dH3fGVndMYo


Short video.
Morphology change, in real time.

As always, watch in HD 1080.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
AWESOME JOB! That's the clearest video I've seen yet that shows the conversion to cystic form. A great example of how quick they can change.

dude, are you still using your Amscope? If you are, I'd say your captures are pretty good even with that.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, I am still using my cheap Amscope T-490 Darkfield.
I purchased the 100x oil dark field lens, which is what you are seeing there.
No doubt that if had purchased a more expensive one, the image would be at least a little sharper.

Unfortunately, filming the change was affected by the aberration from the RBC's it was in between, so that little extra light coming off those cells blocked what would have otherwise been a perfect opportunity to film it.

You kind of miss the exact moment the change occurs because of this. I really wanted to see exactly HOW it went about the change, but that light obscured it.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great video & I had missed that one. I will add it to the collection.


When you take the mouth sample, just scrape off some tartar between your gums & teeth. Take the sample from your back molars, as it is more moist there & then spread it back & forth on the center of the slide. Place the cover slip & then add Vaseline to the edges to avoid quick dehydration if you plan on looking at it at lengths.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Question for Lymedin2010--

if I purchase a good used TRINOCULAR microscope, can I purchase an additional "Phase Contrast" lens later-- or does the scope itself have to be constructed initially for phase contrast use?

I just want the option of purchasing a phase contrast lens--- if Im finding that the regular compound with darkfield is not giving me good video quality.

It looks as though Phase Contrast provides the brightest and best images.

The Amscopes available on Amazon seem to be a pretty good deal for the money.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
https://youtu.be/dH3fGVndMYo


Short video.
Morphology change, in real time.

As always, watch in HD 1080.

Yes-- excellent, DudeKansas-- you can see the classic "loop" beginning to form in the middle of the spirochete..probably a precursor to the cyst-- although I have seen vids where the cyst forms very rapidly with no loop and you can see the spirochete inside its protective cyst, gyrating ---and even propelling the cyst.

The dangerous thing about cysts is that when they hatch later (under more favorable conditions) there can be up to 12 baby spirochetes inside.!!! [Frown] [Frown] This is why doxycycline is potentially harmful --- doxy promotes the conversion of live spirochetes into cysts, as per Sapi's research. A person should probably always be taking Flagyl (cyst killer) while they are on doxycycline or Amox-- as per Burrascano's protocol. It takes cysts 18 months to die (become unviable) on their own, as per Brorsons' research.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Question for Lymedin2010--

if I purchase a good used TRINOCULAR microscope, can I purchase an additional "Phase Contrast" lens later-- or does the scope itself have to be constructed initially for phase contrast use?

I just want the option of purchasing a phase contrast lens--- if Im finding that the regular compound with darkfield is not giving me good video quality.

It looks as though Phase Contrast provides the brightest and best images.

The Amscopes available on Amazon seem to be a pretty good deal for the money.

Look up the microscope and see if there are any additional components you can add. For some microscopes, you can buy kits to convert them to phase contrast.

Make sure the microscope you are looking at is convertible. Go to the manufacturers site and look up the specs for the specific model.

It is possible, just not for every microscope.

But yes, you can buy it and convert it to a phase contrast microscope if there is a kit available.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Lymedin,

I'll have to look and see if I still have some old photos.

I recorded video of fibrin strands that were visible on the slide with the intention of using it to show what they look like.

They are easily differentiated from a spirochete if you know what you are looking at.

I'll see if I still have that footage saved somewhere.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Phase depends on scope & just see if phase exists with the particular model in question. The condensor & objective lenses are always tied to the phase viewing for maximum visuals. Many scopes can be converted though.


This is my other video showing fibrin clearly with the same setup & only difference being LED vs CFS bulb replacement. A big difference in how the camera system interprets the lighting & what is revealed.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FlpCs0MiS8
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
FYI, I use my Reichert over my Zeiss now only for one reason. The fact that the lighting system uses mirrors that reflect light from the back of the scope. In this way I am able to use a LED light, which produces even bigger unfavorable visuals, and the end result is less heat & ability to do time lapse without any major focus creep issues. The condenser on the Reichert is an Abbie & it is really inferior and tends to produce slight blurry/distorted visuals.


My Zeiss is VERY sharp because of condenser & Zeiss optics, but I forego the sharpness for the time lapse benefits. Another benefit is that I can run the LED light in the back of my Reichert with very little light spilling into the room & disturbing all night time lapse.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Lymedin,

I also use a high lumen LED for my microscope.
I bought an LED headlamp for about 30 dollars, I can't remember the what the lumen rating was. Maybe 600? But there is a stark difference between what is visible with that light, and what is visible with a comparable level of illumination from a standard CFL bulb or any other standard bulb.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, most definitely by the human eye. However the camera has a very difficult time picking up LED light, at least the crappy USB interpretation software does.


CFL interprets much more natural & better with my Amscope USB cam. You can see the difference of the 2 light source in the video I last posted, even with my bad combo of glass on the Reichert there is a huge differnce in detail.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yea, I might attempt a higher lumen bulb in the near future.

My headlamp goes through AAA batteries like the cookie monster does with cookies. Batteries are expensive.

But I did notice, with darkfield, that the LED light, at the same lumens as a regular bulb, provided much better results both to the eye and with my DSLR.

Which bulb do you use currently?
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
FYI, I use my Reichert over my Zeiss now only for one reason. The fact that the lighting system uses mirrors that reflect light from the back of the scope. In this way I am able to use a LED light, which produces even bigger unfavorable visuals, and the end result is less heat & ability to do time lapse without any major focus creep issues. The condenser on the Reichert is an Abbie & it is really inferior and tends to produce slight blurry/distorted visuals.


My Zeiss is VERY sharp because of condenser & Zeiss optics, but I forego the sharpness for the time lapse benefits. Another benefit is that I can run the LED light in the back of my Reichert with very little light spilling into the room & disturbing all night time lapse.

Shhhh.... you're making me jealous for a research grade scope. [Smile]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This bulb produces perfect light & interpretation by my USB camera. I show the bulb at time 3:20.
https://youtu.be/7FlpCs0MiS8?t=201


Time 12:24 for the Cree LED bulb, with much less heat & great for time lapse.
https://youtu.be/kFQom3ssd38?t=744


Don't forget if you buy a used microscope expect to sell it back when you want at the same or similar price. So really you are renting it for months on end & can sell it if you are pressed for monies.


PS I am looking forward to see what you guys are finding in your mouths. I checked my sperm & nose in the past & nothing significant. Next time I will be checking a wound or a sample from thin skin areas that are red & inflammed.
 
Posted by dal123 (Member # 6313) on :
 
Which microscope are you using? What about the one from Michael Coyle?

When you put a drop of blood on the slide do you then take a needle and crush the cells to make the bugs jump out. Then put a cover slip on the blood and view in microscope?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Reichert & Zeiss scopes.


I show ya how to make a slide here.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ1scQdbmtg


You can also gently press down on the slide afterward & before putting on oil. Do this to make the field of view even narrower & ultimately sharper.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Hey, Lymedin, I remember watching that video when I first picked up some bulbs to try out. However, I went with what I could find at Wal-Mart and Home Depot.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
There are many that work, but the important thing to look for is DAYLIGHT white light (5000K), as it comes out clearest & best in recordings.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Hi Guys--- Well I finally bought the Amscope Trinocular, and my very first view of my red blood cells looked almost exactly like this ( one hour ago) (I don't have the a camera set up yet) Except that the black spots were a tad bigger in size, and my red blood cells looked more irregularly shaped and clumped than these ones:

 -

I guess I am really sick based on an initial view of my blood.. [Frown] [Frown] I did not want to admit it.... but pictures do not lie.

Sadly, the 100 objective is not that great for my Amscope (its a bit dark and a little bit fuzzy)--- I was counting on this--- but the 40 objective is super clear/bright and and I could clearly see the black spots in about 65-70 percent of my red blood cells. I guess these scopes are all about the lens.

I scraped a small morgellons lesion and looked at the blood under darkfield--- it was absolutely beautiful!! It looked like an amazing fractal.

Well I'm guessing Bartonella may be my biggest problem-- most of my red blood cells are massively infected. The black spots are quite large. There were also some kind of balloons inside many of my cells
Ill post pics when I get the camera--- but I may return this Amscope trinocular or purchase a different 100 lens for it-- since this 100 lens is not that great.
Any suggestions on an excellent brand of 100 objective lens?

Thanks for all your posts regarding microscopes---At least I finally made the plunge..!!!!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
WakeUp, which Amscope did you get?
I use an Amscope.
Once you get used to using it and figuring things out, your skills will greatly improve and you might be impressed what you are able to get out of it.

Also, if you don't want to put any money into a better 100x lens, you can get eye pieces that will increase the magnification.

The standard is usually 10x, but you can by 15 and 20 also. So you can get a resolution close to 1000x without spending nearly the same amount of money.
Just a thought.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Which model did you buy exactly?

That image above was stained, did you stain your blood sample? It may be artifacts.

"Fig 1. Write –Stained Bartonella bacilliformis in blood of an Oroyo fever infected human (Source: The Prokaryotes)"
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Kansas---Thanx for the encouragement--- I was disappointed with the 100 lens but perhaps its my lack of experience. This is the Amscope I got: (I know I overpaid, but I just had to take the plunge and start-- )

AmScope T490B-DK Compound Trinocular Microscope, WF10x and WF20x Eyepieces, 40X-2000X Magnification, Brightfield/Darkfield, Halogen Illumination

Lymed2010-- Well Im very new at this, but I'm almost positive those black spots inside the red blood cells were not artifacts....... but I will the buy the stains and keep looking.

But ---- my blood looks like total crap!!!! No wonder Im in bed most of the day.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Hi Guys--- Well I finally bought the Amscope Trinocular, and my very first view of my red blood cells looked almost exactly like this ( one hour ago) (I don't have the a camera set up yet) Except that the black spots were a tad bigger in size, and my red blood cells looked more irregularly shaped and clumped

Way to go for taking the plunge! Don't be too discouraged, this tool will help give you some direction once you get accustomed to what you are looking at. The giemsa staining is EXTREMELY helpful I have found.

If you were only looking at live blood, it is very possible that those RBCs were merely crenated, not infected. I have found live blood great for seeing the ketes, but staining much better for differentiating objects. If you get a bunch of purple dots on your RBCs on a giemsa stain, then you may have cause for alarm.

Welcome to the gang!!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
WakeUp,

That is the exact same microscope I use.

I have added a 100x Oil Immersion lens for Darkfield at 1000x, which also required a new condenser.

However, pick up a set of 20x eyepieces if you want a greater magnification without the extra cost. I was pleasantly surprised with the resolution from the 20x eyepieces, with a dry dark field condenser.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Also, upgrade the light for dark field. The bulb was not nearly bright enough.

Take Lymedin's advice on bulb, and get a cheap 10 dollar lamp from wal-mart or something to use.

I use a 30 dollar LED headlamp, i think 1600 Lumens, but adjustable.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Oh, my bad. Just saw that it comes with 20x eyepieces.

And then remembered that is where I got mine.

It does it's job, trust me.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Perhaps I'll make a video demonstrating my setup, and set it to private (might have my face in it)? For y'all to view.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Way to go wakeup...dude that would be most insightful..you all are on the front lines!
on the staining can the chemicals be purchased w/o commercial liscence ?...is a fixer necessary?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, you can purchase a majority of the stains anywhere, and some are relatively cheap.

Look up staining kits on Amazon. Gram Stain kits, Giemsa/Wright, etc.

Methanol can be purchased if you use that as a fixative, etc.

You start running into trouble finding stains when you get into the more specialized stuff.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, you can purchase a majority of the stains anywhere, and some are relatively cheap.

Look up staining kits on Amazon. Gram Stain kits, Giemsa/Wright, etc.

Methanol can be purchased if you use that as a fixative, etc.

You start running into trouble finding stains when you get into the more specialized stuff.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
False spirochetes p2, my next video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhG9gMp_SJk
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
Also, upgrade the light for dark field. The bulb was not nearly bright enough.

Take Lymedin's advice on bulb, and get a cheap 10 dollar lamp from wal-mart or something to use.

