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Author Topic: Lyme Disease Obituaries
Tincup
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This thread is in honor of those who have passsed away from Lyme and tick borne diseases. They will not be forgotten.

[ 10-31-2017, 07:06 PM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Tincup
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Posted by 5dana8 (Member # 7935) on 28 June, 2006 07:45 PM :

Hey Tincup

The Lyme Times used to run obituraies.

Not lately though... From reading them in the past most deaths due to lyme I read where from suicides and death from a combination of lyme-ALS

Back issues at www.lymetimes.org

[ 09-08-2011, 10:28 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Tincup
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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 28 June, 2006 09:00 PM :

I am pretty sure that my older post on this subject got deleted during the last house cleaning...

But here is some information that I kept in a word doc.

This list is not comprehensive...

[ 09-08-2011, 10:29 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Tincup
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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 28 June, 2006 09:00 PM

_________________________________________________

(1) Lyme-associated parkinsonism: a neuropathologic case study and review of the literature.
Cassarino DS; Quezado MM; Ghatak NR; Duray PH. Arch Pathol Lab Med, 127(9):1204-6. 2003.

(2) Borrelia burgdorferi detected by culture and PCR in clinical relapse of disseminated Lyme borreliosis.
Oksi J; Marjamaki M; Nikoskelainen J; Viljanen MK. Annals of Medicine, 31(3):225-32. 1999.

(3) Central nervous system infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. Clinico-pathological correlation of three post-mortem cases.
Bertrand E; Szpak GM; Pilkowska E; Habib N; Lipczynska-Lojkowska W; et al. Folia Neuropathol; 37(1):43-51. 1999.

(4) Borrelia burgdoferi-seropositive chronic encephalomyelopathy: Lyme neuroborreliosis? An autopsied report.
Kobayashi K; Mizukoshi C; Aoki T; Muramori F; Hayashi M; et al. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord, 8(6):384-90. 1997.

(5) Inflammatory brain changes in Lyme borreliosis. A report on three patients and review of literature.
Oksi J; Kalimo H; Marttila RJ; et al. Brain, 199(Pt 6):2143-54. 1996.

(6) Ceftriaxone in the treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis.
Rohacova H; Hancil J; Hulinska D; Mailer H; Havlik J. Infection, 24(1):88-90. 1996.

(7) Rapidly progressive frontal-type dementia associated with Lyme disease.
Waniek C; Prohovnik I; Kaufman MA; Dwork AJ. Journal of Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, 7(3):345-7. 1995.

(8) Borrelia burgdorferi myositis: report of eight patients.
Reimers CD; de Koning J; Neubert U; Preac-Mursic V; Koster JG; Müller-Felber W; Pongratz DE; Duray PH. J Neuro, 240(5):278-83. 1993.

(9) Lyme disease acquired in Europe and presenting in CONUS.
Welker RD; Narby GM; Legare EJ; Sweeney DM. Military Medicine, 158(10):684-5. 1993.

(10) Fatal encephalitis caused by concomitant infection with tick-borne encephalitis virus and Borrelia burgdorferi.
Oksi J; Viljanen MK; Kalimo H; Peltonen R; Marttia R; et al. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 16(3):392-6. 1993.

(11) Fatal Lyme carditis and endodermal heterotopia of the atrioventricular node.
Cary NR; Fox B; Wright DJ; Cutler SJ; Shapiro LM; Grace AA. Postgrad Med J, 66(773):258. 1990.

(12) Fatal adult respiratory distress syndrome in a patient with Lyme disease.
Kirsch M; Ruben FL; Steere AC; Duray PH; Norden CW; Winkelstein A. JAMA, 259(18):2737-9. 1988.

(13) Borrelia in the brains of patients dying with dementia.
MacDonald A. JAMA, 256(16):2195-6. 1986.

(14) Fatal meningoradiculoneuritis in Lyme disease.
Melet M; Gerard A; Voiriot P; Gayet S; May T; et al. Presse Med, 15(41):2075. 1986.

(15) Fatal pancarditis in a patient with co-existent Lyme disease and babesiosis: Demonstration of spirochetes in the heart.
Marcus LC; Steere AC; Duray PH. Annals of Internal Medicine, 103:374-6. 1985.

Fetal demise:

(16) Gestational Lyme borreliosis. Implications for the fetus.
MacDonald AB. Rheum Dis Clin North Am, 15(4):657-77. 1989.

(17) Borrelia burgdorferi in a newborn despite oral penicillin for Lyme borreliosis during pregnancy.
Weber K; Bratzke HJ; Neubert U; Wilske B; Duray PH. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 7:286-9. 1988.

(18) Human fetal borreliosis, toxemia of pregnancy, and fetal death.
MacDonald A. Zbl. Bakt. Hyg. A, 263:189-200. 1986.

(19) Culture positive seronegative transplacental Lyme borreliosis infant mortality.
Lavoie PE; Lattner BP; Duray PH; Barbour AG; Johnson HC. Arthritis Rheum, Vol 30 No 4, 3(Suppl):S50. 1987.

[ 18. October 2006, 10:37 AM: Message edited by: Melanie Reber ]

Posted by trails (Member # 1620) on 29 June, 2006 02:32 AM :

Ted Hoggard (mitch's son) should be added to the list. I do not know his age. His death was published in Lymetimes last year but he passed away 2 years ago this August. I spoke with his father today who shared tears and more info about his death than he has before
with me. It was Lyme related.

I can not believe the strength of some families. And the depths of compassion that this illness can create in some people.

[ 09-08-2011, 10:33 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Tincup
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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 29 June, 2006 06:08 AM :

Here are a some from recent posts:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=015250;p=1#000000

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=014920

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=014391

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=040617

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=039279

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=034817

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=034818

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=034332

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=030243

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=013885

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=013869

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=013382

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=012238

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=011415

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=010773

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=011235

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=010743

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=010406

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=041476

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=040414

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=043479

I had to stop there because this is too depressing. I hope that the LDA or "someone" has a database to track those they become aware of. We will never know the full scope of this continuing tragedy.

[ 09-08-2011, 10:37 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by SuZ-Q (Member # 5903) on 29 June, 2006 07:54 AM :

This is so heartbreaking. After a thorough list has been compiled, it should be sent to the Infectious Disease Association and all the ducks who do not believe in chronic Lyme. This is all I can write at the moment for the tears.

[ 09-08-2011, 10:39 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 30 June, 2006 03:00 AM :

Please add another Lyme victim to the list:

Christopher Peter Thomas, Annapolis, MD died May 2006 from complications of Lyme

Abundance of ticks increases Lyme disease fears

By PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer

Perched on blades of grass, or burrowed into the fur of mice and deer, they're waiting to latch on to a human for their next meal.

Barely bigger than a freckle, ticks are out in force in summer months, and they're carrying nasty diseases they can pass on to humans.

Experts say both the abundance of ticks and the prevalence of Lyme disease are increasing in this area.

"I'm seeing more ticks than I have in years," said Dr. Michael Raupp, an entomology professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. "Ticks are going to be on the way up."

And prime tick season - May through September - coincides with the prime time for humans to be picnicking, hiking, bird-watching and engaging in other outdoor activities where ticks thrive.

That intersection of tick and human activity can lead to the transmission of illnesses such as Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi.

When caught early, Lyme disease is often easily treated with a course of antibiotics. But it often can be a tricky illness that can be difficult to diagnose let alone treated.

If it goes undetected, Lyme disease can spread, causing an array of troublesome symptoms, such as severe headaches, neck stiffness, shooting pains, dizziness and memory problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In rare cases, Lyme disease can even be fatal.

Last month, an Annapolis man, Christopher Peter Thomas, died from complications of Lyme disease. Mr. Thomas recorded sound for films and documentaries, and believed he contracted the illness while working on a set in Virginia.

"Maryland is definitely one of those states that always has Lyme," said Dr. Kelly Russo, a public health physician with the Anne Arundel County Department of Health. "In this area, physicians are aware of it."

In 2005, there were 117 reported cases of Lyme Disease in Anne Arundel County, up from 74 in 2004 and 77 in 2003.

Doctors must report Lyme disease cases, but Dr. Russo said the number of cases should be taken "with a grain of salt" because the disease doesn't always show up on tests and not all suspected cases are reported.

Lyme disease usually is transmitted from animal to human through ticks, said Dr. Raupp, the entomologist. He said it's a common misconception that only deer carry Lyme disease and pass it on to ticks. Mice and small rodents are more likely reservoirs, he said.

The tick that usually transmits Lyme disease is the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis. It is smaller than other ticks, sometimes as tiny as a little freckle.

Ticks are often found in fields or the transition area between a field or lawn and the woods.

When in those areas, people should use a repellent including DEET and wear long sleeves and tuck their pants into their socks to prevent ticks from climbing aboard. Light clothing can help in spotting ticks.

And after spending time in tick habitat, it's a good idea to give a good once-over to search for ticks. Enlisting a friend, partner or parent can help in finding hard-to-spot ticks.

Dr. Raupp said he had a case of Lyme disease in the late 1980s, though he was lucky to spot it and get treated quickly. The telltale sign of Lyme disease is the bull's-eye rash around the bite site, sometimes accompanied by flu-like symptoms.

Any ticks should be removed gently with tweeze, Dr. Russo said. After a bite, it's a good idea to keep a lookout for symptoms, which can show up days or weeks later, she said.

The good news is that if a tick bites, it usually takes 24 hours or more for the tick to transmit Lyme disease, Dr. Russo said.

Sometimes symptoms show up, even when a person has no idea they were even bitten by a tick.

That's what happened to Tony Caligiuri's then-8-year-old daughter, who didn't have any symptoms until she woke up one day in 2003 unable to walk.

What he thought was a sprained ankle turned out to be Lyme disease and prompted Mr. Caligiuri into becoming an advocate for Lyme disease patients.

Mr. Caligiuri, who grew up in Annapolis and now lives in Centreville, is the chief of staff for U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest.

After his family's ordeal - his daughter has been symptom-free for about four months now - Mr. Caligiuri got Mr. Gilchrest to sponsor a federal bill to improve Lyme disease research.

The bill calls for more federal money for research, the creation of an advisory panel and a national education campaign.

Mr. Caligiuri said he hopes more research will help end tests with false results, as well as address disagreements over how to treat Lyme disease.

The federal government recommends a short course of antibiotics, though some patients and doctors believe longer courses of antibiotics are necessary to treat chronic cases.

Though the measure has more than 40 cosponsors, Mr. Caligiuri acknowledged Lyme disease can be a tough sell. There also have been attempts at the state level, including a failed measure to require insurance companies pay for longer courses of antibiotics.

Mr. Caligiuri said he hopes momentum will build toward getting government action on the disease.

"We're getting so many calls from people in the same position," he said.


Published June 19, 2006, The Capital, Annapolis, Md.
Copyright © 2006 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.

[ 09-08-2011, 11:16 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 30 June, 2006 03:48 AM :

Another Lyme victim:

William "Billy" Boesche, 41, died June 10, 2006.

Obituary

William Henry "Billy" Boesché, 41, owner of a landscaping and hauling business, died June 10 at his home in Highland. He had chronic Lyme disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease.

Mr. Boesché owned CleanUps Unlimited in Highland for 14 years, working until about two years ago, when his condition worsened. He had previously worked in pool maintenance and the pool supplies business.

He was born in Bear Creek, Pa. He moved with his family in 1977 to Ocean City, where he enjoyed spending time at the beach. He liked to work around the house and was considered the family historian.

Survivors include his wife of 17 years, Michele Boudrye of Highland; his mother, Betty Boesché of White Marsh, Md.; three brothers, Steven Boesché of Sykesville, Md., Jon
Boesché of White Marsh and David Boesché of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; and a sister, Michelle Gilder of Bethesda.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Article:

Lyme disease patient diagnosed self
By Laura D'Alessandro
-----------------------------------
(photo)

Dr. James Burns, owner of the Main Street Med center in Salisbury uses a scaple to remove a tick from a patients back.

(First in a two-part series)

OCEAN CITY -- Local attorney Jay Phillips spent four-and-a-half months with constant flu conditions, a migraine headache and a fever of 103 degrees before he finally realized he might have Lyme disease.

"I estimate I had it for about 10 years before it broke out," he said. Phillips' initial diagnosis didn't even come from a doctor. He discovered it himself.

"Here I am sick as a dog and tired all the time, aching all over, stiff neck ... the whole nine yards," he said. "I had come in contact with the Pennsylvania Lyme Disease Association and had a pamphlet with a test in the back."

Phillips went down the list of symptoms in the pamphlet. He said he scored around 75 percent positive, but when he approached his doctor he wasn't given any help.

"I subsequently have learned that a lot of doctors have an aversion to being known as a Lyme doctor. It's just politically unpopular," he said.

Unable to find treatment, he sought the help of the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society and was directed to specialist Dr. Gregory Bach who, like any Lyme specialist, is located three to four hours away.

During one of his many visits to Bach's Pennsylvania office for hefty antibiotic treatments, Phillips met people in the waiting room with astonishing cases.

A girl in her mid-20s had been misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis and was prescribed steroids. "She had been treated at the University of Pennsylvania and John Hopkins; she's suing them for malpractice," Phillips said. The steroids made her Lyme disease worse, Phillips said. He described her as just now able to stand on her own, and with impaired speech.

Phillips also ran into a familiar face in Bach's office. Billy Boesche, a fellow Ocean City resident who had relocated to Columbia, Md., had been infected with Lyme disease three times. His first two infections came from tick bites on Assateague Island.

"A neurologist at John Hopkins told him there was no such thing as chronic Lyme disease," Phillips said. Boesche died June 10 in his home. His obituary said he suffered from chronic Lyme disease and subsequently developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Boesche, Phillips and the young girl he met in the waiting room are just a few among the many people who have had trouble finding proper treatment for Lyme Disease.

In 2005, 1,235 cases were reported in Maryland and 891 cases were reported the year before, according to Robert Beyer of the Maryland Vector-born Disease Interagency
Work Group.

Despite word of its prevalence on the Eastern Shore, the Worcester County Health Department has only confirmed eight cases in 2005 and seven in 2004. However, Debra Stevens of the department said this data may not include cases that do not fit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's criteria.

"For a confirmed case to get reported to the CDC and meet the criteria, the bull's-eye rash has to be at least 5 centimeters," Stevens said. "Or they must have the lab test and symptoms."

But not every infected tick bite leaves the signature rash. Phillips said the standard blood test, the ELISA test, used by doctors is only about 65 percent accurate.

Phillips said the western blot test and more advanced DNA testing is accurate but is not accepted by mainstream doctors who are also unwilling to treat or recognize chronic Lyme disease.

"Insurance won't pay for that. They don't like you to have it unless the Lyme shows up on the standard blood test," he said. "But it moves in and sets up home in the cells."

Now, Phillips takes a high dosage of medication and must cleanse his kidneys and liver every day so the antibiotics don't damage them.

"I have to go to Pennsylvania every month and every month they draw blood to see the status of my various bodily functions," he said.

If he had only been diagnosed sooner, the treatment would not be so severe.

"When it becomes imbedded in the cellular structure it takes long-term and high antibiotic therapy," he said.

The Lyme Disease Association of the Lower Shore and other organizations, such as ILADS, are working to make Lyme Disease treatment widely accepted and available.

Reach Laura D'Alessandro at 410-213-9442, Ext. 19 or e-mail ldalessand@dmg.gannett.com.

Originally published Thursday, June 22, 2006
Worcester County Times

[ 09-08-2011, 11:05 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by pmerv (Member # 1504) on 30 June, 2006 03:55 AM :

Here's what I know:

I am keeping a log of obits I see. We are not doing obits in the Lyme Times any more because people found them depressing and some parents didn't want their kids to see
them. A big proportion were suicides.

Sarah Weiss Olson had a webpage with a list but she stopped doing it. She used to contact the people and verify everything. I don't know if she still has the info.

Tom Grier and some other people were working on an autopsy project, but weren't able to complete it.

I have investigated the idea of an autopsy project. The other day I called NDRI which is a middleman for getting tissues to researchers. They suggested I contact tissue banks and see if they could help us. It would mean asking for a corner of a freezer to save bits until a researcher wanted them. Or seeing if the banks had another idea.

We would need to design a form and figure out what bits should be harvested for maximum yield. People would have to fill out the forms and probably pay up front.
Someone would have to keep track of everything.

Alan MacDonald thinks it is not worthwhile since the evidence he has published, no one is interested in. Paul Duray said he would help with forms. Nick Harris probably would also know what bits were best.

Autopsies are expensive.

That's where it is now, folks, as far as I know. Does anyone want to be a project manager because that's what it's going to take.

pm

[ 09-08-2011, 11:08 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 30 June, 2006 04:26 AM :

Published: June 20, 2006 11:49 pm
Henry Daily Herald, McDonough, GA

06-21-06 Obituaries

Brian Hirsch

Brian Hirsch, age 43, of McDonough, Ga., died Monday, June 19, 2006. He was born in Tampa, Fla., to Vern and Marian Herron Hirsch. Brian fought a long and courageous faith led battle with ALS (Lou Gehrig's)/Lyme disease for seven years.

His faith in Christ never diminished and his smile never faded. His motto was ``I can choose to laugh or I can
choose to cry. I choose to laugh.''

His life verse was Proverbs 3:5-6. `Trust in the Lord
with all your heart and lean not to your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him and He will make your path straight.'

Brian was a member of Salem Baptist Church and the Encourager's Sunday school class. He was a Nascar fan and an avid sportsman who enjoyed playing and coaching. He was the owner of Eagle Electric and was known in the community as a colleague not a competitor.