I use a 30 dollar LED headlamp, i think 1600 Lumens, but adjustable.

True--- the problem with the 100 objective is the lack of enough light.. One of the reasons why I hesitated to purchase the Amscope was the fact that I had read reviews saying that scopes with LEDs (not halogen) lights are much better and brighter-- and this Amscope does not have a led light. I will try to supplement my light with a bright lamp first-- and then perhaps buy the headlamp.

Ill also buy the stains--- but I am quite positive that I saw the dark spots inside my red blood cells -----without a stain!!

I had fiddled with the fine focus---- and then the black spots inside the cells suddenly came into view-- it was stunning-- these spots were not outside of the cells.

This also explains why I have had burning on my feet for the last 6 months-- a classic sign of bartonella. My immunity has also been poor in the last few years--- and Bartonella is an immune suppressant. I have been bitten by at least 3 ticks over the past 25 years, and have had 2 bullseye rashes, and one smaller bright red rash from these bites...

A few years ago I successfully diagnosed Cedar Rust on my Gala apple trees---- by just using 1 sample diseased leaf--- and then comparing it to dozens of online photographs of different apple tree diseases--- and BINGO --- it was cedar rust (rust colored spots on the leaves)!

I had several Cedar trees growing--- right next to my apples- and I had no idea that the cedar trees were infecting my apple trees with spores... Pictures are worth a thousand words.. Anyway, I planted Liberty apples were are resistant to cedar rust. (The Gala apple trees all died!!)

Its very gratifying to find the source of a problem---- and not to have to shell out thousands of dollars from so-called "tree experts" and "doctors" ---- who often provide a wrong diagnosis----- after taking lots of your money.

I am researching Bartonella herbs/treatments now--- but will see if I can get pics of the dark spots inside the cells--with and without staining. I might even consider trying to find out which strain of Bartonella it is with a decent blood test, once I have replicated the results several more times..

The camera is coming soon.

Have a great weekend.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
False spirochetes p2, my next video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhG9gMp_SJk

Wow--- nice resolution and video. I like the cute white blood cell.

The red blood cells at the beginning of the video do not look normal and healthy though!! Normal and health red blood cells should be round, of the same size and not configured in clump like chains--- as is the case in your video.

The cells are showing rouleau (sludge blood) which indicates undigested sticky protein-- meaning the red cells are not charged negatively (repelling each other properly) , and are thus not repelling each other as they should--- and instead they are clumping in the long chains visible at the beginning of the video-- which probably means you have low energy. The red cells do look pretty healthy though, even though they are in chains-- their shape is nice and plump with smooth edges-- far better than how my cells look. (My edges are smooth, but the shape of the cells is not round/plump-- instead a lot of my cells have a smooth irregular blob shape with black specks inside.)

I saw a video of live blood of before and after drinking barley grass juice-- and the positive effect on the blood rouleau was amazing in just one hour. This effect can also be achieved with pycnogenol, and supposedly with mangosteen (or was it noni?) juice. Exercise also causes red blood cells to separate from their chains and to declump. Pancreatic enzymes also help with the digestion of proteins-- so the stickiness of the red cells is lessened and chains fall apart.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Live Blood video--- before and then 30 days after taking pycnogenol/digestive enzymes. (The lady had chronic fatigue syndrome)

Massive rouleau is shown at 4 minute mark

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEzo-P_Spqo#t=19.892241754
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Oh Lymed2010--

Another thing I noticed in your most recent blood video was that many of your red cells have a weird paisley or carrot root type shape--- when they should be nice and round and plump. This paisley shape is not normal, I think.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUnxB6Vyz-U

I think Dr. Chambers in the video above believes that weird paisley shape is due to a parasite. (at about minute 6)
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Only the first 2:30 is the untreated blood (pre-heat). This was a wetter mount than usual, as I thought the heat would lyse most of the rbc's.


When you see rbc's standing on their sides, it means the slip cover was not compressed as much & there is space between slide & cover for clumping. If I create a thinner smear & compress the slip cover, then it does not look as bad.


Take a look at my blood here.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFl_Fq0CsYE


Also, if one takes venous blood & not finger prick blood, then it will look healthier as you don't have to squeeze the finger & cause some trauma.


All depending on what you ate, drank, & meds you took before extraction, blood can look different. The slight changes in preparation from slide to slide can also make it look different too.


What do you think about this blood?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maAR-QtUv8w
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
This was a wetter mount than usual,...

When you see rbc's standing on their sides, it means the slip cover was not compressed as much & there is space between slide & cover for clumping. If I create a thinner smear & compress the slip cover, then it does not look as bad.

Also, if one takes venous blood & not finger prick blood, then it will look healthier as you don't have to squeeze the finger & cause some trauma.

All depending on what you ate, drank, & meds you took before extraction, blood can look different. The slight changes in preparation from slide to slide can also make it look different too.

I agree. It's interesting the conditions some people try to "diagnose" by just the appearance of the RBCs on a particular sample. What I have found after looking at perhaps hundreds of samples is that the amount of rouleaux and crenation depends almost entirely on the volume of blood under the coverslip.

Try this experiment for comparison: Place two drops of blood on a slide, one on each end with enough margin on the ends that your coverslips will not extend over the ends of the slide.

On the one side, use a very small drop of blood; on the other, use a large drop of blood. The large drop will easily spread across the area of the whole coverslip, whereas the small drop won't even reach the edges. Then look at both samples.

In the large drop, the RBCs will have much rouleaux and crenation, but on the small drop, they will appear round, evenly spread, and healthy.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Yes, I have seen similar results TNT.


-1 drop 37% HCL on 1 drop finger pricked blood.
-400x w/cam zoom.

RBC's & WBC's have lysed. String-like objects observed, but no definitive signs of spirochetes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piAShlOGtko

************************************************

1 drop of pure vinegar (higher PH than HCL...less acidic) produced no spiros either.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHc8XdBnNWI

Although, my subsequent tests with diluted vinegar produced tons & tons of spirochetes & tons of SOP with subsequent bleb release into the blood plasma. Video to come eventually.


************************************************

Freezing blood for 24 hrs did not produce any spirochetes that emerged out of cysts either as I suspected might happen after long term observations.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbj7tTqUeCI
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Ooops-- it was Goji juice--- (not mangosteeen juice) that rectifies the blood Rouleaux "stickiness" problem (sludge blood) seen in live blood, within 24-48 hours-- according to this live blood video presenter, who is supposedly a Johns Hopkins trained medical doctor (hopefully not paid to sell Goji):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vhHe55s9rg

The narrator basically says that blood rouleaux is also related to blood acidity. Another way to alkalize is to take 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda in a quart of water or just drink trader joe's alkaline water.

So far I'm not seeing much Rouleaux in my own blood--- nor is there any crenation (scalloped edges)-- but my RBCs are oddly deformed, and I am still seeing little black dots clinging to the outside of the red blood cells-- although not as many as yesterday. (I saw 15 cells with black dots attached per screen today, plus I think I might have seen two spirochetes with bulbous ends.)

One of those live blood experts was saying that live cells with scalloped edges usually indicate some sort of toxin in the body and/or oxidation. Goji has one of the highest antioxidant levels (Orac score--Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) of all juices.

Pycnogenol also has a very high Orac score. It would be interesting to see if Goji or Pycnogenol supplementation for a few days can reduce the scalloped edges and rouleaux seen in live cells.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I put baking soda in my coffee every day & brush my teeth with baking soda.


Noni juice will have a similar effect & are touted by some Lymies.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
MD with microscope demonstrates major increase in blood Rouleaux and spicules 20 minutes after patient ingests 200 grams of sugar, including corn syrup.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QinveDTLMGQ

So it seems there is controversy as to whether Rouleaux and spicules are simply a function of cover slips/slide preparation, or whether they reflect a "process" going on inside the body.

I guess Im undecided, but my gut tells me that this doctor is correct, though obviously the way one prepares a slide is also of importance..I can't see either Rouleaux or crenation happening within 2 minutes of the time blood is drawn though. They probably come out of the body this way.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I put baking soda in my coffee every day & brush my teeth with baking soda.


Noni juice will have a similar effect & are touted by some Lymies.

Yeah I thought about doing that too because I drink a LOT of coffee and it is very acidifying which is bad.. on top of red wine which is also acidifying.

But instead I try to drink a green drink every day, after the coffee. Can't taint my Pete's Major Dickinson Blend with baking soda. LOL
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
No, I agree, but the prep can change & influence the outcome too.


"All depending on what you ate, drank, & meds you took before extraction, blood can look different. The slight changes in preparation from slide to slide can also make it look different too."
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
My headlamp goes through AAA batteries like the cookie monster does with cookies. Batteries are expensive.

But I did notice, with darkfield, that the LED light, at the same lumens as a regular bulb, provided much better results both to the eye and with my DSLR.

Which bulb do you use currently?

I'll have to post some pics of the LED lamp I built. It is a bit redneck-ish, but works pretty well. Great for viewing, but not quite as good for photography (the LED bulb from Walmart works great for that).

My homemade light runs off 120V AC current, so I don't have to worry about burning through batteries. I purchased the applicable AC to DC adapter, then ran through a dimmer, then out to my CREE LED chip. It's a 10W LED chip, so I screwed it down against a heat sink with built in fan and used heat-sink paste between the chip and heat sink for heat dissipation. I can let it on all night and it doesn't heat up. It's great for doing time-lapse (which I still haven't really done much of because of camera). I didn't run the fan wires through the dimmer, so the fan stays on the whole time it's plugged in. The light runs through the dimmer.

I also screwed a glass lens down over the top of the chip to give a more focused beam since I was not going through the frosted accumulator lens or neutral density filter lens that was necessary to remove to use the homemade LED lamp.

All the parts came from Amazon, and I think I may have $40 in it. You do have to know how to solder your wires to your chip (which anyone of us can do).

I used the 10W CREE LED chip that was 6500K, so it's very white. A 5000K or 6000K would easily do, and as Lymedin has suggested, would probably be the best.

Maybe tomorrow I'll post some pics of it, if you promise not to laugh.

I also made a parfocal tube/adapter (out of PVC fittings and tubing) for my trinocular port that accepts a 23mm c-mount adapter. It fits real nicely and does a great job, too. It cost maybe $6 compared to nearly $50 for a machined parfocal tube/adapter on EBAY. And, using the right fittings, I can make the length adjustable to fit my needs depending on the camera I use.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Looking forward to seeing it. I have tried my phone on the scope & a camera on the scope, but I found both inconvenient compared to the relative quickness of USB recording & viewing on the PC. Better video, but a lot longer to perform tasks.


Time lapse pictures as opposed to direct resolution was a game changer in quality, but one needs to spend time stitching all the images...again more time.


I have not played with the above too much & did not get maximum resolution because of the having to drag the scope next to the TV for proper focus. The smaller screens on the electronics are hard to judge focus.


I have also tried various LED mini-flash lights & a LED halogen bulb. The USB cam does not interpret the light very well & it looks horrible on all of them. Nothing beats the DAYLIGHT 5000K of the LED bulb so far, but the CFL daylight is even better.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Here is my Sony a6000 video of my blood with NaCl addition, but the video is not maximized.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shbAhRgfx1U


Has anyone tried the vinegar + water method, as I mention before this produces plenty of spiros & SOP. More than what I have seen on one slide than my entire time of observing spiros & SOP's in my blood since I started observing them.


Vinegar + water formula to produce tons & tons of spirochetes & SOP's.
1) Take 4ml filtered water + .4 white vinegar. You can mix any amount as long as it is 10:1 ratio of water to vinegar.

2) Add 1 drop of this mix to the slide & then add 1 drop of blood on top of the vinegar drop on the slide.

3) Smear the two across the slide to make a wet drop perparation.

4) Seal the slip cover with vaseline if doing 40x objective or immersion oil if doing 100x oil.

In 24 hrs you should see a good amount & in 36 hrs even more. They keep on coming out for days on end & then the blood will be littered with blebs after SOP formation disperses them.

[ 04-29-2016, 08:59 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Wow-- Lymedin2010--- your dispersed red cells look very healthy and clean in the video above. Have you made changes to your diet since you filmed your classic "My Horrific Lyme Blood" video? Or is this cleaner looking blood just slide prep in your estimation?

I saw what looked like only 3 spirochetes at most--- dangling off your cells-- and most of your red cells looked plump, uniform and round, with the exception of a maybe just 2 Degmacytes-- "apple bite" cells and only a couple of what look like crenated or Echinocytes (Burr Cells look like a Hedgehog).

"A degmacyte (aka “bite cell”) is an abnormally shaped red blood cell with one or more semicircular portions removed from the cell margin. These “bites” result from the removal of denatured hemoglobin by macrophages in the spleen...... Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in which uncontrolled oxidative stress causes hemoglobin to denature and form Heinz bodies, is a common disorder that leads to the formation of bite cells."

(Goji or pycnogenol (or anything with a high ORAC) reduces oxidative stress.)

Here is a guide I found on a few illnesses associated with different morphologies of red blood cells-- it might be useful for us:

https://theartofmed.wordpress.com/2015/09/05/morphological-abnormalities-of-red-blood-cells/

Cheers--- and I liked the music in the video.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Nothing beats the DAYLIGHT 5000K of the LED bulb so far, but the CFL daylight is even better.

I definitely want to get my hands on one of those CFLs to try for myself!

If you could mount your A6000 "closer" to your scope I'm sure you could get some "STELLAR" images and video with a bit more magnification.

Are you using a lens between your camera and scope? I just started mounting my camera without a lens and I get a MUCH better image without the distortion from the lens.... the greater advantage being not having the microscopic debris on the lens I couldn't really get off.

If you are using using a relay lens, you are probably sacrificing clarity and magnification (when using a camera with an exposed processor like on a mirrorless or CCTV camera).
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Oh--- I may have gotten "Borrelia Hunter" and "Borrelia Tamer "-- on youtube-- mixed up... if so my apologies... its hard to keep track of all these different names...
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by WakeUp:
Oh--- I may have gotten "Borrelia Hunter" and "Borrelia Tamer "-- on youtube-- mixed up... if so my apologies... its hard to keep track of all these different names...

Same guy- namely Lymedin2010! [Cool]

I like the music on that last video, too!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I added NaCl to my blood in the last video. The description is in the Youtube comment section & I describe what I used.


"-Zeiss Laboratory 14 microscope 40x / 0.65, 160 / 0.17 Objective & Zeiss Condenser 0.9 & lighting from a house lamp with 5000K CFL DAYLIGHT bulb between original light source & condenser (daylight proper Kelvin temperature bulb is VERY important).


-1 drop of finger pricked blood + 1 drop .9% NaCl ~30 min after preparation (Notice how nicely the cells are dispersed due to NaCl).


-Sony Alpha a6000 camera + Sony "NEX" camera mount to Canon "E" mount adapter + Amscope CA-CAN-NIK-SLR (the Amscope adapter fits both Canon & Nikon DSLR's & can fit any other DSRL with an additional adapter). This whole setup fits INTO any standard eyepiece (trinocular port, or any of the dual eyepiece port, or even a monocular port microscope for a cheap purchase). Output was simultaneously sent to TV via micro HDMI. Sensor is an APS-C & video recording at 1920x1080 60i. If one does time lapse PICTURES & not video then the max resolution will be 6000x3376, better than video & you can string the pictures in the free MS Movie Maker application (link below).
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...


Video settings are at default & ISO auto. Video is a bit washed out and it is best to set auto ISO to manual & lower the ISO (to the light source) for improved video. This Sony camera has a time lapse app in its app store for $10 & makes a great overall cam for family pics, video & microscopy until its 4K successor comes out.


Here is a review of the camera & these cameras can be had much cheaper on Ebay:
http://www.dpreview.com/products/sony...


-The NaCl addition seems ideal for the dispersion of RBC's & makes it ideal to view blood spirochetes, BUT I find that it stagnates the spirochetes & I see less of them come out in the plasma. Maybe it forces them into cysts within the rbc? Quite the opposite happens when I use the vinegar + water method (filtered water + .2-.4 ml vinegar), as the decrease in PH makes for some explosive viewing & forces many spirochetes out of the RBC's & many of them into the String of Pearls formation as well."
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Here are the pics to my DIY LED lamp:


 -

 -

 -

 -

This is on the very lowest brightness:

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
And, the pics of my DIY parfocal tube that receives 23mm lens or c-mount adapters:

 -

 -

 -


And, with my dual view adapter on at the same time:

 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Sweet setup. Did you get that dual scope I linked you to way back when?


The LED has a blue hue, is that a problem on camera? Does the LED got hot? My LED bulb on a lamp gets inserted into the back of my Reichert & then gets reflected by mirrors to the condenser in the front. Practically no heat at all & it is time lapse heaven!!!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Sweet setup. Did you get that dual scope I linked you to way back when?


The LED has a blue hue, is that a problem on camera? Does the LED got hot? My LED bulb on a lamp gets inserted into the back of my Reichert & then gets reflected by mirrors to the condenser in the front. Practically no heat at all & it is time lapse heaven!!!

It's a decent scope to start out with. No, this was a scope I found but I have added to it by collecting components in great "box-lot" deals. For instance, the dual-view adapter came on a teaching 10 series scope that had both heads (4 eyepieces), came with two CCTV cameras, (one of which was usable and I'm using- the Sony), and a c-mount parfocal coupler with lens. Don't choke, but I got that scope and all accessories for $80 (plus shipping)!

My light is actually very white....perhaps so white it could appear blue. I think the high color temp does make it less ideal for photography, but is great for viewing.

The light barely gets warm on the heat sink (with fan). I think it's rated at 900 lumens. I put current to one of those chips to see how long it would last off a heat sink, and it lasted no more than 5 seconds.

Your Reichert is a higher-end setup with the lamp assembly outboard of the scope...that's nice and definitely preferable, especially for time-lapse.

I recently gutted the OE lamp housing that I removed and am in the (slow) process of customizing an LED setup that will take the place of and bolt up to the bottom of the scope as the original. That way I can use the diaphragm and neutral density filter the scope came equipped with. It's not priority, so it may be a while till I get that done. I'm hoping that I will be able to make it so that it doesn't create and transfer much heat.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
I just noticed that new member "aspara" has deleted his posts on the previous page. I'm glad I quoted some of his comments.

I just want to bring to everyone's attention to be very careful sharing any personal info, contact info, or sensitive info with new members that have not been established very long. I had sent "aspara" a link for stain by private message, and in his reply he told me to reply to his "personal" email claiming he didn't use the email on his Lymenet account much and that it was fortunate he had seen the message.

HUH? Kinda strange to use an idle email account for a new Lymenet account don't you think? Well, that sent up red flags immediately and of course I didn't respond to his "personal" email address.

Just be aware. There are people (perhaps in high places even) trying to exploit personal info from us to do us harm and perhaps to try to undermine our microscopy efforts here concerning borrelia.

I hope I am wrong about aspara being a troll...but just be careful everyone!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good to know.

TNT, there are many people all over the world that are checking their Lyme blood now. Information has spread near & far.


Many have created their own groups & their own experiments now. Some share with me aside from the groups we are in as well. The know-how has now exploded.


It is far beyond this group here.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Awesome video of a spirochete burrowing out of a rbc with some aggression by another Lymie.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wDV4TliIHg
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by TNT:
I just noticed that new member "aspara" has deleted his posts on the previous page. I'm glad I quoted some of his comments.

I just want to bring to everyone's attention to be very careful sharing any personal info, contact info, or sensitive info with new members that have not been established very long. I had sent "aspara" a link for stain by private message, and in his reply he told me to reply to his "personal" email claiming he didn't use the email on his Lymenet account much and that it was fortunate he had seen the message.

HUH? Kinda strange to use an idle email account for a new Lymenet account don't you think? Well, that sent up red flags immediately and of course I didn't respond to his "personal" email address.

Just be aware. There are people (perhaps in high places even) trying to exploit personal info from us to do us harm and perhaps to try to undermine our microscopy efforts here concerning borrelia.

I hope I am wrong about aspara being a troll...but just be careful everyone!

Yes--- definitely--- I had that happen to me a number of years ago here--- I was "hunted" and taunted by a person who googled my email as posted in my profile here--- and then researched everything about me-- (he got a lot of his facts wrong... lol) and then he began to call me at 1 am-- and hang up, and he published ad hominem attacks about me all over the internet-- not that it hurt me because I was already disabled by then....LOL..... Other female Lyme warriors were also harassed by this person.. Whoever these highly paid "stalkers" are, they will eventually be exposed as more and more truth about Lyme is revealed.. Lyme is now widely being viewed as involving some sort of a government coverup ---- and hundreds of thousands-- if not millions--- of people who are frustrated and looking for answers about Lyme disease-- and about all spirochetes' effect on healthcare in America.

Microscopy is very threatening to these stalkers because it exposes the nonsense the stalkers have put forward to the public as the lie that it is. (One example of a lie:--" lyme is easily cured by 2 weeks of antibiotics"... when Spirochetes are clearly visible in the blood of those who have been on antibiotics!!!..) Microscopy exposes that lie for what it is: nonsense.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
Oh--- Here's an interesting guide to red blood cell abnormalities. I'm figuring if I can fix most of these abnormalities I'm seeing in my own red blood cells( tear drop, agglutination, burrs and schtocytes), my cells will be healthier and less prone to infection. Kind of like the" terroir" approach to growing healthy and delicious wine grapes--- fix the "terrain,"--- add nutrients--- and grapes resist disease.

 -
http://www.medical-labs.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Summary-of-red-blood-cellsmorphology.jpg
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Awesome video of a spirochete burrowing out of a rbc with some aggression by another Lymie.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wDV4TliIHg

Totally awesome videography.

Glad people in France are waking up.

We will find a cure.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
One last red blood cell abnormality chart for your interest/review-- I find it interesting that the "malarial infected" cell is lumped in/similar to Bartonella and Babesia on this chart:
 -
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Perfect looking spirals in this persons Lyme'd up blood. Using a private concoction & somehow they are producing spirals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZtCj9rHqwM&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Perfect looking spirals in this persons Lyme'd up blood. Using a private concoction & somehow they are producing spirals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZtCj9rHqwM&feature=youtu.be

I wonder why they are not spiraling? Do you think they are dead?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I think they are stagnant & docile, but not dead but could be on their way to death since the preparer has added solutions that is not normally found in blood or ticks.


It is pathologically advantageous for them to have a slower metabolic rate, not be as affected by antibiotics & persist in our bodies and I think that is the reason for the straighter & passive forms.


I see many different varieties in tick juice too & I also see the spiraling stagnant forms as well. They just stagnate in place & some occasionally move slightly. I may put up another video showing this in ticks.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
So I have made a discovery. I had used .9% NaCl (salt) drops in my blood preps in the past & it disperses the cells very nicely & prevents coagulation (fibrin formation & clumping).


I had always said that these additions to my live blood preps stagnates the spiros. It seems like it prevents them from coming out of the rbc's & they become impossible or very hard to see in this solution & in the plasma over time.


I was curious to buy more clues & see if the same would hold true if I used 2 drops of NaCl in tick juice & WOW! The spiros come out of cysts within a few min to an hour, just like normal, but they all look very stagnant & like something is wrong. Where they would have built up vitality & movement, they now become completely stagnant & most of them do not move & look dead by 24hrs.


The .9% solution is the same type they use to hydrate people in the hospitals & use to flush IV's with.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgcaCqXjZBY


http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw=Reichert+microscope&_osacat=0&_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=.9%25+sodium+chloride&_sacat=0


Maybe there is some truth to salt/C for LD, but who knows how the body utilizes & process such amounts of salt? Maybe use the salt without C? You guys are welcomed to confirm this.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Dr. Bela Bozsik lectures on his DualDur reagent at the prestigious NorVect conference. The DualDur agent is used to view spirochetes directly in human blood. He then shows blood spirals that have been proven positive by monoclonal antibody immuno staining provided by the CDC (shocking of all the people to help).

He then shows us an electron microscopic image, demonstrating to us the two membrane layers (outer membrane & cytoplasmic membrane).