Most important to him was his family. He was a loving husband, father, brother and son.

Mr. Hirsch is survived by his wife, Kay Hirsch of McDonough, Ga.; children, Justin Hirsch of McDonough, Ga., Kalina Hirsch of McDonough, Ga.; parents, Vern and Marian Hirsch of Stockbridge, Ga.; siblings, Michael Lyle of McDonough, Ga., Richard Lyle of Forsyth, Ga., Kathy Holt of Stockbridge, Ga., Deann Oliver of Jackson, Ga., Thomas Hirsch of Stockbridge, Ga., Rhonda LaTourette of Jackson, Ga.; wife's parents, Clark and Gwen James of McDonough, Ga.; sisters-in-laws, Regina Hammock of Canton, Ga., and Heather Graham of Acworth, Ga.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday, June 22, 2006 at Salem Baptist Church with the Rev. Rick Statham and the Rev. Dan McKay officiating.

Interment will follow at Fairview Memorial Park. The family will receive friends Wednesday, June 21, 2006 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Salem Baptist Church, Phase I-Recreation Department, 1724 Georgia Highway 155 N, McDonough, Ga., 30252. Those who wish
may sign the on-line registry at

www.cannon-cleveland.com.

Cannon Cleveland Funeral Directors 770-914-1414.

[ 09-08-2011, 11:12 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 30 June, 2006 04:42 AM :

Kym Cooper, 1968-2006

Published Wednesday, January 18, 2006

Kimberly Ann "Kym" Nagle Cooper, 37, of Columbia passed away Monday, Jan. 16, 2006, at her home after a long battle with Lyme disease.

Cooper

Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 21, at Memorial Funeral Home with Adam Boster officiating.

Kym was born Aug. 2, 1968, to Steve and Susan Telin Nagle at Fort Leonard Wood.

Survivors include her mother, Susan Cooper, and stepfather, Gary, of Columbia; her father, Steve Nagle, and stepmother, Robyn, of St. Louis; three sisters, Steffany Boster and her husband, Adam, of Columbia, Margaret Nagle of St. Louis and Alecia Nagle of Redlands, Calif.; one brother, Robert Nagle of St. Louis; and four nieces and nephews, Jace, McKayley, Faith and Lukas Lee Boster.

Kym is remembered for her love of family, music, dancing and the great Missouri outdoors.

In her childhood she studied gymnastics, which grew into a lifelong love of modern dance. She was an accomplished swimmer and especially enjoyed her many visits to Finger Lake State Park and Rock Bridge State Park.

Last summer, Kym rescued a small boy from drowning in a backyard pool. Before contracting Lyme disease, she served as a licensed practical nurse and is remembered for her kind heart and special skills as activities director
working with senior citizens at Fayette Nursing Home.

Family is recommending donations be made to the National Lyme Disease Association Inc., a not-for-profit corporation, through the association's Web site,

www.lymediseaseassociation.org,

or directly to the Lyme Disease Association Inc., P.O.
Box 1438, Jackson, N.J., 08527.

[ 09-08-2011, 11:15 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 30 June, 2006 09:40 PM :

One hundred now...

there just aren't any words...

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Posted by trueblue (Member # 7348) on 30 June, 2006 10:23 PM :

Can I add one without an obit?

Eileen Secor was my local support group leader when I was first diagnosed. She died of a massive heart attack in her sleep at 43 years old.

She lived in New York state.

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Posted by cordor (Member # 9449) on 30 June, 2006 11:15 PM :

I am so happy to see this subject being talked about. I have felt that way for quite some time now. I have told my Husband "Make sure my obt says Chronic Lyme". People need to be made aware of the seriousness of this disease.

The doctors that say "there is no such thing as chronic lyme" will never know what they are talking about, unless it hapens to them or their family. Sad state of affairs.

These are the ones that have promised to do no harm. I have run into quite a few of them.

Not my lyme doc, but others that I have been referred to for other medical conditions. They can be so cruel. And it's a shame.

Thank you for bringing up this important subject and I will start writing mine also.

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Posted by Tincup (Member # 5829) on 01 July, 2006 01:58 AM :

Oh my God... this is insane.

I came here tonight and I just saw the obituary for another one of our Lymenet members... ALS/Lyme. He was one of the most dear people I've ever met.

A few notes about Billy...


http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=1&t=045364#000001

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Posted by lifeline (Member # 3445) on 01 July, 2006 09:13 PM :

This is, indeed, very humbling...very sad to read...all too young...

There is not enough research...not enough in the medical profession who care...we seem to be all we have, here at Lymenet, and, with a few, too few, doctors who dare take their chances...who care enough to treat us.

lifeline

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 05 July, 2006 03:09 AM :

Dear friends,

As I add to this growing list, I would like to make it as accurate as possible. If any of you knew the deceased, will you please help by providing whatever information that you can?

I am needing:

name
age
state of residence
family contact info, if posible
obits, if possible


We are already in motion with the Memorial Park project. I'm pleased that some of you are open to this idea in conjunction with the center.

Again, if anyone would like to help with the Memorial project, please feel free to contact me personally, or reply to the Memorial post:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=045367

(I could sure use a bit of help with this)

Thanks,
Melanie

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Posted by trueblue (Member # 7348) on 05 July, 2006 02:32 PM :

Melanie,

I'll edit my post above to reflect the state (New York) I have no further info. It was a long time ago, maybe 12 years?

I only know she had a teen-aged daughter that was or just had started college.

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Posted by jazzygal (Member # 9145) on 06 July, 2006 01:07 AM :

This is something I have been pondering lately...if this disease takes me out, I am talking to my family about donating my organs to a reputable research group who is studying lyme and chronic lyme.

It seems the least I can do. I wont be needing those organs after I am gone and they are not donate-able for human transplant--so why not help the Lyme community out??

I am making sure my family knows my wishes in advance so no one will pressure my husband into not doing it.

It seems the most easy way to get the research to reflect accurately what is going on is to provide them with study materials that we KNOW meet the criteria!

Just a thought...

JazzyGal

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Posted by seibertneurolyme (Member # 6416) on 06 July, 2006 01:34 AM :

JazzyGal,

For your info.

What you have suggested may be easier said than done. My husband's mother had always planned to donate her body to science. She even had it in her will.

However, the institution she chose (a medical college) would only accept bodies that were physically located within 40 miles I think it was of their institution. Lawyers also indicated that the request was not binding on family -- they could overturn it if they wished.

If you are serious about this, then you probably should do some additional research now.

Some specific diseases and/or institutions do have active procurement programs and established procedures for doing this.

Bea Seibert

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Posted by lymemomtooo (Member # 5396) on 14 July, 2006 10:04 AM :

I have a weird question..I run a dusty old museum and do a lot of genealogy research for people. We have even had requests from Europe to find long lost relatives..

HOw do you find research on a deceased person if they have donated their body to science?

Normally, I go thru cemeteries and the local church burial records and nothing like this would be included.

While it is not a big deal to any of us living..trust me, I would not tell the familes that have come from Wales in the last few years to hug a grave that I do not know where they were taken.

Just a stupid question I suppose..But I currently need some diversions..lymemomtooo

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 14 July, 2006 04:47 PM :

[Obituary]

Kathleen E. Schuyler, 52, of Avondale, PA passed away in Fair Hill,MD on June 21, 2006. She was the wife of Roy L. Schuyler III with whom she shared 30 years of marriage.

Born in Springfield, OH, she was the daughter of the late Clifford R Schumacher and Dorothy E. Schumacher of State College, PA. She was a member of Red Clay Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, DE.

Kathleen's passion was education. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Penn State University with Distinction in 1973, a Master of Arts in Remedial Reading from Lehigh University in 1975, and a degree of Juris Doctor Cum Laude from Widener University in 1996.

She is survived by:

Husband: Roy L. Schuyler III

2 daughters: Lynn S. Harris and her husband Dr. Matthew R. Harris of Payson, AZ Karen Schuyler of Palo Alto, CA

One Son: Stephen F. Schuyler of Avondale, PA

One Brother: Clifford A. Schumacher of Milford, MI

In accordance with the wishes of the decedent, services and burial are private.

Contributions in her memory can be made to the Lyme Disease Association of Southeastern, PA, PO Box 944, Chadds Ford, PA 19317.

Arrangements are being handled by the Kuzo & Grieco Funeral Home, Inc. Online condolences may be made by visiting

www.griecofuneralhomes.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=015411

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Posted by snowflake (Member # 8950) on 17 July, 2006 02:51 AM :

Obituary
Lori Lynn (Daman) Widlund of Minnesota

Widlund, Lori Lynn (Daman) Age 42, went to be with the Lord on April 20th after a difficult battle with Lyme Disease. Preceded in death by Grandpa Art Daman, Grandpa and Grandma Simonson.

She will be deeply missed by her children, Par Widlund and Vanessa (Rai) Manrique; loving parents Harlen and Sandie Daman; sisters, Julie Korus and Michelle (Brian) Gunderson; nieces and nephews, Brittney (Chris) Lingasin and Aaron Korus, Jacob and Ellie Gunderson, Daman and Aidan Lingasin; and her special pet Samantha.

Memorial service 3 PM Saturday, April 29 at Roberts-Eckert Funeral Home, 555 SW Centennial Drive, Forest Lake, MN. Visitation from 1:30 until 3:00 PM Saturday at the funeral home.

Memorials preferred to Lyme Disease Assoc. Inc., PO BOX 1438, Jackson, NJ 08527.

Lori suffered for so long and is finally free of pain. May she know the peace and unconditional love she always gave to us. "We didn't know how lucky we were to have
her... We know now."

A special thanks to Dr. Betty Maloney, who befriended and helped her on this journey.

Roberts-Eckert 651-464-4422 roberts-eckert.com

Published in the Star Tribune on 4/27/2006.

http://www.legacy.com/StarTribune/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonId=17552082

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Posted by lymemomtooo (Member # 5396) on 17 July, 2006 10:55 AM :

Were it not for God's intervention and good timing, I am afraid I would have had to add a name for last night. Parents please be very vigilent with cutters..Sometimes they find too
sharp an object. lmt

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Posted by treepatrol (Member # 4117) on 18 July, 2006 08:35 AM :

Harry Hartner of Manhattan, Kansas, died on Jan. 26, at the age of 62, after suffering from Lyme disease and terrible headaches for almost 4 years. He had been on an IV antibiotic for 4 weeks.

He had a bad Herxheimer reaction from the drug, which was causing a severe headache that wasn't relieved by medication, severe insomnia which was continuing for several days in a row, severe depression, and severe thinking problems.

He took his own life.

Harry had several tick bites in May of 2000 after working in his pasture and became ill shortly after that. He continued to suffer from chronic fatigue and headaches, and he kept getting fevers.

His wife Karen suspected it was Lyme disease, but they were told by doctors that people can't get Lyme disease in
Kansas.

The following year, in May, 2001, he was in his pasture again and was bitten by several more ticks. He became ill just 16 hours later, with a high fever.

This time he was treated with 3 weeks of doxycycline.
He continued to suffer from a severe headache and depression and went from doctor to doctor for two more
years, undergoing numerous tests which didn't help.

He finally saw a Lyme disease doctor in July of 2003 and began antibiotic treatment on August 1. He and his wife joined the Kansas City Lyme Association in September.

Harry took oral medications: clindamycin, quinine,
amoxicillin, and flagyl, before starting Claforan by IV.

Nothing made the headache go away. He became discouraged. Harry leaves his wife Karen; a son, Keith Hartner; 2 daughters, Hilary Wahlen and Kayleen Classen; one sister; and 2 grand-daughters.

Harry's family wants to prevent this tragedy from happening to other people. They are trying to get the
word out that Lyme disease is in Kansas.

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Posted by Tincup (Member # 5829) on 18 July, 2006 08:05 PM :

I know Melanie has been feeling rather icky lately... and no rush at all or pressure... but I was wondering if there has been any updates on the proposed Lyme Disease Memorial
project?

Thanks!

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 18 July, 2006 08:40 PM :

YES!

You must have been reading my mind again...scary thought.

I am about to post an update any minute now.
(and sadly...also add updates to the growing fatalities list)

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 18 July, 2006 08:48 PM :

Dear Friends,

The LD memorial park project is well underway!

Here are few updates...

* We are at this time going through the process of establishing non-profit status and developing a Board of Directors (all LD patients)

* We are developing a website as an informational hub (friendly to LD patients)

* We are verifying the growing list of TBD fatalities, contacting families, and researching obituaries

* We have begun contacting state support group leaders to ask for additional names and state specific information

* We are researching appropriate site locations

* We are researching existing memorial proposals, site development issues, and design criteria

* We are developing our Mission Statement and Bylaws

* We are gathering ideas and brainstorming Facilities concepts

* And, we are developing the preliminary conceptual design

I am very excited about this project...and very pleased that Billy's family has embraced it. The design concept is slowly making its way from my head onto paper, and I hope to share that with you all very soon!

This will be an ongoing project; a living Memorial. My greatest wish would be for each of us to obtain a sense of ownership by participating in its developmental stages and in its continual growth.

If any of you are in the position to offer help with the researching, brainstorming, or any other suggestions...we are all ears!

Also, I would like to take this opportunity to thank each of you who have already offered your help...it is appreciated beyond words.

Sincerely,
Melanie Reber


``I too tend to plant trees in honor of those I love that pass away! Something symbolic to me about trees I guess, whether it be the trees branches reaching toward heaven, or just the growth year after year - signifying strength throughout all kinds of weather!'' - Billy Boesché


"The roads are different, but the goal is one. When people reach the goal, all those who yelled at each other along the road, 'You are wrong!' or 'You are a blasphemer!' forget all possible differences. There, all hearts sing in unison." Rumi

(thanks lightfoot [Smile] )


The National Lyme disease Memorial Park Project:

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=045367

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Posted by PinchotGail (Member # 5066) on 26 July, 2006 01:41 AM

Dr. Michael G. Linebaugh MANCHESTER TWP.

Dr. Michael G. Linebaugh, 60, a well known York orthodontist, died Thursday, April 27, 2006, at his home, Walnut Run Farm, after a lengthy battle with chronic Lyme Disease and resulting ALS.

His wife of 39 years, Wanda M. (Caufman) Linebaugh, and family were at his side. Born October 17, 1945, in York, he was a son of the late Dale W. Linebaugh and Ruth V. Linebaugh of York.

He is also survived by two sons, Michael C. Linebaugh and his wife, Nicole of York, and Stephen T. Linebaugh and his wife, Ashley of Lancaster; a grandson, Preston W. Linebaugh of York; a brother, Judge Stephen P. Linebaugh and his wife, Jane of Dover; a sister, Cecilia A. Dove and her husband, Dr. Scott Dove of Flint Hill, Va.; nieces, Emily
and Megan Linebaugh; and nephews, Jenkins, Reed, Brian, and Justin Dove.

A 1963 graduate of William Penn Senior High School, he held degrees from Juniata College, University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, and Georgetown University
School of Dentistry.

While in dental school, he was awarded a U.S. Navy Dental Corps scholarship and was selected for a dental residency at The Bethesda Naval Hospital. An assignment with the Navy took him to the remote duty station in Argentia, Newfoundland.

After completing an Orthodontia Residency at Georgetown in 1979, he established a private practice in York. He was a past president of the York County Dental Society.

Additional professional memberships include

The Pennsylvania Dental Society, The American Dental Association, American Association of Orthodontists, and Diplomat American Board of Orthodontists.

He was the first Chief of Orthodontics at the inception
of York Hospital's George Bentzel Dental Center. For fifteen years he served as Orthodontist for the York County Cleft Palate Clinic. In addition to developing several orthodontic appliances, he was published and contributed to a textbook in Clinical Orthodontics.

Dr. Linebaugh had also been a member of Equadent, completing three mission trips to Ecuador to treat dental and facial deformities of orphaned and indigent children.

Dr. Linebaugh was an avid outdoorsman enjoying hunting, fishing, sailing, tennis, and jogging. He ran in the Pittsburgh and Marine Corps marathons. He was a hobby farmer.

Dr. Linebaugh was a lifelong member of the York YMCA. He was a patron of The Farm Lands Trust, The York Symphony Orchestra, and the Strand Capitol Performing Arts Center.

He was a lifetime member of St. John's Episcopal Church, where he had served as acolyte, lector, and chalicer. A member of the Vestry at various times, he served as both
Junior and Senior Warden.

A visitation will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 5, 2006, at Kuhner Associates Funeral Directors, Inc., 863 S. George St. (the former Hahn Home), York.

A memorial service is scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday, May 6, 2006, at The Episcopal Church of Saint John the Baptist, 140 N. Beaver St., York, with his pastor, the Rev. David W. Lovelace, officiating.

Burial will be in the Lloyd Memorial Garden of the Church with reception to follow in the Parish Hall. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St.
John's Episcopal Church, 140 N. Beaver St., York, PA 17403; or to a favorite charity.

Published in the York Daily Record & York Dispatch on 4/28/2006.


Gail

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Posted by shadow13 (Member # 1467) on 26 July, 2006 04:31 AM :

I am just amazed after reading this post ... amazed that we still have to fight to have Lyme disease be recognized by those who pull the purse strings.

I don't have any obits to add, but a few years ago I was staying in Cape Cod with a friend for a week. In that span of ONE WEEK, there were THREE obituaries with cause of
death related to Lyme Disease.

The memorial is a wonderful idea. If I can do anything, please do not hesitate to let me know. Right now I am going to write my own obituary.

Thanks,
Deb

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 26 July, 2006 10:12 AM :

My dear friends,

Thank you so very much for continuing to contribute information to this list.