The live spirochete looks exactly what we see in our Lyme Diseased blood and what I have seen explode in my blood as I developed more & more Lyme Disease symptoms!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyCVB5kG5PQ
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
-400x w/cam zoom.
-24ml RODI water + 2.4ml white vinegar + 50mg minocycline. (water:vinegar = 10:1).
-Two drops of above solution on one drop of my Lyme Blood.

This was supposed to be a control for my standard vinegar + water solution & was to show inhibition of spirochetes & transformation into cysts. Instead it showed multiple linear rigid bodies (RGB). Most of the rbc's have lysed or ghosted, as was expected.

Are these rigid spirochetes, crystals, or other? I subsequently made another control with the same minocycline solution above, but with no blood & such bodies were not present, nor were they present in the blood + water + vinegar solution.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVK5ihSrkF8
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Plenty of SOP's!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKa4gM-R078

Video starts slow & then I show you more.

-400x w/cam zoom
-4ml RODI water + .4ml white vinegar (WV) (10:1 ratio)
-1 drop of above solution (WV) + 1 drop finger pricked blood, & seal slip cover with Vaseline for 400x or oil immersion for 100x.

The whole point of this was to burst open the rbc's & allow the spirochetes to be readily seen in the plasma, but I found new things to learn instead.

This marks the 23-24th hour after preparation & I see many string-like objects & many String Of Pearls (SOP). Some of the strings have only a few pearls & they appear rather large & have the color & consistency of rbc's. So I wonder if some or all of the SOP's are actually shedding from the rbc wall? There are most definitely spirochetes in our blood, but with this finding we have to question the proposition & be more weary of what is a spirochete in Lyme blood. Maybe they are still mostly all spirochetes & I wish we could get more direct testing.

When I prepared this solution I do not mix the WV with 1 drop of blood thoroughly. I add the drop of WV to the slide first & then touch the drop of blood from my finger to the WV & then place the slip cover on top (no smear). I do this to get a gradient of areas with mixed PH's. Some of the areas will have rbc's that will ghost & release the hemoglobin, other areas will totally destroy rbc's, & yet the sweet spot is what I show in the video. In this area the rbc's have not lost their hemoglobin & appear reddish in color & not clear or hollow (ghosted).

To get more rbc that are not ghosted with this method you can prepare 4ml RODI water + .2ml White Vinegar (less vinegar).

At the 36th hour there ends up being more & they keep coming out for days, not in this video & maybe a future video.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Plenty of SOP's!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKa4gM-R078

Beautiful video, Lymedin!!! The number of SOP's is absolutely amazing.


quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Some of the strings have only a few pearls & they appear rather large & have the color & consistency of rbc's. So I wonder if some or all of the SOP's are actually shedding from the rbc wall? There are most definitely spirochetes in our blood, but with this finding we have to question the proposition & be more weary of what is a spirochete in Lyme blood. Maybe they are still mostly all spirochetes & I wish we could get more direct testing.

Perhaps they could also be spirochetal "round bodies." They resemble what I have seen in week-long samples after the ketes are "gone." (when I'm on ABX). Earlier I posted one of Mildred Arbaux's videos in which you can see loads of these same round bodies and it was after she had been on a macrolide, a tetracycline, and Flagyl for a whole year--pulsed. I'm sure you've seen it already, but if not, here it is again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzcQgLRm3jI

I really should put up my video with the round bodies.

Back to your video...
I really wonder if those round, white, "budding" "globs" could possibly be candida capsules and psuedo-hyphae....it sure looks like it. I used to see loads of that in my blood earlier on.

Here is something that may just be me, but I think it would be nice if you could get just a little more magnification on your 400x captures. It always confuses me until I move it in or out, but (I think) if you could move your camera out a little you could get that extra magnification without resorting to the 100x objective. (I think you move it the opposite way if using a relay lens). If I view your videos on full screen, I can see things ok, but it would be nice for a little more.

Again, great work!
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks.

This last video was the slide to my control for the minocycline trial I was running. I was hoping the mino would inhibit the spiros from exiting rbc's & SOP's if they were really Borrelia or spiros. This would have bought us more clues, but the concentration of mino + WV was too strong & lysed most of rbc's & also produced those mysterious rigid linear bodies. Stevia as an inhibitor is on my list, as well as trying WV on normal blood.


Look someone made a video suggesting they are "Needle Borrelia," but I have never heard of this before & don't know for sure. When I asked another person who used to work in a lab & with Borrelia if this was possible, they said yes & they have seen it. I don't know why there aren't more references to these forms & I am still weary to call them spirochetes. I am also getting reports from other Lymies now who have seen the rigid linear forms in their Lyme blood, without any additions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xEYoG_bGD5U


I think the hollow forms are simply ghosted & warped rbc's that were the first to enter the solution, when it is most acidic. They rupture & release their internal contents & bring up the PH of the entire solution & the subsequent increase of PH has less lysis effect on rbc's.


I need 40x to get a better overall feel & 100x is a pita with shallow depth of field. I've had a 60x (no oil) objective on my list for a while. I can zoom in with my software & see fine, but the damn software cannot record the zoom. The WV video is harder to see, because there is a lot of hemoglobin in the plasma due to lysis of rbc & it decreases the contrast & makes it more difficult to see things. Also my original video is sharper & the Youtube processing looses some detail.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another person responded that they too see the rigid spiros in their modified blood.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_eWNvqSxxo&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y89fqP0Kecg


In this video they look like they are the spiky projections coming out of crenated rbc's (acanthocytes).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zQ0Hsk9Kmo


Many hours later it looks like these things have grown & are yellow like the color of the mino. So these are minocycline crystals that somehow form in human blood, but not when viewed on its own.

The main trial WV yielded spirochete type structures as I normally see in my blood, but the mino control yielded no such gyrating & wiggling spirochete-like structures, only these rigid linear crystals.

The rounder & oddly shaped structures I do see in just the control mino/water/vinegar solution (without the blood) & come from the mino solution. So mine are crystals, but I don't know what the other ones seen in other videos are, as they appear a bit more fluid & not as rigid at times & mine are strictly rigid. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5txx52z64-0

[ 05-06-2016, 05:22 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
How much mino was that? In rhuby q first video there is a larger black speck oval dancing organism any idea what that bugger is? Is that b.l.o./proto ? I just saw that inside my rbc
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I went gung ho at 50mg & I may do smaller doses.


Anything that shape/size & that has Brownian dance is hard to tell from blood artifact. I've only seen one convincing video of Bart, which moved in a very specific way that was a dead giveaway & not in just Brownian motion. The owner won't release it to the public though.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
FYI, all of my water/vinegar (WV) tests have yielded many spirochetes & SOP's in my blood & rbc cell wall components.


I have finished round 1 of 24 hr of "normal" (blood of a healthy person) with WV & there is not one single spiro, SOP, rbc phopholipid component or string of any sort found. NOT ONE & therefore no video to show!


Would be nice for you guys to try & chime in as well. I am going to drop the vinegar ration & do something like 4ml water to .2ml or .1ml vinegar to produce even more SOP's & spiros in my blood, as this will not burst & leave more rbc's intact. Going to try this out on my blood first before I do any more normal blood.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
1) Dr. MacDonald is finding Borrelia in some patients CSF & blood as well.
https://vimeo.com/166688480

__________________________________________
2) Electron microscope image of Borrelia in our blood.

"Credit: EYE OF SCIENCE/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Lyme disease bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria, the cause of Lyme disease and a red blood cell (erythrocyte). These spirochaete (spiral-shaped) bacteria are passed to humans through the bites of infected Ixodes sp. ticks. Symptoms of Lyme disease include skin lesions, muscle pain, neurological and cardiac abnormalities, and arthritis. Treatments include antibiotic and corticosteroid drugs. Magnification: x6600 when printed 10 centimetres wide."


https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/592518/view

 -

__________________________________________
3)Borrelia in our blood.

"Credit: CNRI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Caption: Lyme disease blood sample. Light micrograph of a blood smear showing infection with Borrelia sp. bacteria (thin coils). Several Borrelia bacteria infect humans, including those responsible for Lyme disease and relapsing fever. The bacteria are most often spread by ticks. Giemsa stain. Magnification: x300 at 35mm size."

https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/259318/view


 -


__________________________________________
4) https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/12151/view

 -



__________________________________________
5) My blood with my PH altering method + slide frozen for 6 minutes to lyse most of the rbc's.

 -

__________________________________________
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
WOW!! AWESOME PIC OF A SPIROCHETE IN YOUR BLOOD, LYMEDIN!!!!


I'd be interested to know how you took that picture to get such a clear close-up.


quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:




_________________________________________
5) My blood with my PH altering method + slide frozen for 6 minutes to lyse most of the rbc's.

 -

__________________________________________


 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
A few things actually had to come together. First off the spiro is naturally thick & unlike some spiros which can be smaller & thinner.


Other thing is there is some staining involved here & lastly my Amscope video software has a snap shot feature. The video allows me to zoom in, but I cannot record video in zoomed in mode. I can however zoom in & take a pic easily as I did here.


I had done some initial test on freezing my blood & discovered that it is VERY efficient in destroying all the rbc's & all the rbc cell walls & phospholipid spiro-like structures. My first few rounds produced no clear spiros, but maybe some smaller ones & cysts.


My next round was trying to freeze it for a short time & allow some of the rbc's to survive, as in this video. Others have now tried the freezing method & they find too that freezing is a great way to destroy rbc's & cell wall components. Next phases will be in BSK growth & there will be no possible confusing spiro-like for actual growing spirochetes thereafter.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The idea is to rapidly ascertain spirochetosis in the blood via blood freezing. I'll go into detail as I believe this can help us all.


It was very disheartening to realize that the PH altering method using Water & Vinegar can produce micro rbc components that look like SOP's & hence my venture to try to eliminate the rbc's. During my first round I froze my blood for 24hrs & noticed that it was VERY efficient in eliminating most all rbc's & all larger phospholipid cell wall components, which can also form spiro-like subjects that can confuse us.


You can see one of my first trials in this video after a 24 hr freeze & notice the efficacy of rbc elimination.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbj7tTqUeCI


I assumed spiros would have transformed to cysts & that they would have revived upon thawing in the fresh blood prep, as a few papers & Dr. MacDonald's blood brain bank cultures seem to suggest. I will copy & paste (at a later time) the proof that Borrelia should survive the freeze, which I posted in another group & as I went into further detail there. I did not witness any cyst re-animation or any true active or suspended spiros. At the same time I now realize that the forces of the freeze might have forced water vapors through the Vaseline sealant & that is why I did not witness any brownian motion of particles in the plasma. The next set of trials involved adding the PH mixture, which contained water & made the sample wetter & I was able to observe brownian motion in part of the slide. Future trials will involve a harder seal of the slip cover before freeze, maybe using Elmer's glue. I don't think I will use nail polish as that seemed to affect blood sample in past tests.


I then wanted to assess what freezing would do to actual spirochetes in tick juice & decided to freeze the slide for 6 hrs. The video from that trial can be seen here, but I regrettably used filtered water as opposed to RODI water & need to do additional runs.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjozMzU2fTg


Again I expected many to form cysts & then revive. Instead I noticed lack of brownian motion in suspended particulates, which again indicates to me that water vapor escaped through the Vaseline. On the flip side I did record spiros which were suspended in time due to the freeze. You can watch my previous tick videos to satisfy yourself that they are indeed spiros, as right after tick juice preparation & RODI addition I do not see such spiro objects. They must all be in cyst form & come out within the hour after prep in non frozen samples.


I would imagine that many things can happen to spiros when frozen. Some will get completely destroyed, while others will be dead but intact & others may survive. I believe the survival rate may depend upon the type of solution it is in, as tissues (brain...etc) is not the same as blood. Most importantly the RATE at which freezing is achieved might be critical. Super rapid freezing in dry ice will produce less crystals & less spiro destruction & a very gradual freezing my allow Borrelia ample time to form cysts before the crystals & may be protected. One of my next attempts will be to refrigerate the sample for a more gradual temp reduction & then freeze. BSK cultured freezing tests can easily provide us with big clues, but one needs to keep in mind that variations can exist depending on the solutions or tissues that are frozen.


Now the bigger deal with all this is when the freezing trials are done & we add BSK or DIY culture medium to the slide after freezing. Imagine the impact of seeing video scans of a blood sample after freeze with all rbc's gone & then a video of many spiros grown after BSK addition. No one can claim that they are mere artifacts stemming from any rbc's then & we would have taken the next leap forward. Obviously PCR culturing & DNA Probing is the ultimate goal then, but until then this is what we have to work with.


Could Borrelia survive freezing? I am sure the evidence suggest that they could, but it might not mean that all of the Borrelia survive freezing & some may die off & be inactive. Also rapid freezing in liquid nitrogen is not the same as the freeze in the fridge, as the former produces less water crystals.

1) "Freezing to Liquid Nitrogen temperatures DOES NOT KILL BORRELIA." from the great Dr. Alan. http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5129

2) The research paper (Kumi-Diaka, J. and Harris, O, (1995)
British Veterinary Journal, Mar/Apr 1995. v. 151 (2)) appears to confirm WALA’s assertion: “It is possible that pathogens causing Lyme disease and Lyme-like illness can remain viable after freezing” is correct. http://www.lymedisease.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/WALAScopingStudySubmission.pdf

3) "LYOPHILIZATION: the creation of a stable preparation of a biologic substance by rapid freezing and dehydration of the frozen product under high vacuum" http://jb.asm.org/content/88/3/811.full.pdf

4) "Respectfully Alan B. MacDonald MD FCAP FASCP Nov 9, 2013 PS: Alan has cultivated living Borrelia from frozen autopsy Alzheimer's Autopsy Brains commencing in 1986 [JAMA: "Borrelia in the Brains of patients dying with Dementia" and Judith has cultivated Borrelia from Alzheimer's Autopsy brains commencing in 1993.
Death of the body human is survived by Live Borrelia in Dead Human Brain tissues.
Astonishing!!! Yes but True and Validated!!

Alan"
http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5129

[ 05-20-2016, 05:41 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Borrelia burgdorferi.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QsDOypxrYY
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Borrelia burgdorferi.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QsDOypxrYY

WOW! That's really good! Now all you need is a video of them moving again once they thaw.

What stain are you using?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
No, that is a fixed silver stain of cultured Bb.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
Hey guys, I'm loving this thread, thanks for all the information! So cool!

After reading the last 10 pages, I'm now looking to buy my first microscope. I want to look for spirochetes, and potentially Bart/Babs with a Giemsa stain if possible (I suspect I have these co-infections but tests come back negative).

At first I was going to buy an Omax or an Amscope, but reading here it sounds like I'd be better off with a higher quality, used scope.

I don't want to spend much more than $250 (not a ton, I know), but even after doing a ton of research, I can't seem to figure out what I need.

The big 4 manufacturers, even buying used, seem to be out of my price range. Ones that are in my price range seem super old and neglected.

I started looking at older AO scopes as an intermediate, but my goodness, their series lineup is confusing: 10 vs 50 vs 100 vs 110 vs 120 vs 400 vs microstar vs phasestar etc etc etc.

Could any of you experts give me some solid recommendations to help me along? I'm tempted to just go back to Omax or Amscope on Amazon, but I don't want to sacrifice image quality when I'm looking at tiny things like Babesia inside of red blood cells.

Any help appreciated! Or eBay links too if you've got any bookmarked!
Thanks again!
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I use an Amscope.

http://www.amazon.com/AmScope-T490B-DK-Magnification-Illumination-High-Resolution/dp/B004TP7KDM?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00

However, I outfitted it with a 100x dark field lens and a new condenser.

But the image quality is certainly sufficient.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFa6S8fB2Tk

The 400x images are what you will get with it straight out of the box.

Get a Darkfield or Phase-contrast microscope.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:

At first I was going to buy an Omax or an Amscope, but reading here it sounds like I'd be better off with a higher quality, used scope.

I don't want to spend much more than $250 (not a ton, I know), but even after doing a ton of research, I can't seem to figure out what I need.

The big 4 manufacturers, even buying used, seem to be out of my price range. Ones that are in my price range seem super old and neglected.

I started looking at older AO scopes as an intermediate, but my goodness, their series lineup is confusing: 10 vs 50 vs 100 vs 110 vs 120 vs 400 vs microstar vs phasestar etc etc etc.

Could any of you experts give me some solid recommendations to help me along? I'm tempted to just go back to Omax or Amscope on Amazon, but I don't want to sacrifice image quality when I'm looking at tiny things like Babesia inside of red blood cells.

Any help appreciated! Or eBay links too if you've got any bookmarked!
Thanks again!

That's great you are ready to get started with your own microscopy!

Each person has their own opinion about starter scopes, and some of it is probably dependent on what they started out with.

I like my AO 10 series because they are lab-grade, readily available, and parts and accessories are readily available. If you watch carefully, I know you can get a decent used AO 10 series scope for what you are budgeting.

I paid less than $115 for my scope (shipping was additional) and it came equipped with 400x phase contrast. Because components are still plentiful, I have acquired various accessories at very reasonable prices. AO 10 series scopes are very straightforward, so they make great starter scopes. I have been very pleased for the most part.

Unfortunately I don't know of any good deals at the moment. There had been a great (I think 110 model) fully equipped phase contrast scope for sale a few weeks ago for $450. It was a very nice scope in great condition and equipped with a phase turret condenser and all PLAN dark phase objectives up to 100x (objective).

I'm sure a good deal will come along if you are able to sit tight and watch for a bit.

One thing to remember is that even some of the older high end scopes are still as good or better than some of the cheapest new scopes of today.

Whatever you buy, a scope is an investment that holds its value if taken care of. You can always upgrade in the future.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:


I started looking at older AO scopes as an intermediate, but my goodness, their series lineup is confusing: 10 vs 50 vs 100 vs 110 vs 120 vs 400 vs microstar vs phasestar etc etc etc.


I would recommend against getting a 50, 60, 150, or 160 series AO scope. They have very few options for accessories and to my knowledge are only brightfield scopes. I doubt components from 10, 110, 120, or 400 series can be used on them.

But 10, 110, and 120 series AO scopes are great scopes with plenty of accessories available!
I have not seen as many 400's so I can't speak with any confidence about them. I think their parts are interchangeable with the 110 series. But don't quote me on that.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
thatdudefromkansas:
Was the dark field lens that came stock on yours insufficient, or is it a specific objective you need for dark field?

Also how come you needed a new condenser? Was the stock one not good for 100x?

If I bought a lightfield Amscope, like a B120, what modifications would I need to get 100x darkfield?

Sorry if the questions are dumb, just getting my head around all this stuff [Razz]

Your videos are great quality btw.

TNT:
Thanks for the info, comparing to what I've seen, yours sounds like a really good deal! The only thing I wasn't sure about was the lighting on some of these older units. Do you ever feel like you wished you had LED or is the old stuff better?

Are these AO scopes convertible to dark field if it doesn't come that way?

Any opinion on any of these:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/American-Optical-One-Ten-Binocular-Microscope-4-10-40-100x-Plan-/141970439451?hash=item210e18fd1b:g:LYsAAOSwv9hW5jn7

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/AO-American-Optical-Microstar-One-Ten-Compound-Microscope-W-4-Plan-Achro-Lens-/162046063669?hash=item25bab2b435:g:BukAAOSw3mpXGSY8


Thanks again guys, great info in this thread, and tons of cool vids!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:


TNT:
Thanks for the info, comparing to what I've seen, yours sounds like a really good deal! The only thing I wasn't sure about was the lighting on some of these older units. Do you ever feel like you wished you had LED or is the old stuff better?

Are these AO scopes convertible to dark field if it doesn't come that way?

Any opinion on any of these:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/American-Optical-One-Ten-Binocular-Microscope-4-10-40-100x-Plan-/141970439451?hash=item210e18fd1b:g:LYsAAOSwv9hW5jn7

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/AO-American-Optical-Microstar-One-Ten-Compound-Microscope-W-4-Plan-Achro-Lens-/162046063669?hash=item25bab2b435:g:BukAAOSw3mpXGSY8


With lab and research grade scopes the optics are superior. The LED lighting can be retrofitted. There is a company on Ebay that makes LED retrofit kits for nearly all the older high-end scopes. The kits are $140.

But, all you have to do if you want LED and can't sink much money into a retrofit is use an LED bulb on a small lamp and place that under the condenser as Lymedin has demonstrated. That's what I did until I made my own home-made LED lamp (see pics above).

Yes, you can equip an AO scope with darkfield if you don't initially buy it that way. Usually it simply involves buying a darkfield condenser (unless you want to do 1000x darkfield as Dude is doing. That is more involved).

Those two scopes you linked to are good scopes with PLAN objectives. They would do very well for plain brightfield. You would have to buy a darkfield condenser if you would want to pursue that. But, you could probably get just as nice a brightfield scope for a cheaper price if you keep looking. You should be able to get one similar to those for approx. $150. Still, not a bad price for those.

Brightfield is all you need for viewing Giemsa stains, but darkfield and phase contrast is best for viewing spirochetes, so I would try to find one equipped, or one that can easily be equipped that way.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
TNT, how would an AO 110 compare to something like this:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/REICHERT-MICROSTAR-IV-410-LAB-MICROSCOPE-WORKING-BULB-LOT-Medical-Parts-biology-/301958447770?hash=item464e20429a:g:tcAAAOSwXSJXOeMB#shpCntId


Again, thanks a ton for all the help.

EDIT: wooops just realized you already mentioned 400 series in your above post.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Glad to see more are interested.

Scopes & what works for one person can be very subjective, as some choose to spend the minimal amount & are happy to just see spirochetes. Others will not be content to simply see them, as they will want sharper & clearer images & video, and yet others will require upper echelon scopes that are more sensitive to pickup fluorescent stains.


Most lab grade scope will be just fine to view blood & spiros.

"Plan" objective lenses means the whole field is in focus & we like these lenses since we don't desire blurry edges & vignetting.


Generally achromatic lenses are good enough & I use those (plan achro). But apochromatic are better & are optimized for 3 colors coming together simultaneously, as opposed to only 1 color (2 elements: an achromatic lens and a meniscus lens) for the achromatic & 2 colors for the fluorites objectives. The plan-apochromatic are the most complex & can have up to 15 elements & are far more expensive. Normally better to worst type objectives (apochromatic -> semi- apochromatic -> achromatic -> non-achromatic), which also means pricier -> cheaper. . These can also dependent upon the application needed. Achromatic is the norm & what usually microscopes are fitted with, as they provide a relatively good price to acceptability point. The differences between apochromatic & achromatic objectives quality can sometimes appear subtle & all depending on the preparation of the objects being viewed & application (ex. microphotography or fluorescent capture).


For the condensor, typically the higher the NA the better the image, but one can get by with a NA of 0.9 & get good results. My Zeiss is a NA 0.9 & the Reichert even worst as it is an Abbe & not even achromatic, but can pickup far more detail due to oblique illumination & so sometimes it is not always about the numbers or types. The trade-off is because of the Abbe the images are not as sharp as they would be with achromatic
or apochromatic.


Nice lighting alternative.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Stereo-Compound-Microscope-Understage-Illuminator-LED-10W-USA-EU/272146873182?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D777000%26algo%3DABA.MBE%26ao%3D 1%26asc%3D35389%26meid%3Dbb24da43d8d64c128b7571f48ac42c80%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D262417131710


A great deal on a scope that just sold & that I was monitoring for someone.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/CARL-ZEISS-MICROSCOPE-392560-9001-W-10X-EYE-PIECES-FIVE-OBJECTIVE-TURRETT-/191871196743?hash=item2cac6a1e47%3Ag%3AgSIAAOSwfZhXNPkr
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Ask about the objectives on the Reichert. My Reichert 40x is comparable to my Zeiss 40x, but my NPL Fluotar on the Zeiss blows the Reichert Plan Achro out of the water & is far more expensive as well. You can still see the spiros with 100x oil on the Reichert, but they will not look as crisp & sharp as the Zeiss & some people will be ok with this.