It IS very difficult work, but so necessary for all of us to make our voices heard...and the voices of the departed counted for.

If you would like to contribute other information, please do. If you can locate nanes, ages, state of residence, or obits, etc.

PLease post those here so I can add them in.

Also, I would like to ask that you make sure to add the STATE with your information...some obits are difficult for me to decipher state information from because they were posted locally with only citiy information included.

I know this is sad and sobering...but it is our reality. And until we can show that TBD associated deaths do indeed occur everywhere, we will contiue to be dismissed and
uncounted as having a serious diseases.

My sincerest thanks,
Melanie

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 18 September, 2006 12:42 PM :

Professor commits suicide after catching dementia from tick bite

18.09.06

Dr. Alasdair Crockett

http://tinyurl.com/nqtvq)

Brain disease: Alasdair Crockett killed himself

One of the country's top experts on modern life may have killed himself after catching a rare brain disease from a tiny insect bite.

University professor Alasdair Crockett was found dead in woods near his home on Saturday 48 hours after he was reported missing.

His distraught widow has told police the the leading academic was suffering from anxiety after he was bitten by a wood tick that carries the potentially-deadly Lyne Disease.

The illness can usually be treated and cleared up with anti-biotics but in extremely rare cases if it is not caught and treated early it attacks the nervous system leading to dementia.

The land, air and sea search for Dr Crockett, 38, was called off when police officers combing countryside around the family's home in Brightlingsea, Essex found a body in creekside woods a mile away.

A former research fellow at Nuffield College Dr Crockett took up a senior part-time post last year with a prestigious think tank that monitors life in modern Britain.

As one of the chief officers with the Institute for Social and Economic Research Dr Crockett and his colleagues based at Essex University collect data on people's changing lives.

Their findings are considered so important they are often used in determining government policy.

Cambridge-educated Dr Crockett, who held a Masters Philosophy degree, specialised in the sociology of religion and 19th century economic history.

But his life changed as he was forced to come to terms with the more serious long-term effects of Lyme Disease, an illness initially caused by an insect bite and often picked up by walkers and ramblers.

If treatment is not given early enough the disease can lead to severe mental illness such as schizophrenia.

A spokesman for Essex police said that Dr Crockett had been exhibiting symptoms of extreme anxiety which is among the effects of the disease in its advanced stages.

On Saturday after a widespread search involving a police helicopter, divers and searchers on the ground, Dr Crockett's body matching his description was found in Thicks Wood a 15-minute walk from near the family's home in the popular yachting village.

The hunt for the missing professor had involved a sweep of countryside around the town and divers were preparing to explore rivers and sandpits in the area.

A description of Dr Crockett - 6ft tall, slim with collar-length dark hair and wearing rectangular glasses - was also circulated to ports and airports.

But police said when he vanished he had taken nothing with him, such as his wallet, and was wearing only a T-shirt, trousers and shoes.

Mrs Crockett and the couple's two young children are currently being comforted by family and friends.

A family liaison officer said: "Understandably Mrs Crockett is devastated by the news and totally distraught, as are his family and close friends.

"She has asked that people respect her privacy as she comes to terms with the death of her husband."

An inquest will be held but a police spokesman said yesterday that foul play was not suspected and they were not looking for anyone else in connection with Dr Crockett's death.

Lyme Disease is caused by a single bite of a spider-like wood tick found in forests and on moorland all over the country, often where there are deer.

The initial symptoms of a rash, drowsiness and muscle pains can normally be treated successfully with anti-biotics.

But in extremely rare cases it can develop and become a chronic illness which slowly destroys the nervous system.

It leads to loss of hearing, numbness and can eventually
cause serious mental health problems such as schizophrenia

Posted by heiwalove (Member # 6467) on 18 September, 2006 04:31 PM


it can develop into a chronic illness which destroys the nervous system "in extremely rare
cases" - extremely rare? i don't ****** think so. grrrr.

thank you to everyone who contributed to this post. it all makes me unbelievably sad & infuriated.

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 20 September, 2006 05:01 PM :

Librarian was dedicated to students, family

Tuesday, September 19, 2006

By MARIAN ACCARDI
Times Staff Writer accardi@htimes.com

Vickie Crawford of Athens was a career teacher, and her passion for getting students excited about reading was so strong that she returned to school in her late 40s so she
could become a librarian.

"Vickie realized how important it is for children to learn how to read and to develop a love for reading," said Joe Jackson, the principal at Athens Middle School, where
Crawford was a librarian. "Lives have been enriched because of their experience with her."

Crawford even spent two summers driving back and forth to Livingston to take courses toward earning a master's degree in library media - her third master's degree - from the University of West Alabama. She was the librarian at Athens Middle School for about four years until taking medical leave, then she retired last year when she was unable to keep working because of the effects of Lyme disease.

Crawford died Sept. 10 at age 55. She is survived by her husband, Gary Crawford; two sons, Aaron Crawford and Tyler Crawford; a stepson, Michael Sean Crawford; her father, Charles Griffin, and mother, Irene Griffin; seven grandchildren; two brothers, Derald Griffin and Harrison Griffin; and two sisters, Glenda Collier and Charlene McClendon.

"She thought that children should be raised in a wholesome environment and be encouraged to read at an early age," said Gary Crawford. "She loved getting children
interested in reading."

Vickie was dedicated to making Athens Middle School's library "a center of learning," Jackson said. "She worked extremely hard at that.

"She was a special person because of her commitment to education and her desire to make a difference with children."

After earning a master's degree in physical education from Jacksonville State University, Vickie Crawford taught P.E. at Brownwood Elementary School in Scottsboro. She also
taught kindergarten at First Baptist Church preschool in Athens for a few years.

While teaching at Athens Elementary, she earned a second master's degree, this one in early childhood development. She also taught at Elkmont Elementary.

Even the years when the Crawfords' sons were young and she took time off from teaching, Vickie was a volunteer at their schools.

"She always had the best interest of the students in mind," said Jane Lynn, a part-time library aide at Athens Middle School. "She was very dedicated to her job. She always
wanted to make sure everything was taken care of."

Lynn recalled that Vickie was always smiling despite her illness. "Even when she wasn't feeling well, she gave it her all."

Vickie was a caring person, always sending out get-well cards and birthday cards, her husband said. To keep track of the birthdays of family members and friends, she recorded them at the first of every year in a new calendar.

Even when the couple traveled, Vickie would take along a small pocket calendar so she wouldn't miss anyone's birthday. "She thought that everyone should get a birthday card," Gary Crawford said.


© 2006 The Huntsville Times
© 2006 al.com All Rights Reserved.

http://www.al.com/news/huntsvilletimes/index.ssf?/base/news/11586573734810.xml&coll
=1


****************************************

Vickie's story:
http://lymeblog.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=36

[ 09-08-2011, 11:53 AM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 23 September, 2006 10:19 AM :

St. Petersburg Times - St. Petersburg, Fla.
Author: RYAN DAVIS
Date: Jul 6, 2002
Start Page: 1
Section: PASCO TIMES
Text Word Count: 372


Copyright Times Publishing Co. Jul 6, 2002

Vincent Sota fought big fires, but it was a tiny tick that rendered him a quadriplegic. Sota, a former Pasco County Fire Rescue driver engineer and emergency medical
technician, died Thursday. He was 47.

He started at the county in 1991 and worked in the Hudson, Seven Springs and Crystal Springs stations.

His wife, Mary, has been fighting to draw attention to his affliction for more than two years. Vincent Sota was diagnosed in 1999 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal nerve disease that renders its victims unable to walk or even talk. It is commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Mary Sota, 40, refused to believe the diagnosis. Her research led her to believe he had Lyme disease, which is caused by bacteria contracted from ticks and mimics many symptoms of ALS. Mary Sota said he caught it from a deer tick in Florida.

Detected early, Lyme disease is treatable, but it took 15 doctors before Vincent Sota was diagnosed with Lyme disease.

Every time his story got out, Mary Sota said she received e- mails and calls from people across the United States who suffered similar fates.

They gave her hope, she said. Last year was the couple's 11th anniversary.

"He owes me 39 more," she told the St. Petersburg Times in December. "I'm not letting him go until I get 39 more years."

At that point, Vincent Sota was looking better. His 220-pound frame, which had withered at one point to 131 pounds, was starting to get bigger again.

He was home from the hospital. He was confined to a bed and couldn't speak, but he communicated with his wife by blinking. His children - David is 7 and Emiko two years
older - climbed into his bed to kiss him.

His wife slept by his side on an air mattress - but never for more than four hours at a time. She needed to monitor the machinery that helped him breathe and eat.

"I would love," she said, "to hear his voice again."

- Ryan Davis is the police reporter in Pasco County. He can be reached in west Pasco at 869-6245, or toll-free at 800-333-7505, ext. 6245. His e-mail address is
rdavis@sptimes.com.

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 23 September, 2006 02:20 PM :

The Orphan Patient
A Plea to Fellow Health Care Providers

http://www.publichealthalert.org/2-Page-6.html


A wonderfully written and heartbreaking account of what Travis Wilson endured...
by G.S.

[ 11. October 2006, 10:18 AM: Message edited by: Melanie Reber ]

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 15 October, 2006 01:54 PM :


The National Lyme disease Memorial Park Project:
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=045367

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Posted by TNhayley (Member # 8249) on 16 October, 2006 03:26 PM :

Lyme suicide. Long and sad....
Hayley

Coen plays on without No. 1 fan (MA)

The Boston Globe, Boston MA
October 14, 2006

Coen plays on without No. 1 fan

By Marty Dobrow, Globe Correspondent | October 14, 2006

AMHERST -- Liam Coen stood on the sideline, a portrait of serenity. His blond hair matted with sweat, his helmet to his hip, Coen soaked in the scene last Saturday: a sparkling autumn afternoon, a hint of crispness in the air,
maples firing, almost 16,000 people in the stands, his father and grandfather among them.

His University of Massachusetts team was already up on William & Mary, 45-7, and Coen's work was done. It had been another day at the office, efficient and lethal. He had
thrown the ball 17 times, completing 12, for 275 yards and a touchdown.

Coen had proved himself yet again a master of moving forward. Composed and quietly confident, he had dissected the Tribe defense. There was nothing he liked better than figuring out the geometry of the game -- looking at this stunt, that blitz, this package, and
figuring out what to do. It was all about adaptation.

Always, the question was: Given this, now what?

The analysis complete, Coen watched the fourth quarter play out, savoring every breath. The Tribe had the ball deep in their territory, third and 15. UMass linebacker Cesar Rosario, one of Coen's closest friends, stepped in front of a pass with nothing but green ahead of him, the
sweetest defensive candy.

His eyes were too big for his stomach, though, as he dropped the ball, then crumpled for a moment of anguish, lamenting what could have been. Coen couldn't resist, taking a few steps onto the field and swatting Rosario on the backside. He busted on him a little bit, but also told him, "It's no big deal."

A field goal and a few minutes later, UMass had its second straight 48-7 victory. The Minutemen were 4-1 (suffering only a 1-point loss on the road to Division 1-A Navy).

Coen was now No. 1 in the nation in Division 1-AA in passing efficiency. For a few moments afterward, he basked in the glow, sharing fists and fives with teammates, signing some autographs, squatting down to whisper something sweet to his 9-year-old cousin,
Emily.

Then, of course, there was the phone call from his best friend, Tim Day.

"Twelve of 17?" Day said, incredulously. "That's not so good. What happened with those other five?"

Coen laughed long and loud. Life was good.

But not perfect. Day was right. He, more than anyone, understood: Things could never be complete. That had been made abundantly clear nine months ago to the day when the darkness had become too much for Coen's mother, Beth.

For so long, they had been inseparable, doting mother and only child. If all was well, she would be there, of course. She had always been there, until that Saturday in January -- the day the star quarterback could not forget in a thousand lifetimes.

In his blood

In Rhode Island, the Coens are an institution. They stand for the things they believe in: family, education, football. In the smallest state, they have the biggest dreams.

They began with Liam's grandfather, Philip Coen, now 77, solid as a statue. In the underbelly of Newport during the Depression and World War II, Philip grew up amid the grit, not the glitz.

Far from the Gatsby-like mansions, he lived down an alley in a small apartment, working a couple of jobs even as a kid, shoveling coal before school. Sometimes on summer days he would escape for a swim at Second Beach, pounding the water in front of the colorful sailboats and yachts, the sweep of the Atlantic, the sense of possibility.

Even now, on summer days, you can see him out for a mile swim, dodging the jet skis, keeping his body taut, his mind alive.

Philip loved football, the way the game took your measure. He played before the days of facemasks, breaking his nose time after time, coming back for more. When Boston College offered him a full scholarship in the late '40s, he leaped at the chance. By his senior year, the lineman was the team's captain and MVP. Then it was back to Rhode Island for a lifetime of coaching and teaching, becoming a head of guidance, then a principal, then a superintendent of schools.

The football didn't fall very far from the tree with Philip's son, Tim, Liam's father. At Barrington High School, Tim was an all-state fullback and linebacker, a cannonball in pads. He turned down football scholarship offers to play baseball at Eckerd College -- a move he says he regretted right away.

After graduation, he returned to Rhode Island to the game he loved. For 31 years now he has been teaching special education and coaching football, currently at Portsmouth High.

In summers for years, he worked as the head lifeguard at Second Beach. That's what he was doing half a lifetime ago when he met the vibrant Beth Bowley, a college student with light brown hair and a smile he couldn't resist.

Her playful spirit was palpable, the musical laughter, the love of art and photography. Beneath the vivaciousness was a sensitivity he admired, an ability to feel the pain of
others.

In years to come, she would become a much-loved history teacher at South Kingstown High, a confidante to generations of students, a leader of the school's gay-straight alliance, an Irish Catholic board member for the Rhode Island Holocaust Museum.

They were married in 1982. Three years later, they had their only child. Blond-haired, blue-eyed Liam burst on the scene in November, making his dad happy by not arriving on a Saturday.

Special bond

Always, Liam respected the game. His grandfather would take him to Second Beach to skip stones, to walk along the cliffs, but mostly to throw a football. ``We always had a
ball, all the time playing catch," Liam said. Philip took Liam to many games at BC, a scene the youngster found mesmerizing.

At home with his father, he would watch game tape after game tape. ``I'd have to sit on the couch and throw the ball back and forth as he ran by all night long," Tim said.

In 1992, Tim took the head coaching job at Salve Regina, a Division 3 college in Newport. Liam was ever present. During games, he was the ball boy. At practices, he
would pester players to run routes.

``I didn't have much of my dad's time because he was always working," Liam said. ``When I did get to see him, I would take full advantage of it, play catch with all the coaches, talk to all the players. I really thought I was part of the team."

From a young age, he sought the discipline. He saw what it took. ``It was," said Tim, ``all he ever wanted to do."

On the home front, it was clear that Liam's mom was calling the signals. Both father and son say she did the lion's share of the parenting, pouring herself into Liam's life. She left work for years, not wanting to miss a thing, day care out of the question.

She soothed every wound, taught him to ride a bike, went for many a walk. In time, she got him out running 5-kilometer races with her. She pushed him hard in school, insisting on the extra mile. When there were problems with friends, or later with girls, Beth was the ear and the shoulder he would turn to again and again. ``She was awesome," Liam said, a smile blooming beneath his tightly drawn eyes. ``Me and my mom had a great bond."

``He was her world," said Tim. ``He was everything to her. She never missed anything he ever did."

When Liam went to school, Beth took the teaching job at South Kingstown High. In 1993, she took a day trip with colleagues for a workshop on Nantucket.

In a bog, she was bitten by a tick, and almost immediately got the bull's-eye swelling in her neck.

She was ill for much of the summer, but the Lyme disease was undiagnosed , and when she returned to school, her energy returned.

Tim recalls she often stayed up until 1 a.m. working on lesson plans, and sometimes awakened at 4 to run before school. Before long she was competing in marathons, pouring herself into her students and her son. She seemed to be the vision of vitality.

When Liam was ready for high school, the family moved from Warwick to North Providence. He enrolled at La Salle Academy. Tim left Salve Regina to coach his son. Football increasingly dominated their world.

Liam was a gangly youngster with big hands and big feet. He wasn't overly fast or strong. There were guys with better arms. But he had a presence, a composure, a push toward perfection.

He began to draw the attention of college coaches. The Coens sat with Joe Paterno at Penn State. They were invited to tryouts at Syracuse and Maryland and Virginia. BC seemed very interested, and that for Liam represented the dream.

Then there was UMass, a 1-AA program, decidedly a second choice. The Coens loved then-coach Mark Whipple, an innovative offensive mind, who offered Liam a full ride and told him not to feel any pressure about it -- ``See what happens with the 1-As, and understand that we'll be here for you."

In the end, he was the next guy at all of the 1-A programs, losing out at BC when the Eagles offered the scholarship to Chris Crane. Tim Coen was angry, but Liam took it in stride, and signed with UMass, comfortable with the program and excited about Whipple.

And then, just like that, Whipple left, accepting an offer to become quarterbacks coach with the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The Minutemen quickly hired Don Brown away from Northeastern. Right after the press conference, Brown's first phone call was to Liam Coen. ``We want to have you here," Brown said from his car. ``We want you to make this your home."

After a day of deliberation, Liam agreed.

Those high school years were tough on Beth. She was exhausted and experiencing an alarming amount of joint pain, and migraines that just wouldn't go away.

She now had to drive 45 minutes each way to school, and her once buoyant spirit began to lag. She didn't seem to be thinking that clearly at times. Doctors thought perhaps it was chronic fatigue syndrome, and began to prescribe pain medications .

The empty nest that followed when Liam went to UMass in the fall of 2004 hit her with seismic force. ``She just wasn't herself," Liam recalled. ``That just kept going and going. She was just in so much pain. "

Incomprehensible loss

The Coens struggled through Liam's freshman year, during which he redshirted, learning the system. He had a decent spring, then came back last fall as the backup to Tim Day, the senior starter.

Right from the start, the two had a bond. Day, too, was a competitive New England kid, having been raised in Manchester, N.H. Like Coen, he had a voracious appetite for the minutiae of the game.

And like Coen, he also was a leader, full of positive energy. He had known pain in his life, having had a father who killed himself when Tim was 4, but he never carried it as a chip -- most people on the team didn't even know
about it.

Day was coming off an excellent junior season, but he struggled in an opening win over Richmond. In Week 2, he had a disastrous time at Colgate, as the Minutemen committed seven turnovers just past halftime, and fell behind, 17-0. Nicked up, Day limped to the bench, and Brown decided to give Coen a chance.

The redshirt freshman almost rallied UMass all the way back, throwing a pair of touchdown passes and leading a final drive into Colgate territory. Though it stalled in the
17-14 loss, a star had been born.

The friendship that deepened between the two was out of some coach's dream. Day told Coen straight up, ``I think I can do a better job than you -- but I accept the coach's
decision." Rather than be bitter, Day worked hard with Coen to get him ready for the speed and brutality of the college game.

Then Day morphed into a receiver, and became one of Coen's favorite targets. When Coen suffered a concussion against James Madison, Day came off the bench to rally the Minutemen to victory -- then stepped back again the following week as Coen reclaimed his starting job. Off the field, the players talked and talked.

Coen had a stellar freshman campaign. He completed 63.9 percent of his passes. His 137.48 passing efficiency was 22d in the nation, and third in UMass history. His father was beaming, his grandfather all aglow.

But off the field, the Coens were facing a devastating battle. Beth, finally diagnosed, was told the Lyme disease had progressed so far that she was not apt to get any real relief for 3-5 years. She was on OxyContin and Vicodin, which sometimes dimmed the pain but left her listless and disoriented.

She was unable to work, to run, to do any art or photography. ``Everything she loved," said Tim Coen, ``she couldn't do."

After the season, Beth's depression deepened. When the semester ended, Liam went home to a world that was spiraling away. There was tension between his parents, and Liam found himself avoiding his mom.

``She was severely, severely depressed," he recalled, his voice quieting. ``I couldn't talk to her sometimes. I felt so bad. I couldn't even deal with it."

Liam's dad, who had gained some weight, was struggling with diabetes. Shortly after the new year, his heart began to race, and he was admitted to Miriam Hospital with suspected congestive heart failure. Liam tried to hold things together the best he could.

On Friday night, Jan. 6, he was at a buddy's house when his mother called. For an hour and a half he sat in his car in the driveway talking to her, and he felt much better about things.

``It was the first time [in so long] we had had a calm conversation," Liam said. He told her that they could get through this, and suggested they go to family counseling. ``She said she felt terrible, and I kept trying to build her up. She kept asking me if I loved her. I said, `Of course, I do. What are you talking about?' "

Liam returned home that night around 1 a.m., and went to sleep. In the morning, he left a note for his mother saying he was going to the hospital to see his dad, and that she could meet him there when she got up. Liam had bought his father a tiny television to watch the US Army All-American Game that day, a high school all-star contest.

They waited for Beth, and waited some more. Liam called several times, then asked a neighbor to go check. The neighbor found her next to a bottle of Vicodin. She was 46.

Numb, stunned, Liam worked to get his father discharged, and started calling relatives. He drove his dad home, and they didn't say a word the whole way. They arrived to a chaotic scene -- ``cop cars, all these people outside, just
a total mess. That . . . that will go down as the most difficult day of my life."

Given this, now what? His first non-family call went to Day, who was driving on a highway in New Hampshire.

``What?" Day shouted, pulling over to the shoulder. ``I'm coming down right now."

Coen was stunned at the support from people at UMass. Right in the middle of winter break, squadrons of players descended to Rhode Island, as well as the entire coaching
staff, and athletic director John McCutcheon. Coen leaned hard on the team.

``The support system here was the strongest," he said, ``the one I look to the most. It was really special. It was something I'll never forget."

At the funeral, overflowing with relatives and football players and students and teachers from South Kingstown High School, Tim Coen spoke his heart: ``I just want to thank Beth for bringing up such a wonderful son. I know that I was busy with a lot of things. I couldn't ask for a better son."

Back at school in the spring, Liam put together his best semester yet, earning a 3.4 grade-point average -- something he wishes his mother could see. In the spring game, he went 9 for 9, completing everything.

This fall, he hasn't been much off that mark. Going into today's game at Towson, he is completing 66.3 percent of his throws, and his gaudy 178.52 passing efficiency is unmatched at the 1-AA level.

After every touchdown, Liam has been pointing up to Beth, and given the prolific offense, she is getting plenty of contact from her son.

Tim Day, now living in Florida, has been in contact with Liam regularly, checking in about his mental health, busting his chops about football. ``I've never seen anyone handle something as maturely as he did," Day said. ``It's amazing for me to see how strong he's
been."

Brown, meanwhile, has been amazed at what he's seeing from his quarterback. ``I'm really proud of him," said Brown. ``Forget football -- I'm really proud of him as a man."

[ 09-08-2011, 12:10 PM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 16 October, 2006 05:21 PM :

Thanks for posting Haley,

I had Elizabeth Coen listed as a resident of RI at time of death, and this appears to be MA.

I can't really tell from this article...
can someone clear that up for us? Thanks.

(I think it is nap time for me)

M [Smile]

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www.LymeDoc.org

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Posted by TNhayley (Member # 8249) on 16 October, 2006 06:20 PM :

Sorry Melanie,

I just looked right over her name. My only excuse is .... it's raining? Here's the obit and you were correct:

Elizabeth Coen

NORTH PROVIDENCE - Elizabeth A. (Bowley) Coen, 46, of Sherwood Avenue, died Sunday, January 8, 2006, at her home after a 2-year illness. She was the wife of Timothy R. Coen. Mother of Liam P. Coen.

Born in Newport, RI, she was the daughter of Margaret (Maynard) Shea of Middletown and Rodney Bowley of Newport. She leaves two brothers, David P. Bowley of Exeter, NH and John P. Bowley of Groton, CT, a sister, Stacey A. Yarrow of Middletown; her stepfather, Daniel Shea and her stepmother, Paula Bowley.

Mrs. Coen was a history teacher at South Kingstown High School for 12 years until she became ill in 2004. She received an Associates Degree from Salve Regina University in Newport and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts, summa Cum Laude from Rhode Island College.

Beth was a loving, devoted and caring wife and mother, a beloved teacher, she was a confidant to many of her students. She was a member of the Board of Directors of the Holocaust Museum in Providence.

Visiting hours will be held on Wednesday, January 11, 2006, from 4-8 p.m. in the Russell J. Boyle & Son Funeral Home, 331 Smith Street, Providence. Funeral services and burial will be private.

In lieu of flowers, donations to American Lyme Disease Foundation, P.O. Box 684 Somers, NY 10589, in her memory would be appreciated.

Posted by sometimesdilly (Member # 9982) on 16 October, 2006 06:24 PM :

source for E. Coen's obit- is the Newport Daily News (online) Oct. 16, 2006.

[ 09-08-2011, 12:13 PM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by Melanie Reber (Member # 3707) on 02 November, 2006 12:55 AM :

Gregory Lee Bankert

Gregory Lee Bankert, 56 entered into eternal peace at his home on Sunday, October 29, 2006. He was the beloved husband of Tanya L. Bankert, with whom he celebrated 28
years of marriage and the loving father of Melissa L. Albaugh, Alicia L. Runkle, and Stephanie L. Bankert.

Born September 11, 1950, Greg was the son of Harold J. Bankert of Vero Beach, Fla., and the late Betty L. (Rohrbaugh) Bankert McLane.

Greg formerly was a self-employed remodeling contractor. Being an outdoorsman, Greg enjoyed hunting with his daughter Alicia, grandson Nathan, and his family and friends.

He also enjoyed NASCAR, fly-fishing and going camping at Poe Paddy State Park where he was most recently a campground host.

Greg liked his ice cream and going on shopping trips with his daughter Steph. He enjoyed using his hands and God-given talent to create furniture and crafts for his family and friends. Greg was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Dallastown, where he enjoyed singing in the choir.

In addition to his wife and daughters, Greg will be greatly missed by his sister, Viveca L. Miller and husband Larry of Lancaster; his grandchildren, Nathan, Ashley and Cortney
Albaugh of Littlestown; son-in-law Todd Runkle of Red Lion, father and mother-in-law, Robert and Catherine Hamberger; brothers and sisters-in-law, Zane Hamberger, Judy and James Whitecomb, Paula Zambito, John and Amy Hamberger, and Christine and Mark Pentz;

a host of nieces, nephews; and dear friends, including Rich and Mary Blymire.

Greg was preceded in death by his son, Michael L. Bankert; and stepfather, Ronald D. (Bud) McLane.

The viewing will be from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, November 3, 2006, at the John W. Keffer Funeral Home and Crematory, Inc., 902 Mt. Rose Ave.

A Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 251 E. Main St. Dallastown,
with the Rev. Charles Persing as the celebrant. Burial will be in Susquehanna Memorial Gardens.

Memorial contributions may be made to the York Lyme Disease Association, c/o 3600 Tower Drive, Dover, PA 17315.

www.kefferfh.com

Published in the York Daily Record & York Dispatch on 11/1/2006.

http://www.legacy.com/york/Obituaries.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=19792388

[ 09-08-2011, 12:19 PM: Message edited by: Tincup ]

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Posted by KarenB (Member # 10510) on 03 November, 2006 11:12 AM :

Oh my God,

I had no idea you could die from complications of lyme. I have read these and my heart
goes out to all the families. I just cried reading these.

What does it take for this country to recognize the impact of this disease?

So sad

karenb

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Amanda Reese, 25, Florida


http://news.yahoo.com/s/cdh/20051123/lo_cdh/lifeofhelpingotherscutshort

Life of helping others cut short

By Sheila Ahern Daily Herald Staff Writer Wed Nov 23, 7:24 AM ET

Carole Reese answered her phone late Saturday night. A stranger on the line said her daughter Amanda was in a Florida hospital and that she and her husband, Jim, should come.


Right away.

"At that exact moment I knew," Carole said. "A chill went through my entire body."

By the time Carole and Jim arrived in Florida early Sunday, Amanda, 25, was unable to talk and was hooked up to more machines than the couple could count. Later that day, Amanda died.

"She knew I was there," said Carole, tearing up. "I could tell she wanted me to fix her hair, so I did. She knew I was there. She looked right at me."

The week before she died, Amanda was near Orlando, starting a second volunteering stint with AmeriCorps. She was leading a team of 10 other AmeriCorps volunteers cleaning the Nature Conservancy in Kissimmee, Fla.

Neither her parents nor AmeriCorps officials know yet why Amanda died. An autopsy was performed Tuesday, but getting results could take weeks.

"She was such a healthy person," Jim said. "Then she just shut down."

Reese graduated from Rolling Meadows High School and Illinois State University. She was the only child of the Arlington Heights family.

Amanda and her team arrived in Florida last week. On Saturday, the group wrapped up a day of shopping and grabbed a bite to eat at a fast-food restaurant, Carole said.

A short time later, Amanda broke out in hives and experienced hot flashes. Her team members immediately took her to the hospital.

By the time Carole and Jim arrived early Sunday, Amanda's throat closed up and an X-ray showed she had an enlarged heart, Carole said.

"She declined too quickly," she said. "Everything shut down. Even the doctors don't know what could cause a young person's body to shut down so quickly."

Jim slowly shook his head from side to side Tuesday as he talked about his daughter's death.

"We don't know if it was a virus or something she was allergic to or what," he said.

Amanda had no serious health problems but caught Lyme disease as a child, Carole said.

"I'm thinking it might have been a compilation of things," Carole said.

Before coming to Florida, Amanda volunteered near Biloxi, Miss., helping hurricane victims who still were in temporary shelters but needed to be relocated to trailers supplied by the
Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Her work in Mississippi was nothing new for Amanda. Helping people was something she just always believed in, Jim said.

"She was a great girl," he said. "She lived her life for other people."

"Everyone who got to know her loved her," Carole added.

Dave Ponce is another Arlington Heights native who volunteers with AmeriCorps. The two became close friends while living in shelters and working 16-hour days in Mississippi, Ponce said.

"We were buddies," Ponce said. "It was an intense situation and hard sometimes because so many people needed so much help. But Amanda kept things light-hearted. She kept things in perspective."

AmeriCorps members must be between 18 and 24 years old and complete at least 1,700 hours of service during the 10-month commitment. In exchange, they receive about $4,700 to help pay for college.

Amanda was going to use that money to attend graduate school and eventually work with children, Carole said.

"Who knows what she would've been," she said.

Colleen Sullivan was Reese's roommate and sorority sister at Illinois State University.

"Amanda was just so much fun. Everyone loved her," she said. "I remember we went kayaking in Chicago. It was so much fun."

Sullivan took a train from Chicago to visit Amanda's parents Tuesday and is planning a wedding that won't be the same without Amanda, she said.

"She was going to be one of my bridesmaids," Sullivan said.

Services for Amanda Reese will be Saturday at Glueckert Funeral Home, 1520 N. Arlington Heights Road. Exact times are pending.

Serving: Cause of death likely won't be known for weeks

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Amanda Schmidt, 11, New Jersy

Amanda Schmidt
Mandy Schmidt, 11, of Sayreville, NJ, died of Lyme disease on Sept. 24, 1990, after a long illness.- From The Lyme Times, LT 3.1, summer 1992. Wednesday, September 26, 1990 LA Times P.M. Final Page: P-2
HEALTH; First Lyme Disease Death Told
By: From Times Wire Services
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- An 11-year-old girl has died of Lyme disease, marking what could be the nation's first reported case of a fatality caused by the tick-borne illness, health officials said today. The listing of Lyme disease as the cause of death for Mandy Schmidt of Sayreville was confirmed Tuesday, said Bernard Mihalko, the director of the Middlesex County Health Department. Tom Skinner, a spokesman for the federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, said today the agency had never received a report of a death from Lyme disease. Lyme disease is spread to humans by deer ticks infected with the bacteria. Type of Material: News Brief; Wire Service Story 1990 Los Angeles Times.

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Arlene DeLaurier, 79

DeLaurier, Arlene (Nee Jacob) On Sept. 19, 2006, Arlene would have been 80 years of age. She took a one way trip to Heaven on July 7, 2006. She was very sick for a long time, suffering from complications of Emphasema and Lyme Disease .

Preceded in death by her parents Arthur and Marie Jacob. Survived by her beloved daughter, Renee and her beloved son-in-law Steve Gehl, and her beloved son, Jim. She is also survived by her grandson, Steven Rehberg; her great-grandsons, Nicolas and Tyler Rehberg; her former spouse Ray; her brother Marvin "Bud" and his spouse Carol; her sister Carolyn Taylor and spouse Ed, along with many cousins, nieces, nephews, and Arlene's closest companion, Jeannie Karlik.

Arlene was employed by HOH Chemical and was a faithful Secretary to President Tom Boland. Arlene will be sadly missed by everyone!! So when you hear the song, "Always", know that she will be listening, too, knowing how loved she was by everyone!

Published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on 9/17/2006.

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Balsorah Lamar Savely Miller, 64, Virginia

http://msuinfo.ur.msstate.edu/alumnus/summer04/Alumnus_summer04.pdf

Balsorah Lamar Savely Miller
('61)--Seaford, Va.; historical interpreter
at Yorktown Victory Center, Sept. 22,
2003.

http://lymediseaseresourcec.bizland.com/archives/LT35.pdf

Balsorah Lamar Miller, ``Marnie,'' age 64, passed away on Sept 22, 2003 in her daughter's home in Richmond, Virginia from complications of ALS and Lyme disease.

She led an active and creative life, enjoying her job as historical interpreter at the Yorktown Victory Center for the 18 years prior to her illness.

She was ``in the battlefield'' (literally) and constantly exposed to ticks in her work. Some of her co-workers also developed Lyme.

The family wishes to acknowledge the loving, attentive care given to her by Dr. S. B., an ILADS board member. She will be particularly missed by her sister G. S., a nurse practitioner treating Lyme patients in Austin, Texas.

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Dr. Basil Roebuck, 75, Arizona

Former associate professor in psychiatry and neurology, Virginia (b Darlington 1923; q Durham 1945; MRCPsych), d 22 February 1998.

ROEBUCK, Dr. Basil, of Blacksburg, passed away Sunday, February 22, 1998, at St. Joseph's Hospital in Phoenix, Ariz.

He leaves to cherish his memory a loving family; his wife, Barbara; and his three daughters and a son, and their families; Belinda and Robert Profitko and their daughter, Kimberly, of Waldwyck, N.J., Christine and Richard Blake and her daughters, Sarah and Erin Burke of Mt. Pleasant, S.C., Sheila Roebuck and John Catts of San Rafael, Calif., and Patrick Roebuck of Walnut Creek, Calif......

A memorial service will be held at Bruton Parish Church, Colonial Williamsburg, at 11 a.m. on February 28, 1998. Funeral services will follow at Princess Anne Memorial Park, Virginia Beach. Arrangements are being taken care of by H.D. Oliver Funeral Apartments, Virginia Beach.

Those wishing to make memorial contributions, please consider the Lyme Disease Foundation, 1 Financial Plaza, Hartford, Conn. 06103.