My Reichert:
Plan Achro 40x (Plan Achro 40/0.66 ph, infinity/0.17 1734)
Plan Achro 100x (Reichert USA 100, 1736)

Condensor: N.A. 1.25 ABBE ASPHERIC ( 1.36-1.25)

Sample Reichert 100x Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbUiyrU1dn4


My Zeiss:
-100x oil Objective: Leitz Wetzlar Germany NPL Fluotar 100/1.32 OEL, 160/0.17
-Zeiss, 40 Ph2 / 0.65, 160 / 0.17 Objective (5181320)

-Condenser: Zeiss 0.9

-Sample Zeiss 100x video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMaDBl_my28


Keep in mind that sometimes the preparation itself can also make the difference between video comparisons as well as the actual glass used.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Ask about the objectives on the Reichert. My Reichert 40x is comparable to my Zeiss 40x, but my NPL Fluotar on the Zeiss blows the Reichert Plan Achro out of the water & is far more expensive as well. You can still see the spiros with 100x oil on the Reichert, but they will not look as crisp & sharp as the Zeiss & some people will be ok with this.


My Reichert:
Plan Achro 40x (Plan Achro 40/0.66 ph, infinity/0.17 1734)
Plan Achro 100x (Reichert USA 100, 1736)

Condensor: N.A. 1.25 ABBE ASPHERIC ( 1.36-1.25)

Sample Reichert 100x Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbUiyrU1dn4


My Zeiss:
-100x oil Objective: Leitz Wetzlar Germany NPL Fluotar 100/1.32 OEL, 160/0.17
-Zeiss, 40 Ph2 / 0.65, 160 / 0.17 Objective (5181320)

-Condenser: Zeiss 0.9

-Sample Zeiss 100x video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMaDBl_my28


Keep in mind that sometimes the preparation itself can also make the difference between video comparisons as well as the actual glass used.

Love your videos Lymedin. Actually it was your Youtube video where you show how to do a blood smear that got the wheels turning in my head for all this. So thanks a ton, I find it so cool!

Ya that Zeiss you linked looks pretty nice. Too bad I'm a day too late.

I would like to experiment with darkfield or phase contrast, so I'm considering buying something that has those objectives/condensers ready to. So it's a trade-off between either getting a really nice lightfield scope and upgrading later if I want (more $), or finding something a little less nice but with darkfield and/or phase contrast (I've seen some AO 10's with phase).

Lots more researching and hunting around for me!
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:


Love your videos Lymedin. Actually it was your Youtube video where you show how to do a blood smear that got the wheels turning in my head for all this. So thanks a ton, I find it so cool!

Yes, Lymedin is doing AWESOME work! He has been the inspiration for many of us.

quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:

I would like to experiment with darkfield or phase contrast, so I'm considering buying something that has those objectives/condensers ready to. So it's a trade-off between either getting a really nice lightfield scope and upgrading later if I want (more $), or finding something a little less nice but with darkfield and/or phase contrast (I've seen some AO 10's with phase).

Lots more researching and hunting around for me!

That's the predicament many of us suffering from, and treating for lyme, are in. But, I think what we are all saying is that you can start with pretty much anything-but to start out with as nice a scope as one can afford- and upgrade as you are able. The pocketbook is the limiting factor when it comes to microscopes.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I'll check for a darkfield from time to time & post anything if I see it.


If we ever get any skin lesions or cuts, it might be worth looking at broken scab bleeds & surface lesions under our scopes.

"Background
Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) is a rare histiocytic disorder of unknown origin. Objective We conducted an investigation of skin biopsy specimens from 7 patients with NXG for the presence of Borrelia by focus-floating microscopy.

Results
Borrelia could be detected as single, paired, or clusters of spirochetes in 6 cases of NXG whereas two cases investigated with a Borrelia-specific polymerase chain reaction (23s-RNA) remained negative."


This means FFM is better at detecting Borrelia than PCR!!!

https://ajcp.oxfordjournals.org/content/ajcpath/127/2/213.full.pdf
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Thanks TNT!

Wow, a really cheap fluorescent microscope. You have to ask questions though. Does it have a mercury lamp & does it need to be replaced, how many filters does it have, & what are the objectives....etc. Price of a scope, ya get a free fluorescent feature to potentially do acridine orange & DNA Probing. http://www.ebay.com/itm/AMERICAN-OPTICAL-AO-MICROSTAR-2071-VERTICAL-FLUORESCENCE-MICROSCOPE-/162035068586?hash=item25ba0aeeaa:g:ZPoAAOSwz2lXBwPB

[ 05-25-2016, 06:51 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
There are actually several fluorescent AO scopes now for really really good prices. One for $200 even!

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p4712.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.H0.Xamerican+optical+fluorescent+microscope.TRS0&_nkw=american+optical+fluorescent+microscope&_sacat=0
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I saw that one too, it has a missing mercury light...expensive. BUT you can DIY a led light into the existing one with some trial & error.

Check it out.
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/libindex3.html#fluoro
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I captured another cyst formation. The transition goes from atypical spiro -> to "Tennis Racket" form -> then to cyst. Check the Youtube description for detail.

Full morphological sequence in this video: Atypical form -> "Gun Holster" -> "Tennis Racket" -> Cyst.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXJTGo59gqM


You can watch the long play of the same video, without the 8x below.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYbQPrZg3V8

[ 05-31-2016, 04:55 AM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another person captures a nematode that looks exactly like the one in my video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v92I8S6gtpc&feature=youtu.be


This is mine:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQvmCjuxJAQ


Similar as this one too:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRFTG35PdsU


Now 3x Lymies with nematodes in their blood. This on top of Alan MacDonald studies on nematodes in MS patient autopsy.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
I am sick with flu today, but I did see a similar" worm" in live blood a few weeks ago-- when I get up to it I will try to post the pic here if it is not too dried out.

The worm in the video above seems to be about 20 to 30 times longer than the average red blood cell--- so we can rough ball the size. It also seems to be somewhat flat and pointed at both ends. Do you think its similar to these filariaforms?  -
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I captured another cyst formation. The transition goes from atypical spiro -> to "Tennis Racket" form -> then to cyst. Check the Youtube description for detail.

Full morphological sequence in this video: Atypical form -> "Gun Holster" -> "Tennis Racket" -> Cyst.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXJTGo59gqM


You can watch the long play of the same video, without the 8x below.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYbQPrZg3V8

Amazing videos Lymedin2010--- it looks like that spiro which was hanging off the red blood cell encysted directly INTO the red blood cell near the end of the video.... hmm.. its like it catapulted itself inside while it was in the process of forming a cyst. I guess the spiro would get double protection from that maneuver-- at least for the life of the red blood cell.

Our red blood cells are like sitting ducks waiting to be parasitized and slaughtered!! If there were just a drug that could relax the spiro's sucker-like grip on the red cell wall--- that would be of major benefit to Lyme patients. Pumpkin seed oil apparently does this for worm parasites in the intestines-- they relax their grip on the intestinal wall for a few hours, and can be flushed away by eating a lot of fiber and cascara sagrada shortly after taking the pumpkin seed oil..
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
The filarial worms I have seen in ticks have a more rounded & blend end, & in our blood they appear more sharply pointed. So I do think they are another type, probably opportunistic from mosquito bites post chronic LD. Someone suggest that mine are Ascaris Lumbricoides larva, but I am not so sure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH5proNntwo

Thanks. The time lapse runs longer before it encysts & the rbc was dragged by the moving plasma, but was held on tightly by the sticky end to the slide. I always said that the secret to killing these things is in blocking the tip entrance & in so doing we probably block the blebs too. The blebs are also generated by the tips of these spiros & so to me I think they are one the same.


The rbc's cannot simply allow things to flow intracellularly, otherwise we would not oxygenate properly & so the spiros are well protected there. IV abx would work best, as it worked for me when I first got sick & I could not see anything in my blood.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
The filarial worms I have seen in ticks have a more rounded & blend end, & in our blood they appear more sharply pointed. So I do think they are another type, probably opportunistic from mosquito bites post chronic LD. Someone suggest that mine are Ascaris Lumbricoides larva, but I am not so sure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lH5proNntwo

Thanks. The time lapse runs longer before it encysts & the rbc was dragged by the moving plasma, but was held on tightly by the sticky end to the slide. I always said that the secret to killing these things is in blocking the tip entrance & in so doing we probably block the blebs too. The blebs are also generated by the tips of these spiros & so to me I think they are one the same.


The rbc's cannot simply allow things to flow intracellularly, otherwise we would not oxygenate properly & so the spiros are well protected there. IV abx would work best, as it worked for me when I first got sick & I could not see anything in my blood.

Lymedin2010--- this video of the worms inside a tick is particularly valuable!! We should raise some money on Gofundme and offer a $5,000 reward at college campuses in the Northeast (where ticks are easy to get --- just drag a sheet out in long grass) for definitive ID of these worms from a biology PhD student or professor. I guess we would need to do a PCR or some other genetic test to properly identify these filarial worms!! Wow-- that video shows the tick is literally stuffed with those worms. I just can't believe that the government has not bothered to ID these worms yet-- after more than 30 years.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
These onchocerca worms look very similar to the worms in your video of the filarial worms inside the tick-- they have more rounded ends, and are less pointy:
web page http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/Onchocerca_volvulus_01.jpg

Eva Sapi did say that the worms had genetic elements of onchocerca, but were not onchocerca.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
This recent study from 2014 in a journal of Veterinary studies, with Eva Sapi as an author, confirms the worms to be of the Acanthocheilonema genus::

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Filarial-Nematode-Infection-in-Ixodes-scapularis-Namrata-Miller/f1de07ed639cd266ebd010665584ecebfc56da2e/pdf

[ 06-04-2016, 10:50 AM: Message edited by: WakeUp ]
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
BINGO!!!

Here's a pic of the Acanthocheilonema worm lifecycle--- it has both ROUNDED and POINTED ends at different part of its lifecycle--it is rounded in the tick-- which explains the rounded worms in your video---, and it is more pointed when it is in the mouse (mammal)!!:
 -
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
The Acanthocheilonema viteae worm that is harbored in ticks here in America has been sequenced recently by the University of Edinburgh:

http://nematodes.org/genomes/acanthocheilonema_viteae/

Unfortunately for us, this worm does not harbor the symbiotic Wolbachia bacteria, which means that it cannot be killed by the antibiotics that kill wolbachia.

Here's another study on how the Acanthocheilonema viteae worm disables our immune systems via "Cystatin" from its poop (rectal gland secretions) LOL:
https://filariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2883-4-9
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Great links, thanks!

I am sure we will ultimately learn that a few different species can be transmitted in ticks. We are starting to realize that post chronic Lyme, that we can acquire further opportunistic parasitic & other forms of infections. These can be transmitted via various alternate means, such as mosquito bites, eating raw meats, swallowing a bug accidentally...etc.
 
Posted by WakeUp (Member # 9977) on :
 
To follow up on the acanthocheilonema filaria worm found by Dr. Sapi in ticks--- This pubmed study:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17061115

shows that an extract of the Lantana Camara plant (a pretty flower) kills 80% of the Acanthocheilonema worms and sterilizes the rest. Unfortunately i think the Lantana Camara plant is toxic to grazing livestock.

A list of all filariacidal plants studied to date can be found on table 1 of this link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3588050/

(Interesting that withania somnifera, turmeric and garlic are on the above list...) I will add these filariacidal plants to my list of Spirochetcidal compounds-- and move further links over there for future reference. Cheers...
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good find.

"PUMPKIN SEED (CUCURBITA PEPO)
Medicinal use and Health Benefits


Pumpkin seed is used to get rid off intestinal parasites, such as pinworms and, for a long time, widely used to extract taenias or tapeworms from the human body. In the first case, it is advised to eat peeled seeds in the desired amount. In the second case, it is recommended to do the following procedure: Smash 50 gr. of fresh seeds; mix them with sugar or honey. Eat the mixture as the only food for a day in the main meals. After some hours, try to make a deposition and see if the parasite has been expelled. On the contrary, this process can be repeated on another occasion. Laxative: It favours the intestinal transit, being specially interesting the fact that it does not irritate the intestinal tract (Look at the pumpkin as an edible fruit) Anti-prostatic: Recent studies seem to suggest it is very effective, when combined with the lipophilic extract of the palm " Serenoa repens " for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. By decreasing the inflammation, this gland doesn't make so much pressure on the urethra, which makes easier the expulsion of urine."

http://www.parasitetesting.com/Pumpkin-Seed.cfm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=pumpkin+seeds+antiparasitic
_________________________________________

http://www.drclark.net/cleanses/beginners/herbal-parasite-cleanse
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
From the CDC:
https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/resources/pdf/benchAids/Artifacts_benchaid_who.pdf


Cure for babs microti:
http://news.yale.edu/2016/06/06/combination-therapy-cures-tick-borne-illness-mice
 
Posted by ohioperson22 (Member # 47837) on :
 
Has anyone done Geimsa stains on themselves? I think all you need to do is get some blood on a slide, fix it (apparently by soaking in alcohol then drying), applying the stain, waiting, and then looking (perhaps with a wash of excess reagent).