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Robert "Bob" Schneider, 63, Indiana

http://www.courierpress.com/news/2006/aug/20/tick-talk/#comments

Evansville Courier & Press
Evansville IN
August 20, 2006

Family blames member's death on tickborne illness

By LIBBY KEELING
Courier & Press staff writer 464-7450 or keelingl@courierpress.com
Originally published 12:00 a.m., August 20, 2006
Updated 11:30 p.m., August 19, 2006

Robert "Bob" Schneider collapsed in his Spencer County home July 5.
Two days later, neighbors found him lying on the floor where he had
fallen.

The former Evansville resident was hospitalized for more than 25 days before his death Aug. 2 at St. Mary's Medical Center.

He was admitted to the intensive care unit with multiple organ and respiratory failure, low blood platelet levels, altered mental status and septic shock, a condition occurring when massive
infection results in low blood pressure and flow.

Members of his family are convinced omplications of Rocky Mountain spotted fever caused his death. Although an initial positive laboratory test for the tickborne bacterial illness was not
confirmed prior to his death, Schneider's son said medical staff found an embedded deceased tick and a live tick crawling on his 63-year-old father's body.

"The signs and symptoms all point to it," said Trent Schneider, 40. "I found out, that like colds or flu, children and elderly people are its prey, per se - the people most likely to develop severe complications."

When identified in early stages, Rocky Mountain spotted fever typically is a highly treatable disease. Its initial symptoms, however, are vague and flu-like, which complicates diagnosis.

Many people who develop the disease after receiving a tick bite are hospitalized. Without timely and appropriate antibiotic treatment, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can be fatal.

Sudden fever, intense headache, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain and confusion are among the first signs of infection. Many - but not all - people develop a rash after the initial onset of symptoms. Abdominal pain, achy joints and diarrhea may occur.

If the disease progresses without treatment, the bacteria can attack and damage cells in the blood vessels. That damage allows blood to leach into nearby tissues. Leaking blood can be responsible for the rash. It also can damage tissues and organs.

"The tests came back and he did test positive for Rocky Mountain spotted fever," said Judy Schneider Kron, his younger sister. "The medical staff at St. Mary's was absolutely wonderful. They worked so hard to save his life."

Schneider's family has been working to reconstruct the chain of events leading to his hospitalization.

Trent Schneider said he spoke with his father on the telephone shortly before July 4. During that conversation, his dad said he had been feverish and not feeling well for a few weeks.

The elder Schneider, a decorated Vietnam veteran, made several unsuccessful attempts to obtain treatment at the Veteran's Administration Outpatient Clinic in Evansville, according to his son.

On July 5, he was diagnosed with sinusitis at a Deaconess Urgent Care Center before collapsing at his home later that evening, Trent Schneider said. Two days later, neighbors found his father, still on the floor.

An ambulance took him to Perry County Memorial Hospital in Tell City, Ind. The next morning he was taken by helicopter to St. Mary's Medical Center. The family did not learn of his hospitalization until after his admission to the Evansville hospital, Schneider said.

His dad was having difficulty breathing and could not speak when Schneider first saw him at St. Mary's. The news was grim: Bob Schneider had a 40 percent chance of survival.

"I saw my dad with a mask on and he was sitting there upright and he was huffing and puffing and his eyes were about as big as half dollars," Schneider said. "You could see the fear in his eyes."

Before the end of the day, Schneider said his father was placed on a ventilator, the ticks were discovered and antibiotic treatment for
tickborne infection was initiated. "If anything, Bob was healthy. He was a procrastinator and he procrastinated too long on this one," Kron said through tears. "... People need to check for ticks. That's the important part." She believes the ticks on her brother's body likely came from his small farm in Evanston, Ind.

After retiring from his position as a social worker at Evansville State Hospital about 12 years ago, he moved to the property on the Spencer-Perry county line.

With the exception of a few good days when he squeezed her hand or responded to conversations with eye movements, Kron said her brother remained unresponsive as doctors worked to improve his deteriorating condition and ascertain its cause. "A tick. A little tick," Kron said. "I think my brother and my nephew really were the ones that said this is serious. We need to get the word out."

Although Trent Schneider authorized St. Mary's physicians involved in his father's care to speak about the case, requests for comment received no response.

According to Bob Schneider's medical records - provided to the Evansville Courier & Press by his son - doctors were still considering tickborne illness as a potential underlying cause of his systemic infection three days before he died. Schneider's records indicate he tested positive for both Rocky Mountain spotted fever and erlichiosis, another related tickborne disease. A second test for Rocky Mountain spotted fever was ordered July 24. The results of that test are not included in his medical records.

Physician's notes, however, indicate Rocky Mountain spotted fever was considered more of a possibility than erlichiosis, but neither appears to have been considered a conclusive diagnosis.

Schneider said a doctor told him a positive test for Rocky Mountain spotted fever could indicate previous rather than current disease, but no other potential underlying cause for his father's illness was offered. A physician also said an autopsy would be inconclusive, according to Schneider.

No evidence of prior Rocky Mountain spotted fever infection exists in Bob Schneider's records at the VA Medical Center in Marion, Ill., according to information requested by his son. Irreversible brain damage, hypertension (more likely hypotension, based on his medical
records), sepsis with multi-organ dysfunction and a severe lung problem were reported as his cause of death, according to the Vanderburgh County Health Department. His death certificate does not mention Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

"I can't say if he did or didn't have it," said Dr. Lloyd McGinnis, health officer for the Spencer County Health Department.

A state epidemiologist characterized the three potential cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever reported this year in Spencer County as previous, not current, infections, McGinnis said. Other tests or clinical observations could change that impression, he added.

In the days before his death, Bob Schneider reached near complete organ failure. His blood pressure became dangerously low, and his white blood cell level plummeted. The prognosis was dismal.

"I went in and talked to him. I said, 'You know, it's not looking very good,'" Trent Schneider recalled. "I told him I loved him very much. I wasn't ready for him to go, but you know, I told him that I felt that he was suffering and we needed to let him go."

Kron said her brother watched what he ate, exercised and was aware of the risks of tick exposure.

"He was very careful, very careful, about checking himself for ticks," she said. "If you have any of the symptoms of fever, rash, tiredness, whatever, they may be any of the tickborne illnesses. Immediately get to your doctor."

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Carole A. Tegnander, 60, New York

Carole Ann Tegnander (nee Ramsey) died at her "home on the Lake" on Friday, February 17,2006 following a long and courageous battle against ovarian cancer. She was 60 years old.

The daughter of the late Frank "Jack" and Marguerite Ramsey, she was born January 29, 1946 and raised in Valley Stream. There she met and married her husband, Richard J. Tegnander. They continued to live and work on Long Island until 2002 when, after retiring, they moved to Rock Hill to be closer to their son and his family.

A family statement said, ``People who knew Carole saw she had an easy smile, was always up beat regardless of the pain she endured from two crushing illnesses. She lived her life by the motto, `NEVER QUIT.'

In 1990, after 10 years of undiagnosed suffering, she was found to have late stage Lyme Disease. She found the strength to co-found the Long Island Lyme Association (LILA). She helped run support groups meetings, gave educational seminars, and even testified before the U.S. Senate Health Commission in Washington D.C. and various NYS committees to help raise awareness of Lyme Disease. She was compassionate toward those with Lyme and a staunch advocate for reform of our health insurance system, which was often at odds with those needing treatment.

"When Carole was first diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2001 she met it head on, seeking aggressive treatment. As with Lyme Disease, she became outspoken in her attempt to raise public awareness and funding for research into this `silent killer,' which takes the lives of thousands of women each year.

In spite of her health issues she managed to enjoy life. She and her husband often traveled with a small group of friends she called the Cruise Crew. An avid animal lover, she was known to stop traffic on busy roads to rescue a stray dog or cat giving them shelter and a chance for a better life. At one point she had as many as three dogs and five cats in their small cape-style home on Long Island.

However, in the 60 years of her life she will be remembered as a loyal and loving wife, a joyful and caring friend, and devoted mother and grandmother. While dealing with the pain of countless surgeries and chemotherapies she found great joy and satisfaction in having seen her son successful in his career, married to a beautiful and loving wife, whom Carole loved as if she were her own daughter, and most especially being a doting grandmother.''

She is survived by her husband of 38 years, Richard J. Tegnander; a son, Brian Joseph and his wife, Lynn Tegnander, of Jeffersonville; grandchildren Allison, Sean and Morgan; and several cousins.

Her Mass of Christian burial was celebrated on Monday, February 20, at St. George's Church in Jeffersonville. Fr. Ignatius Vu officiated. Internment followed at Calvary Cemetery, Youngsville.

In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10021.
Arrangements were under the direction of the VanInwegen-Kenny, Inc. Funeral Home of Monticello.

Published in the Times Herald-Record on 2/19/2006

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Carrie Elaine Mollett, 9, Georgia

http://news.mywebpal.com/partners/680/public/news634321.html

Tickborne illness confirmed in girl's death
Public Health Office has identified no other cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Gordon County.
05/25/05

From staff, AP reports

Public health officials say a Gordon County third-grader died of Rocky Mountain spotted fever earlier this month.
C
arrie Elaine Mollett, 9, died May 10 at T.C. Thompson Children's Hospital in Chattanooga.

Carrie, daughter of William Albert and Melissa Faye Mollett of Resaca, was a third-grader at Max V. Tolbert Elementary School.

"This has been confirmed as a case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever," said Logan Boss, public information officer for the Northwest Georgia Public Health Office.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most severe and most frequently reported tickborne illness in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is broadly distributed throughout the continental United States, as well as southern Canada, Central America, Mexico and parts of South America.

Last year, there were 17 confirmed and 61 probable cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever and 12 cases of Lyme disease in Georgia. While none of those cases was fatal, one person died from tick-related human monocytic ehrlichiosis.

Boss said the Public Health Office has identified no other probable cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Gordon County. "We have received an increase in the number of calls to our office, but it is probably a result of increased awareness because of this case," he said.

Although there are hundreds of species of ticks in Georgia, only a few types bite people: the American dog tick, the Lone Star tick and the black-legged tick, also known as the deer tick. Most cases of disease from ticks happen between April and September, but people can be infected all year.

Health officials recommend that people wear long-sleeved clothing that's tucked into socks or pants to make sure ticks don't crawl inside. In addition, wearing insect repellent with the chemical DEET also helps. Health officials said checking one's body for ticks at the end of the day also is important.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by bacteria that is spread to humans by tick bites. Common symptoms of tickborne disease often happen from four days to four weeks after being bitten and may include fever, a rash, headaches and muscle pain.

The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment it can be fatal, according to the CDC.

The tick season already is under way across the increasingly warm South, said Dr. James Oliver Jr., who oversees the Smithsonian's National Tick Collection housed at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro.

"There are a lot of warm, active species beginning to be active now," Oliver said. "We've been getting increased numbers of calls about ticks." Officials want ticks for study

The Georgia Division of Public Health is partnering with the University of Georgia and the Georgia Poison Center to conduct a study that will help identify areas in Georgia where the chances of getting sick from a tick bite are greatest.

If you find a tick attached to yourself or another person, you can call the Georgia Poison Center at (404) 616-9000 or (800) 222-1222, 24 hours a day, seven days a week for information about tick removal, identification and testing.

When you call, the Georgia Poison Center will provide information about how to mail the tick to get it tested. UGA will test the tick for the bacteria that cause tick-borne diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease, southern tick-associated rash illness and tularemia, depending on the species of tick.

Three weeks after you call the Georgia Poison Center, an expert in tick illness from the Georgia Division of Public Health will call you to ask some questions about exposures to tick habitats and find out if you have developed symptoms of a tickborne illness; you will get the results of the tick testing when it is complete.

For more information about tickborne diseases in Georgia, visit the Web site at or call the Georgia Division of Public Health at (404) 657-2588. HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF

* Wear light-colored clothing that allows you to see any ticks crawling on it.

* Tuck your pants legs into your socks so that ticks cannot crawl up the inside of your pants legs.

* Apply repellents to discourage tick attachment. Repellents containing permethrin can be sprayed on boots and clothing and will last for several days. Repellents containing DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) can be applied to the skin, but it will last only a few hours before reapplication is necessary. Use DEET with caution on children. Application of large amounts of DEET on children has been associated with adverse reactions.

* Conduct a body check for ticks. Use a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body. Remove any tick you find on your body.

* Parents should check children for ticks, especially in the hair, when returning from potentially tick-infested areas. Ticks may also be carried into the household on clothing and pets, so both should be examined carefully.

Source: Centers for Disease Control SYMPTOMS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can be extremely difficult to diagnose in its early stages, even for experienced physicians who are familiar with the disease. Initial signs and symptoms can resemble other infectious and noninfectious diseases and can include:

* Sudden fever

* Headache

* Muscle pain

* Rash appearing two to five days after the onset of fever

* Rash often beginning as small, flat, pink, non-itchy spots on the wrists, forearms and ankles; the spots turn pale when pressure is applied and eventually become raised on the skin.

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Christina Marie Lambeth, 19

"Miss Christina Marie, 'Christy' Lambeth of Winston-Salem died Thursday, February 10, 2000 after losing the battle to Lyme disease.

She was born July 8, 1980, in Forsyth County. Christy was a member of Hopewell Moravian Church. She was preceded in death by her grandfather, Rex Louis Holder Sr. and her grandmothers Rose Marie Church Holder and Willa Dean Lambeth. Surviving are her mother and father, A. Dean and Betty Holder Lambeth, and her sister, Courtney Michelle Lambeth.

Funeral services will be held 2 pm Sunday at Hopewell Moravian Church. Christy will lie inside at the church 30 minutes prior to service. Burial will follow in Parklawn Memorial Gardens.

Memorials may be made to the Lyme Disease Foundation in her memory. The family expresses deep appreciation to God, Hopewell Moravian Church, friends and family that have stood by and supported us through Christy's long, hard struggle."

She died at the age of 19.

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Craig W. Moon, 46, Maine

LEWISTON -- Craig W. Moon, age 46, of Back Cove Drive in Turner, died Wednesday, April 12, 2006, at Central Maine Medical Center in Lewiston with his loving family at his side.

He was born in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 11, 1959, a son of Ann (Burton) and George W. Moon Jr.

Craig was a graduate of Oakland Mills High School in Columbia, Md., class of 1977, where he was an allstate football player. He was a graduate of the University of Maryland, where he received a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering with a minor in process control. During his education, he became a member of Tau Beta Pi.

Craig moved to Maine from Maryland to work as a chemical engineer at International Paper Co. in Jay. He later went to work for Scott Paper Co. in Hinckley, and currently was employed by New Page Corp. in Rumford as the information technology manager.

Craig was an avid outdoorsman, fishing and hunting with his kids at every chance. He was especially proud of his two children, Amelia and Philip, whom he taught to hunt and fish very well. They won multiple trophies and awards doing these things.

He was a whiz at working on computers and often had the dining room table covered with two or three at a time that he would be fixing for friends and family.

He was a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the Monmouth Fish & Game Club; Ducks Unlimited; and the National Rifle Association.

He was greatly admired for his dry sense of humor, tenacity, perseverance, determination, and will to live.

He was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in January of 2000. In June 2002 he underwent a "mini" bone marrow transplant and ended up being in remission less than two years later. He fought very hard to beat the numerous obstacles thrown in his path. He spent 58 days in the hospital in June and July of 2004, after being totally paralyzed by lyme disease, having the distinction of being the only known bone marrow transplant patient to contract lyme disease. He even had an article published about this in the Journal of Infectious Clinical Diseases in December of 2005.

During his hospitalization, he only missed four days of work. He came home still in a wheelchair and went to therapy every day.

He helped to coach his son's football team for a few years and that summer he did it from his wheelchair, not even missing the first practice.

He was the best role model for his kids.

His unwavering courage and zest for life were fostered by his immense support system of family and the most incredible friends, to whom we will be forever thankful.

He is survived by his wife of 20 years, Debra Ann (Bernard) Moon; a daughter, Amelia Moon, and a son, Philip Moon; his father, George W. Moon Jr. of Parksley, Va.; a sister, Karen Koenig and husband, Jeff, of Catonsville, Md.; a brother, Gary Moon and wife, Dorrie, of Crisfield, Md.; sister-in-law Judy Ellis of Rumford; brother-in-law Roger Whitehouse of Rumford; mother-in-law Alfreda Bernard of Rumford; nieces and nephews Nicholas and Ashley Moon, Jacob, Luke, and Joseph Koenig, Christine Reynolds, and Diane Ellis.

He was predeceased by his mother, Ann Moon, in 2005.

Visiting hours will be 4 to 8 p.m. on Monday, April 17, at the S.G. Thibault Funeral Home. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 18, at St. Athanasius & St. John Catholic Church, Rumford.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory may be made to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Craig Moon Fund, c/o Dr. David C. Fisher, 44 Binney St., Boston, MA 02215.

Arrangements are by S.G. Thibault Funeral Home & Cremation Services, 250 Penobscot St., Rumford, ME; 364-4366; http://www.dignitymemorial.com

Published in the Morning Sentinel on 4/15/2006.

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David A. McHoul, 63, Massachusetts


David A. McHoul, 63 ; was Cape funeral home director
By Jillian Orlando, Globe Correspondent | June 10, 2005

David A. McHoul, a Provincetown funeral home director since 1985, died Monday at the Cape End Manor Nursing Home of complications from Lyme disease. He was 63.

The son of a funeral home director, Mr. McHoul grew up in the business. "Whatever the families needed he seemed to be able to accommodate them," said Jim Keefe, office manager at McHoul Funeral Home.

It was important to Mr. McHoul to help people in the difficult times after losing a loved one, but it was not easy work. ''Sometimes it would be upsetting working in this business because we buried friends a lot," said Sandy Dobbyn, Mr. McHoul's girlfriend of 16 years, who also works at the funeral home.

Mr. McHoul was born in Boston, the eldest of three sons of Alexander and Mildred (Hennessey) McHoul. He went to Watkinson Preparatory School in Hartford and to college at the New England Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences in Boston.

After college, he served in the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War.Returning from the war, he ran McHoul Services, a funeral livery service in Boston with his brother Douglas from 1962 to 1983.

In 1984, Mr. McHoul left Boston and moved to Provincetown and opened McHoul Funeral Home a year later. "He was in control of everything and never got flustered," Keefe said.

Mr. McHoul loved Provincetown and met many people whom he befriended and who enjoyed his sense of humor, his girlfriend said. ''Oh, he knew everyone," Dobbyn said. ''We loved to eat out at all the restaurants, and the staff were our friends."

Mr. McHoul got coffee with ''the boys" at Adams Pharmacy every morning and enjoyed riding his bike around town.

He began traveling frequently in the 1990s, visiting 14 Caribbean islands during that decade. Locally, he traveled to Long Point on his boats, Digger I and No Wake. Accompanying him on many boating trips was his Dalmatian, Dune who lived to be 14 years old.

Later in life, his Wheaten terrier, Wheeti, was by his side, helping to pull his wheelchair around town, Dobbyn said.

In addition to his girlfriend and parents, he leaves two daughters, Kelly Doyle of Plymouth and Kary Gatens of Los Angeles; two brothers, Douglas of New York and Puerto Rico, and Donald of North Attleborough; and three grandchildren.

A funeral Mass will be said today at 11 a.m. in St. Peter the Apostle Church Hall in Provincetown. Burial will be in St. Peter's Cemetery.

© Copyright 2005 Globe Newspaper Company.
Link to article in Boston Globe online

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David Lee Thomas, 18, New Jersey

On May 18, 2000, David Lee Thomas of Tinton Falls, New Jersey, died after a long battle with Chronic Lyme Disease.

David was a member of the varsity swim team, the Baptist Church of Red Bank and Monmouth High School. He was 18 years old.

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Deanice Hinton, 49, Oklahoma


Deanice Hinton died of lyme December 11 of 2004 at the young age 49.
My mother was infected in 1984 for 20 years she suffered with lyme.


I thank each of you for your stories and help. Keep fighting and telling your stories or those who have passed will have died in vain.

I will not allow my mother to die in vain come the spring of 2005 I will be entering medical school, also if anyone knows how I would like help in organizing a walk for lyme in May in the state of Oklahoma in honor of my mother.

My thanks amber Hinton

My mom did respond to the antibiotics the problem was getting them, she was off of them for 3 months and had a severe yeast infection, when waiting for the rocephin to come she was being treated for the yeast. The doctor ordered her not to be exposed to anyone sick because of her depleted immune system, of course people didn't beleive that.

I contacted the CDC and the Oklahoma department on health today. The CDC apparently don't receive many lyme cases from Oklahoma because in Oklahoma the doctors are not required to let the CDC know about an infection because it is lonestarie another strain of lyme.

I ask both the department of health what they are doing to let Oklahomans know about the risks of this disease. Get this. They have pamphlets and information but they must be requested by a doctor in order to receive them. Other diseases they send out regularly.

Anything wrong with this picture.
You will have to excuse me I have a world to save

http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=030243

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John Martini, 55, Massachusetts


http://tinyurl.com/8ekv9

``Joni suspects Lyme disease killed her husband, who lived a healthy life up until he was diagnosed with the disease last August.''

Old Colony Memorial
SouthOfBoston.com
8-13-05

`He touched everyone he met'
By Daniel Axelrod
MPG Newspapers

PLYMOUTH (Aug 13) - Former Plymouth conservation agent John Martini faced his first obstacle at six months old when his parents left him on the doorstep of St. Mary's Home in Binghamton, N.Y.

Raised by nuns until he was 18, Martini moved out and worked as a cab driver in Boston, where he paid his way through UMass-Boston and earned a bachelor's degree in political science and American history. After two marriages, two children, a career teaching high school, and running a landscaping business, Martini died July 24 at age 55.

Joni, his wife of 19 years, suspects her husband died of Lyme disease.His death was unexpected and relatively sudden, and the official cause remains unknown pending numerous tests.

Martini left behind his daughter Julie, 30, his son Jeffery, 27, a massive backyard garden of exotic plants and a legacy of being a vibrant, outgoing, sociable, kind, generous, optimistic, and loving man, according to friends and family.

Reaching out to everyone

Joni Martini still has the thank you letters from John's former Falmouth junior/senior high school students tucked away in a folder.

``Students sent letters saying they were sorry to see him go. They liked his sense of humor,'' Martini said.``He used to have some students who stayed in touch for years at a time. Even after they'd move to different states they'd call and ask him for advice.'' Wherever he worked and whatever he did, Martini made a lasting impression.

``He was a family guy, warm, caring and wonderful, and he made you feel very special,'' Michelle Turner, administrative assistant for Plymouth's Conservation Commission, said.Turner worked closely with Martini during his days as a part-time conservation agent for Plymouth. Turner said staffers knew when the bubbly Martini came in the town offices because he filled the room with a cheerful vibe and chitchat.

Turner is Italian, and Martini used to kid her in Italian, discuss Italian food and talk about Italy.

``You felt like you were a part of him when you spoke with him,'' Turner said. ``Everyone misses his personality. I still have a picture of him on my desk. I look at it all the time.''

After graduating among the top 5 percent of his class at UMass in 1972, Martini cultivated his love of cooking by working as a chef for a nursing home in Falmouth.

He married Christine Beaulac, with whom he had his two children. Martini spent the next 13 years working, mostly as a chef, and raising his children Jeffrey and Julie. He won custody of the children in 1980, after a long divorce.

Now a single parent, he was partly led to teaching by his need to make more money. He went back to school at Southeastern University to earn his teaching certificate and began teaching history for the Falmouth school district in 1985. Martini again graduated from Southeastern magna cum laude, among the top 5 percent of his class.

At SMU in the mid `80s, John focused on another lifelong passion - learning about New England's Native American clans. Joni still occupies the couple's Plymouth house, where visitors will see a bookcase, built by John, full of perhaps 400 books on Native Americans - just a sample of what he read.

Back when John was in school, he visited the Falmouth Christmas Tree Shop just to catch a glimpse of Joni, a fellow divorcee ``he had the `hots' for,'' Joni said. Coincidentally, Joni's sister, Barbara Beltran, and Martini earned their teaching degrees at the same time.

Barbara liked Martini - who had no idea she was Joni's sister - so she gave him Joni's phone number. John's random phone call to Joni one day led to a six-hour conversation, a follow-up date to the movies, a six-month courtship and marriage.

``You know how people say they have a soul mate?'' Joni said. ``There was just something that clicked there. We both were interested in the same things and it wasn't awkward to talk.''

Martini got a job at Falmouth schools, where he worked for three years before moving to Cornwall, Vt. in search of a wholesome life and good schools for his beloved children. John taught for a time in Vermont and the family became self-sufficient farmers.

No flatlanders (except John)

``Usually Vermont natives call newcomers flatlanders and it takes a while to fit in, but John fit right in,'' Joni said. Martini fit in so well that Cornwall's 1,000 or so residents voted the newcomer onto the board of selectmen.

When the family arrived, they settled in after buying 25 acres and a three-bedroom contemporary home renovated by John after he studied carpentry on his own. The family grew crops, tended chickens and heated the house with wood John split and burned in wood stoves. Joni raised the kids and, while they were in school, worked at a general store where she got to know community members.

One day, residents at the store suggested Joni tell John to run for the board of selectmen. At first he dismissed her suggestion, but soon John delved into campaigning. He loaded hand-painted signs into his big old white Oldsmobile, drove around town and shook hands and chatted with everyone he met. The newcomer with no political experience won the local election by a landslide against an incumbent town leader. Martini's time as a Cornwall selectman was the beginning of a long life of community service as a teacher and member of various boards and committees in the communities where he lived.

Martini also taught from 1987 to 1989 at Otter Valley Union High School in Brandon, Vt., where he established an alternative education program for disadvantaged and disaffected students, just as he'd done at Falmouth. Martini even helped start a reading program and aided in the development of the state's Educational Reform Act.

All along, though, a love of the earth grew deep within him. No longer content just to foster his student's academic and personal growth, he went to school to become a landscaper. After Martini learned landscaping, the family moved to Plymouth. He had lived here briefly and loved the town, and Joni wanted to be closer to her family in Falmouth.

Making his mark on Plymouth

Besides his Vermont community service, Martini served on Plymouth's master plan committee, the downtown steering committee and two different economic development committees and as a town meeting member. He was a long-time Mason, a part-time conservation agent for Plymouth and even a tutor for those who couldn't read.

Speak with those who knew or loved Martini and you'll find a recurring theme - not only did John do everything he could to get to know people, he couldn't stand pat if he saw something in the community needing fixing.

``He meant a lot to many of us for different reasons,'' friend and planning board member Larry Rosenblum said. ``John was concerned about the community and also a great cook, a great gardener and you got the sense he was a shepherd tending to his flock with everything.''

Rosenblum was shocked when Martini recruited him to run for the planning board. ``Usually the candidate picks the campaign manager, here the campaign manager picked the candidate,'' Rosenblum said. Rosenblum remembers one day when Martini drove past the synagogue on Pleasant Street downtown and noticed the lawn's beat-up appearance. Martini wasn't Jewish.

``But he said to the Rabbi, `It looks like the garden needs tending,' and he volunteered to do that,'' Rosenblum said.

Martini's landscaping business, Alden Court Gardens, is still owned by his wife and operated by 24-year-old Jeff Parsons and his assistant, who serve 40 to 50 clients.

``John was never afraid to learn something new or different, and I think that's what made him so successful,'' Joni said. ``If you spoke Polish he'd go out and try to speak Polish.''

The Martinis' house is decorated with Native American artifacts from John's travels.

Outside, John's second passion is quickly evident in the form of the sprawling garden with red pine needle-covered walkways, through which John would walk potential customers to help them plan their gardens.

``His knowledge of plants was amazing, and he knew all the Latin names. Sometimes I had to say `Speak English, John,' `` Turner said. ``And as conservation agent his rapport with people in the field was special.''

Even Martini's kids are excelling in life. Julie works for the Massachusetts Cultural Council on Arts and Jeffery is doing his graduate work at Georgetown University. After a stint working for the conservative think-tank Rand Corporation, Jeffery is studying Arabic.

The end: fast and frightening

The end for John Martini was fast and frightening. Martini contracted the deer tick-transmitted Lyme disease last August and the tell-tale big bull's-eye rash appeared on the upper inside of his right leg complete with a hard egg-like lump. Two months of antibiotics followed and the disease seemed to go into remission. Subsequent Lyme disease tests showed up negative.

But by February John felt tired all the time. His face was puffy and his eyes were often half-closed. The muscular 5-foot, 6-inch 150-pound landscaper became weak and lost muscle strength. He hired assistants to help with his business and took naps during the day between landscaping jobs.

``The doctors had no clue what was going on, and every part of his body hurt,'' Joni said. ``John seemed to feel it was still the Lyme disease, but the doctors said it wasn't and testing didn't show it.''
By June, John was hospitalized at Jordan Hospital for a week with the mysterious ailment. He seemed to feel better and he came back home, but, by early July, Martini was back in the hospital and sicker than ever.

``On July 3, I took him to the Jordan ER and he could hardly walk, his heart was racing, and we were so very scared,'' Joni said. ``We didn't know if he was having a heart attack.'' The hospital admitted him, ran more inconclusive tests and on July 9 sent him to Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

He died about two weeks later after a steady stream of inconclusive tests and antibiotics, but not before he got to know all the doctors and nurses on the floor.
He spent his last days sleeping, reading the novel ``The Da Vinci Code'' and dipping his hands in the soil of a plant a friend brought him. The hospital is still running tests on his body to confirm whether Lyme disease was the culprit.

Joni suspects Lyme disease killed her husband, who lived a healthy life up until he was diagnosed with the disease last August.

``He was always positive and he thought he'd get better when he got sick,'' Joni said. ``I'm still in shock. It's still hard to believe that he's gone. I just miss his voice and his laughter. He had a very good sense of humor, he joked a lot, he was silly and he used to like to tell and play practical jokes.''

Martini hopes the doctors pinpoint what killed John, and most of all she wants the public to somehow learn from John's death. (See sidebar) She thinks John ``would be honored'' if his body is used to help fight Lyme disease.

``I told the doctors if there's anything in his body that can help the next person that comes along, so they don't have to suffer like he did, I hope they find it, because I still have to live with the fact that, if they don't find anything, I just won't know what killed him.'' (end quote)

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Jon Pierre Lavallee, 46, Massachusetts


June 20, 2002

Cape Cod Times motor-route driver; enjoyed woodworking

WELLFLEET - Jon Pierre Lavallee, 46, died Wednesday at Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Boston of Lyme disease.

A Nauset Regional High School graduate, he was an athlete and an avid fan of all sports. He was a gifted craftsman, who enjoyed woodworking, building furniture and restoring antiques, some of which were hand-painted by his partner, Beth. He was a familiar face at the Wellfleet Flea Market, where he sold many of his creations.

He worked for the Cape Cod Times as a motor-route driver for many years, delivering in the Provincetown and Truro areas.

He leaves his parents, Russell and Cynthia Lavallee of Wellfleet; two sisters, Cynthia A. DeJong of Sheboygan, Wis., and Michele A. Dumont of Wellfleet; a brother, Brian S. Lavallee of Brewster; his life partner, Beth Sherwood of Wellfleet; and many nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Wellfleet United Methodist Church, Main Street, Wellfleet.

Donations may be made to Wild Care, P.O. Box 760, Brewster, MA 02631, attn: Karen; or to the Animal Rescue League, P.O. Box 1265, Brewster, MA 02631.

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Jonathan Bleefield, Maryland


On May 27, 2004, JONATHAN BLEEFIELD; beloved son of Kathryn Von Hagel and the late Charles Bleefield; step-son of George Von Hagel, Jr.; beloved brother of David Bleefield, Laurie Fields, Amy Entwisle and Anne Exton; step-brother of Carol Blair, George Von Hagel, III and Violet Cheatham.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Lyme Disease Foundation, 1 Financial Plaza, Hartford, CT 06103. Services private.
Published in the Baltimore Sun on 6/1/2004.

[ 06. November 2006, 01:29 PM: Message edited by: Melanie Reber ]

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Kathy Cavert


Posted by Ann - OH

Sadly, Kathy Cavert died several years ago. She was an amazing advocate and educator. She founded a support group, lectured a lot and did a study that was presented at a National Lyme Conference. She had a newsletter and published quite often.

Her own case was very complicated by some severe car accident injuries and several surgeries that she had to have over the years.

She was a very beautiful, tiny, blonde woman who loved her dogs and had very dedicated and loving friends.

Here is one of her best articles, written in the mid 1990's.

Ann - OH
[quote]

Psychosocial Issues of Lyme Disease
Kathy Cavert

As with all serious and debilitating diseases, there are some factors that come into play more than the disease itself which complicates things for the patient and the family. These issues are sometimes more devastating than the disease itself.

One of the biggest problems with Lyme disease is that it can render the victim completely helpless and unable to work or take care of the family. The disease can mimic other diseases in combination such as Lou Gehrig's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, polymyalgia rheumatica, fibromyalgia syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, Alzheimer's and lupus. It is painful and causes debilitating fatigue and weakness to the point of paralysis at times. It can cause seizures and Bell's palsy, meningitis and encephalitis. It can cause bone pain and joint pain so severe that it can be frightening.

As with all severe disabling diseases, this one carries with it a whole host of problems other than the disease itself. The following are but a few:

Guilt. Feeling bad about feeling bad particularly when one is unable to work or keep up their share of the housework and child-rearing. This carries over into marital relationships as well because although the Lyme person looks well on the outside, often they feel as though they are dying on the inside. It is hard when loved ones and friends want to go someplace and have a good time and the Lyme patient wants to stay home due to fatigue or pain. They oftentimes feel guilty for being such a dull partner.

The symptoms can also lead to guilt surrounding the lack of sexual interest because the disease is a neurologic disease and can cause some sexual problems as well.

Isolation/Desertion. Often the Lyme patient has the sympathy of friends, physicians, and family at first. But as the months pass and the years pass and the patient continues to complain of varying symptoms and the blood test scans continue to come back negative, friends and family pull away. They begin to doubt the sanity of the person. The physicians begin blaming the patient and suggesting emotional overlay, hysteria, depression or psychogenic problems. The family follows suit.

This kind of abandonment only makes things worse for the Lyme person. They not only have to deal with chest pain, numbness, tingling, infections, fevers, dizziness, pain, weakness, fatigue and memory loss, etc., but they have to do it with strange looks, nasty comments and mistrust from the people who were at one time close to them.

Validation of the person. It is difficult to feel validated as a person when others are telling you that you are nuts and that your symptoms do not exist or that you are bringing them on yourself. Validation must be done now more from within and one finds themselves in the dilemma of trying to beef up their own self-esteem with positive affirmations. This is a time when we all need to feel support and so often we feel just the opposite.

Employers accuse patients of faking illness; family accuse them of not wanting to work or carry out daily chores; friends accuse them of being hypochondriacs and no longer being the kind of friend that they were in the past. Children worry if it is their parent, and spouses become concerned as well.