Apparently this would find all kinds of protozoans and worms. This could save money as apparently Geimsa stains have to be done at different points over time and even different times of the day to find specific organisms.

Is this just a bad idea for someone who is not skilled in laboratory pathology?

LOL, and how crazy would your doctor think you were if you showed up with your own microscopy pictures?
 
Posted by ohioperson22 (Member # 47837) on :
 
How do you know a spirochete seen in your blood is not a dental spirochete (treponema genus) that got into blood from brushing teeth or flossing?
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
I just did a giemsa stain and saw some interesting shtuff on my friends amscope ...a few dots but one ufo that took up whole rbc..i will try to post pic ...it was quik dip vet stain thanks lyme net ...

also ohio there are 100 species of borreliosis and then there is leptospirosis, syphilis and others but even if it is dental gone systemic treatmwnt is still the same ..

Also i have my blood parasitized with toxo or proto or babs but tx is all the same .i guess for frequencys i wanna know what species but i have gotten more answers from a scope that 33 ducs

lymed did a vid of his mouth stctuff a while back..also a dentist named norquist has done good u toob vids of spirochetes using h202 ,clorone dioxide ,and others his best results were laser and honey with herbs...

personally propolis has helped gums ..too bad i cat do that iv...ha
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
These pics are bad but i was stoked to do the stain..i likely dont have enough light using my buddies scope ..first pic shows weird artifact anybody seen such a creature?

http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/RPSxbBG3/file.html
http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/9hW22rN8/file.html
http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/jZGYGYXw/file.html
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by bluelyme:
These pics are bad but i was stoked to do the stain..i likely dont have enough light using my buddies scope ..first pic shows weird artifact anybody seen such a creature?

http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/RPSxbBG3/file.html
http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/9hW22rN8/file.html
http://www79.zippyshare.com/v/jZGYGYXw/file.html

My first thought and opinion is that it resembles Babesia canis (Babesia that generally infects dogs).
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
The size and shape of the organisms in the RBCs of the first and third pics seriously resemble Babesia canis.

The size and shape of the dots on the RBCs of the second pic suggest Bartonella.

[ 06-15-2016, 09:21 PM: Message edited by: TNT ]
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Thanks tnt ..yes on the bart, on the other ,the lab at african university is trying to say its toxoplasmosis.i was thinking proto but now that you mention the canis i have been bit by a few dogs..

..same sorta treatment was just hoping to narrow it down for frequencys. And yes ohio i showed a nurse at the er my spirochettes video and he was facinated but in disbelief. My tcm rife duc takes a it at face value..
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Word on the street is that a lot of times the rbc may have inclusions within the cells that look just like little dots & a doctor had told us to be weary of this. I would prefer to see the other forms of babs for a more guaranteed positive ID.


I captured another SOP reverting back to an atypical form. I think the large SOP's may be rbc wall phospholipid formations & I will have some good proof video clips once I put it all together in a future video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKZLVwqe_fk


I also include a LIVE VIEW of the same video above, to show that the pearls are really gone & have been consumed by the body & to dispel any notions of focus issues (in case anyone questions it).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5bR3D_b5xs


Below is the P1 first video that I posted a while ago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIDlKbDHKd8
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Another filarial worm in a fellow Lymie.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-Vty4NYWh4
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
I would prefer to see the other forms of babs for a more guaranteed positive ID.

I really lean towards the B.canis. If followup giemsa smears begin to show a clearing in the pyriform shapes, I would feel 100% positive.

If his original smears were stained too long, that could possibly make them dark like that.

Blue, I would continue to monitor your blood via Giemsa stain and look for more items like what you showed us, especially a clearing in the pyriform shapes, or other Babs morphologies.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
There was a nice article the doc posted on the inclusions, I will have to find it & some pitfalls to watch out for when staining.


Another cyst forming video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRd5N_Ghy0Q


The entire collection below.


Cyst forming videos collection directly in our Lyme Diseased human blood:

***4 stage cyst formation.
Atypical form -> "Gun Holster" -> "Tennis Racket" -> Cyst.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXJTGo59gqM


***Atypical spiro to "Tennis Racket" form & then to Cyst (Discoid Gemma type) directly in HUMAN BLOOD. Tennis racket forms are widely known & seen in Borrelia obtained from ticks & wild grown in culture.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eg_Id74a_4I


Another precious cyst formation capture that stops mid way at the "Tennis Racket" form.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH3fGVndMYo


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRd5N_Ghy0Q


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HUtKungjvE


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nK9VuG-ZnU


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gcuqfk97TA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVf39rSop48


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HVwFqGpTnY


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsJ5Zit6q0U


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18F1xKvGeH8


Partial cyst forming video, from "Tennis Racket" to cyst morphology:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUsVAd4n_1c
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
This just goes to show what a nice deal you can get on a scope if you watch for it.

Someone just got a nice AO 110 binocular equipped with plan objectives for brightfield (40x, 100x, 400x, and 1000x) and dark phase contrast (400x)!

Went for $85 plus shipping!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Optical-AO-One-Ten-Microstar-Microscope-/322131288391
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Sweet deal for someone...I love those types of deals. As I said before I got 2x microscopes for $200. Just the 1000x objective on one of the scopes was really worth $300-400.


Here is P3 of my SOP reversing video. The object went from SOP to reverse to atypical & then hours later it forms a cyst.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNrivCVK6FE


My very, very long SOP capture.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLdb93zS6OM


Here is another filarial in a posters blood.
https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/t31.0-8/13490762_1060646467306156_5508777845193411645_o.jpg

[ 06-26-2016, 04:10 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
My blood on BSK-H on day 5. I froze the blood sample to lyse most of the rbc's & hopefully release the true spiros & eliminate any false spiros.


This looks & moves like a true atypical spiro.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVEYiWeML5M
 
Posted by kms1990 (Member # 41700) on :
 
Im not sure if this has been asked before, however does anyone offer assistance reviewing members blood for tbd here? I am really interested in this type of study but not sure if I am able to complete the analysis myself or work the equipment given the severity of my neurological illness right now. Thanks!
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Kms lymed posted this in another thread ...you may be able to find a practioner here ..also there is duc here who will send samples to africa for darkfield identification ..not cheap

.http://www.phmiracleliving.com/t-microscopist-list.aspx

looks like nj has 2 practioners .keep us posted
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Hey all,

I am in buying mode for a new scope. Looking for a model with high resolution at 1000x and greater. Fluorescence capability is a definite plus, but one that is convertible is good as well.

Maybe y'all know some good brands/models. Price is not a concern. Dont care if it's 10,000 dollars. I am going all in.

Let me know if you see any good deals on ebay, or know of models straight from manufacturer.

It's hard to find example images or.video from any models, so I will certainly use the return policy to my advantage to make sure it is a good fit.

Time to upgrade from my cheap amscope.

Once I find a model, my current setup will also be for a sale, and Id let it go for a very reasonable amount for anyone here that wants it. As in beat any price and adjust based on financial situation, just to share the capability to do this yourself.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I would get this Zeiss & no worries about mercury lamps for fluoresence, as this uses LED based technology. I LOVE my Zeiss lenses for both camera equipment & microscopy, as they are unparalleled.


Price will be 5-6K, but cheaper if you can get a used one.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUBDON39kec

http://www.zeiss.com/microscopy/en_de/products/light-microscopes/primo-star-iled.html

"
-Reflected-light fluorescence
-Rapid switching from fluorescence excitation to brightfield illumination
-Economical LED concept
-Battery pack for operation without a main power supply
-Special eyecups eliminate the need for a dark room during a tuberculosis test
-Simple to operate
-Durable and robust
-Tried-and-tested Carl Zeiss optics made from high-quality glass
-High-quality materials
-Worldwide support from Carl Zeiss"
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Cool. You get great quality with your scope, too Lymedin. Zeiss has a good reputation for optics, camera or otherwise. Can't really go wrong with the brand.

How's the BSK working out so far? Got any long term cultures planned yet?
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
A selling point for me is darkfield. I'll have to see if that's compatible with any kits or condensers for that, as well as if that method is compatible with other types of fluorescent stains.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Dr. MacDonald has suggested Nikon or Olympus as well.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
Once I find a model, my current setup will also be for a sale, and Id let it go for a very reasonable amount for anyone here that wants it. As in beat any price and adjust based on financial situation, just to share the capability to do this yourself.

I know Haley has been wanting a scope for a few years now. I don't know if she got one yet, or not.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I captured a nice spiro on day 5 of BSK culture & it was very rewarding to have most of the rbc's lyse from freezing and I am very pleased with that method as it eliminates most false spiros.

I have been using Elmer's Glue to seal my slip covers, but it looks like it must be porous & it is drying the slide out over time. I am waiting on the next rounds of trials.


Here is a cheap FM. The mercury bulbs are rather expensive too & burn up rather quickly. One has to keep them on for a few minutes each time you turn them on, as they heat up & give off the proper spectrum of light.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Labophot-Epi-Fluorescence-Mercury-Microscope-/252373755952?hash=item3ac2a5e830:g:xGAAAOSwqbZXE4x5

[ 07-10-2016, 07:07 PM: Message edited by: Lymedin2010 ]
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This Chinese import can be had in DF as well & at a fraction of the cost. Even if you need to replace one or 2 of the objective lenses, it may still be worth it.

Will you be doing FITC & fluorescent Bb antibodies or acridine orange?

http://www.cnoec.com/sale-1893719-infinity-plan-led-fluorescence-microscope-100x-1000x-a16-0907-bl.html


 -


On another note, a nice spiro video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lY5cf6d5-4I&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Dude - Let me know, i could be very appreciative of your good graces ...

another great video lymed ..thank you
 
Posted by lymenotlite (Member # 33166) on :
 
Labx sells a lot of equipment. Here is a Zeiss Primo Star for $1,769, only one in stock.

http://www.labx.com/item/carl-zeiss-primo-star-upright-photo-microscope/2018700#MoreDesc

There's also one on eBay:
http://www.labx.com/item/carl-zeiss-primo-star-upright-photo-microscope/2018700#MoreDesc
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Nikon makes very good scopes. Just have to find a good deal on them.

And Bluelyme, I'll keep you updated.

As an FYI for you, the scope I have now has both a dry dark field condenser and oil dark field, and I have a 100X oil objective w/ Iris on it as well, so you can use the 100x under darkfield. So really, I have 3 condensers for it. 2 dark, and 1 bright.

There are a few systems to look at. I have considered dropping considerable money on a microscope.
One of the higher end models, or even older models.
You can find Nikon Microphot systems on eBay and other places online, for example, for between 5,000 and 8,000 dollars.

What I don't want to sacrifice on my next scope is resolution. I am ready to move up a step.
My current setup is great, but I want to be able to see the minute details in high resolution at high magnifications, similar to what you would see in legit research labs.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Amscope makes some models as well, but not sure if the quality of those models are comparable to the price, relative to other manufacturers.

Can't really go wrong with Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, or Olympus.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Is this good enough resolution? This guy sets up & sells rigs like this. I would imagine it could be retrofit with Fluorescent too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gd4fsEbWreQ
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
That's actually pretty good. I am curious how it looks in 4k? Also, I would have to see the setup, as well as actually try it out first, if it is something he makes himself.


I wonder if it is just a camera type attachment that he makes? And not a full microscope system?
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
I PM'd you his emails w/description.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Thanks, responded. I emailed them.