Parents begin to doubt the validity and the severity of the symptoms and the Lyme patient sinks into depression, at last fulfilling the prophecy of the doctors who for so long had suggested that to be the case in the first place.

Lyme is like having symptoms of all the major diseases compiled into one. It can leave one in quiet desperation. Lyme disease is an infection and an infection that affects the brain. Adding insult to injury, the brain manifestations such as subtle encephalitis and meningitis can cause patients to be emotionally labile, or perhaps moody.

Most Lyme patients are people whose lives have been filled with activity and outdoor things and for the most part, these are people who lived life to its fullest and suddenly were struck down. The adjustment is not easy.

There is fear of the future and fear of the present. With concomitant brain inflammations and central nervous system problems, it can cause a variety of emotional problems, unlike anything the patient previously knew.

We are hoping that the physicians in the midwest will stop and take a good look at what is really going on here. We do have a problem and it is a problem that at some point, must be addressed. Unfortunately I am finding more and more people who have suffered with Lyme for over 6 years and it concerns me greatly.

It is my sincere hope that soon each and every physician in Kansas City and the surrounding areas will include Lyme in their differential diagnoses when symptoms are suggestive of a combination of rheumatologic, neurologic or cardiac.

Lyme Disease is not a benign disease. It is a very serious spirochetal disease which must be treated with aggressive antibiotic therapy.[end quote]

--------------------
www.geocities.com/ldbullseye

[ 04. November 2006, 07:57 PM: Message edited by: Melanie Reber ]

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Larry Bennett, 50, Texas


http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/news/state/031805_APstate_suvbody.html

Family who couldn't afford burial kept body in SUV
By The Associated Press
(3/18/05 - ROYSE CITY, TX) -- A woman who couldn't afford to bury her ex-husband last month drew criticism from neighbors and questions from police after she stored his embalmed body in the back of an SUV in the family's driveway for two days.

"The phone rang off the wall with calls such as, 'How ... can you all be so cold-hearted and keep Larry in that vehicle in front of your home?' " said Brenda Pitts Bennett, who had let 50-year-old Larry Bennett live with her after their 1995 divorce.
Larry Bennett, a former building inspector whose poor health had cost him his job and drained his finances, died Feb. 26. His cause of death is pending, but his ex-wife said he died of complications of Lyme disease, a bacterial disease spread by ticks.

Larry Bennett was buried in his ex-wife's hometown of Farmersville, but not before the Bennetts became the talk of the neighborhood.

Brenda Bennett said she went to Rockwall County shortly after the death to collect money for a burial. A judge told her the county allows up to $1,000 for cremation of paupers. The ex-wife said she took the $1,000 to a funeral home because she thought it would pay for a burial instead of cremation, but she later was told that it wouldn't be enough.

So, she said, the family had little choice but to load Larry Bennett's body in their SUV and take him home while they figured out what to do.

She said the family soon started getting angry calls -- so many, that they had to take the phone off the hook -- and people started driving by just to look at the body, which was in a bag.

Royse City police received numerous calls about the body, Sgt. Jim Baker said. But the body wasn't removed because no law was violated, and since the body was
embalmed, it posed no health issue, Baker said.

"It was believed to be safe, and the family had a right to claim it," he said.

After two days, a mortuary agreed to store the body. Larry Bennett was buried March 10 with the help of donations.

Brenda Bennett said the treatment from the community was disheartening.

"Everyone acted like I was insane. ... I know they could not have come up with the money at all to afford a funeral for their loved one, yet they wanted to condemn us," she wrote.

(Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved

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Lauren Faxon Brooks, 57, Connecticut

http://www.norwalkcitizen-news.com/obituaries

Norwalk Citizen~News
Obituaries
Article Launched:10/26/2006 11:47:48 AM EDT

Lauren Faxon Brooks of Old Greenwich lost her valiant and courageous struggle with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 57 on Oct. 12.

She had a wonderfully humanitarian, kind and gentle spirit and will always be remembered for her unwavering commitment to helping family, friends and those in need. She was an extraordinarily gracious woman blessed with many gifts, including a boundless sense of humor and compassionate nature that will live on in the hearts of and continue to inspire all who knew and loved her.

Originally from Palo Alto, Calif., she graduated from Cubberley High School and Cal Poly in San Luis, Obispo, Calif., where she was a member of Delta Chi Omega. She met her husband, Torrey, while she was the registrar at the Stanford Business School. They married in the Napa Valley and settled in Greenwich in March 1985. She was a member of the Greenwich Board of Realtors for 17 years, was the founder and president of Brody Realty, and was a member of the Greenwich Country Club.

For the past eight years, she was an active board member and the vice president-education of Time for Lyme, Inc., of Greenwich, a nonprofit organization dedicated to education and research regarding Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. She was instrumental in creating and disseminating educational materials regarding tick-borne diseases, both for local and national use. She was especially proud of her work with the local chapter of the American Red Cross to create a tick removal kit, which is now distributed nationally, and her personal guidance of many individuals afflicted with Lyme.

The Brooks family owned the Brooks Community Newspapers until 1998. She was the daughter-in-law of B.V. Brooks, who was the president and publisher of the newspaper company.

In addition to her husband, she is survived by her two sons, Brody and Brandon of Old Greenwich; her mother, Ernestine Faxon of Palo Alto; her sisters and brothers-in-law, Robin and James Yurash and Teri and Matt Peters of California; many nieces, nephews and cousins; and, of course, her beloved Dachshund, Bailey. She was predeceased by her father, Bill Faxon.

Memorial contributions may be made to Time for Lyme, Inc., designated for the Lauren F. Brooks Memorial Fund at P.O. Box 31269, Greenwich 06831. For additional information about her, visit www.laurenbrooks.org.

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Leo Bogart, 84, New York

Posted by Ann - OH

I put all the information about babesiosis first because some was at the beginning and some at the end of the obituary and I wanted to be sure you read it all.

The entire obituary is posted below.
Ann - OH


[quote]
Sociologist Leo Bogart Dies of Babesiosis from Long Island (NY Times 10-19)

October 19, 2005

Leo Bogart, 84, Sociologist Who Studied Role of Media in Culture, Is Dead
By JULIE BOSMAN

Leo Bogart, a sociologist, author and marketing specialist who was known for
studying the role of the mass media in culture, died Saturday at Mount Sinai
Hospital in Manhattan. He was 84.

The cause of death was babesiosis, a parasitic disease that is transmitted by
ticks, said his wife of 57 years, the former Agnes Cohen.
.................

After checking into Mount Sinai on Aug. 7, Dr. Bogart learned that he had
babesiosis, a malarialike infectious disease that destroys red blood cells. It
is typically found in coastal islands of the Northeast, and Mrs. Bogart said
her husband might have contracted it on a trip to the couple's home on Long
Island."
[end quote]

[Here is the full obituary]
Sociologist Leo Bogart Dies of Babesiosis from Long Island (NY Times 10-19)

October 19, 2005

Leo Bogart, 84, Sociologist Who Studied Role of Media in Culture, Is Dead
By JULIE BOSMAN

Leo Bogart, a sociologist, author and marketing specialist who was known for
studying the role of the mass media in culture, died Saturday at Mount Sinai
Hospital in Manhattan. He was 84.

The cause of death was babesiosis, a parasitic disease that is transmitted by
ticks, said his wife of 57 years, the former Agnes Cohen.

Dr. Bogart, who also studied advertising and public opinion and wrote nearly
a dozen books, argued that market forces should not be the sole determinant
of media content. He decried the increasing presence of violence and sex in
film and television, asserting in his most recent book, "Over the Edge," that
advertisers degrade content through their desire to capture the youth market.

He was an influential figure in the marketing and advertising industries. He
served for many years as the executive vice president and general manager of
the Newspaper Advertising Bureau, the sales and marketing organization of the
newspaper industry.

He taught marketing at New York University, Columbia University and the
Illinois Institute of Technology. He was a senior fellow at the Center for Media
Studies at Columbia and a Fulbright research fellow in France.

At his death, Dr. Bogart was a director and senior consultant for Innovation,
an international media consulting firm, and wrote a column for Presstime,
the magazine of the Newspaper Association of America.

Dr. Bogart was born in Lwow, now Lvov, Poland, and moved to the United States
with his family at age 2, eventually becoming fluent in seven languages.

After graduating from Brooklyn College in 1941, he joined the Army Signal
Intelligence Corps. Fluent in German, he intercepted communications in Germany
during World War II. He chronicled that experience in his memoir, "How I Earned
the Ruptured Duck: From Brooklyn to Berchtesgaden in World War II." He earned
a doctorate in sociology at the University of Chicago.

After checking into Mount Sinai on Aug. 7, Dr. Bogart learned that he had
babesiosis, a malarialike infectious disease that destroys red blood cells. It
is typically found in coastal islands of the Northeast, and Mrs. Bogart said
her husband might have contracted it on a trip to the couple's home on Long
Island.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by two children, Michele H. Bogart
and Gregory Charles Bogart; and one grandchild.

* _Copyright 2005_
(http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) _The New York Times Company_ (http://www.nytco.com/)
http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=3;t=013869

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Martha Bradley, 68, Maryland


Martha J. "Marty" Bradley, 68, a resident of Annapolis for 22 years, died of complications of Lyme disease March 11 at Anne Arundel Medical Center after an 11-year illness.

Mrs. Bradley was born Jan. 16, 1937, in Salem, Va., where she graduated from Andrew Lewis High School as valedictorian of her class and from Roanoke College with a degree in chemistry.

She retired in 1994 from the Environmental Protection Agency where she was a chemist for 15 years.

Mrs. Bradley was a member of Asbury United Methodist Church in Annapolis.

Surviving are her husband, Robert D. Bradley, whom she married June 4, 1995; and one brother, Charles Hall of Huddleston, Va.

Visitation will be from 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesday at Kalas Funeral Home, 2973 Solomons Island Road in Edgewater, where memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday. Burial is private.


Copyright © 2005 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.

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Mary T. Patten, 59, New Jersey

Mary T. Patten was born in Paterson, New Jersey.
She lived in Totowa, New Jersey, and was a beloved member of LymeNet (MaryPat).

Mary passed away January 22, 2006 at the age of 59. She will be missed by many.

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Meg Betz, 18, New Jersey


http://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu.edu/user/jake/mosaic/lymenet-l/4

The following letter appeared in the January 1993 issue of "LymeLine," the
newsletter of the Lyme Disease Network of NJ.

Dear Friends,

Let me introduce myself. I am a mother of a family in which all four
members have Lyme Disease. I call you friends because I believe all Lyme
patients and their supporters are bound by a special community of care and
concern. What happens to one of us has a direct impact on all of us as we
struggle to be well, preserve our rights, and live happy, productive lives.

I would like to tell you about my daughter Meg. Meg was a vivacious, active
child who excelled in school, played travel soccer, volunteered in a shelter
for disadvantaged children, and was active in student government and social
activities.

She was a freshman at the University of Delaware where she hoped to discover
how she could make the world a better place. She has a social life that
would rival that of a celebrity. Meg had an incredible zest for life and
laughter that few of us will ever approach. Her own proclaimed motto was
"Don't sleep too long, walk too fast, or forget to smile in the sun."

During her many lengthy hospital stays she sought out those sicker or less
ambulatory and would go to any length of silliness or sympathy to cheer them
up. When she was bed ridden and unable to get up she would amuse her
roommates and visitors with wry observations and witty impersonations of
people they knew.

She could never stand to see someone sad or hurt and not try to help.
She never knew a stranger, only potential friends... of which she had an
amazing number. She always made time to be there for her friends when
they needed her. Meg had an incredible inner strength surpassed only by
her true, sincere belief in the goodness of her life. She was a person you
would like to know.

Meg died three weeks before her nineteenth birthday of cardiac arrhythmia
brought on by Lyme Disease.

You cannot give Meg back to her mom, dad, and sister. You cannot erase the
pain, fill the gap in our lives, or ease the longing in our hearts to have
her with us. But you _can_ help us prevent this from happening to another
person with Lyme Disease. _Please_ take the time to write to your Senators
and Congressmen urging them to support and promote legislation for Lyme
Disease research and funding.

_Please_ write to the CDC and the NIH and make your plight and your concerns
known. Don't allow another Lyme death to occur. It is up to us to keep this
issue in front of them and insist that they address it.

It is up to us to make them admit and acknowledge the seriousness of this
illness. Please write today.

With heartfelt gratitude,

Diane D. Betz
Meg's Mom

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Mike Thomas, 48, Florida

Man loses battle with Lyme disease
Tallahassee Democrat - Tallahassee,FL,USA
Sun, Oct. 09, 2005
By Jennifer Jefferson
DEMOCRAT STAFF WRITER

On the Internet, he was known as Dr. Mike even though he wasn't a physician.

Mike Thomas, 48, was a supervisor of water utilities for the city of Tallahassee.

After being diagnosed with amytrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, he became an avid researcher of the disease.

His research led him to China to undergo experimental treatment in December, but he died Wednesday at home of Lyme disease.

In Beijing, Thomas met other patients from around the world who turned to him for information. The BBC even featured him on a show about the experimental treatment he received in China.

On Sunday, he was at his computer reading e-mails from overseas, said Juhan Mixon, Thomas' best friend.

"No one expected it to happen quite as quickly as it did," said Candace McKibben, the pastor who is presiding over the funeral 2 p.m. today at the chapel of Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee.

In August 2003, Thomas was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease, a fatal condition that causes motor neurons to deteriorate and muscle movement to diminish. Doctors say Thomas and the 30,000 others in the United States who have it usually have three to five years to live.

In the fall of 2004, Thomas couldn't wiggle his toes or raise his right foot. So Mixon helped Thomas raise $30,000 needed to travel to China to get millions of olfactory ensheathing glia cells from second-trimester aborted fetuses inserted into his brain and spinal cord in hopes of stimulating the other cells to work. The procedure is still in the experimental stages.

Thomas and his wife, Kim, went to Beijing Oct. 31, 2004, and returned Dec. 2.

When Thomas came back, he could walk and stand without a brace, Mixon said. He was even able to go back to work. In January, his condition deteriorated, and he was soon diagnosed with Lyme disease.

Ticks transport the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The symptoms include a skin rash, fever, headache and fatigue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart and the nervous system.

Thomas was undergoing treatment for the disease, but it was in the late stages when it was diagnosed, Mixon said. Thomas could still walk but had to use a walker.

After extensive research online, Mixon said, Thomas questioned whether he had Lyme disease from the start or whether the diseases were interrelated.

Thomas never found out.

After the China trip, "We were all hopeful that he would get better," Mixon said. "We were hopeful that (if) we could treat the Lyme disease, he would be better."

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Peter Anthony Banducci, 45, California


PETER ANTHONY BANDUCCI Beloved husband, father, son, brother, uncle, cousin and friend, went to be with the LORD on September 28, 2006 after a long battle with ALS and Lyme disease. The diseases may have destroyed his body, but did not destroy his mind and spirit, his love for the LORD and others.

The LORD blessed Marian and the late John Banducci with Peter on February 27, 1961, he was 1 of 6 produced by this blessed union. Pete attended school in the Mission area of Fremont, graduated in 1979. He studied automotive repair at a young age and was blessed with a true gift from GOD. He went to Ohlone College where he majored in business and met his future wife, Pamela. He went on to study many automotive courses and was an ASC certified Master Tech. On September 2, 1986, he independently opened Pete's Foreign Auto Repair. It is in its 21st year of business and continues to operate under Roger daRocha and Pamela. Pete had the business certified as a Green Business and a AAA approved facility.

Peter went on to marry Pamela on December 31, 1987. This union was blessed with 2 children, Alyssa and Samuel. His family meant everything to him. Some of his most enjoyable times were spent out on the boat with his family; celebrating family birthdays and holidays; baseball at Niles-Centerville Little League and was a big Giant's and A's fan; he enjoyed music, especially Michael McDonald and Chris Isaak; and last but not least he enjoyed his calls to his mom and Batman.

Pete valued honesty, family, friends and the LORD. He developed 2 new friendships with Jocelyn and Marcus who helped his family with his care. He was cared for by his loved ones at home.

Peter is survived by his wife, Pamela; children, Alyssa and Samuel; his mother, Marian; his siblings/spouses, Monica and Mitch Radosky, Angela and Randy Ochs, John and Michelle Banducci, Chris and Kelly Banducci and Paul and Sally Banducci; in-laws, Carmen Harpel, Judy Harpel, Cheryl and Dan Martin, Randy and Debbie Harpel and Mitch and Gina Harpel; many nieces and nephews, cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, John Banducci and father-in-law, Louis Harpel.

He was ready for his marathon to celebrate his eternal rebirth and he will be deeply missed by all. We ask you to celebrate the life and rebirth of Peter on Saturday, October 28, 2006, 1 p.m. at Corpus Christi, 37891 - 2nd Street, in the Niles area of Fremont. Donations preferred to ALS/MDA Forbes Norris Center, S.F., CA.

Published in the ANG Newspapers from 10/21/2006 - 10/26/2006. (Inside Bay Area)

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Peter Edgar Hare, 73, Florida

Peter Edgar Hare's memorial service will be at the New Smyrna Beach Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1910 Pioneer Trail, on Saturday, May 13, at 4 p.m. Dr. Hare was born in Maymyo, Burma, on April 14, 1933, to missionary parents, Eric and Agnes Hare.

He graduated from Pacific Union College in 1954 and married Patti Martin a week later. In 1955, he completed a master's degree from UC Berkeley and returned to PUC to teach chemistry for three years before beginning a doctoral program at Caltech, graduating with a Ph.D. in organic geochemistry in 1962.

The next year he began a rewarding 35 years with the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Geophysical Laboratory as a research scientist. He developed an amino acid age-dating technique and collaborated with scientists around the world. In 1998, he retired, and moved to Volusia County in 1999.

Early Friday morning, May 5, at the age of 73, he peacefully fell asleep in Jesus at the Port Orange Christian Adult Care Home after a long battle with Lyme disease. We await the last trumpet, for the trumpet will sound. Our beloved husband, father, and PopPop will be raised incorruptible.

He is survived by his wife, Patti, and two children, Carol Pack, Laurel, Md., and Calvin Hare, Orlando; three grandchildren, Stacey Pack, Brian Pack, and Travis Hare; and a brother, Leonard Hare, Berrien Springs, Mich.

Memorial gifts may be sent to Pacific Union College Advancement Office, One Angwin Ave, Angwin, CA 94508, for the P E Hare Scholarship Fund.

Published in the Daytona Beach News-Journal on 5/10/2006.

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Richard Olney, 71, France

Richard Olney
New York Times
Wednesday, August 4, 1999

Richard Olney, one of the first food writers to introduce the simple
joys of French country cooking to American readers as well as chefs
like Berkeley's Alice Waters, was found dead yesterday at his home here
in Provence. He was 71.

Kermit Lynch, a California wine merchant who has a house near Mr.
Olney's, said that the writer's gardener found him in bed. Lynch said
Mr. Olney had a bout of Lyme disease two years ago but had appeared
``in wonderful shape'' when the two of them last met about a week ago.

Mr. Olney lived alone in a simple hillside house near the French port
city of Toulon on the Mediterranean. Surrounded by olive trees, the
house centered on a kitchen with a large fireplace, a stone sink and
collections of books and terrines. He dined in fair weather on a table
set under a grape arbor outdoors.

His reputation was based on a pair of early books -- the ``French Menu
Cookbook'' and ``Simple French Food,'' which appeared in the early
1970s -- and on the Time- Life cookbook series, which he helped to
edit. He wrote more than 35 books on food and wine in all, including an
autobiography called ``Reflexions,'' which was in the final editing
process when he died. John T. Colby Jr., the publisher of Brick House
Press, which is producing the memoir, said it would be published in
October.

Mr. Olney's influence in the culinary profession was profound, although
he was not as well-known to the public as Julia Child or Elizabeth
David, the English cookery writer with whom he is often compared. Yet
his recipes, set out with clinical precision, were within the capacity
of any careful cook; they were simple and direct, the polar opposites
of the complex formulas typical of French nouvelle cuisine.

Mr. Olney's most important disciple was Waters, who keeps a jacket-
less, food-stained copy of ``Simple French Food'' in the kitchen of
Chez Panisse.

It was Mr. Olney who introduced Waters to David, over a three-hour
lunch of white truffles, an extravaganza that neither soon forgot.

"He lived his life so consciously and purposefully," Waters said
yesterday. ``When some people build a stone wall, they think about it
for weeks beforehand. Richard spoke that way, wrote that way and cooked
that way -- strict, demanding but unpretentious. There are hundreds of
great cooks, but not many with his talent and aesthetic sense.''

Born in Marathon, Iowa, Mr. Olney attended the University of Iowa for a
time, then spent a while in Paris, financed by his father, before
heading for New York. While studying painting at the Brooklyn Museum
Art School, he waited on tables at 17 Barrow St., a small restaurant in
Greenwich Village. In 1951, at the age of 24, he left the United States
for France, and he never moved back.

Many saw Mr. Olney as a hermit, but Colby, his publisher, said he kept
in constant touch with friends and family in the United States by fax.

Among his survivors is a nephew, John, who, to Mr. Olney's great
delight, went into the wine business in California, working at Ridge
Vineyards in Cupertino.

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Rick Fincham, 44, Maryland


So very sad to lose another lyme victim. This man was a landscaper. Had picked ticks off of him but never saw a bite. He got ill about a year and a half ago and was finally confined to a wheel chair. He died on May 17. 2005 at age 44 after first going to the wrong hospital in Maryland and them stating it was not lyme. We went to the funeral home on Sunday and it was so very, very sad.

He leaves a 12 year old girl and a college age boy plus his wife. His parents cared for him to give the wife some rest. What do you say when this happens. He was under treatment from an LLMD.

Many prayers for the victim's family.

He had bartonella and lyme. Was tested by Igenex and Bowen which confirmed lyme but no babesia of HME, HGE.

This is an article about his little girl. This was before he passed away.

Gambrills gymnast to compete in nationals
By SHARON LEE TEGLER, For The Capital

Docksiders Gymnastics in Millersville has trained aspiring gymnasts in Anne Arundel County since 1975 and current owners Bob and Kim Ouellette continue to turn out top notch athletes.

One of them, 13-year-old Rachel Fincham, is the pride of her Gambrills neighborhood. The teenager recently placed in the top seven in a regional gymnastics competition in Allentown, Pa. As a result, she will compete Thursday through May 15 in the United States Association of Gymnastics Junior Olympic Nationals in Ontario, Calif. Her goal is to place among the top four competitors in her age group.

Those four are awarded a trip to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs to train with the national team coaches. Rachel qualified for the nationals by competing in four disciplines: vault, uneven bars, balance beam and floor exercise.

Rachel's family is elated about her success and her mother, Linda, plans to accompany her to the competition.

"Rachel worked really hard to achieve her goal of going to nationals," Mrs. Fincham said. "She is an amazing gymnast and I am so proud of her determination, her hard work and her wonderful spirit."

However, Rachel's achievements are tempered by challenges for the Finchams at home.

Rick Fincham is his daughter's most ardent supporter in spite of having been stricken with a serious illness a year ago which resulted in a loss of mobility.

Bob Oullette explained that Rick was incredibly involved with the gymnastics program at Docksiders until his health worsened and he was unable to work in landscaping.

If Rachel's excited by the chance to compete in the nationals, she doesn't necessarily show it. Instead, her thoughts turn immediately to her father.

"It's been a tough year knowing my dad has been too ill to come to our meets. However, every time I compete, I know he's there in spirit and is still so proud of me for everything I do."

Rachel's Docksiders teammates and trainers express the same kind of concern.

"They were always a supportive and helpful family. They are wonderful people who would do anything for anybody. We feel like now it's our turn to help. We'd like to give back," said Mr. Oullette.

A group of staff members and families from the school, spearheaded by Kim Oullette, have done just that.

Their contributions have ranged from fund-raising to surprising the family a couple weeks ago with landscaping, carpentry and other home improvement efforts that may have slipped by as the Finchams have struggled with Mr. Fincham's health problems.

Neighbors in the Finchams' Four Seasons community had the same idea.

To help her achieve her goals they have set up an account for her at Sun Trust Bank in Gambrills. Their initial aim was to offset expenses incurred by Rachel and Linda for the trip to California. Looking ahead, however, the fund could possibly contribute to some Olympic or other opportunity in her future. They are hoping for more donations to this benefit fund.

Helping Rachel will mean the difference between sending a quartet or a quintet to the national competition.

Four other Maryland girls - who also train at Docksider Gymnastics qualified in the top seven as well. Two, Alexis Green and Toi Garcia, are Anne Arundel County residents. The others, Stephanie Ouellette and Krystal Welsh, are from Howard and Prince George's counties, respectively.All are level-10 national qualifiers, technically the highest level aside from elite gymnasts who compete internationally.

Training and competing at such a high level can be taxing, both physically and finacially. The team's trip to California is one example. A USAG organization raises money to defray the costs for their travel expenses.

However, parents are still responsible for a portion of the total cost, about 25 percent including gymnast and coaching fees. The girls are housed as a team in a hotel with the other competitors and coaches, but parents who attend pay their own way.

If you would like to make a donation to the benefit fund for Rachel, contact Sun Trust Bank, 2644 Chapel Lake Drive, Gambrills, MD. 21054 or any other Sun Trust Bank. The account is under the name of Rachel Fincham.

Sharon Lee Tegler is a freelance writer in Severna Park.

Published May 07, 2005, The Capital, Annapolis, Md.
Copyright � 2005 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.

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Dillon Jamison King, 37, California

Services will be Friday for Dillon Jamison King, who died of Lyme disease Jan. 5, 2005 in his home. He was 37.

A Santa Cruz native, Mr. King graduated with honors from UC Irvine and a Christian School of Ministry. He returned to Santa Cruz to pursue health care, jewelry design, manufacture and art. He performed marriages for many of his friends.

Mr. King is survived by parents Gordon and Wendy Augason of Kentucky; sister Stephanie A. Ranquist of Kentucky; brother Mark Augason of Scotts Valley; longtime devoted friend Elizabeth Strong of Soquel; four nephews; and two nieces.

A candlelight service will be 7 p.m. Friday at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Santa Cruz, 6401 Freedom Blvd., Aptos.

Burial will be in Oakwood Memorial Park. Arrangements are by Oakwood Memorial Chapel.

http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2005/January/12/obit/obit.htm

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Doris Grade, Iowa

Please add Doris Grade, Iowa, to this list. She passed away early this year. She was a wonderful lady, very kind. I spoke to her on the phone a few times. We talked about our former nursing careers and how much we missed it, since I also worked as a nurse consultant before Lyme. Lyme forced Doris to retire early.

In May the LDA of IA made plans to have trees planted in honor of Doris and 6 other Iowans who have died from Lyme disease. The plantings will take place this month.

Here is an excerpt from the May 2006 LDA of Iowa newsletter:

The Lyme Disease Association of Iowa regrets to report that one of our family of Lyme Disease members has died from the complications of Lyme Disease. Doris Marie Grade died after a three week hospital stay in Carroll, Iowa. Doris and her husband, Louis, were original members of our group.

To describe Doris, we quote a bit of her obituary from the Carroll newspaper,

`` Mrs Grade joined the Iowa State Department of Health as a nursing consultant in the spring of 1978. Her job was to inspect health care facilities such as hospitals, nursing homes, psychiatric units, rehab agencies and home health agencies for compliance with state and federal rules. She trained for this job at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

She was a member and had served on the altar guild at St Paul Lutheran Church in Carroll. She was also a member of the Carroll Genealogical Society, the Lincoln Highway association and the St Anthony Nurses Alumni Association. She enjoyed reading and traveling. ``

May God bless Doris and her grieving family.

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Edward Stanley Arnold, 54, Tennessee

ARNOLD, EDWARD STANLEY - 1951-2006. Edward was born in Clinton, Tennessee November 26, 1951 and died in Nashville, Tennessee on February 25, 2006.

His parents were Polie E. Arnold and Mildred Presson Arnold. Mildred taught in Oak Ridge. Polie worked at K-25.

Edward attended Mrs. Hanna's Kindergarten Class at age four, and then attended Clinton Elementary School. He went to North Clinton School for one year while the present elementary school was being built. He was a Boy Scout until he became an outfielder for Doc Thomas' Baseball Team. He was a Drum Major for Mr. Anderson and Student Council President in High School. He attended Vanderbilt University, becoming a Psychiatrist after 8 years of studies.

In June, 2000, he contracted Lyme Disease. He hasn't practiced medicine since 2000. His last treatment was at Vanderbilt University.

Eddie especially enjoyed baseball, fishing, and reading about the Civil War. He is survived by: his mother; sister; his niece; nephew; and two great nephews.

The family will receive guests at the Stockdale Malin Funeral Home in Camden, TN on Wednesday, March 1, 2006 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. The funeral will be held immediately afterward in the same place at 6:00 pm. There will be a service in celebration of Eddie's life on Saturday, March 4, 2006 at Memorial United Methodist Church in Clinton, TN at 4:00 pm.

Published in the Knoxville News Sentinel on 2/28/2006.

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Robert Michael Hanson, 49, Washington

Nov. 23, 1955 - July 8, 2005

ENUMCLAW, Wash. - Robert "Rob" Hanson was called home on July 8, 2005. He had been fighting Lyme Disease for about one year.

Robert was born in Deer Lodge, Mont., to Bob and Ruby Hanson. He graduated high school from Laurel, Mont., in 1974, and entered the United States Air Force in 1975. He set his sights on being an air traffic controller, and after leaving the military, he was hired by the FAA in 1980. He was promoted to Air Traffic Control Supervisor in 1990. Robert loved his work.

He met the love of his life, Jan Anderson, and they married in 1966, and resided in Enumclaw.
Robert loved his family, hunting and fishing. He also loved having his friends over for Dodge RAM parties, where he would help them improve their Cummings diesel pickups.

Robert is survived by his wife, Jan; daughters Bridget, Becky and Chrissy; son Robert Jr.; grandchildren, Emma and Robert Tyler, Kaycee; and his mother and father, Bob and Ruby Hanson of Laurel; sisters Vicki Brester of Laurel, Cindy Davis of Sheridan, Wyo.; and brother Ric Hanson of Columbus. Robert also has many living nieces and nephews.

Robert will be missed by all who knew him by his hard work, practical jokes and love for family and friends.

Published in the Billings Gazette on 7/18/2005.

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Ellen Agnes Loughlin, 56, Arizona

Very sad news.

After a decades-long battle vs Lyme disease, my dear friend Ellen Loughlin died May 19, 2006. Apparently the Lyme disease bacteria was too much for her heart.

Ellen and I both saw the same local infectious disease specialists, who ruled out Lyme disease.


Years ago Ellen responded well to IV antibiotics but she relapsed when treatments stopped.

She was 56.

http://www.legacy.com/tucson/Obituaries.asp?Page=LifeStory&PersonID=17973812


Ellen Agnes Loughlin

Ellen Agnes Loughlin Of Tucson, AZ, died after a long, brave battle against chronic, disseminated Lyme Disease on May 19, 2006. She was 56 years old.

Born on March 23, 1950 in Tachikowa, Japan to the late Lt. Colonel Charles Thomas Loughlin (USAF, retired) and Beatrice Gunning of Remsenburg, Long Island, NY, she was a graduate of Westhampton Beach High School in Westhampton Beach, Long Island, NY, and completed her undergraduate work at Stony Brook University, NY. Her postgraduate degree in Education was completed at the University of California in Los Angeles, CA.

She is survived by three sisters, Patricia Loughlin Stanley of Tucson, Janet Loughlin Rubin of Remsenburg, Long Island, NY, and Elizabeth Marie Loughlin of Islip Terrace, Long Island, NY; a maternal aunt, Mari Gunning Hart of Lido Beach, Long Island, NY; five cousins; five nephews; and one niece.

A accomplished musician and artist, Ellen had many interests including, skiing, ice-skating, swimming, and horseback riding, to name a few. However, she will perhaps best be remembered by her strong Catholic faith, as well as her life-long love of children, and how selflessly-devoted she was to all children, particularly her third grade students, her niece, her nephews, and all their friends. People in Tucson grew to know and love the kind, generous person simply known as "Aunt Ellen" to so many.

A funeral mass will be celebrated in honor of Ellen's life on Saturday, June 10, 2006 at 10:00 a.m. at SS. Peter and Paul Catholic Church on Campbell Ave. Rosary will be prayed Friday evening at 6:00 p.m. also at SS. Peter and Paul Catholic Church. In addition a mass of the Christian Burial will be celebrated on June 22, 2006 at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Quiogue, Long Island, NY with interment to follow in Remsenburg, Long Island, NY.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any donations please be made to Lyme Disease Foundation, 1 Financial Plaza, Hartford, Connecticut 06013.

Published in the Tucson on 6/4/2006.

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Ruth Ann Tobin, 71, Pensylvania

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04303/403541.stm

Obituary: Ruth Ann Tobin / A founder of Lyme disease support group

Friday, October 29, 2004
By Bob Batz Jr., Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Ruth Ann Tobin, who turned her own battle with Lyme disease into a support group that has helped many others, died Monday of cancer at her home in Lawrenceville. She was 71.

It was after a 1989 church trip to the Catskills that Mrs. Tobin was diagnosed with Lyme, a confounding and controversial disease that was first linked to tick bites in Lyme, Conn., in the mid-1970s. Six months after her treatment, she relapsed, and then took antibiotics for four years to recover.

Around 1990, she helped found the Pittsburgh Lyme Disease Support Group, and continued to meet with it monthly, every second Monday, at Calvert Memorial Presbyterian Church in Etna.

She was outspoken about Lyme, which she believed was underdiagnosed and undertreated. As she told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 1995:

"What worries me is that the doctors in this area seem to be so uninformed about this disease. There's no excuse for that ignorance in this big of a city."

Tammy Burleson, of Elizabeth Township, says Mrs. Tobin was so tell-it-like-it-is she was "a little scared" of her when she joined the support group in the early 1990s. But with characteristic kindness and dedication, Mrs. Tobin helped her get information and find doctors, and later helped her start the South Hills support group that Burleson still leads.

She describes her mentor as "very accepting and very knowledgeable," adding, "She's going to be greatly missed, not only by her friends and family, but by the Lyme community as a whole."

Mrs. Tobin had worked as a payroll clerk for the Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, and then was an active traveler with the Arsenal chapter of AARP. After she was diagnosed with cancer, she was a regular in the dance and movement group at the Cancer Caring Center in Bloomfield.

"She had tons of energy," said her daughter, Janet Hodnik of McCandless, who said that until recently she had continued to help people with Lyme disease.

"She spent a great deal of time on the telephone, even when she was ill with cancer," Hodnik said.

Mrs. Tobin also is survived by her husband, Robert; two sons, Robert, of Shaler, and Daniel, of Lawrenceville; and eight grandchildren.

Friends will be received from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today in the Daniel T. D'Alessandro Funeral Home, Butler and 46th streets, Lawrenceville. A Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. tomorrow in St. Mary Church in Lawrenceville.

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