So we'll see if it is suitable.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I have zeroed in on a few prospects for microscopes.
You can find quite a few serviceable, research grade microscopes from the 80s and 90s, still in use by labs, that are relatively affordable compared to the newest models.

I am seeking out those options, as they will provide the highest quality, highest resolution imaging.

We'll see how they pan out.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This looks like a sweet deal & comes with LB obj. lenses w/higher resolving power.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Olympus-Vanox-AHB-LB-Microscope-w-Phase-Contrast-LB-obj-Fluorescence-illum-/191916193704?hash=item2caf18b7a8:g:iiYAAOSwXeJXfacP


He sells the mercury lighting box/power supply & camera setup/controller separately, but cheap.
http://www.ebay.com/sch/ranger_mikey/m.html?item=191916193704&hash=item2caf18b7a8%3Ag%3AiiYAAOSwXeJXfacP&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
This looks like a sweet deal & comes with LB obj. lenses w/higher resolving power.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Olympus-Vanox-AHB-LB-Microscope-w-Phase-Contrast-LB-obj-Fluorescence-illum-/191916193704?hash=item2caf18b7a8:g:iiYAAOSwXeJXfacP

Ha, I thought about posting the link to that one, too. Yes, someone will get a sweet machine. I am watching just to see how high (or low) it goes.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Thanks for the help in looking for scopes, guys.
Input is always good.

I have put the money down for a new one.

I will unveil it when it is appropriate.
Got's all kinds of goodies. I bought it used, but everything appears to be in new condition.

High quality lenses. Phase Contrast/Darkfield, DIC, Epi-Fluourescence, and standard Brightfield.

I am actually excited to play around with the DIC. Especially on a high quality. If you don't know what that is, just look it up. Very similar to standard Phase Contrast.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by thatdudefromkansas:
Thanks for the help in looking for scopes, guys.
Input is always good.

I have put the money down for a new one.

I will unveil it when it is appropriate.
Got's all kinds of goodies. I bought it used, but everything appears to be in new condition.

High quality lenses. Phase Contrast/Darkfield, DIC, Epi-Fluourescence, and standard Brightfield.

I am actually excited to play around with the DIC. Especially on a high quality. If you don't know what that is, just look it up. Very similar to standard Phase Contrast.

AWESOME!! You're making me drool. Would love to see a pic of it sometime. Can't wait to see some blood with it.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
I'll post a video of the setup and get some BSK samples under it once it's all set up.

Start looking into getting some fluorescent stains and working through that process.
Figuring out which, antibody-wise, to start out with.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
This one?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Zeiss-JENALUMAR-Epi-fluorescence-DIC-brightfield-polarization-microscope-Excl-/252434421124?hash=item3ac6439584:g:YFgAAOSw3ydVjrds
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
Yes, but not for that amount.
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZnY871HZhM

Interesting.
Also note, Darkfield is preferred method for viewing the nematodes, no fixation or staining required.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Good stuff, thanks!

Interesting how there is a lot more buzz about Borrelia in the blood nowadays. Sounds like everyone's concerted efforts for recognition has started to pay off.
 
Posted by Lymedin2010 (Member # 34322) on :
 
Filarial worms:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOVchzYuhNU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeE-0DANSZ4&feature=youtu.be
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Lymedin2010:
Filarial worms:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vOVchzYuhNU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeE-0DANSZ4&feature=youtu.be

E-E-E-E-e-e-e-W-W-W-W-w-w-w-w !!!! THAT, is unmistakable! I'm glad I've never seen anything like that in my blood!!!
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
Just took possession of an AO10... excited to re-read this thread and figure out how to get going.
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by mustardseed2:
Just took possession of an AO10... excited to re-read this thread and figure out how to get going.

Way to go, mustardseed2! Looking forward to hearing/seeing what you discover. Don't be afraid to ask questions or post any pics/videos.

Is your 10 equipped with either darkfield or phase contrast?
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
No darkfield for me.

I might try a makeshift dark stop at some point for 40x, but I'm more interested in doing staining to check for co-infections.

Looking into how to do Giemsa now.

My first look at my blood cells, I didn't notice anything funny looking, except a couple of them had a large, black, bumpy, V-shaped inclusion. Not sure what those were.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
Guys, I have a lot of small specs in my blood samples that are green in color... any idea what that stuff could be?

Also, if someone could PM me a website where I could buy some methanol and some giemsa stain that would be amazing.

[ 07-21-2016, 11:25 PM: Message edited by: mustardseed2 ]
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
http://www.shopmedvet.com/product/dip-quick-stain-kit-complete-kit/Laboratory-Equipment-and-Supplies-Stains
careful not to do it to long ..do thin and thick smear
 
Posted by thatdudefromkansas (Member # 46768) on :
 
mustard,
You can also purchase anything you need off of amazon for basic giemsa/wright/gram stains.

You can get the stains, buffers (if you want to use it), methanol, etc.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
So I saw my first potential spirochete tonight.

I haven't read this entire thread, so I'll go back and see if it matched what other people have seen.

It had bulbous tips, and sometimes looked like the string of pearls mentioned earlier. It was oscillating around quite quickly.

Are there any other organisms in the blood that could potentially look like this?

I also saw a couple that were shorter, with a bulb on each end and a short connection in between.
 
Posted by bluelyme (Member # 47170) on :
 
Congrats it is scary cool huh?..cant wait to get my own scope
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
Ya it's very interesting.

I did several smears on the first day, and didn't find anything.

On Day 2 I re-checked the smears from Day 1, and still nothing. Then I made new smears, and still nothing.

Then before I went to bed, I did one more smear (this is 8 hours after my previous smear), and all of a sudden I could see a couple of them.

I'm going to draw more blood before bed tonight to see if there's a pattern or if it was coincidence.

edit: I also bought that camera stand from ebay for $20. It's coming from Chine though, so maybe by September I'll be able to post pictures haha.
 
Posted by mustardseed2 (Member # 48048) on :
 
Check out this worm I found.
Took the picture with my cell phone straight through the eyepiece.

10x objective
10x eyepiece

 -
 
Posted by TNT (Member # 42349) on :
 
Interesting report! Sounds just like Bb....clinically & morphologically it is! It's interesting that they say most l-forms are not pathogenic except in rare cases! But, these sure caused symptoms!

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S0482-50042009000500004&script=sci_arttext&tlng=en

Brazilian Lyme-like disease (Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome - BYS)


Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
Print version ISSN 0482-5004
On-line version ISSN 1809-4570
Rev. Bras. Reumatol. vol.49 no.5 São Paulo Sept./Oct. 2009

http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0482-50042009000500004
ORIGINAL ARTICLE


Report on the unusual presence of latent microorganisms in animals: a risk to research and health of employees?


Natalino Hajime YoshinariI; Silvio Arruda VasconcelosII; Arary da Cruz TiribaIII; Giancarla GauditanoIV; Elenice MantovaniV; Virgínia Lúcia Nazário BonoldiVI

IAssociate Rheumatology Professor of the Medical School of Universidade de São Paulo
IIProfessor of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health at the Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade de São Paulo
IIIRetired Infectious Diseases Professor of Universidade Federal de São Paulo
IVAssisting Physician of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Medical School of Universidade de São Paulo
VRheumatology PhD student at the Medical School of Universidade de São Paulo
VIBiologist of the Rheumatologic Investigation Laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Medical School of Universidade de São Paulo

Correspondence to


-----------------------------------------------

ABSTRACT

We report the unusual finding of mobile spirochetal microorganisms with different morphologies and sizes, on dark-field microscopy of the blood of animals from the Vivarium of the Medical School of USP. The bacteria did not grow in common culture media, shows faint staining to Giemsa and silver-derived stains, and serologies and molecular tests were negative for Borrelia and Leptospira.

Electron microscopy revealed the presence of microorganisms with Mycoplasma-like morphology and, due to its mobility, it was suggested that they represented Mollicutes of the genus Spiroplasma. Microorganisms with the same morphology were also observed in 15 out of 26 employees (57.6%) of the Vivarium of FMUSP; however, clinical and laboratorial exams indicated that those individuals were healthy.

Additional studies undertaken at the Rheumatology Department of FMUSP demonstrated the presence of the same structures identified at the Vivarium in approximately 94% of the patients with Baggio-Yoshinary syndrome (BYS) and 20% of healthy individuals. Electron microscopy of the blood of BYS patients showed bacteria that shared similarities with Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, and Bacteroides. Since serologies and molecular tests were negative for those contaminants, and based on publications in the medical literature, it was suggested that those latent infectious agents were L-form bacteria, defined as cell wall deficient bacteria, assuming, therefore, Mycoplasma morphology and they are, for the most part, harmless to the host.

We concluded that spirochetal microorganisms visualized in animals and employees of the Vivarium were non-pathogenic L-form bacteria from contaminants in the environment, regular infections, or endogenous microorganism from the normal saprophytic flora. On the other hand, spirochetal organisms identified in BYS, by preserving the capacity to invade cells in vitro, are potentially pathogenic and related to the etiology of BYS. We consider BYS as a novel Brazilian zoonosis caused by spirochetes adapted to their latent form, possibly due to bacterial mutations in response to ecologic and geographic conditions unique to Brazil.

Keywords: spirochete, spirochete-like, L-form bacteria, Mycoplasma, Lyme-like disease, Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome, Borrelia, latent microorganism, Vivarium, laboratory animals, Brazil.


INTRODUCTION

On an administrative ruling published on 04/06/2002, the dean of USP, Professor Adolfo José Melfi, appointed Professors Natalino Hajime Yoshinari (Medical School of the Universidade de São Paulo - FMUSP), Silvio de Arruda Vasconcelos (Veterinary and Zootomy School of USP-FMZUSP), and Arary da Cruz Tiriba (Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP) for a Commission created to investigate unusual bacteriological problems linked to Vivariums.

The problem in the Vivarium of FMUSP began in the beginning of 2001 when Dr. Ismar Cestari detected in vitro the presence of spirochete-like microorganisms in culture of spleen cells of an animal from the Vivarium of the Medical School of USP (FMUSP).

To understand the extension of the problem, the Commission examined the blood of the animals on dark-field microscopy and, indeed, confirmed the presence of spirochete-like microorganisms in 15 out of 15 mice blood samples (BALB/c, A/SNELL1, SWISS, and C57BI/6), in two out of 5 rat blood samples (WISTAR), five out of five rabbit blood samples, and in none of the guinea pig blood samples.

Blood samples were examined again on the second semester of 2002 and 28 out of 40 (70%) blood samples of different species of mice and rats were positive. The same procedure was used in animals from the Veterinary and Zootomy School of USP (FMVZUP, from the Portuguese) and dark-field microscopy showed "spirochetal structures" in only two out of eight mice blood samples and in none of the hamsters, indicating a problem of Vivariums, although this finding was more common at FMUSP.

Clinically, animals from the USP Vivarium were apparently healthy. The veterinary Sueli Blanes Dani et al.1 undertook preliminary biochemical analysis of serum pools of four female mice and five of WISTAR rats, showing increased levels of BUN, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), suggesting the presence of some infectious or toxic factor responsible for the development of liver function-related biochemical disruption.

In the same study, electron microscopy and immunohystochemical tests of the lungs, liver, spleen, heart, and kidneys of the animals, and they identified Mycoplasma pulmonis in almost 100% of the animals in conventional vivariums, and in 18% of those that maintained adequate sanitary barriers. They stated that studies in the literature reported liver diseases caused by Mycoplasma in sheep, doves, and goats, but they did not find reports on rats. To confirm those findings, we repeated the electron microscopy of the blood samples of rodents with spirochetal organisms (Figure 1).

 -

Since optical microscopy revealed the presence of mobile microorganisms of different sizes, ranging from miniscule dots to elongated structures reaching up to 15-20 µm, in the blood sample of the animals, the Commission initially thought they could be spirochetes. Serology for Leptospira and Borrelia, hemocultures in aerobic and anaerobic media and BSK, as well as molecular testing (PCR) for Leptospira and Borrelia, performed at FMUSP, FMVZUSP, and Biological Institute were persistently negative.

The uncommon size of the structures identified in the peripheral blood of the animals called the attention of the members of the Commission b